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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to

Small Businesses

2014 Bottomline Technologies. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this report by any means is strictly prohibited.
Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

INTRODUCTION
Many financial institutions view small-business mobile banking as a necessary evil. They know
they need to offer it but struggle to build the business case for investing in a product that is
often given to customers free of charge. Banks are at a crossroads; they can offer small
businesses their consumer offerings, rebranded as business ones, or invest in true business
mobile banking offerings that will likely better meet most customer needs.

This whitepaper will help those institutions considering the latter build the case for doing so. It
sizes the small-business mobile banking opportunity and highlights other factors beyond fee-
based revenue that banks should look to when justifying their investment in enhanced small-
business mobile banking capabilities.

METHODOLOGY
This whitepaper was sponsored by Bottomline Technologies. The information is based primarily
on the results of a September 2013 online survey of 1,003 U.S.-based businesses generating less
than US$20 million in annual revenue. While this revenue range goes beyond the small-business
definition used by many institutions, it represents a segment largely underserved by financial
institutions and thus untapped revenue potential. The margin of error for a survey of this size is
3 points at a 95% level of confidence. Figure 1 shows a breakdown of survey participants by
annual revenue.

Figure 1: Survey Participants by Annual Revenue

Breakdown of Survey Participants by Annual Revenue (N=1,003)

US$10 million to
US$20 million
15%
Less than
US$100,000
US$5 million to 32%
US$9.99 million
12%

US$1 million to US$100,000 to


US$4.99 million US$999,999
18% 23%

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

MARKETPLACE AND ADOP TION


The financial crisis put many bank's' business mobile banking plans on hold for a few years. With
the crisis now behind them and financial institution's now accepting a "new normal," mobile
banking offerings have been rolled out into the marketplace much more quickly over the last
couple of years.

Aite Group estimates that approximately 65% of U.S. banks with more than US$10 billion in
assets, 30% with less than US$10 billion in assets, and 20% of credit unions offer mobile banking
to their small-business customers (Figure 2). These estimates include both consumer offerings
rebranded as business ones as well as true business mobile platforms. The percentage offering
mobile capabilities to corporate customers is far lower.

Figure 2: Business Mobile Rollouts By Institution Type

Estimated Percentage of Financial Institutions With Small-Business


Mobile Offerings (Assets in US$)

65%

30%
20%

Banks with Banks with Credit unions


more than $10 billion less than $10 billion

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

Further, we estimate that approximately 32% of businesses generating less than US$20 million in
annual revenue are now banking through this channel. While adoption rates vary by business
size, mobile banking interests businesses of all sizes (Figure 3). The most successful banks have
achieved small-business mobile adoption rates of about 20%, while Aite Group estimates the
industry average to be about 10% to 12%.

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Figure 3: Interest in Mobile Banking by Business Size

Firm Likelihood to Bank Via a Mobile Device Over the Next Year
(By revenue size in US$)

$10 million to $20


16% 43% 41%
million (n=152)

$5 million to $9.99
26% 26% 47%
million (n=121)

$1 million to $4.99
29% 35% 37%
million (n=182)

$100,000 to
41% 32% 27%
$999,999 (n=226)

Less than
54% 24% 22%
$100,000 (n=322)

Total (N=1,003) 37% 31% 32%

Not likely Likely Already use

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

It is important to point out that most of the businesses that have adopted mobile banking are
using the channel primarily (and in some cases exclusively) for basic capabilities such as checking
balances. This is largely due to the types of offerings in the marketmost small businesses are
using consumer mobile platforms as opposed to platforms with more business-specific
capabilities. This is evidenced by the far lower percentage of small businesses using business-
specific capabilities such as initiating or approving Automated Clearing House (ACH) or wire
payments (14%) or making pay or no-pay decisions with positive pay (Figure 4).

In other words, low adoption of more advanced mobile banking capabilities is not so much due
to low interest but rather due to limited availability. A February to April 2012 Aite Group survey
found that approximately 59% of U.S. banks that have more than US$10 billion in assets offer
their small-business customers the ability to check balances and transfer funds via mobile, while
1
only 24% also offer the ability to authorize transactions via mobile.

