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Traduccin Grammar A.

Grammar: Be Statements/Yes-No Qs
Listen to the Grammar Coach.

Gramatica Oraciones con Ser o estar de si o no


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Oraciones de si o no y preguntas con ser o estar


A: Hola soy Sam, soy asistente de I-Travel.
B: Hola, soy Chris. Estoy en ventas en Comunicaciones Silica

Listen to the grammar explanations and examples. Escuche las explicaciones gramaticales y los
ejemplos.
1. We introduce ourselves with I'm and a name. Nos presentamos con Yo soy y un nombre

Chris: Hi, I'm Chris. Hola Soy Chris


Sam: Hello, I'm Sam. Hola Soy Sam

2. We often give more information about ourselves. A menudo damos mas informacin acerca
de nosotros mismos.
Sam: Hello. I'm Sam. I'm an assistant at I- Travel. Hola, Soy Sam. Soy un asistente en I Travel.
Chris: Hi, I'm Chris. I'm in sales at Silica Communications. Hola soy Chris. Estoy en ventas
en Comunicaciones Silica.

3. We can also use a yes-no question to start an introduction. Tambien podemos utilizas una pregunta de
si o no para empezar una presentacin.

Sam: Excuse me. Are you Chris Redmond? Disculpe, Es ud. Chris Redmond?
Chris: Yes, that's right. Si, as es.
Sam: Hi, I'm Sam Weiss. Hola, soy Sam Weiss.
Sam: Are you from Silica Communications? Eres de comunicaciones Silica?
Chris: Yeah, that's right. I'm Chris Redmond. You're from I-Travel. Si, asi es. Soy Chris
Redmond.
Sam: Right. I'm Sam Weiss.

4. Here's how we introduce other people.


Chris: Bill, this is Clara Fisher. She's in sales too.
Bill: Nice to meet you, Clara.
Clara: Nice to meet you too.
5. We make statements with the present tense of be like this:
I'm a teacher.
He's a waiter.
We're students.
They're in sales at Silica.
Remember, we use the word a with singular nouns that begin
with consonant sounds. Here are the consonants:
B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, P, Q, R, S, T, V, W, X, Y, Z.
a waiter
a teacher
We use the word an with singular nouns that begin with vowel
sounds.
Here are the vowels:
A, E, I, O, U.
an assistant
an employee
6. We use the word not to make the negative form.

Sam's a taxi driver.


They're salesmen.

7. We contract negative statements with is not and are not in two


ways.
He is not busy.
He is not busy.
They are not busy.
They are not busy.
8. To make questions with the verb be, we change the order.
Sam is a taxi driver.
They are students.
1. We use the simple present tense for facts
and things that happen again and again.

Chris takes a trip every month.


Sam gets up at 5:00 a.m. every day.
Chris speaks two languages.
Sam works for I-Travel.

2. We use the simple present tense with like,


love, need, have, and want.
Chris likes his job.
I love grammar.
We want your job!
3. Use the simple form of the verb with I, you, we, they, and plural
nouns.
I work in a school.
Sam and Kate work at I-Travel.
The interns work on Monday and Wednesday.
Remember, nouns are the names of people, places, and things.
4. One form is different. We add -s or -es to the simple form of the
verb with he, she, it, and singular nouns.
Kate likes her job too.
Sam reads the Sunday Times.
He goes to L.A.
She does a lot of work.
When we use he, she, or it, the verb is spelled in three different
ways:
When the simple form ends in sh, ch, x, s, z, or o, we add -es.
I teach.
Emily teaches.

When the simple form ends in a consonant plus y, we change


the y to i and add -es.
We study.
She studies.

When the simple form ends in any other letter, add -s.
They work.
Sam works.
This form of the verb is called the third person singular.
5. The verb have is special. We use have with I, you, we, and they.
We use has with he, she, and it.

I have a lot of work.


Sam has two jobs.

6. To make the negative form of the simple present tense, we use


does not or do not and the simple form of the verb. We also use
the contractions doesn't and don't.
For I, we, you, they, and plural nouns, use do not or don't and
the simple form of the verb.
I work at I-Travel.
I do not work at Silica Communications.
She lives with Sara.
She does not live with Kate.
7. To make a question in the simple present tense, we use do or
does and the simple form of the verb. Notice the order of the
words:

They work at at Silica Communications.


Sam works at I-Travel.

8. We can answer a question with a long answer.


Dave: Does Sam work at I-Travel?
Kate: Yes, he works at I-Travel. He's my assistant.
But usually we use short answers, especially in conversations.
Dave: Do Chris and Clara work at Silica Communications?
Kate: Yes, they do.
Dave: Does Sam work there, too?
Kate: No, he doesn't.
Grammar: Short Answers to Yes-No Qs

Listen to the grammar explanations and examples.

1. We can answer yes-no questions by saying


only Yes or No.
Emily: Are you at home today?
Student: Yes.
Paul: Is he a computer programmer?
Laura: No.
Laura: Do you want to go to school?
Frankie: No.
Laura: Does Sam drive a taxi on
weekends?
Chris: Yes.
2. For questions with the simple present of be, we can also answer
like this:
Paul: Are you hungry?
Frankie: Yes, I am.
...or...
Frankie: No, I'm not.
Chris: Is I-Travel on Union Street?
Sam: Yes, it is.
...or...
Sam: Not it isn't.
No it's not.
Emily: Are you at home today?
Students: No, we aren't.
No, we're not.
Remember, we don't use contractions for short answers with
yes.
We don't say, Yes, it's.
3. To answer questions in the simple present tense, we can use
do or does, or don't or doesn't.
Laura: Does Sam drive a taxi on weekends?
Chris: Yes, he does.
Chris: Do they work at I-Travel, too?
Sam: Yes, they do.
Chris: Do they work at Silica Communications?
Sam: No, they don't.
Remember, we don't answer, Yes, they work or No, they no
work.

4. After the answer, we can add extra information.


Laura: Are you hungry?
Paul: Yes, I am. That soup smells delicious.
Sam: Do you like your work?
Chris: Yes, I do. I like sales a lot.