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MISAMIS OCCIDENTAL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


Oroquieta City

On-the-Job Training Experiences among Fourth Year - Duhat Students:

Its Feedbacks and Implications

An Action Research

By

VIVIAN D. ECHALICO

March 2012
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page .. 1

Table of Contents . 2

List of Table . 4

I. BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

Introduction 5

Theoretical Framework 7

Purpose of the Study 7

Significance of the Study 8

Scope and Limitations of the Study 8

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES 9

III. METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Research Method 11

Research Respondents 12

Research Procedure 12

Statistical Treatment of Data 12

IV. PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND

INTERPRETATION OF DATA 13

V. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS

AND RECOMMENDATIONS
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Findings 17

Conclusions 18

Recommendations 20

BIBLIOGRAPHY 21

APPENDICES

A. Letter of Application 22

B. Students Logbook 23

C. Certification 24

D. Survey Questionnaire 25
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LIST OF TABLE

Page

Table 1 Respondents Feedback on their On-the-Job Training (OJT) 13

Experience
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I. BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

INTRODUCTION

Education has been regarded as a means toward economic stability and

progress. The increase productivity of the workforce is due mainly to the increase in the

education and training of the people. The success and development of the country

would greatly depend in the productivity of its human resources which is considered

as one of the vital asset of the nation. And to have a good and competent man power

resources, quality education and intensive training is necessary for the students to

become skilled and productive workers when they become part of the labor force. It is

said that education is primarily concerned with the opening out to the world of the

students so that he can choose his interests and mode of living, and his career

(Taladtad, 2010).

The Department of Education has an extensive high school career development

program through its Memorandum No. 149, S. 2011 on Career Pathways for High

School Students that emphasizes the mandate of secondary education which is to

prepare students for lifelong learning and the world of work. It assists students in

formulating a career path prior to graduation from high school. Not only does this

planning and preparation provide job training for them to be ready for the workforce or

post-secondary education. It also motivates them to finish high school and reach for

their dreams.

One of the career pathways is on Technology and Livelihood Education (CP-

TLE) which aims to prepare the students in the world of work, since not all students in
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high school will enroll at college, the lesson they learn in this subject will produce them

as skilled person in their field. CP-TLE builds the capacity of the high school student for

self-employment and provides pathways for further education and training in a chosen

career. It will also provide students with opportunities to become economically

productive even if they decide to leave the formal school system at any given time

(http://clkss.org.ph, 2011).

National Competency-Based Teacher Standards (NCBTS) has defined the

different dimensions of what effective teaching is. It is noted that NCBTS Domain 6.1.3

on Using Community as a Laboratory for Learning encourages teachers to know

community resources and strategies for experiential learning and make use of the

community as a laboratory for learning (NCBTS-TSNA Primer, 2009).

The new K to 12 curriculum of DepEd which will be implemented next school

year recognizes the role of co-curricular activities and community service in the holistic

development of children. This means that students will not limit their learning to the

classroom. Instead, they will be asked to learn from their communities outside campus.

College students are familiar with this way of learning by doing; most of them render

community service or undergo On-the-Job Training (OJT). Students in Senior High

School will be given a similar opportunity to do OJT, internship, or apprenticeship.

(Cruz, 2012).

The Misamis Occidental National High School is one of the pilot schools

implementing the Career Pathways in Technology and Livelihood Education (CP-TLE)

in the area of Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Being the pilot
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teacher, the researcher prompted to let the CP-TLE (ICT) IV-Duhat students undergo an

on-the-job training (OJT) and conduct a survey on the students feedbacks about the

OJT experience and its implications. Moreover, the researcher conducted the study to

help students to believe in themselves, their potential and discover career paths that

they can love and embrace. This study may also enlighten other educators into the

implementation of the on-the-job training to prepare our high school students for higher

education, world of work and lifelong learning.

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

This study is anchored on David Kolbs (2008), an American educational theorist,

Experiential Learning Theory. Experiential Learning Theory defines learning as the

process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience.

Knowledge results from the combination of grasping and transforming experience.

Knowledge resides, not in the individuals head, but in communities of practice.

Learning is thus a process of becoming a member of a community of practice through

legitimate peripheral participation (e.g. apprenticeship).

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY

The researcher would like to find out the students feedbacks about their on-the-

job training (OJT) experience and its implications.