1. See Aite Group's report, Small-Business Mobile Banking: A Promising Opportunity, June 2012.

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Figure 4: How Small Businesses Use Mobile Banking

Current Adoption of Mobile Banking Capabilities


(N=1,003)

Check account balances 32%

Mobile capture/deposit 15%

Initiate payments 14%

Approve payments 14%

Positive pay 11%

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

BUILDING THE CASE FO R INVESTMENT


While many banks recognize that they need to offer more advanced mobile capabilities to small-
business customers, securing the budget to do so isn't always an easy taskespecially for those
without deep pockets. This section explores how banks can build the case for investing in this
important channel, despite the fact that mobile access is often offered free of charge to small-
business customers. Rather than focusing on the direct revenue, we examine factors such as
competitiveness and the profile of mobile users. Mobile banking users represent an extremely
attractive customer segment for financial institutions. While they may not pay fees for mobile
access itself, they tend to use multiple bank products for which they do pay. This is a revenue
stream that financial institutions can't afford to lose.

COMPETITIVENESS
A financial institution's mobile capabilities are an "important" or "very important" consideration
when selecting a new banking relationship for 51% of businesses generating less than US$20
million in annual revenue (Figure 5). Banks therefore have no choice but to invest in these
capabilities or jeopardize their future success with this customer segment. Mobile capabilities
are especially important to businesses generating greater than US$1 million in annual revenue.

Figure 5: Mobile as a Consideration in New Bank Selection

Q. Regardless of whether your business plans to switch financial


institutions, if you were to look for a new banking relationship, how
important a consideration would mobile banking (smartphone or tablet)
capabilities be? (N=1,003)

Not important at
Very important all
22% 21%

Only a little
important
7%

Important Neutral
29% 21%

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

M O B I L E U S E R S R E P R E S E N T A N AT T R A C T I V E C U S T O M E R S E G M E N T
When comparing those businesses that currently use mobile banking with those that don't, it is
clear that current and future mobile users represent an attractive segment for financial
institutions. They offer a greater potential for future cross-selling than those not interested in
mobile banking, and they tend to represent banks' more profitable customers.

The next several figures break down and compare the small-business segment into three sub-
segments, including (1) those businesses currently banking via a mobile device, (2) those that
likely will over the next year, and (3) those that are unlikely to do so (Figure 6).

Figure 6: Survey Participants by Likelihood to Bank Via a Mobile Device

Breakdown of Survey Participants by Likelihood to Bank Via a Mobile


Device Over the Next Year (N=1,003)

Already use
32% Not likely
37%

Likely
31%

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

MONTHLY SPEND
Businesses already using or likely to use mobile banking over the next year tend be more
profitable customers for their banks. Among survey participants, 47% of those not likely to use
mobile do not spend any money on banking products and services each month compared with
the only 16% and 19% of those already using it or likely to. Approximately 45% of mobile banking
users generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue spend more than US$50 each month
on banking products or services, making them an attractive segment (Figure 7).

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Figure 7: Mobile User Groups by Monthly Spend

Q. Approximately how much does your company spend monthly with


your bank or credit union on products and services such as online
banking and payroll (not including interest on credit products)?

Already use mobile


16% 12% 13% 15% 19% 26%
banking (n=321)

Likely to use
mobile banking
19% 14% 16% 16% 16% 20%
over the next year
(n=311)

Not likely to use


mobile banking 47% 24% 9% 6% 3% 11%
(n=371)

$0 Less than $10 Between $10 and $25


Between $26 and $50 Between $51 and $100 Greater than $100

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

NUMBER OF ACCOUNTS
In addition to spending more money with their banks, mobile banking users also tend to have
more accounts than those who eschew mobile. Both those already using mobile banking as well
as those likely to are far more prone to have more than one account with their primary
institution than are those not interested in mobile banking. The early adopters of mobile
banking (those already using it) are the most likely to have at least four accounts (Figure 8).

