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A Project report on

“A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF LEVELS OF JOB SATISFACTION


OF OFFICERS AND STAFF OF NUMALIGARH REFINERY LIMITED
AND THEIR TRAINING NEEDS IDENTIFICATION”
Submitted to Centre for Management Studies, Dibrugarh University for the Partial
fulfillment of MBA curriculum.

Submitted by:

KANGKAN DAS

MBA 4th Semester


CMS-DU.

Institutional guide: Organizational guide:


Dr.Amalesh Bhowal Mr. Manoj Kumar Das
Faculty, Deputy Manager
CMS-DU P&A,
Numaligarh Refinery
Limited

Center for Management Studies


Dibrugarh University
Dibrugarh 786004
Assam.
CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the project report entitled ‘A COMPARATIVE


ANALYSIS OF LEVELS OF JOB SATISFACTION OF OFFICERS AND STAFF
OF NUMALIGARH REFINERY LIMITED AND THEIR TRAINING NEEDS
IDENTIFICATION’ has been prepared by Mr. Kangkan Das, a student of 4th
Semester, under my supervision and guidance. It is based on the work
done at Numaligarh Refinery Limited, Golaghat, Assam during the period 01st
June – 31st July, 2006 as part of the requirements for the award of the
Degree of Master of Business Administration (MBA) of Dibrugarh
University.

It is further certified that the said project report has not been submitted
to any other University or Institution for similar purposes.

I wish him a successful career and a prosperous life ahead.

(Dr.Amalesh Bhowal)
Acknowledgement

Despite all the hurdles and difficulties I have been able to complete the
project with greater ease and self-confidence. So At the very onset I would
like to thank my university authorities, our Director-in-charge, Prof Pranjal
Bezborah and Mohd.IrfanUllah (Training and placement Officer- CMS DU)
for allowing me to undergo summer training at Numaligarh Refinery Limited.

I am very much thankful to the authorities of NRL for accepting my


application to undergo the training at NRL.

I am extremely grateful to my organizational guide Mr.Manoj Das


(Chief Manager, HR) for his valuable guidance and suggestions in spite of his
busy schedule.

At the same time I am also thankful to my institutional guide


Dr.Amalesh Bhowal for his constant guidance and help.

Further, I would like to extend my sincere thanks to Mr. Nagen Kalita,


Manager (T&D) and also Mr. Kumud Saikia, Officer (T&D) for their
valuable support and help.

Last but not the least I am thankful to the respondents who helped me
out by filling in the questionnaires without which the survey could not have
taken place.

Kangkan Das
Preface

Practical knowledge is very much important in any kind of study. In the


MBA course also in the fourth semester a summer training programme has
been incorporated in the curriculum to gain some practical knowledge about
the application of research methodology in management and its various
aspects in the practical field.

The title of the project is “comparative analysis of levels of job satisfaction


of officers and staff of Numaligarh Refinery Limited and their training needs
identification”. The project is basically a survey, which is made by collecting
data from respondents using questionnaires.

The project report has been made on findings and interpretations of data
collected .The report also contain information, which is collected in addition
of the questions under study.

The project report also contains recommendations for improving the levels
of job satisfaction of the employees of Numaligarh Refinery Limited and also
about the training needs which the employees of the refinery requires to
become more productive.
Executive Summary

• Project Title: A comparative analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff
of Numaligarh Refinery Limited and their training needs identification”.
• Location: Numaligarh Refinery Limited, Numaligarh, Dist-Golaghat, Assam.
• Duration: 2 [Two] Months
• Period: June-July, 2006
• Name of Student: Kangkan Das
• Organizational Guide: Mr. Manoj Das.
• Institutional guide: Dr.Amalesh Bhowal.
• Major objectives: There are two major objectives of the project study. First is to
compare the levels job satisfaction of officers and staff of Numaligarh Refinery
Limited. And secondly to identify their training needs.
• Research methodology used: The research methodology included collection of
primary data through questionnaires. A sample of 70 respondents (35 from officers and
35 from staff), which is of more than 10% of total employees of NRL, was taken
through convenient sampling method. The analysis part was done with the help of both
mathematical and statistical tools and techniques.
• Chapterisation:
Chapter 1 consists of Introduction to Job satisfaction and training needs of
employees.
Chapter 2 consists of history and information of Numaligarh refinery Limited.
Chapter 3 consists of objectives of the study, hypothesis of the study, significance of
the project, research methodology applied in the study and also limitations of the
study.
Chapter 4 consists of Interpretation and analysis of the data collected.
Chapter 5 consists of findings of the project study, recommendations
and finally the conclusion of the study.
Apart from these the report consists of Preface, Annexure and Bibliography.
• Major findings:
• Regarding job satisfaction of officers and staff:
 From the survey it is clear that more than 60% staff is satisfied while only 32%
officers are satisfied with the pay package provided by the organization.
 From the survey it is clear that nearly 50% officers are satisfied with the overall
organizational culture while only 34% staff is satisfied with the organizational
culture.
 It is clear from the survey that more than 50% officers and staff are satisfied with
the benefits like House Building Loans, Medical facilities, two wheeler/car loans
and other facilities provided by the organization for their family members and
children’s like education, medical, Sports, entertainment, clubs and other such
amenities.
 It is clear from the survey that neither from the officers nor from the staffs is
satisfied with the performance appraisal techniques used by the organization. It is
clear that majority of officers and staffs enjoy enough authority to do their job.
 From the survey it is clear that neither the officers nor the staffs are satisfied with
the promotional and growth opportunities provided by the organization. More than
34% officers and staff are dissatisfied with the promotional and growth
opportunities. Again more than 43% staff is fully dissatisfied with the promotional
and growth opportunities.

a.Regarding training needs identification of officers and staff :


i. From the survey we find that 97% officers and 86% staff believe that training and
development programmes enable employees to develop and rise in an organization.
While 3% officers and 14% staff doesn’t believe so.
ii. It is clear from the results that 43% officers and 46% officers believe that training
is needed most to know how to perform a job.
iii. Nearly 77% officers and 91% staff prefer training outside the organization and
80% officers and 89% staff prefers training every year and moreover 80% officers
and 86% staff prefer training by outsiders.
iv. From the analysis it is seen that 100% officers have attended T&D programmes
so far while 80% staff have attended such programmes and 20% staff is yet to
receive any training.
v. Lastly from the survey it is clear that 68% officers and 51% staff think that
training programmes are most effective in accepting more challenging jobs.

Recommendations:

Recommendations regarding Job satisfaction of both the officers and staff of NRL:
 Empowerment can be very useful in improving the levels of job satisfaction of
employees.
 The Performance appraisal techniques should be more improved and the appraise
should be informed about his/her strengths and weaknesses.
 Promotional and growth opportunities of both the officers and staff should be
improved i.e. it should not be on the basis of time but should be on the basis of
performance.
 Roles and responsibilities of the employees should be more clearly defined.
 Job enrichment can be a major motivator to increase the levels of job satisfaction
of both the officers and staff.
 More ergonomics should be used during designing of a job especially for jobs in
the production sites.
 To improve the levels of job satisfaction more R&D work should be done in the
fields of Personnel research.

• Recommendations regarding training needs identification of officers and staff of NRL:


 More training programmes to improve technical knowledge and managerial
aspects should be observed i.e. more developmental training programmes should be
organized periodically.
 More external training for the employees should be organized yearly (if possible).
 More training should be given to develop behavioral competencies like attitudinal
development etc, on regular basis especially for the staff cadre.
Table of contents

Pg.no.
Declaration
Acknowledgement
Preface
Executive summary

Chapter 1:
A.1 Introduction to HR Research
A.2 About job satisfaction
A.3 Factors affecting Job satisfaction
A.4 Effects of job satisfaction
B.1 About T&D
B.2 T&D as a source of competitive advantage
B.4 Methods used in Training Needs Assessments
B.5 Consequences of absence of Training Needs
Assessments
Chapter 2:
2.1 Introductions and History of NRL
2.2 Overview
2.3 Corporate objectives
2.4 Mission
2.5 Vision
2.6 People, Health & safety Policy
2.7 Environment and ecology
2.8 Commitment to Society
Chapter 3:
3.1 Objective of the study
3.2 Hypothesis
3.3 Significance of the study
3.4 Research methodology used
3.5 Limitations
Chapter 4:
4.1 Analysis and interpretation of data
Chapter 5:
5.1 Findings
5.1 Suggestions
5.2 Conclusions
Bibliography
Annexure
3.4 Research methodology used
3.5 Limitations

Chapter1

About HR research, job


satisfaction and Training
needs assessment
1.1. Introduction to Human Resource research:
Research is understood as the systematic and goal-oriented investigation of
facts to establish a relationship between two or more phenomena. The purpose of HR
or Personnel research is to identify HR problems at an early date, so that remedial
action can be taken before the problem gets magnified. Wide ranges of topics are
covered in personnel research. Some of them are:
• Wage surveys
• Effectiveness of various recruitment sources
• Effectiveness of training efforts
• Training needs identification
• Job analysis
• Job satisfaction survey
• Survey of employee needs
• Performance appraisal validation
• Turnover analysis etc.
Research can lead to an improved understanding of HR practices in an organization.