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SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY

The outcomes of this study are beneficial to the following entities:

School administrators. They will get information about the real benefit of the

on-the-job training. They would also have an assurance that if todays learners are

exposed to the world of work, there is high hope of them becoming economically

productive and lifelong learners.

Teachers. This study would be a great reason and motivation for them to start

into the implementation of the on-the-job training to prepare our high school students for

higher education, world of work and lifelong learning.

Students. They will become more familiar with the realities of working and they

would not take OJT for granted.

Parents. This study will increase awareness on the benefit of the on-the-job

training and for them to be supportive of their childs endeavor.

SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

This study was conducted at the Misamis Occidental National High School and

limited only to the Fourth Year Duhat students. The range of the study was from

October 2011 to March 2011. This study will be limited only to determine the feedbacks

of the students on their on-the-job training (OJT) experience and its implications.
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II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND RELATED STUDIES

This chapter presents some theories, studies and concepts related to the

implementation of the on-the-job training (OJT) in the learning process.

According to Cristobal as cited by Taladtad, et. al (2010), the OJT program is a

good program for augmenting the knowledge skills and competencies of the task. He

asserted that what the students learn from the classroom is what the students apply

during OJT.

Confucius once said, "If all I do is hear, I will forget. If I hear and see, I will

remember. If I hear, see and do, I will understand". On-the-Job-Training or OJT is job

training that occurs in the work place. It is part of a college curriculum that aims to train

and orient students about the work and their future career. It is very important not only

to teach students their chosen career but to show students the reality about working

(Gomez, 2010).

According to Scribner and Sachs (2011), on-the-job training programs offer an

array of formats for relating learning to practice that may very well be useful in settings

other than the workplace. In probing teaching and learning when they are embedded in

work, we are challenged to broaden our conceptions of the kind of social processes and

activities that constitute education.

School to work programs, by definition, link students and schools with the

workplace. This is accomplished through school partnerships with employers, unions,

civic groups, and other public and private sector organizations. Together, these
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organizations help students develop the skills needed for the competitive job market

while making their educational experience relevant to the world they will experience as

adults. All students need to be prepared to enter the job market, and this should begin

long before graduation (Donaldson, et. al., 2001).

On-the-job training is significant because it takes skills training into the real world,

and teaches students to produce in a different, more adult, environment. Students may

well pick up new skills they can use for a variety of purposes (www.nlplifetraining.com,

2012).

On the job training or OJT is one method by which students is given a chance to

apply the theories and computations that they have learned from the school. It also

helps the students to acquire relevant knowledge and skills by performing in actual work

setting (www.scribd.com, 2010).

According to Rich Guzik (2002), the on the job training can have positive effects

on trainee morale as it teaches them not only have skills related to the specific tasks

they do at work but also trains them with the ability to think critically and solve problems

that sometimes can be applied to their normal lives.

The most effective method to develop the competence and skills of students is

through hands on training the on-the-job training. This process exposes the students

to the different fields and learned. Moreover, it allows the students to become familiar

and made known with the actual operation of the business and the state-of-the-art of the

facilities, equipment and technology used. Many opportunities for development can be

found on-the-job. Perhaps this would be a stepping stone for the trainees to develop
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themselves and acquire new learning through gained experiences during trainings. It is

very essential component of the learning process, geared towards preparing students

future career (Taladtad, et.al., 2010).

III. METHODS AND PROCEDURES

This chapter presents the research method, research environment, research

respondents, research instrument and its validation, data gathering procedure and

statistical techniques used.

RESEARCH METHOD

The researcher employed the descriptive research as method on this study to

determine the students feedbacks on their on-the-job training (OJT) experience and its

implications. It involved 54 students of the IV-Duhat, section 1 of the Regular Program

of Misamis Occidental National High School, Oroquieta City.

An OJT Feedback Survey was utilized in the study using the Likert Scale. The

following qualitative description was adapted to quantify the responses of the

respondents in every item. Scale Descriptive Rating: 4=Strongly Agree; 3 = Agree; 2

Disagree; 1 Strongly Disagree.

The researcher also solicited the respondents comments and suggestions.