Figure 8: Mobile User Groups by Number of Accounts

Q. Approximately how many accounts does your business have with its
primary institution? (Segmented by likelihood to use mobile banking)

Already use
23% 54% 19% 4%
(n=321)

Likely to
30% 54% 12% 3%
use(n=311)

Not likely to use


54% 38% 5% 3%
(n=371)

1 account 2 to 3 accounts 4 to 5 accounts More than 5 accounts

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

ONLINE BANKING SAVVY AND ADOPTION


Perhaps the greatest difference between those businesses already using mobile banking and
those not likely to is in their current adoption of sophisticated online banking capabilities.
Mobile banking users are high adopters of bank technology, especially within the online channel.
This means not only deeper relationships with customers but also a higher potential to generate
fee-based revenue (Figure 9).

Figure 9: Mobile Users and Online Banking Adoption

Adoption of Sophisticated Online Banking Capabilities


(Those already using mobile banking vs. those not likely to use it)

40%
Online bill payment
75%

28%
Transf er f unds
63%

22%
ACH payments
49%

17%
Domestic wires
48%
Not likely to use mobile
Management of 14% banking (n=371)
direct deposit 47%
Already use mobile banking
22% (n=321)
Positive pay
46%

14%
Electronic invoicing
45%

12%
International wires
39% Differences in product use between
businesses using and businesses not
Ability to purchase 5% likely to use mobile banking are
f oreign currency 32% statistically significant.

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

F UTURE POT ENTIAL


As mobile banking users represent a profitable group for financial institutions today, they also
show greater promise for future new revenue streams through their growth objectives, interest
in future products, and willingness to recommend their banks to peers than those not interested
in the channel.

GROWTH PLANS
Fifty-one percent of U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue are
working toward moderate growth over the next two years, and some are looking to grow
aggressively. Those businesses already using mobile or likely to do so are almost twice as likely to
have aggressive growth plans than those not interested in mobile banking (Figure 10). This

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

aggressive growth will likely lead to greater demand for more sophisticated products and
services and thus additional fee-based revenue for their primary financial institutions.

Figure 10: Growth Plans by Mobile Usage Group

Percentage of Businesses Looking to Grow Aggressively Over the Next 2


Years

15% 16%
9%

Not likely to use mobile Likely to use mobile banking Already use mobile banking
banking (n=371) over the next year (n=311) (n=321)

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

INTEREST IN ADDED-VALUE SERVICES


Those interested in mobile banking, as well as those already using it, show higher levels of
interest in the products and services that some banks are considering offering as added-value as
well as revenue-generating offerings. Financial institutions do not commonly offer products and
services such as help building a business plan or company website, but these products represent
some new product ideas that institutions are considering as they look for ways to deepen
relationships with their business customers. Based on our research, moving forward with these
products may make sense, especially given the level of interest from mobile banking users
(Figure 11).

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Figure 11: Interest in New Added-Value Services

Q. How likely would your business be to look to its primary financial


institution for each of the following if they were offered?
(Percentages represent those stating they would)

11%
Back up data 41%
51%

12%
Store images of
38%
important documents
48%

Ability to create and 10%


store legal 39%
documents 47%
Not likely to use mobile
7% banking (n=371)
Building a business
37%
plan
46% Likely to use mobile banking
over the next year (n=311)
Assistance with 9%
retirement planning 32%
f or employees 42% Already use mobile banking
(n=321)
8%
Building a company
34%
website
41%

Source: 'Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

LOYALTY
Attracting new customers can be a challenging, as well as expensive, task for financial
institutions. Therefore, it is important that banks have customers who are satisfied and willing to
recommend them to their peers. Those businesses already using mobile banking are significantly
more likely to recommend their primary financial institution to other businesses similar to theirs
than are businesses that don't currently use it or plan to (Figure 12).