1.1.1. About Job satisfaction:


Job satisfaction basically means the amount of pleasure associated with a
particular job. Simply if anyone likes his/her job intensely it signifies job satisfaction
and if anyone dislikes his/her job intensely it signifies job dissatisfaction.[1]
Job satisfaction is a very important factor, which draws attention of both
managers of an organization as well as researchers and academicians. Job satisfaction
has a vital relationship with motivation, performance and productivity of an
employee.
There are certain factors, which lead to job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction.
These can be understood from the Two-factor theory proposed by Frederick
Herzberg[2]. This model is widely accepted by managers concerned with the problem
of human behavior at work. Herzberg and his associates Mausner, Peterson and
Capwell began their initial work on factors affecting work motivation in the mid
1950’s.From the research it was revealed that there are certain characteristics which
tend to be consistently related to job satisfaction and others to job dissatisfaction.
These are intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors such as achievement,
recognition, the work itself, responsibility, advancement and growth seem to be
related to job satisfaction. These factors are known as motivators or satisfiers.
Extrinsic factors such as company policy and administration, supervision,
working condition, salary, security and interpersonal relations seem to be related to
job dissatisfaction. They are also known as hygiene factors or dissatisfiers.
According to Herzberg, satisfaction and dissatisfaction are not opposite poles
of one dimension, they are two separate dimensions. Motivator’s effect satisfaction
and dissatisfaction is effected by hygiene factors.
The relationship between performance and satisfaction can be understood
from the Performance satisfaction model of Porter and Lawler ( Souce:HR and
Personnel Management by K Aswathapa). According to the model valence (i.e. an
individuals preference for an outcome) and expectancy (i.e., his/her belief that effort
will result in desired outcome) lead to effort (force or motivation). Effort
accompanied by ability, skill and role clarity lead to performance. After the
performance the rewards that follow and how they are perceived will determine
satisfaction.

1.1.2. Factors affecting the levels of job satisfaction of employees: (Source:


HR and Personnel Management by K Aswathapa)
A wide range of variables affects the level of job satisfaction. They are:
(a) Organizational factors:
o Nature and size of the organization,
o Personnel policies and procedures,
o Industrial relations,
o Job design,
o Technology and work culture,
o Supervision,
o Styles of leadership, etc.
(b) Individual factors:
o Personality
o Education
o Intelligence and abilities
o Age
o Marital status, etc.
(c) Socio-cultural factors:
o Relationship with workers
o Group working and norms
o Informal relations
o Attitudes
o Beliefs and values, etc.
(d) Environmental factors:
o Economic conditions
o Social conditions
o Technical changes
o Governmental influences
o Political legal environment, etc.
Apart from the above factors certain other factors called as situational
factors also influence the level of job satisfaction. They are types of supervision,
rewards, promotional and growth opportunities, work groups, etc.

1.1.3. Effects of job satisfaction:


Job satisfaction and dissatisfaction has a variety of effects. These effects can
be seen in context of employee turnover, absenteeism, and productivity and also in
an individual’s physical and mental health.
o Employee turnover: Turnover is the rate with which employees leave an
organization within a given period of time. When an individual feels
dissatisfied with his or her job, at the initial stage he/she tries to overcome
this through various ways of defense mechanism. If he/she is not able to
do so, he/she opts to quit the job thus affecting the employee turnover.
High employee turnover may result in disruption of production, problems
in quality control, and difficulty in building teamwork and morale.
o Absenteeism: Absenteeism refers to the failure on the part of employees to
report to work though they are scheduled to work. In other words
unauthorized absences constitute absenteeism. Job dissatisfaction can be a
cause of avoidable absenteeism. This absence is due to lack of satisfaction
from job, which produces a lack of will to do the work and hence alienate
the worker from the job.
o Productivity: Productivity of an employee can be affected by level of job
satisfaction. A more satisfied employee can be a more productive
employee. It may not be true in some situations but we can have an overall
comment that “a satisfied worker may not necessarily lead to increased
productivity but a dissatisfied worker leads to lower productivity”.
o Physical and mental health: Degree of job satisfaction affects an
individual’s physical and mental health. Since job satisfaction is a type of
mental feeling, so its favorableness or unfavourablrness affects the
individual’s psychology, which ultimately affects ones physical health.

1.2.1. About Training and development:


In simple training refers to the process of imparting skills and development
refers to the learning opportunities designed to help employees grow. A formal
definition of T&D is “any attempt to improve current or future employee performance
by increasing an employee’s ability to perform through learning, usually by changing
the employee’s attitude or increasing his or her skill”. (Source: HR and Personnel
Management by K Aswathapa )

1.2.2. Training and development as a source of competitive advantage:


Training and development offer competitive advantage to a firm by
removing performance deficiencies, making employees stay long, minimizing
accidents, scrap and damage; and meeting future employee needs. Through T&D
there is a greater stability, flexibility and capacity for growth in an organization.
Training contributes to employee stability in at least two ways. Employees become
efficient after undergoing training. Efficient employees contribute to growth of an
organization and growth renders stability to the workforce. Further trained employees
tend to stay with the organization. Training makes the employees versatile in
operations. Flexibility is therefore ensured through training. Even dissatisfaction,
complaints, absenteeism, and turnover can be reduced if employees are trained well.
(Source: HR and Personnel Management by K Aswathapa ).
1.2.3. Benefits of training:
(a) Benefits for the organization:
 Leads to improved profitability and/or more positive attitude towards profit
orientation.
 Improves the job knowledge and skills at all levels of the organization.
 Improves the morale of the workforce.
 Fosters authenticity, openness and trust.
 Helps prepare guidelines for work.
 Aids in understanding and carrying out organizational policies.
 Provides more information for future needs in all areas of the organization.
 Organization gets more effective decision-making and problem-solving
skills.
 Aids in developing leadership skills, motivation, loyalty, better attitudes,
other aspects that successful workers and managers usually display.
 Improves labour-management relationship.
 Creates an appropriate climate for growth, communication.
 Helps employees adjust to change.
 Aids in handling conflict, thereby helping to prevent stress and tension.

(b) Benefits to the individual which in turn ultimately should benefit the organization:
 Helps the individual in making better decisions and effective problem solving.
 Through T&D, motivational variables of recognition, achievement, growth,
responsibility and advancement are internalized and operationalised.
 Aids in encouraging and achieving self-development and self-confidence.
 Helps a person handle stress, tension, frustration and conflict.
 Provides information for improving leadership, knowledge, communication
skills and attitudes.
 Increases job satisfaction and recognition.
 Helps a person develop speaking, listening and writing skills.
 Helps eliminate fear of attempting new tasks.

(c) Benefits in Personnel and Human relations, Intragroup and Intergroup Relations
and Policy implementation:
 Improves communication between groups and individuals.
 Aids in orientation for new employees and those taking new jobs through
transfer or promotion.
 Provides information on governmental laws and administrative policies.
 Improves interpersonal skills.
 Makes organizational policies, rules and regulations viable.
 Builds cohesiveness in groups.
 Provides a better climate for learning, growth, and co-ordination.
(Source: HR and Personnel Management by K Aswathapa and Personnel
Management by C.B Mamoria )
1.2.4. Training needs Assessment:
Training needs assessment diagnoses present problems and future
challenges to be met through training and development. Organizations spend vast
sums of money on T&D. before committing such huge resources; organizations
would do well to assess the training needs of their employees. Organizations that
implement training programmes without conducting needs assessment may be
making errors.
Needs assessment occurs at two levels- group and individual. An individual
obviously needs training when his/her performance falls short of standards.
Inadequacy in performance may be due to lack of skill or knowledge and this can be
remedied by training. Assessment of training needs must focus on anticipated skills of
an employee. Technology changes fast and new technology demands new skills. It is
necessary that the employee be trained to acquire new skills. Training and
development is essential to prepare the employees to handle more challenging tasks.
Assessment of training needs occurs at group levels too. Any change in
organization’s strategy necessitates training of groups of employees. Training in
groups can be used when high scrap or accident rates, low morale and motivation, or
other problems are diagnosed.

1.2.4.1. Methods used in training needs assessments: (Source: HR and Personnel


Management by K Aswathapa )
For group or organizational analysis For individual analysis
Organizational goals and objectives Performance appraisal
Personnel/skills inventories Work sampling
Organizational climate indices Interviews
Efficiency indices Questionnaires
Exit interviews Attitude survey
MBO or work planning systems Training progress
Quality circles Rating scales
Customer survey/satisfaction data
Consideration of current and projected
changes

1.2.4.2. Consequences of absence of training needs assessment: (Source: HR


and Personnel Management by K Aswathapa )
• Loss of business
• Constraints on business development
• Higher labour turnover
• Greater pressure and stress on management and staff to provide cover
and increased overtime working
• Pressure on job-evaluation schemes, grading structure, payment
systems and career structures
• Need for job redesign and revision of job specifications
• Higher training costs.
1.3 References:
[1] Source: HR and Personnel Management by K Aswathapa
[2] ibid
[3] ibid
[4] ibid
[5] ibid
[6] ibid
[7] Source: ibid and Personnel Management by C.B Mamoria
[8] ibid
[9] ibid
Chapter2

About NRL in Brief


2.1. Introduction and history:

Numaligarh Refinery Limited is one of the finest refineries in the country and is
popularly known as “Assam Accord Refinery”. The refinery is designed to process
3MMTPA of indigenous crude oil by adopting the state-of-the-art technology. It has
also incorporated the Numaligarh Refinery Marketing Terminal for despatching of
products. NRL’s identity is based upon the theme “Energy in Motion”, symbolizing
NRL’s commitment towards ushering in a new industrial dawn. An informal style of
functioning, system bound approach and congruous teamwork enables the lean and thin
organizational structure of NRL to deliver its business and social objectives
Numaligarh Refinery Limited popularly known as the "Assam Accord Refinery" has
been set up in the district of Golaghat, Assam in fulfillment of the commitment made
by the Govt. of India in the historic "Assam Accord" signed on 15th August 1985 to
promote industrial and economic development of Assam.
• Proposal for Numaligarh Refinery included in the” Assam Accord" on 15th August
1985
• IBP Co. Ltd was appointed as the implementation agency with Equity structure IBP
51 %, Govt of Assam 10 % & Public 39 % on 23rd June 1989
• Environmental clearance received on 31st May 1991
• Environmental clearance received on 31st May 1991
• Foundation stone laid by former Prime Minister Sri P. V. Narasimha Rao on 3rd
July 1992.
• Foundation stone laid by former Prime Minister Sri P. V. Narasimha Rao on 3rd
July 1992.
• Numaligarh Refinery incorporated on 22nd April 1993
• BPCL inducted as major promoter with equity structure BPCL 32%, Govt of Assam
10%, and Public 39%.
• The ERP System implemented live from October, 1998 to automate business
processes of the organization in integrated environment
• Honorable Prime Minister of India Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee dedicated Numaligarh
Refinery to the Nation on 9th July 1999 and commercial production was started
since 1st of October 2000.
• Flagging off of 1st Rail Rake of products from Marketing Terminal by Honorable
Member of Parliament Shri Ram Naik on 9th April 2000
• The first batch of ATF produced in the refinery was dispatched through rail in
December 2001.
• A 10 TMTPA LPG Bottling Plant was commissioned on 21st April, 2002