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RESEARCH RESPONDENTS

The purposive convenience sampling was utilized in choosing the research

respondents. The researcher chose the IV-Duhat students. This group was chosen

since the students are the 2nd batch of the CP-TLE (ICT) program. The group is

composed of 14 boys and 40 girls. The selection ensured that the group had the

classroom situation according to the curriculum they have, that they have taken

Computer Education (ICT) subject since first year until present and that they have

possess skills in Word Processing, Spreadsheet, PowerPoint Presentation, Adobe

Photoshop, Desktop Publishing, Basic Web Design, Basic Programming, Basic

Database Management, Computer Assembly, Maintenance and Troubleshooting.

RESEARCH PROCEDURE

At the start of the School Year 2011-2012, the respondents were informed about

the requirements of the subject, CP-TLE (ICT) IV. They will undergo the On-the-Job

Training (OJT) on the Mid-Year break. Due to the many requirements the respondents

would do during the mid-year break, the researcher only require them to have at least 8-

10 hours of training. After the break, the OJT Feedback Survey was then conducted to

the respondents and they were also asked to give their comments and suggestions to

their OJT experience.

STATISTICAL TREATMENT OF DATA

The data gathered were then analyzed and interpreted using the frequency,

percentage and weighted mean. The computations were done using MS Excel program.
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IV. PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

This chapter is the presentation, analyses, and interpretation of the collected

data related to the study.

Table 1
RESPONDENTS FEEDBACK ON THEIR ON-THE-JOB TRAINING (OJT) EXPERIENCE
(n=54)
SD D A SA
STATEMENTS (1) (2) (3) (4) WM Description
F % F % F % F %
1. The on-the-job training (OJT) allows
Strongly
me to test what I learn in new and 0 0 0 0 23 42.59% 31 57.41% 3.57
Agree
more complex situations.
2. The OJT develops my skills needed Strongly
0 0 0 0 22 40.74% 32 59.26% 3.59
for the competitive job market. Agree
3. The OJT gives me a taste of the real
Strongly
worlda glimpse of what lies ahead 0 0 0 0 18 33.33% 36 66.67% 3.67
Agree
after I graduate high school.
4. The OJT provides opportunities for Strongly
0 0 0 0 27 50.00% 27 50.00% 3.50
me to gain new ideas. Agree
5. The OJT motivates me to practice Strongly
0 0 0 0 26 48.15% 28 51.85% 3.52
skills and apply knowledge Agree
6. The office/establishment provides
Strongly
opportunities or tasks for me to use 0 0 0 0 19 35.19% 35 64.81% 3.65
Agree
and develop my computer skills.
7. My OJT supervisor provides positive
0 0 1 1.85% 30 55.56 23 42.59% 3.44 Agree
role model and constructive support
8. What I learn in my experience as an
Strongly
OJT trainee is useful to me in the 0 0 0 0 24 44.44% 30 55.56% 3.56
Agree
future.
9. My OJT experience broadens my Strongly
0 0 0 0 20 37.04% 34 62.96% 3.63
skills and knowledge. Agree
10. Through the OJT, I gain invaluable
experience that I can take with me as Strongly
0 0 0 0 26 48.15% 28 51.85% 3.52
I move forward with future careers Agree
and education.
Legend: SD Strongly Disagree D Disagree A Agree SA Strongly Agree
Ranges for Weighted Mean
3.50-4.00 Strongly Agree 1.50-2.49 Disagree
2.50-3.49 Agree 1.00-1.49 Strongly Disagree

Table 1 shows the respondents feedback on their on-the-job training (OJT)

experience. Primarily, thirty-six (36) or 66.67% of the respondents strongly agree that

the OJT training gives them a taste of the real world a glimpse of what lies ahead of
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them after graduating high school. This affirms to Gomez (2010) theory that the on-the-

job training is very important not only to teach students their chosen career but to show

students the reality about working. Furthermore, this supports Taladtads theory that the

OJT is very essential component of the learning process, geared towards preparing

students future career.

Table 1 also confirms that the respondents strongly agree that the

office/establishment provides opportunities or tasks for them to use and develop their

computer skills having a weighted mean of 3.65. This proves www.scribd.coms (2010)

statement that the on-the-job training is one method by which students is given a

chance to apply the theories and computations that they have learned from the school.

It also helps the students to acquire relevant knowledge and skills by performing in

actual work setting.