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Figure 12: Referral Likelihood by Mobile Usage Group

Percentage of Businesses Likely to Recommend Their Primary Financial


Institution to a Business Similar to Theirs

Already use mobile


73%
banking (n=321)

Likely to use mobile


banking over the 62%
next year (n=311)

Not likely to use


mobile banking 63%
(n=371)

Source: 'Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

ROLLING OUT A SUCCESSFUL MOBILE OFFERING


Once a bank has decided to move forward with either rolling out a new small-business mobile
program or enhancing an existing program's functionality, it is critical to understand how small
businesses plan to use the channel and perform transactions. This section highlights critical
small-business mobile functionality, access modes, and common device types. It also analyzes
expectations for smartphones versus tablets.

FUNCTIONALITY
The small-business value proposition for mobile banking goes far beyond the ability to check
balances. While checking balances is likely to be the most common transaction type performed
via a mobile device, the true value of the channel is the ability for business owners to maintain
productivity when they are out of the office. Several additional functionalities are therefore
critical to a bank's small-business mobile banking success. Below is a list of the functionalities
that banks most often offer to their small-business mobile users:

Check balances

View detailed account activity/transaction history

Transfer funds internally between accounts at the bank

Pay bills to payers already set up through the online channel (electronic bill pay)

Payment approvals/authorizations

Of those capabilities listed above, payment approvals/authorizations are often the most critical
to small businesses. Many small-business payments require a second level of approval; in these
cases, one individual is responsible for initiating the payment, while a second is required to
approve it. Since the second individual is often the business ownera person who is likely to be
on the road meeting with customersmobile approvals allow payments to be made even when
the business owner is out of the office, enabling productivity levels to be maintained.

Additionally, continued concerns about fraud within the industry have led to a rise in small-
business interest in positive pay, a bank service that aids in the prevention of check fraud. The
ability to view images of checks flagged by positive pay systems and make pay/no-pay decisions
on them via a mobile device is therefore also seeing a great deal of interest from small
businesses. Table A shows interest levels in key mobile functionalities by business size.

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Table A: Interest in Mobile Functionality by Revenue Size (In US$)


Functionality and use Total Less than $100,000 $1 $5 $10
(N=1,003) $100,000 to million million million
(n=322) $999,999 to to to $20
(n=226) $4.99 $9.99 million
million million (n=152)
(n=182) (n=121)
Make Already use 30% 28% 27% 35% 31% 33%
transfers
between Would be nice to 24% 19% 24% 25% 30% 33%
accounts at have
the same
Would be 10% 9% 7% 12% 11% 16%
bank
important/critical

Make Already use 18% 12% 15% 24% 28% 24%


transfers
between Would be nice to 32% 22% 34% 34% 35% 42%
accounts at have
different
banks Would be 9% 9% 5% 11% 8% 13%
important/critical

Set Already use 14% 4% 12% 21% 21% 24%


up/initiate
wire Would be nice to 24% 17% 23% 24% 30% 35%
payments have

Would be 8% 6% 4% 10% 7% 16%


important/critical

Initiate ACH Already use 15% 7% 9% 20% 22% 25%


payments
Would be nice to 30% 23% 29% 36% 26% 37%
have

Would be 7% 5% 5% 7% 9% 11%
important/critical

Make Already use 14% 8% 11% 23% 21% 18%


expedited
(same-day) Would be nice to 33% 31% 31% 36% 38% 38%
payment have

Would be 10% 7% 8% 12% 9% 21%


important/critical

View and Already use 11% 7% 9% 14% 13% 15%


make
pay/no-pay Would be nice to 33% 23% 26% 39% 37% 43%
decisions have

Would be 10% 6% 7% 12% 13% 11%


important/critical

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Functionality and use Total Less than $100,000 $1 $5 $10


(N=1,003) $100,000 to million million million
(n=322) $999,999 to to to $20
(n=226) $4.99 $9.99 million
million million (n=152)
(n=182) (n=121)
Take picture Already use 15% 11% 10% 19% 20% 23%
of checks
using mobile Would be nice to 35% 30% 38% 36% 31% 40%
device for have
deposit
Would be 9% 8% 5% 10% 9% 13%
important/critical