2.2. Overview:

Within two years of its commercial operation NRL achieved global standard by
obtaining certification of its Quality, Environment and Occupational Health & Safety
Management Systems under the Standards ISO 9001:2000, ISO 14001:1996 and
OHSAS 18001:1999 respectively, from Det Norske Veritas (DNV), a premier agency
well known world-wide. It may be highlighted that it is a rare achievement the work
has been completed within a year of commencement and the three Certifications have
been cleared at the first attempt itself, besides the fact that all the three systems were
taken up simultaneously. DNV has thereafter re-certified NRL against the latest
versions of all the standards again in the year 2005 for a further period of three years.
Numaligarh Refinery Limited has been awarded Level-9 certification in the scale of 1-
10 under the protocol of International Safety Rating System (ISRS), one of the most
prestigious and globally acclaimed Loss Control Management Systems and
benchmarking tools, by the globally reputed auditing and consulting agency M/s Det
Norske Veritas (DNV), Norway in the year 2005. It may be mentioned that earlier NRL
has achieved the rare distinction of achieving Level 8 in the Baseline audit itself during
March, 2003.Just in the second year of its operation NRL achieved a major milestone
on 9th August 2002 by obtaining certification of its Quality, Environment and
Occupational Health & Safety Management Systems under the Standards ISO
9001:2000, ISO 14001:1996 and OHSAS 18001:1999 respectively, from Det Norske
Veritas (DNV), a premier agency well known world-wide. It may be highlighted that it
is a rare achievement for the work to have been completed within a year of
commencement and the three Certifications were cleared at the first attempt.
NRL has also received the rare distinction of achieving Level 8 in the Baseline audit
itself in the scale of 1-10 of the International Safety Rating System (ISRS), a
comprehensive and globally acclaimed benchmarking tool for safety and environment.

2.3. Corporate Objective:

• Maximize refinery capacity utilization and optimize product pattern by efficient


refinery operation.
• Ensure smooth and timely evacuation of products; create a sound customer base and
necessary marketing infrastructure. Achieve highest standards in product quality,
safety, and health and environment protection.
• Manage and operate the facilities in an efficient and cost effective manner for
generation of adequate internal resources.
• Inculcate best business practices through the use of ERP and E-Commerce.
• Focus on development and growth of Human Resource through proper training and
career planning
• Plan for production and marketing of low volume, high value products. Remain at
the technological forefront by continuous up-gradation of in-house expertise and
absorption of latest technologies.
• Establish strong corporate identity and brand equity. Facilitate economic and
industrial development of the region.

2.4. Mission:

• Develop core competencies in Refining and Marketing of petroleum products


with a focus on achieving international standards on safety, quality and cost
• Maximize wealth creation for meeting expectations of stakeholders.
• Create a pool of knowledgeable and inspired employees and ensure their
professional and personal growth.
• Contribute towards the development of the region.

2.5. Vision:

To be a vibrant, growth oriented energy company of national standing and global


reputation having core competencies in Refining and Marketing of petroleum products
committed to attain sustained excellence in performance, safety standards, and
customer care and environment management and to provide a fillip to the development
of the region.

2.6. People and Health and Safety policy:

NRL's Human Resource is dynamic and their average age works out to 36 years.
The total manpower of NRL as on 1st December 2005 was 671 comprising 301
Management Staff and 370 Non Management Staff. Amongst these, there are 23
women employees. The company is sensitive to the needs of the society and has
employed 129 employees belonging to the SC/ST community and 187 employees
belonging to Other Backward Classes. In line with its commitment to provide its
employees a good place to work and live, NRL has been maintaining in the best
possible way the residential, educational, health and recreational facilities.

2.6.1. Health and Safety Policy:

NRL strongly believes that health, safety and environmental performances are an
integral part of the business and accordingly commit themselves to carry out all
activities connected with refining, storage, despatch and marketing of petroleum
products up to customer’s premises with the highest concern for preservation of the
Environment and Safety & Health of all concerned.
In pursuance of the above policy, NRL shall:
• Ensure compliance of all stipulations as encoded in Statutes, applicable codes of
practices and relevant guidelines, MINAS, OISD standards etc. apart from its
own policies & manuals.
• Adhere to the requirements of Environmental Management Systems conforming
to ISO 14001:1996 and Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems
conforming to OHSAS 18001:1999 in all the relevant activities throughout the
organization.
• Adopt safe and eco-friendly technology, sound design and engineering practices
as well as comprehensive operation, maintenance and inspection procedures,
and strive to improve upon them continually by setting objectives and reviewing
the performance of the systems in line with the changing needs.
• Monitor their operations for the economic use of energy and water.
• Continuously work towards mitigation of adverse environmental impacts, if
any, of their operations on air, water and land.
• Prevent mishaps, minimize risks and hazards and adopt suitable control
measures including Disaster Management Plans for effective mitigation of the
likely consequences
• Prevent occurrence of occupational diseases and accord highest concern for the
health of all concerned.

2.7. Environment and Ecology:

Numaligarh Refinery Limited was conceptualized as one of the most environment


friendly and energy efficient refineries in the country. Right from its inception,
conscious efforts had been taken at every stage to preserve the environment complying
with statutory norms prescribed by concerned authorities. Besides normal pollution
control measures specific steps had been taken to ensure that there was no adverse
impact on the adjacent Kaziranga National Park. To avoid disturbances to flora and
fauna of Kaziranga National Park, over dimension consignments and over weight
consignments have been transported successfully. This has been possible by using river
ways from Kolkata via Bangladesh through river Jamuna & Brahmaputra and then by
river Dhansiri to a specially built jetty at Dhansiri river. The effluent treatment plant
with tertiary treatment facilities along with provisions for reuse of treated effluents is
considered to be one of the most modern as it uses the latest technology. Installation of
non-illuminating ground flare in the refinery is one of the first in the country. In
addition, a 100-meter green belt around the refinery and a 25-meter green belt around
the Marketing Terminal have been created. Five continuous air-monitoring stations are
being installed. As a part of the tree plantation programme, about 10,000 teak trees and
about 2400 other plants have been planted in and around the refinery and marketing
terminal area. Just to reflect the concern of the company for retaining and creating an
environment friendly atmosphere, a novel Butterfly Park, only one in the area adjoining
the refinery has been set up.

2.8 Commitment to society:


While the primary function of NRL is to operate the refinery with optimum
efficiency, the socio-economic welfare of the region is imbibed as an integral part of its
corporate philosophy and organizational culture. It is against this backdrop that the
company initiated definitive measures for improving the lives of people in the
neighboring areas through innovative and people friendly programmes. Right from its
inception, even at the project stage, NRL has been pursuing various Community
Development programmes. Besides concentrating in neighboring areas NRL endeavors
to cover the industrially backward district of Golaghat and also extends a helping hand
to other parts of the State of Assam under the Community Development programme.
NRL continues its endeavors to carryout the community development work as a
part of its corporate philosophy and contribute towards development of the region in
line with its corporate mission.
Chapter3
• Objectives of the study
• Hypothesis of the study
• Significance of the study
• Research methodology
• Limitations of the study
3.1Objective of the study:

The main objective of the study was to analyze and compare the levels of job
satisfaction of officers and staff of Numaligarh Refinery Limited.
Moreover one more important objective is to assess the training needs of the
employees of Numaligarh Refinery Limited.

3.2 Working Hypothesis of the study:

Ho1: “There is no significant difference between the levels of job satisfaction of


officers and staff of Numaligarh Refinery Limited”.
Ho2: “The employees of Numaligarh Refinery Limited don’t believe that T&D
programmes are needed to accept more challenging jobs”.

3.3 Significance of the study:

Satisfaction and dissatisfaction with a particular job is a very important factor for an
employee as well as the whole organization. Levels of satisfaction and dissatisfaction
have effects on various factors like employee turnover, effectiveness of training efforts
and their training needs identification, employee needs and many more factors related
to an organization and its employees, so the most important significance of the project
is to find whether the employees of Numaligarh Refinery Limited are satisfied or
dissatisfied with their job. Again one more significance of the study is the comparative
analysis of levels of job satisfaction, which determines whether the officers are more
satisfied, or the staff members are more satisfied with their respective jobs or vice
versa.
One more significance of the study is the identification of the training needs of the
employees of NRL, as Training needs assessment diagnoses present problems and future
challenges of the organization to be met through training and development.