With a weighted mean of 3.63, the respondents strongly agree that their OJT

experience broadens their skills and knowledge. This further supports Kolbs

Experiential Learning Theory defines learning as the process whereby knowledge is

created through the transformation of experience. Knowledge results from the

combination of grasping and transforming experience. Knowledge resides, not in the

individuals head, but in communities of practice. Learning is thus a process of

becoming a member of a community of practice through legitimate peripheral

participation (e.g. apprenticeship).

Table 1 further illustrates that thirty-two (32) or 59.26% of the respondents

strongly agree that the OJT develops their skills needed for the competitive job market.
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The results confirm Donaldsons (2001) theory that the OJT help students develop the

skills needed for the competitive job market while making their educational experience

relevant to the world they will experience as adults.

Moreover, table 1 depicts that the respondents strongly agree that the on-the-job

training (OJT) allows them to test what they learn in new and more complex situations

with a weighted mean of 3.57. This supports Scribner and Sachs (2011) theory that the

on-the-job training programs offer an array of formats for relating learning to practice

that may very well be useful in settings other than the workplace. This is also in

accordance to Cristobals theory (as cited by Taladtad, et. al, 2010) that what the

students learn from the classroom is what the students apply during OJT.

Sample of Students Comments

Sample Comment 1:

This students comment shows that the respondent likes the on-the-job training a

lot. It reveals that the respondent is hoping that the OJT program will be continued to

the next batch of students for them to experience the same benefits the respondent

gain.
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Sample Comment 2:

Sample Comment 2 illustrates the respondent learned a lot from the OJT

experience. This confirms Guziks (2002) theory that the on- the-job training can have

positive effects on trainee morale as it teaches them not only have skills related to the

specific tasks they do at work but also trains them with the ability to think critically and

solve problems that sometimes can be applied to their normal lives. This is also in

accordance with ww.nlplifetraining.coms (2012) statement that the on-the-job training is

significant because it takes skills training into the real world, and teaches students to

produce in a different, more adult, environment.

Sample Comment 3:

This sample comment confirms that the respondent like the OJT experience. The

respondent even wishes more hours on the training.

Sample Comment 4:

Sample comment 4 shows that the OJT experience greatly influences the

respondent in becoming more aggressive in pursuing their education.


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V. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter presents the findings of this study and on the basis of such findings;

conclusions and viable recommendations are engendered.

FINDINGS

1. Primarily, the respondents strongly agree that the OJT training gives them a taste of

the real world a glimpse of what lies ahead of them after graduating high school

having a weighted mean of 3.67. Furthermore, the respondents also strongly agree

that the office/establishment provides opportunities or tasks for them to use and

develop their computer skills having a weighted mean of 3.65. In addition, the

respondents strongly agree that their OJT experience broadens their skills and

knowledge. with a weighted mean of 3.63. Moreover, with a weighted mean of

3.59, the respondents strongly agree that the OJT develops their skills needed for

the competitive job market. Likewise, the respondents strongly agree that the on-

the-job training (OJT) allows them to test what they learn in new and more complex

situations with a weighted mean of 3.57.

2. The students comment shows that the respondent likes the on-the-job training a

lot. It reveals that the respondent is hoping that the OJT program will be continued

to the next batch of students for them to experience the same benefits the

respondent gain. In addition, the comment illustrates the respondent learned a lot

from the OJT experience. Moreover, the comment confirms that the respondent like

the OJT experience. The respondent even wishes more hours on the training.
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Likewise, the comment shows that the OJT experience greatly influences the

respondent in becoming more aggressive in pursuing their education.

CONCLUSIONS

Based on the findings of this study, the following generalizations are drawn:

1. The teacher-researcher realized that most of the Fourth YearDuhat students

under study strongly agree on the following: 1) the OJT training gives them a taste

of the real world a glimpse of what lies ahead of them after graduating high

school; 2) the office/establishment provides opportunities or tasks for them to use

and develop their computer skills; 3) their OJT experience broadens their skills and

knowledge; 4) the OJT develops their skills needed for the competitive job market;

and 5) the on-the-job training (OJT) allows them to test what they learn in new and

more complex.