Approve Already use 14% 6% 9% 18% 18% 26%


payroll
batches and Would be nice to 26% 16% 23% 35% 29% 31%
other ACH have
payments
Would be 8% 4% 3% 9% 11% 15%
important/critical

Approve Already use 15% 2% 11% 21% 25% 21%


wire
payments to Would be nice to 27% 17% 22% 28% 33% 38%
be made have

Would be 7% 6% 3% 7% 7% 13%
important/critical

Approve Already use 21% 12% 23% 22% 26% 21%


credit or
debit card Would be nice to 29% 23% 26% 35% 29% 35%
transactions have

Would be 10% 9% 5% 11% 11% 19%


important/critical

Reset Already use 24% 21% 23% 31% 25% 24%


passwords
Would be nice to 26% 20% 23% 29% 31% 38%
have

Would be 10% 8% 7% 10% 13% 16%


important/critical

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

ACCESS TYPES
As financial institutions roll out or plan to roll out their mobile banking offerings, they must
make them available in multiple formats. This is due in part to the multiple device types in the
market and small businesses' split preferences regarding the ways in which they prefer to receive
their banking information via the mobile channel. The three primary access modes that financial
institutions are currently offering follow:

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

SMS text banking enables virtually anyone with a cell phone to conduct many basic
banking transactions. SMS messages are best suited for simple transactions, such as
checking an account balance, because they typically rely on the user having to enter
codes in order to receive the information requested and because messages are
limited to 160 characters.

Mobile Web uses the browser of a smartphone and essentially shrinks the
experience users would have using online banking on their computer. The user
experience tends to vary greatly depending on the mobile device. Mobile Web is
typically the easiest solution to implement, offers broad functionality, and is
consistent with a bank's Internet banking interface. Many banks have a different URL
for their mobile Web and online banking offerings.

Rich-client application, also called a "downloadable application" or "mobile app,"


streamlines the online experience and is tailored to a specific mobile device. Today's
most commonly supported devices are the Apple iPhone and Google's Android. The
banking application is downloaded through a secure and authenticated process to
the mobile device. Once downloaded, the mobile application provides an optimal
user experience.

Many banks have chosen to offer both downloadable app and browser-based mobile
offerings. This strategy makes sense because small businesses remain divided in their
preference for each (Figure 13). The only delivery mode preferred by just a small
percentage of small businesses (17%) is text messaging, and this percentage continues
to decline.

Figure 13: Preferred Mobile Access Type

Q. How would you prefer to make banking transactions with your mobile
device? (n=844 businesses already banking or likely to bank via a mobile
device)

With text
messages
Using an app 17%
downloaded to
your mobile
device
36%

Via websites you


can access f rom
your smartphone
or tablet
47%

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

DEVICE TYPES
The small-business segment is currently enjoying high mobile-device penetration; 35% of small-
business survey participants state they use an iPhone for business, while 34% use an Android
phone. Only 23% use a regular cell phone; this is a significant decrease compared to the more
than 40% that did in August 2011 (Figure 15).

Figure 14: Device Types

Q. What type of cell phone/mobile device do you use primarily for


business (check all that apply)? (N=1,003)

iPhone 35%

Android 34%

Regular cell phone 23%

Tablet (such as an
15%
iPad)
I do not currently
use a mobile device 13%
f or business
Other smartphone
9%
device

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

Tablet usage for business has almost doubled by small businesses generating less than US$10
million in annual revenues since 2011 (Figure 15). As banks also look to roll out tablet offerings,
it should be noted that it is unlikelyat least in the short termthat the tablet will cannibalize
usage of smartphone access. The largest percentage of small businesses surveyed stated they
would be interested in performing banking transactions from both device types, regardless of
the transaction type. Both smartphone and tablet offerings should therefore be a part of any
institution's mobile strategy.