3.4 Research Methodology used in the study:


3.4.1. Population:
Presently there are 683 employees in NRL out off which 385 employees belong to
the staff cadre and 298 belong to officers and executive level. Amongst them 23 are women
employees, 7 physically challenged employees, 127 SC/ST employees and 187 belonging
to OBC. (Source: Annual report 2004-05)

3.4.2. Sources of data:


The data collected for the project was by questionnaire method. The questionnaire
was prepared on the basis of discussions with Organizational guide and other employees of
NRL as because they were more to able site the exact scenario that was predominant at that
period. Moreover during the preparation of the questionnaire institutional guide was also
consulted as because he had good knowledge of designing questionnaires. The
questionnaires were distributed among different respondents to collect their responses.
The questionnaire consisted of 28 questions out of which 18 questions were
developed to find the levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff and the other 10
questions were developed to assess the training needs of the employees.

3.4.3 Sample and sampling units:


After discussions with the organizational guide it was clear that a minimum of 10%
employees of the total population are to be taken for the survey. Again it was a huge public
sector company, so surveying each and every employee was not possible in such a short
period. So a sample of 70 respondents (which was more than 10% of the total population)
was taken for the survey.
Out of these 35 were from officers and 35 were from the staff. This was done as
because the analysis was a comparative analysis so it was easier to compare the responses
with equal distribution.
Convenient sampling method was used for collection of responses as because at
least 3-4 employees of each department were to be surveyed and moreover the employees
worked in shifts so it was a bit difficult to know the exact timings of the employees
especially for the staff cadre.

3.4.4. Statistical tools used:


The data collected were then analyzed. Simple statistical tools were used like,
percentage, average, etc so as to keep the research findings as clear and simple as possible.
Pie, bar diagram and charts were used as a visual aid. Then the analyzed data were
interpreted.

3.4Limitations of the project study:

 The sample taken cannot be said as a true representation of the whole universe.
 There was less control over the responses of the respondents.
 It is difficult to know about the degrees up to which the respondents are satisfied or
dissatisfied.
 Unwillingness of some people to answer as thought it is time consuming.

To overcome these limitations best possible precautions were taken. Like the
respondents were asked to give the most authentic data they could ever give. They were
convinced that the responses given by them would be kept secret and would never harm
their career. Moreover in some cases they were even asked not to give their identity but to
give the truest responses.

Chapter4
Analysis and interpretation of
data
ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
4.1 Profile of employees:

4.1.1: Gender composition: Out of the total number of respondents taken there are 68 male
and 2 female employees i.e., in percentage we have,
PERCENTAGE OF MALE AND FEMALE
RESPONDENTS

Female
3%

Male
97%

Male Female

Diagram 4.1.1: Gender composition of the total respondents surveyed.


Interpretation: Out of the total respondents surveyed, 3% are female and the rest 97%
are male employees.

4.1.2: Analysis of annual income of officers and staff:


From the survey we find the following table 4.1:
Below 3 lakh Between 3-4 Between 4-5 Above 5 lakh
lakh Lakh
Number of officers 3 9 16 7
(8.5%) (25.7%) (45.7%) (20%)
Numbers of staff 19 14 2 0
(54.3%) (40%) (5.7%) (0%)
ANNUAL INCOME OF OFFICERS AND STAFF

54.30%
45.70%
40%

25.70%
20%

8.60%
5.70%
0%

Below 3 Lakhs 3-4 Lakhs 4-5 Lakhs Above 5 lakhs

% of officers % of officers

Diagram 4.2: Analysis of annual income of officers and staff.


Interpretation: From the survey it is found that 54.3% staff and 8.6% officers have
annual income of below Rs 3 lakhs. 40% staff and 25.7% officers have annual income
between Rs 3-4 lakhs. Again 45.7% officers and 5.7% staffs have annual income between
Rs 4-5 lakhs. And lastly 20% officers have annual income of more than Rs 5 lakhs.

4.2: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF LEVELS OF JOB SATISFACTION OF


OFFICERS AND STAFF OF NUMALIGARH REFINERY LIMITED:

4.2.1:. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the pay
package provided by the organization:
From the survey we find the following table 4.2:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number 2 11 13 8 1
of (5.7%) (31.4%) (37.4%) (22.9%) (2.9%)
officers
Numbers 2 21 8 4 0
of staff (5.7%) (60%) (22.9%) (11.4%) (0%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST PAY PACKAGE

60%

37.14%
31.40%
22.90% 22.90%
11.40% 11.40%
5.70%5.70%
0%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully


dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.3: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the pay
package.
Interpretation: From the above analysis we find that 5.7% of both officers and staff are
highly satisfied with the pay package provided by the organization. Another 31.4%
officers and 60% staffs are satisfied with the same. Again we find that 37.14% officers
and 22.9% staffs are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the pay package. It is seen
from the survey that nearly 22.9% officers and 11.4 % staffs are dissatisfied with the pay
structure. Lastly it is seen that none from the staff is fully dissatisfied with the pay
package while 11.4 % officers are fully dissatisfied with their pay package.

A.2.2: Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
incentives and perquisites provided by the organization:
From the survey we find the following table 4.3:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number 2 16 12 5 0
of (5.7%) (45.7%) (28.6%) (14.3%) (0%)
officers
Numbers 2 10 17 5 1
of staff (5.7%) (28.6%) (48.6%) (14.3%) (2.9%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST INCENTIVES AND
PERQUISITES
45.70%

34.30%
29%

17.00% 14.30%
5.70%5.70% 5.00%
0.00%1%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully


dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.4: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
incentives and perquisites
Interpretation: From the above analysis we find that 5.7% of both officers and staff are
fully satisfied with the incentives and perquisites provided by the organization while
other 45.7% officers and 29% staffs are only satisfied with the same. Again 34.3%
officers and 17% staff are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the incentives and
perquisites. Nearly 14.3 % officers and 5% staff are dissatisfied. Lastly only 1% staff is
fully dissatisfied with the incentives and perquisites while none of the officers are fully
dissatisfied.

4.2.3. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the overall
organizational culture:
From the survey we find the following table 4.4:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number 6 12 14 3 0
of (17.1%) (34.3%) (40%) (8.6%) (0%)
officers
Numbers 2 8 13 8 4
of staff (5.7%) (22.9%) (37.1%) (22.9%) (11.4%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE

40.00%
34.30% 37.10%

23% 22.90%
17.10%
11.40% 11%
8.60%

0.00%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.5: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
overall organizational culture
Interpretation: From the above analysis we find that 17.10% of officers and 11.4% staff
are fully satisfied with the overall organizational culture while other 34.30% officers and
23% staffs are only satisfied with the same. Again 40% officers and 37.1% staff are
neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the organizational culture. Nearly 8.6 % officers and
22.9% staff are dissatisfied. Lastly 11% staff is fully dissatisfied with the overall
organizational culture while none of the officers are fully dissatisfied.

4.2.4. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the working
conditions provided by the organization in context to the job:
From the survey we find the following Table 4.5:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number 6 21 8 0 0
of (17.1%) (60%) (22.9%) (0%) (0%)
officers
Numbers 2 22 10 1 0
of staff (5.7%) (62.9%) (28.6%) (2.9%) (0%)

SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST WORKING CONDITIONS

63%
60.00%

28.60%
22.90%
17.10%
5.70% 2.90%
0.00% 0.00% 0%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff
Diagram 4.6: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the working
conditions provided by the organization in context to their job.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 17.1% officers and 5.7% staff are
highly satisfied with the working conditions of the organization and another 60% officers
and 63% staff is satisfied with the working conditions. Again 22.9% officers and 28.6%
staff is neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the same. Nearly 2.9% staff is dissatisfied
while none from the officers are dissatisfied with the working conditions. Lastly no one
from both the officers and staff are fully dissatisfied with the working conditions.

4.2.5. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
information provided to do their job:
From the survey we find the following table 4.6:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 7 20 8 0 0
officers (20%) (57.1%) (22.9%) (0%) (0%)
Numbers of 3 21 9 2 0
staff (8.6%) (60%) (25.7%) (5.7%) (0%)

SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST INFORMATION PROVIDED TO DO


THE JOB

57.10% 60%

25.70%
20.00% 22.90%
8.60%
5.70%
0.00% 0.00% 0%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.7: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by information
provided to do the job.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 20% of officers and 8.6% staff are
fully satisfied with the information’s provided to do their job while other 57.1% officers
and 60% staffs are only satisfied with the same. Again 22.9% officers and 25.7% staff are
neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the information’s provided.
Nearly 5.7% staff is dissatisfied while none from the officers are dissatisfied with the
information’s provided to do the job. Lastly no one from both the officers and staff are
fully dissatisfied with the information’s provided to do their job.
4.2.6. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
cooperation and help provided to do their job:
From the survey we find the following table 4.7:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 10 14 10 1 0
officers (28.6%) (40%) (28.6%) (2.9%) (0%0
Numbers of 2 22 8 3 0
staff (5.7%) (62.9%) (22.9%) (8.5%) (0%)

SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST COOPERATION/HELP PROVIDED


TO DO THE JOB

63%

40.00%
28.60%
28.60%
22.90%
5.70% 5.70%
2.90% 0.00% 0%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully


dissatisfied

% of staff % of officers % of staff % of staff

Diagram 4.8: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff against cooperation/help
provided to do the job.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 28.6% officers and 5.7% staff are
highly satisfied and another 40% officers and 63% staff are satisfied with the cooperation
and help provided by the organization to do their job. Again 28.6% officers and 22.9%
staff are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the same. Nearly 2.9% officers and 5.7%
staffs are dissatisfied with the cooperation and help provided. Lastly no one from both the
officers and staff are fully dissatisfied with the cooperation and help provided by the
organization to do their job.