This affirms to Gomez (2010) theory that the on-the-job training is very

important not only to teach students their chosen career but to show students the

reality about working. This is likewise in consonance with Taladtads (2010) theory

that on-the-job training is very essential component of the learning process, geared

towards preparing students future career. This also proves www.scribd.coms

(2010) statement that the on-the-job training is one method by which students is

given a chance to apply the theories and computations that they have learned from

the school. It also helps the students to acquire relevant knowledge and skills by

performing in actual work setting. This further supports Kolbs Experiential


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Learning Theory defines learning as the process whereby knowledge is created

through the transformation of experience. Knowledge results from the combination

of grasping and transforming experience. Knowledge resides, not in the

individuals head, but in communities of practice. Learning is thus a process of

becoming a member of a community of practice through legitimate peripheral

participation (e.g. apprenticeship). The results also confirm Donaldsons (2001)

theory that the OJT help students develop the skills needed for the competitive job

market while making their educational experience relevant to the world they will

experience as adults. Moreover, the results support Scribner and Sachs (2011)

theory that the on-the-job training programs offer an array of formats for relating

learning to practice that may very well be useful in settings other than the

workplace. This is also in accordance to Cristobals theory (as cited by Taladtad,

et. al, 2010) that what the students learn from the classroom is what the students

apply during OJT.

2. Based on the respondents comments, the teacher-researcher realized that the

respondents learned a lot from the OJT experience. It further confirms Guziks

(2002) theory the on- the-job training can have positive effects on trainee morale

as it teaches them not only have skills related to the specific tasks they do at work

but also trains them with the ability to think critically and solve problems that

sometimes can be applied to their normal lives. This is also in accordance with

ww.nlplifetraining.coms (2012) statement that the on-the-job training is significant

because it takes skills training into the real world, and teaches students to produce

in a different, more adult, environment.


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RECOMMENDATIONS

Based on the findings and conclusions, the following recommendations are

presented:

1. The teacher-researcher shall continue to let the Fourth Year TLE (ICT) students

undergo the On-the-Job (OJT) training;

2. The teacher-researcher shall require students more hours in the On-the-Job

training;

3. Encourage other Technology and Livelihood Education (TLE) teachers to let their

fourth year students undergo On-the-Job training.


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BIBLIOGRAPHY
Donaldson, et. al. (2006) Preparing Students for Life: The School-to-Work Reform
Movement. http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/issues/papers/School_to_Work.html.

Gomez, Felix Jr. (2010) Importance Of On-The-Job-Training


http://www.articlesbase.com/career-management-articles/importance-of-
onthejobtraining-2079779.html.

Guzik, Rich. (2002) On the Job Training.


http://www.freequality.org/documents/knowledge/On%20the%20Job%20Training.pdf

Kolb, Alice Y. and Kolb, David A. (2008). Experiential Learning Theory: A Dynamic,
Holistic Approach to Management Learning, Education and Development.
http://learningfromexperience.com/media/2010/08/ELT-Hbk-MLED-LFE-website-2-10-
08.pdf

Scribner, Sylvia and Sachs, Patricia. (2011) On the Job Training : A Case Study.
http://education.eserver.org/on-the-job-training.txt.

Taladtad, Sunjay G. Bala, Maria Katrina R., Rodelas Manilyn, Teope, Rodolfo,
John. (2010). Factors that Affect the On-the-Job Training of BSBA Practicumers of the
University of Manila : An Assessment. http://www.slideshare.net/taladtad/factors-that-
affect-the-on-thejob-training-of-6528978.

Aim of Teaching Career Pathways in Technology and Livelihood Education. (2011)


http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Aim_of_teaching_careers_pathways_technology_livelihood_
and_education.

Career Pathways for High School Students. (2011)


http://www.deped.gov.ph/cpanel/uploads/issuanceImg/DM%20No.%20149%20s.%2020
11.pdf.

Career Pathways in Technology and Livelihood Education Program. (2011)


http://clkss.org.ph/uncategorized/career-pathways-in-technology-and-livelihood-
education-program. Child Labor Knowledge Sharing System.

Experiential Training Methods (2008)


http://www.managementstudyguide.com/experiential-training-methods.htm.

OJT Narrative Report. http://www.scribd.com/doc/14532947/OJT-Narrative-Report.

Training and Development. (2012) http://www2.dupont.com / Career_Center / en_US /


life_at_dupont / training_development.html .

http://www.cookeryonline.com/Thesis/Training/litreview.html . (2011)
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APPENDICES

A. Letter of Application
23

B. Students Logbook
24

C. Certification
25

D. Survey Questionnaire