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Figure 15: Tablet Usage

Business Tablet Usage by Businesses Generating Less Than US$10


Million in Annual Revenue, 2011 vs. 2013

July 2011
7%
(N=291)

September 2013
13%
(N=851)

The increase in tablet usage between 2011


and 2013 is statistically significant

Source: Aite Group's Surveys of small businesses, August 2011 and September 2013

SECURITY
Most businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue (49%) believe that the
mobile channel is equally secure to the online one (Figure 17). This is good news for financial
institutions, as to date, concerns about security have been the key reason business customers
have not adopted the channel. Financial institutions have therefore been focusing efforts on
educating their customers about security, and their efforts seem to be paying off. Of those
businesses that don't see the two channels as being equal from a security perspective, smaller
businesses tend to favor the online channel's security, while larger ones feel the mobile channel
is more secure.

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

Figure 16: Views on Security

Q. Regardless of your current usage, do you view banking via a tablet or


mobile device as more or less secure than banking on your desktop or
laptop? (N=1,003)
Tablet/
smartphone
banking is more
secure than
desktop/laptop
Tablet/ banking
smartphone 11%
banking is less
secure than
desktop/laptop
banking
40%

Tablet/
smartphone
banking is equally
secure as
desktop/laptop
banking
49%

Source: Aite Group survey of 1,003 U.S. businesses generating less than US$20 million in annual revenue, September 2013

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

CONCLUSION
While business mobile banking is a service most banks have not charged for to date, it is a
required offering for any institution looking to succeed with small businesses going forward. As
described throughout this report, there are several compelling reasons for banks to not only roll
out business mobile capabilities but also to continue investing in them. As financial institutions
do so, they should keep the following in mind.

Migrate small businesses. Consumer mobile capabilities are not sufficient to meet
the needs of most small businesses. Similar to what Aite Group suggests for the
online channel, financial institutions must migrate small-business customers onto
commercial platforms with business-specific mobile capabilities.

Bring tablets to the table. Tablet adoption is on the rise. Financial institutions
should not limit their mobile offerings to smartphone capabilities.

Continue to educate customers about mobile security, especially the smallest


businesses. A recent industry-wide focus on education, coupled with more
widespread adoption of mobile banking on the consumer side, has resulted in
greater comfort with the channel by small businesses.

Bundle mobile banking with other business banking capabilities. While most
institutions do not plan to charge small businesses for mobile banking, mobile
banking users show a higher-than-average willingness to pay for other products.
Mobile banking is needed to retain them; however, other products must be cross-
sold to make them profitable.

Work with technology partners and industry analysts to keep on top of industry
best practices to ensure the greatest success for your institution's mobile banking
program.

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Why Banks Should Offer Mobile Banking to Small Businesses February 2014

ABOUT AITE GROUP


Aite Group is an independent research and advisory firm focused on business, technology, and
regulatory issues and their impact on the financial services industry. With expertise in banking,
payments, securities & investments, and insurance, Aite Group's analysts deliver comprehensive,
actionable advice to key market participants in financial services. Headquartered in Boston with
a presence in Chicago, New York, San Francisco, London, and Milan, Aite Group works with its
clients as a partner, advisor, and catalyst, challenging their basic assumptions and ensuring they
remain at the forefront of industry trends.

ABOUT BOTTOMLINE TECHNOLOGIES


Bottomline Technologies (NASDAQ: EPAY) provides cloud-based payment, invoice and banking
solutions to corporations, financial institutions and banks around the world. The companys
solutions are used to streamline, automate and manage processes involving payments, invoicing,
global cash management, supply chain finance and transactional documents. Organizations trust
Bottomline to meet their needs for cost reduction, competitive differentiation and optimization
of working capital. Headquartered in the United States, Bottomline also maintains offices in
Europe and Asia-Pacific. For more information, visit www.bottomline.com.

C O N TA C T
For more information on research and consulting services, please contact:

Aite Group Sales


+1.617.338.6050
sales@aitegroup.com

For all press inquiries, please contact:

Marcel Kay
+44.(0)207.092.8137
pr@aitegroup.com

Heather Bridges
+603.501.5267
hbridges@bottomline.com

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