4.2.7. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
equipments provided to do their job:
From the survey we find the following table 4.8:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 14 16 4 1 0
officers (40%) (45.7%) (11.4%) (2.9%) (0%)
Numbers of 7 23 3 1 1
staff (20%) (65.7%) (8.6%) (2.9%) (2.9%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST EQUIPMENTS PROVIDED TO DO
THE JOB
66%

45.70%
40.00%

20.00%
11.40%
8.60% 2.90% 2.90% 0.00% 3%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.9: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff against equipments
provided to do the job.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 40% of officers and 20% staff are
fully satisfied with the equipments provided to do their job while another 45.7% officers
and 66% staffs are only satisfied with the same. Again 11.4% officers and 8.6% staff are
neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the equipments provided to do their job. Nearly 2.9
%officers and staff are dissatisfied with the equipments provided to do their job. Lastly
3% staff is fully dissatisfied with the equipments provided while none of the officers are
fully dissatisfied.

4.2.8. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
promotional and growth opportunities provided by the organization:
From the survey we find the following the following table 4.9:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 2 10 11 12 0
officers (5.7%) (28.6%) (31.4%) (34.3%) (0%)
Numbers of 2 3 3 12 15
staff (5.7%) (8.6%) (8.6%) (34.3%) (42.9%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST PROMOTIONAL AND GROWTH
OPPORTUNITIES

43%
34.30% 34.30%
31.40%
28.60%

9% 9.00%
5.70% 5.70%
0.00%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.10: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff against promotional and
growth opportunities provided by the organization.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 5.7% of officers and staff are fully
satisfied with the promotional and growth opportunities provided by the organization
while another 28.6% officers and 9% staffs are only satisfied with the same. Again 31.4%
officers and 9% staff are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the growth opportunities.
While another 34.3 % officers and staff are dissatisfied with the promotion and growth
opportunities. Lastly 43% staff is fully dissatisfied with the promotional and growth
opportunities provided by the organization while none of the officers are fully
dissatisfied.

4.2.9. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the
performance appraisal techniques used in the organization:
From the survey we find the following table 4.10:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 3 12 14 6 0
officers (8.6%) (34.3%) (40%) (17.1%) (0%)
Numbers of 4( 10 9 9 3
staff 11.4%) (28.6%) (25.7%) (25.7%) (8.6%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
TECHNIQUES

40.00%
34.30%
29%
25.70% 25.70%
17.10%
11.40%
8.60% 9%
0.00%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.11: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff against performance
appraisal techniques.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 8.6% of officers and 11.4% staff are
fully satisfied with the performance appraisal techniques used by the organization while
another 34.3% officers and 29% staffs are only satisfied with the same. Again 40%
officers and 25.7% staff are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the performance
appraisal techniques. While another 17.1 % officers and 25.7% staff are dissatisfied with
the techniques use. Lastly 9% staff is fully dissatisfied with the performance appraisal
techniques used by the organization while none of the officers are fully dissatisfied.

4.2.10. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by benefits like
House Building Loans, Medical facilities, two wheeler/car loans, etc, provided by the
organization:
From the survey we find the following table 4.11:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 10 17 6 2 0
officers (28.6%) (48.6%) (17.1%) (5.7%) (0%)
Numbers of 2 17 9 3 4
staff (5.7%) (48.6%) (25.7%) (8.6%) (11.4%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST BENEFITS LIKE HBL's
MEDICAL,TWO WHEELER/CAR LOANS etc.

49% 49%

28.60% 25.70%
17.10%
8.60% 11%
5.70% 5.70%
0.00%

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully


dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.12: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff against benefits like
House Building Loans, Medical facilities, two wheeler/car loans, etc, provided by the
organization:
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 28.6% of officers and 5.7% staff are
fully satisfied with the benefits like House Building Loans, Medical facilities, two
wheeler/car loans, etc, provided by the organization while another 49% officers and staffs
are only satisfied with the same. Again 17.1% officers and 25.7% staff are neither
satisfied nor dissatisfied with the benefits provided. While another 5.7 % officers and
8.6% staff are dissatisfied with the benefits. Lastly 11% staff is fully dissatisfied with the
benefits provided by the organization while none of the officers are fully dissatisfied.

4.2.11. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the facilities
provided by the organization for their family members and children’s like education,
medical, Sports, entertainment, clubs and other such amenities:
From the survey we find the following table 4.12:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 6 18 8 3 0
officers (17.1%) (51.4%) (22.9%) (8.6%) (0%)
Numbers of 3 19 7 2 4
staffs (8.6%) (54.3%) (20%) (5.7%) (11.4%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST OTHER FACILITIES PROVIDED

51.40% 54%

22.90%
17.10% 20.00%
8.60% 8.60% 11%
5.70%
0.00%

Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully


satisfied dissatisfied
% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.13: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff against benefits facilities
provided by the organization for their family members and children’s like education,
medical, Sports, entertainment, clubs and other such amenities.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 17.1% of officers and 8.6% staff are
fully satisfied with the facilities provided by the organization for their family members
and children’s like education, medical, Sports, entertainment, clubs and other such
amenities while another 51.4% officers and 54% staffs are only satisfied with the same.
Again 22.9% officers and 20% staff are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the facilities
provided. While another 8.6 % officers and 5.7% staff are dissatisfied with the facilities.
Lastly 11% staff is fully dissatisfied with the facilities provided by the organization while
none of the officers are fully dissatisfied.

4.2.12. Analysis of levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff influenced by the number
of holidays, LTC’s and other such benefits provided by the organization:
From the survey we find the following table 4.13:
Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully
satisfied dissatisfied
Number of 9 18 7 0 1
officers (25.7%) (51.4%) (20%) (0%) (2.9%)
Numbers of 4 18 7 4 2
staff (11.4%) (51.4%) (20%) (11.4%) (5.7%)
SATISFACTION LEVEL AGAINST HOLIDAYS,LTC's & OTHER SUCH
FACILITIES PROVIDED
51% 51%

25.70%
20.00% 20.00%
11.40% 11.40%
6%
2.90%
0.00%

Highly s atisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Fully dissatisfied

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.14: Levels of job satisfaction of officers and staff against holidays,
LTC’s & other facilities provided by the organization.
Interpretation: From the above results we find that 25.7% of officers and 11.4% staff
are fully satisfied with the holidays, LTC’s & other such facilities provided by the
organization while 51% officers and staffs each are satisfied with the same. Again 20%
officers and staff each are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the facilities provided.
Nearly 11.4 % staff is dissatisfied and lastly 2.9%officers and 6% staff is fully
dissatisfied with such facilities provided by the organization.

4.2.13. Analysis of the overall relationship of both officers and staff with their superiors:
From the survey we find the following table 4.14 that shows the comments given by
the officers and staff regarding their relationship with their superiors:
Excellent Very good Good Fair Poor
Number of 16 14 5 0 0
officers (45.7%) (40%) (14.3%) (0%) (0%)
Numbers of 3 6 21 4 1
staff (8.6%) (17.1%) (60%) (11.4%) (2.9%)
COMMENT ON RELATIONSHIP WITH SUPERIORS

60.00%

45.70%
40.00%

17% 14.30%
8.60% 11.40%
0.00% 0.00%3%

Excellent Very good Good Fair poor


% of officers % of staff
Diagram 4.15: Overall relationship of both officers and staff with their superiors.
Interpretation: From the above results it is seen that nearly 45.7% officers have
excellent relationship with their superiors while 8.6% staffs have excellent relationship
with their superiors and it is also seen that 49% officers and 17% staff rate their
relationship with their superiors as very good. While 14.3% officers and 60% staffs have
good relationships with their superiors. Lastly 11.4% and 3% staffs rate their relationship
with their superiors as fair and poor relationships respectively.

4.2.14. Analysis of the overall relationship of both officers and staff with their peers and
subordinates:
From the survey we find the following table 4.15 that shows the comments given by
the officers and staff regarding their relationship with their peers and subordinates:
Excellent Very good Good Fair Poor
Number of 13 19 3 0 0
officers (37.1%) (54.3%) (8.6%) (0%) (0%)
Numbers of 5 10 17 3 0
staff (14.3%) (28.6%) (48.6%) (8.6%) (0%)
COMMENT ON RELATIONSHIP WITH PEERS AND SUBORDINATES
54.30%
48.60%

37.10%
29%

14.30%
8.60% 8.60%
0.00% 0.00% 0%

Excellent Very good Good Fair poor


% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.16: Overall relationship of both officers and staff with their peers and
subordinates.
Interpretation: From the above results it is seen that nearly 37.1% officers while 14.3%
staffs have excellent relationship with their peers and subordinates and it is also seen that
54.3% officers and 29% staff rate their relationship with their peers and subordinates as
very good. While 8.6% officers and 48.6% staffs have good relationships with their peers
and subordinates. Lastly 8.6% staffs rate their relationship with their peers and
subordinates as fair relationship while none of the officers and staff have poor
relationship with there peers and subordinates.
4.2.15. Analysis of whether the roles and responsibilities related to the jobs of both the
officers and staff are clearly defined or not:
When question was asked related to the above topic the officers and the staff
responded in the following way as shown in the table 4.16:
Yes (clearly No (not clearly Can’t say
defined) defined)
Number of officers 22 6 7
(62.9%) (17.1%) (20%)
Numbers of staff 24 9 2
(68.6%) (25.7%) (5.7%)
ARE THE ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES CLEARLY DEFINED?
68.60%
62.90%

25.70%
17.10% 20%

5.70%

Yes No Can't say

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.17: Roles and responsibilities related to the jobs of both the officers and
staffs are clearly defined or not.
Interpretation: From the above results it is clear that 62.9% officer and 68.6% staff find
the roles and responsibilities related to their job clearly defined while 17.1% officers and
25.7% staff say that the roles and responsibilities related to their job are not clearly
defined. Again 20% officers and 5.7% staff have no answers regarding the question
asked.

4.2.16. Analysis of whether they (both the officers and staff) enjoy enough authority to do
their job:
When question was asked related to the above topic the officers and the staff
responded in the following way as shown in the table 4.17:
Yes No Can’t say
Number of officers 29 3 3
(82.8%) (8.6%) (8.6%)
Numbers of staff 25 8 2
(71.4%) (22.9%) (5.7%)
DO YOU ENJOY ENOUGH AUTHORITY TO DO YOUR JOB?

82.80%
71.40%

22.90%
8.60% 8.60% 5.70%

Yes No Can't say

% of officers % of staff

Diagram 4.18: Shows whether the respondents enjoy enough authority to do their job.
Interpretation: From the above results it is clear that 82.8% officers and 71.4% staffs
enjoy enough authority to do their job while 8.6% officers and 22.9% staff say that they
do not enjoy enough authority to do their job. Again 8.6% officers and 5.7% staff have no
answers regarding the question asked.

4.2.17. Analysis of whether they (both the officers and staff) find their job interesting or not:
When question was asked related to the above topic the officers and the staff
responded in the following way as shown in the table 4.18:
Yes No Can’t say
Number of officers 22 3 10
(62.9%) (8.6%) (28.6%)
Numbers of staff 25 8 2
(65.7%) (25.7%) (8.6%)

DO YOU FIND YOUR JOB INTERESTING?

62.90%65.70%

28.60%25.70%

8.60% 8.60%

Yes No Can't say


% of officers % of staff
Diagram 4.19: Shows whether both the officers and staff find their job interesting or
not.
Interpretation: From the above results it is clear that 62.9% officers and 65.7% staff
find their job interesting while only 8.6% officers and staff both doesn’t find their job
interesting. Lastly 28.6% officers and 25.7% staff are not sure enough to give comments.

4.2.18. Question number 18 of the questionnaire for comparative analysis of levels of job
satisfaction of officers and staff of NRL cons ists the suggestions given the officers and
staff to improve their levels of satisfaction. So, analysis of this question is skipped and the
suggestions are added in the suggestion part of the project report.

4.3. ANALYSIS FOR TRAINING NEEDS IDENTIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES OF


NUMALIGARH REFINERY LIMITED:

4.3.1. When asked whether training and development programmes enable employees to
develop and rise in an organization, the respondents responded in the following way:
Table 4.3.1
No. of respondents Yes No
No. of officers 30 5
(86%) (18%)
No. of staff 34 1

Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:
In case of Officers

1, 3%

34, 97%

Yes No

Diagram 4.3.1(i) Responses given by officers regarding T&D programmes.


In case of staff

5, 14%

30, 86%

Yes No

Diagram 4.3.1(ii) Responses given by staff regarding T&D programmes.


Interpretation: From the analysis we can interpret that 97% officers and 86% staff
believe that training and development programmes enable employees to develop and rise
in an organization. While 3% officers and 14% staff doesn’t believe so.

4.3.2. Analysis of reasons for which training is needed the most:


For this the following question was to the employees:
For which of the following reasons do you think training is needed the most:
(A) How to perform a job.
(B) How to report (both superiors and subordinates).
(C) How to cooperate with other functional areas or departments
(D) Both (A) & (B)
(E) Both (A) & (C)
(F) Both (B) & (C)
(G) All the above i.e., (A), (B), (C)
Regarding the above question respondents responded in the following way as shown in
the table 4.3.2:
No. of (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g)
respondents
No. of 15 1 8 0 7 0 4
officers
No. of staff 16 4 13 1 0 0 1
Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:

Comments by officers

11%
0%

20% 43%

0%

23% 3%

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g)

Diagram 4.3.2(i) Responses given by officers regarding the need of T&D programmes.

Comments by staff

0% 3%
0%
3%

46%
37%

11%

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g)

Diagram 4.3.2(ii) Responses given by officers regarding the need of T&D programmes.
Interpretation: It is clear from the results that 43% officers and 46% officers believe that
training is needed most to know how to perform a job and 3% officers and 11% staff
believe that training is needed to report (both superiors and subordinates).. Again 23%
officers and 37% staff believe that training is important to cooperate with other functional
areas or departments report .While only 3% officers and 0% staff believe that training is
equally important to perform a job as well as to report (both superiors and subordinates)
and 20% officers and 0% staff believe that training is equally important to perform a job as
well as to cooperate with other functional areas. Lastly 11% officers and 3% staff believe
that training is important for all the above-mentioned options.
4.3.3 Analysis of the most preferred location for training:
For this the employees were asked the following question:
Where do you prefer training the most?
(a) Inside the organization
(b) Out side the organization.
(c) Or both the locations.
Regarding the above question respondents responded in the following way as shown in
the table 4.3.3:
No. of respondents (a) Inside the (b) Outside the (c) Both the
organization organization locations
No. of officers 3 27 5
No. of staff 2 32 1
Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:
Commentsbyofficers

14% 9%

77%

(a) (b) (c)

Diagram 4.3.3(i) Responses given by officers regarding the location for training.

Comments by staff

3% 6%

91%

(a) (b) (c)

Diagram 4.3.3(ii) Responses given by officers regarding the location for training.
Interpretation: Nearly 77% officers and 91% staff prefer training outside the
organization and 9% officers and 6% staff prefer training inside the organization. While
14% officers and 3% staff prefers both the locations.

4.3.4. Analyzing the preference for training:


For this the employees were asked the following question:
When do you prefer training the most?
(a) Every year
(b) Once after promotion.
Regarding the above question respondents responded in the following way as shown in
the table 4.3.4:
No. of respondents (a) Every year (b) Once after promotion.

No. of officers 28 7
No. of staff 31 4

Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:
When do the officers prefer training the most?

20%

80%

(a) Every year (b) Once after promotion

Diagram 4.3.4(i) Responses given by officers regarding their preferences for training.
When do the staff prefer training the most?

11%

89%

(a) Every year (b) Once after promotion

Diagram 4.3.4(ii): Responses given by staff regarding their preferences for training.
Interpretation: From the above results it is found that 80% officers and 89% staff prefer
training every year while only 20% officers and 11% staff prefer training once after
promotion.

4.3.5. Analyzing by whom the employees prefer training:


For this the employees were asked the following question:
By whom do you prefer training the most?
(a) By insiders
(b) By outsiders.
(c) By both.
Regarding the above question respondents responded in the following way as shown in
the table 4.3.5:
No. of respondents (a) By insiders (b) By outsiders (c) By both
No. of officers 3 28 4
No. of staff 4 30 1
Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:
By whom do the officers prefer training most

11% 9%

80%

(a) By insiders (b)By outsiders (c)By both

Diagram 4.3.5(i) Responses given by officers regarding by whom they prefer training.
By whom do the staff prefer training most

3% 11%

86%

(a) By insiders (b)By outsiders (c)By both

Diagram 4.3.5(ii) Responses given by staff regarding their by whom they prefer
training.
Interpretation: Above results confirm that 80% officers and 86% staff prefer training
by outsiders while 9% officers and 11% staff prefers training by outsiders. Again prefer
11% officers and 3% staff prefers training by both insiders and outsiders.

4.3.6. Analyzing the duration most preferred for training:


For this the respondents were asked the following question:
Which of the following periods would you prefer most for training?
(a) Less than 1 week
(b) 1 Week
(c) More than 1 week
Regarding the above question respondents responded in the following way as shown in
the table 4.3.6:
No. of respondents (a) Less than 1 week (b) 1 week (c) More than 1
week
No. of officers 5 26 4
No. of staff 7 13 15
Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:
Duration prefered most for training by officers

11% 14%

75%

(a)Less than 1 week (b)1 week (c)More than 1 week

Diagram 4.3.6(i) Responses given by officers regarding duration of training.


Duration prefered most for training by staff

20%

43%

37%

(a)Less than 1 week (b)1 week (c)More than 1 week

Diagram 4.3.6(ii) Responses given by staff regarding duration of training


Interpretation: From the results it is clear that 14% officers and 20% staff prefer
training with duration less than 1 week while 75% officers and 37% staff prefer training
with duration of 1 week. Again it is seen that 11% officers and 43% staff prefer training
with duration of more than 1 week.
Analysis of training received by the officers and staff of NRL:

4.3.7. Out of 35 officers and 35 staff, numbers of respondents who have received training
so far are shown in the following table 4.3.7:
No. of respondents Yes( received) No( not received)
No. of officers 35 0
No. of staff 28 7
Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:
% of officers receiving training so far

0%

100%

Yes (received) No(not received)

Diagram 4.3.7(i) Percentage of officers receiving training so far.


% of staff recieving training so far

20%

80%

Yes (received) No(not received)

Diagram 4.3.7(ii) Percentage of staff receiving training so far.


Interpretation: From the above analysis it is seen that 100% officers have attended T&D
programmes so far while 80% staff have attended such programmes. Lastly another 20%
staff is yet to receive any training.
4.3.8. (a) Analysis of functional training received so far by officers and staff of NRL:
It is seen from the survey that out of 35 officers receiving training 33 has received
and 2 has not received functional trainings so far. This can be shown in the
following diagram:
% of officers recieving functional training

6%

94%

Recieved Not received

Diagram 4.3.8.(a)(i) Percentage of officers receiving functional training so far.

Similarly for the staff it is found that out of 35 staff, only 28 have received training
so far. And out of these 28, 23 have received functional training while 5 have not
yet received any functional training. This can be shown in the following diagram:
% of Staff recieving functional training

18%

82%

Recieved Not received

Diagram 4.3.8. (a)(ii) Percentage of staff receiving functional training so far.


Interpretation: From the above two diagrams, it is clear that out of the total officers
receiving training 94% has received functional trainings while 6% have not yet received.
Similarly in case of staff also, out of the total staff receiving training, 82% has received
functional training while 18% has not yet received.

4.3.8. (b) Analysis of Developmental training received so far by officers and staff of NRL:
It is seen from the survey that out of 35 officers receiving training 23 has received
and 12 has not received Developmental trainings so far. This can be shown in the
following diagram:
% of officers recieving developmental training

34%

66%

Recieved Not received

Diagram 4.3.8. (b)(i) Percentage of officers receiving Developmental training.


Similarly for the staff it is found that out of 28 staff members receiving training, 15
have received developmental training while 13 have not yet received any
developmental training. This can be shown in the following diagram:
% of staff recieving developmental training

46%
54%

Recieved Not received

Diagram 4.3.8. (b)(ii) Percentage of staff receiving Developmental training.


Interpretation: From the above two diagrams, it is clear that out of the total officers
receiving training 66% have received developmental trainings while 34% have not yet
received. Similarly in case of staff also, out of the total staff receiving training, 54% have
received developmental training while 46% has not yet received.

4.3.8. (c) Analysis of Behavioral training received so far by officers and staff of NRL:
It is seen from the survey that out of 35 officers receiving training 20 has received
and 11 has not received behavioral trainings so far. This can be shown in the
following diagram:
% of officers recieving behavioral training

43%

57%

Recieved Not received

Diagram 4.3.8. (c)(i) Percentage of officers receiving behavioral training.


Similarly for the staff it is found that out of 28 staff members receiving training, 11
have received behavioral trainings so far while 17 have not yet received any
developmental training. This can be shown in the following diagram:
% of staff recieving behavioral training

39%

61%

Recieved Not received

Diagram 4.3.8. (c)(ii) Percentage of staff receiving behavioral training.


Interpretation: From the above two diagrams, it is clear that out of the total officers
receiving training 57% have received behavioral trainings while 43% have not yet
received. Similarly in case of staff also, out of the total staff receiving training, only 39%
have received behavioral training while 61% are yet to receive.

4.3.9. Analysis of fields in which training is most effective:


For this the respondents were asked the following question:
In which of the following fields do you think training programmes are most
effective?
(a) In providing better service
(b) In increasing salary
(c) In future promotion
(d) In accepting more challenging jobs.
Regarding the above question respondents responded in the following way as shown in
the table 4.3.8:
(a) in providing (b) In (c) In future (d) In
better services increasing promotion accepting
salary more
challenging
jobs.

No. of officers 10 1 0 24
No. of staff 16 0 1 18

Thus from the above table we get the following two diagrams:
Fields in which officers think training is most
effective

29%

3%
68% 0%

(a) (b) (c) (d)

Diagram 4.3.9(i).Fields in which the officers think training programmes are most
effective
Fields in which staff think training is most
effective

46%
51%

0%
3%

(a) (b) (c) (d)

Diagram 4.3.9(ii).Fields in which the staff thinks training programmes are most
effective.
Interpretation: From the analysis it is clear that 68% officers and 51% staff think that
training programmes are most effective in accepting more challenging jobs. Again 29%
officers and 46% staff believe that training programmes help in providing better services.
Only 3% officers think that T&D programmes help in increasing salary, and lastly, only
3% staff believe that they are helpful for future promotions.

4.3.10. Question number 10 of the questionnaire for identifying the training needs of the
officers and staff of NRL consist of the suggestions given by the officers and staff
regarding training and developmental programmes they need for further growth and
development as well as job satisfaction. So, analysis of this question is skipped and the
suggestions are added in the suggestion part of the project report.
Chapter5

•Findings
•Recommendations
•Conclusions
5.1 Findings:

5.1.1. Regarding job satisfaction of officers and staff:


(ii) From the survey it is clear that more than 60% staff is satisfied while only
32% officers are satisfied with the pay package provided by the
organization.
(iii) From the survey it is clear that more than 46% officers are satisfied with
the incentives and perquisites provided by the organization while 30% staff
is satisfied with the incentives and perquisites.
(iv)From the survey it is clear that nearly 50% officers are satisfied with the
overall organizational culture while only 34% staff is satisfied with the
organizational culture. It is also seen that 11% staff are fully dissatisfied
with the organizational culture.
(v) It is found from the survey that more than 65% of officers and 60% of staff
are satisfied with the working condition of the organization, information’s
provided to do their job and also with the cooperation and help provided to
do their job.
(vi)From the survey it is found that more than 80% officers and staff are
satisfied with the equipments provided to do their job. Only 3% staff is fully
dissatisfied with the equipments provided.
(vii) From the survey it is clear that neither the officers nor the staff is
satisfied with the promotional and growth opportunities provided by the
organization. More than 34% officers and staff are dissatisfied with the
promotional and growth opportunities. Again more than 43% staff is fully
dissatisfied with the promotional and growth opportunities.
(viii) It is clear from the survey that neither from the officers nor from the
staff is satisfied with the performance appraisal techniques used by the
organization. It is seen that more than 30% staff and 17% officers are
respectively dissatisfied with the performance appraisal techniques.
(ix)It is clear from the survey that more than 50% officers and staff are satisfied
with the benefits like House Building Loans, Medical facilities, two
wheeler/car loans, etc, provided by the organization. It is also seen that still
11% staff are fully dissatisfied with the benefits.
(x) Same is the scenario with facilities provided by the organization for their
family members and children’s like education, medical, Sports,
entertainment, clubs and other such amenities. It is seen that more than 60%
officers and staff are satisfied with the facilities. But still 11% staff is fully
dissatisfied the facilities provided.
(xi) From the survey it seems that nearly 75% officers while 60% staff is satisfied
with the holidays, LTC’s & other such facilities provided by the
organization. Again nearly 11.4 % staff is dissatisfied and lastly
2.9%officers and 6% staff is fully dissatisfied with such facilities provided
by the organization.
(xii) Regarding relationships with superiors 45.7% officers have excellent
relationship with their superiors while only 8.6% staffs have excellent
relationship with their superiors and it is also seen that 49% officers and
only 17% staff rate their relationship with their superiors as very good.
Again 60% staffs have good relationships with their superiors.
(xiii) Again regarding relationships with peers and subordinates nearly 37.1%
officers and only 14.3% staffs have excellent relationship with their peers
and subordinates and it is also seen that 54.3% officers and 29% staff rate
their relationship with their peers and subordinates as very good. While only
8.6% officers have good relationships with their peers and 48.6% staffs have
good relationships.
(xiv) From the survey it is seen that 62.9% officer and 68.6% staff find their
roles and responsibilities related to their job clearly defined while 17.1%
officers and 25.7% staff say that the roles and responsibilities related to their
job are not clearly defined.
(xv) It is clear that 82.8% officers and 71.4% staffs enjoy enough authority
to do their job while 8.6% officers and 22.9% staff say that they do not
enjoy enough authority to do their job.
(xvi) Lastly it is found that 62.9% officers and 65.7% staff consider their job
interesting while only 8.6% officers and staff both doesn’t find their job
interesting.

5.1.2. Regarding training needs identification of officers and staff:


(i) From the survey we find that 97% officers and 86% staff believe that training
and development programmes enable employees to develop and rise in an
organization. While 3% officers and 14% staff doesn’t believe so.
(ii) It is clear from the results that 43% officers and 46% officers believe that
training is needed most to know how to perform a job and 3% officers and
11% staff believe that training is needed to report (both superiors and
subordinates).. Again 23% officers and 37% staff believe that training is
important to cooperate with other functional areas or departments report
.While only 3% officers and 0% staff believe that training is equally important
to perform a job as well as to report (both superiors and subordinates) and
20% officers and 0% staff believe that training is equally important to perform
a job as well as to cooperate with other functional areas. Lastly 11% officers
and 3% staff believe that training is important for all the above-mentioned
options.
(iii) Nearly 77% officers and 91% staff prefer training outside the organization
and 9% officers and 6% staff prefer training inside the organization. While
14% officers and 3% staff prefers both the locations.
(iv) From the survey it is found that 80% officers and 89% staff prefer training
every year while only 20% officers and 11% staff prefer training once after
promotion.
(v) The survey confirms that 80% officers and 86% staff prefer training by
outsiders while 9% officers and 11% staff prefers training by outsiders. Again
prefer 11% officers and 3% staff prefers training by both insiders and
outsiders.
(vi) Again it is clear that 14% officers and 20% staff prefer training with duration
less than 1 week while 75% officers and 37% staff prefer training with
duration of 1 week. Again it is seen that 11% officers and 43% staff prefer
training with duration of more than 1 week.
(vii) From the analysis it is seen that 100% officers have attended T&D
programmes so far while 80% staff have attended such programmes and 20%
staff is yet to receive any training. Apart from this it is clear that out of the
total officers receiving training 94% has received functional trainings while
6% have not yet received. Similarly in case of staff also, out of the total staff
receiving training, 82% has received functional training while 18% has not yet
received. Again it is clear that out of the total officers receiving training 66%
have received developmental trainings while 34% have not yet received.
Similarly in case of staff also, out of the total staff receiving training, 54%
have received developmental training while 46% has not yet received.
Moreover, it is found that out of the total officers receiving training 57% have
received behavioral trainings while 43% have not yet received. Similarly in
case of staff also, out of the total staff receiving training, only 39% have
received behavioral training while 61% are yet to receive.
(viii) Lastly from the survey it is clear that 68% officers and 51% staff think that
training programmes are most effective in accepting more challenging jobs.
Again 29% officers and 46% staff believe that training programmes help in
providing better services. Only 3% officers think that T&D programmes help
in increasing salary, and lastly, only 3% staff believe that they are helpful for
future promotions.

5.2 Suggestions:

5.2.1 Suggestions to improve the levels of Job satisfaction of both the officers
and staff of NRL:
(i) Empowerment can be very useful in improving the levels of job satisfaction of
employees. More than monetary rewards empowerment is the process of enhancing
the feeling of self-efficacy and a sense of ‘owing ‘a job. Employees can be
empowered by using following tips:
a. Delegate responsibility and along with it authority but not to the extreme
extent.
b. Replace the role of managerial “parent” role with that of “partner” role.
c.Superiors should have tolerance for mistakes committed by subordinates to a
larger extent.
d. Empowered employees need information so get full perspective so superiors
should share information with subordinates.
e.Teams should be allowed to form.
(ii) The Performance appraisal techniques should be more improved and the appraise
should be informed about his/her strengths and weaknesses.
(iii) Promotional and growth opportunities of both the officers and staff should be
improved i.e. it should not be on the basis of time but should be on the basis of
performance. And in case a person is not promoted in due course of time an
alternative rewarding system like providing extra increment can be used to motivate
him/her.
(iv) Roles and responsibilities of the employees should be more clearly defined.
(v) Job enrichment can be a major motivator to increase the levels of job satisfaction of
both the officers and staff. Job enrichment involves adding more motivators to a job
to make it more rewarding. A job is said to be enriched when the nature of the job is
exciting challenging and creative, or gives the jobholder more decision-making,
planning and controlling powers.
Some of the ways to enrich a job are:
a. Giving freedom to schedule one’s own work. For e.g., an employee decides when
to tackle which assignment.
b. Employees should be able to get immediate knowledge of the results they
are achieving.
c.Moreover the worker can be given direct communication authority to
communicate directly with the people who use his or her output, such as a quality
control manager handling customer’s complaints about quality.
(vi) Rewards should be given to the employees in recognition to their performance.
(vii) More ergonomics should be used during designing of a job especially for jobs in
the production sites. Ergonomics help reduce accidents, increase productivity as
well as safety of the employees.
(viii) To improve the levels of job satisfaction more R&D work should be done in the
fields of Personnel research.

5.2.2 Suggestions regarding Training needs identification of employees of


NRL:
(i) More training programmes to improve technical knowledge and managerial aspects
should be observed i.e. more developmental training programmes should be organized
periodically.
(i) More external training for the employees should be organized yearly (if
possible).
(ii) More training should be given to develop behavioral competencies like
attitudinal development etc, on regular basis especially for the staff cadres.

5.3.3 Some suggestions given by officers and staff of NRL to improve job
satisfaction:
5.3.3. (i) Suggestions by officers:
(a) “For performance appraisal the appraise should be informed about his/her weaknesses
and strengths. In case if a person is not promoted in due course of time, an alternative
rewarding system say additional increment etc should be there.”
(b) “Roles of every employee should be clearly defined, appreciation and gifts to be
given to employees (individually) in recognition of their performance and strength of
employees to be identified in entrusting a role”.
(c) “Improved performance appraisal and growth opportunities to be given; the
performance to be judged quantitatively and qualitatively w.r.t assigned task”.
(d) “Renovate the organizational guidelines, service conditions and systems with
innovative ideas at par the global change scenario of oil industries.”
(e) “Field of interest of employee to be evaluated carefully along with their capability and
engage in that appropriate field to get maximum output as well as job satisfaction for
the employee”.
5.3.3. (ii) Suggestions by staff:
(a) “The company should initiate promotional and growth opportunities for all employees
so that they can have proper job satisfaction.
(b) “Considering the job criteria, existing position needs to be evaluated in line with other
PSU’s (oil PSU’s) in particular”.
(c) “Need to take some steps for appreciation’.
(d) “Appropriate training to develop the skills and adequate planning for every job or
project.”
(e) “Dignity of work should be valued, honored; creating an environment of faith, respect
and peace”.

5.3.4 Some suggestions given by officers and staff of NRL regarding T&D
programmes for further growth and development as well as job
satisfaction:

5.3.4. (i) Suggestions by officers:


(a) “More training in technical field is required”.
(b) “Training on critical equipments under functional training; training on disciplinary
and attitudinal development.”
(c) “The importance of developmental and behavioral training cannot be underestimated.
The most important part to make training fruitful is the evaluation after training.”
(d) “Trainings on Supply chain management and practices in oil sector worldwide.”
(e) “There should be more thrust for lower level management staff for external training
on functional area. More frequent training on developmental and behavioral area should
be imparted to middle and higher management staff.”
5.3.4. (ii) Suggestions by staff:
(a) “Training programmes should help in building interrelationship and mutual
cooperation.”
(b) “T&D programmes should be organized frequently preferably outside the refinery
by experts so that employees can perform their jobs efficiently and they can accept
more challenging jobs.’
(c) “More laboratory training should be imparted to laboratory analysts.”
(d) “Training should match with the developing technology and should be helpful for
mind satisfaction and developing of personalities.”
(e) “Community development programmes to develop the culture and innovative
training both to pull out the inherent capability and to impose new idea.”

5.4 Conclusion:
To become a leading organization with the most satisfied and productive employees
is a dream of every organization It is not impossible to become No.1 for an
organization like NRL because it has got the best minds and hands as their human
resources. No doubt the organization is providing every possible facility to its
manpower but by completing the survey we can conclude that:
“There is a significant difference among the levels of job satisfaction of officers and
staff of Numaligarh Refinery Limited”.
In some aspects officers are more satisfied in compared to the staff and in some
other aspects vice versa. So the management should take certain steps to make more
productive and satisfied employee.
Moreover we can conclude that “both the officers and staff of Numaligarh Refinery
Limited believe that T&D programmes are needed to accept more challenging jobs”.
So, regarding training and development programmes the officers and staff
should be given regular training in different fields. This will provide competitive
advantage to the organization against other organizations in the same sector.
Bibliography
Bibliography:

1. Aswathapa K, Human Resource and Personnel Management, Tata McGraw-Hill


publishing company, New Delhi, Fourth Edition, 2005.

2. Annual Report of Numaligarh Refinery Limited.

3. Kothari C.R, Research methodology Methods and techniques, New Age


International (P) Limited Publishers, Second Revised Edition-2004.

4. Mamoria C.B, Gankar S.V, Personnel Management, Himalaya Publishing House,


New Delhi-2003.

5. Website of NRL:
\

Annexure
QUESTIONNAIRE
A PROJECT ON
“A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF LEVELS OF JOB
SATISFACTION OF EMPLOYEES OF NUMALIGARH REFINERY
LIMITED AND THEIR TRAINING NEEDS IDENTIFICATION”.
(This is purely for an academic purpose and it will not be submitted
anywhere else. The information will be kept secret.)
Name: ____________________________________________
Age: ___________________
Gender: Male Female
Designation: ___________________________________Year of joining:
___________
Job group: __________________________________________
Annual income:
(a) Below 3 Lacs (b) 3-4 Lacs
(c) 4-5 Lacs (d) 5 Lacs and above.

A. Questions for Job Satisfaction :

# Please fill in the blanks to complete the following statements with the best
alternative given below:
(a) Fully satisfied
(b) Satisfied
(c) Neutral i.e., neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
(d) Dissatisfied
(e) Fully dissatisfied.

1. I am ______________________________with the current pay


package provided by the organization.
2. I am ______________________________with the incentives
and perquisites provided by the organization.
3. I am ______________________________with the overall
organizational culture.
4. I am ______________________________with the working
conditions of the organization in context to my job.
5. I am ______________________________with the information
provided to do my job.
6. I am ______________________________with the
cooperation/help provided to do my job.
7. I am ______________________________with the equipments provided
to do my job.
8. I am ______________________________with the promotional
and growth opportunities provided by the organization.
9. I am ______________________________with the performance
appraisal techniques used in the organization.
10. I am ______________________________with the benefits like
House Building Loans, Medical facilities, two wheeler/Car loans etc provided by
the organization.
11. I am ______________________________with the facilities
provided by the organization for my family members and
children’s like education, medical, Sports, entertainment, clubs
and other such amenities.
12. I am ______________________________with the number of
holidays, LTC’s and other such benefits provided by the
organization.
13. What is your comment on the overall relationship with your
superiors? Is it-
(a) Excellent (b) Very good (c) Good
(d) Fair (e) Poor.
14. What is your comment on the overall relationship with your
peers and subordinates? Is it-
(a) Excellent (b) Very good (c) Good
(d) Fair (e) Poor.
15. Are the roles and responsibilities related to your job clearly defined?
(a) Yes (b) No (c) Can’t say.
16. Do you enjoy enough authority to do your job?
(a) Yes (b) No (c) Can’t say.
17. At last, do you find your job interesting?
(a) Yes (b) No (c) Can’t say
18. Please suggest some innovative ways to improve your level of job
satisfaction:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
________________

B. Questions for training needs identification:

1. Do you think Training and development programmes enables


employees to develop and rise in an organization?
(a) Yes (b) No
2. For which of the following reasons do you think training is needed the
most:
(a) How to perform a job.
(b) How to report (both superiors and subordinates).
(c) How to cooperate with other functional areas or departments.
(d) Both (a) & (b)
(e) Both (a) &(c)
(f) Both (b) &(c)
(g) All (a), (b) & (c).
3. Where do you prefer training the most?
(a) Inside the organization
(b) Out side the organization.
(c) Both
4. When do you prefer training the most?
(a) Every year
(b) Once after promotion.
5. By whom do you prefer training the most?
(a) By insiders
(b) By outsiders.
(c) Both
6. Which of the following periods would you prefer most for training?
(a) Less than 1 week
(b) 1 week
(c) More than 1 week.
7. Have you received training so far?
(a) Yes (b) No
8. If yes, how many Training programmes in various disciplines
have you attended so far?
In no.s
(a) Functional training ______
(b) Developmental training ______
(c) Behavioral training ______
9. In which of the following fields do you think training programmes are
most effective?
(a) In providing better service
(b) In increasing salary
(c) In future promotion
(d) In accepting more challenging jobs.
10. Please give suggestions regarding training and development
programmes you need for further growth and development as
well as job satisfaction.
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