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CHAPTER 3:AERODROME DATA

3.1 Aerodrome information to be provided for a certified aerodrome

3.1.1 Aerodrome chart. An aerodrome chart will contain the following information:
a) layout of runways, taxiways and apron(s);
b) type of the runway surfaces;
c) designations and length of runways;
d) designations of the taxiways, where applicable;
e) location of illuminated and non- illuminated wind direction indicators;
f) location of the aerodrome reference point;
g) location of terminal buildings;
h) location of control tower;
i) location of fire station;
j) location of navigation aids;
k) location of isolation bay; and
l) location of helipads; where provided.
3.1.2 Aerodrome administration. This will include:
a) name, address, telephone and facsimile numbers of the aerodrome operator;
b) aerodrome usage;
c) aerodrome charges.
3.1.3 Aerodrome location. This information will include:
a) name of aerodrome;
b) latitude and longitude, based on the aerodrome reference point;
c) magnetic variation;
d) aerodrome elevation.

3.1.4 Movement area. The following information will be included:


a) aerodrome reference code number;
b) runway bearings- in degrees magnetic and true;
c) runway length and surface type;
d) runway pave ment strength rating/ load bearing strength;
e) runway and runway strip width;
f) runway slopes;
g) runway declared distances;
h) elevation of the mid point of runway threshold, for instrument runways;
i) runway turning area;
j) Taxiway designation, width, surface type;
k) Apron surface type and aircraft stands.
3.1.5 Visual aids (aeronautical marking and lighting system)
3.1.5.1 This information will include:
a) Marking and lighting systems for runways;
b) approach lighting system;
c) visual approach slope indicator system;
d) aerodrome beacon;
e) marking and lighting systems for taxiways; and
f) any other marking and lighting systems.
3.1.6 Navigation aids
3.1.6.1 Details of all navigational aids serving the aerodromes will be provided.
3.1.7 Rescue and fire -fighting services
3.1.7.1 The category of aerodrome-based rescue and fire- fighting services will be
provided.
3.1.8 Ground services
3.1.8.1 This information will include:
a) availability of fuel (ATF);
b) automatic terminal information service where provided;
c) ground to air communication facilities
d) any other services available to pilots.
3.2 Standards for determining aerodrome information
3.2.1 Type of runway surface. The runway surface type is notified as either:
a) flexible runway surface asphalt, gravel, bitumen seal coat;
b) rigid surface cement concrete.
Note: Where only a portion of runway is sealed, this is advised accordingly.
3.2.2 Runway bearing and designation. The bearing of runways is determined in
degrees magnetic/ true. Runways are normally numbered in relation to their magnetic
direction, rounded off to the nearest 10 degrees.
3.2.3 Runway length. The physical length of runway is provided in whole numbers of
meters.
3.2.4 Taxiway designation. A single letter is used without numbers to designate each
main taxiway. Alpha-numeric designators are used for short feeder taxiways/taxilane.
3.2.5 Aerodrome reference point (ARP). The geographic coordinates of the
aerodrome reference point are notified in degrees, minutes and seconds; based on the
World Geodetic System-1984 (WGS-84). The ARP is located at or near the geometrical
centre of the aerodrome.
3.2.6 Aerodrome elevation. Elevation of the highest point of the landing area is
reported as Aerodrome elevation. Aerodrome elevation is reported in meters, to an
accuracy of one- half meter.
3.2.7 Runway reference code number. For each runway, reference code number is
provided as defined in Para 2.1, Chapter 2.
3.2.8 Pavement strength
a) Aircraft less than 5,700 Kg maximum take-off mass
The bearing strength of a pavement, intended for aircraft of 5700 Kg take-off
mass or less, will be made available by reporting the following information:
i) maximum allowable aircraft mass; and
ii) maximum allowable tyre pressure, e.g. 5000 kg/ 0.5 MPa.
b) Aircraft greater than 5,700 Kg maximum take-off mass
Bearing strength of pavements is reported in accordance with the Aircraft
Classification Number/Pavement Classification Number (ACN/PCN) system,
including all of the following information:

i. the pavement classification number (PCN);


ii. pavement type of ACN-PCN determination;
iii. subgrade strength category;
iv. maximum allowable tyre pressure category; and
v. evaluation method.
Note: The PCN reported will indicate that an aircraft with an aircraft classification
number (ACN) equal to or less than the reported PCN can operate on the pavement
subject to any limitation on the tyre pressure, aircraft all- up mass for specified type(s) of
aircraft.
c) Information on pavement type for ACN-PCN determination, sub-grade strength
category, maximum tyre pressure category and evaluation method will be
reported using the following codes:

(i) Pavement type for ACN-PCN determination Code


Rigid pavement R
Flexible pavement F

(ii) Sub-grade strength category


Code
High strength: characterized by a K value of 150 MN/m and A
representing all K values above 120 MN/m for rigid
pavements, and by CBR 15 and representing all CBR values
above13 for flexible pavements.
Medium strength: characterized by a K value of 80 MN/m and B
representing all K values above 60 to 120 MN/m for rigid
pavements, and by CBR 10 and representing all CBR values
above 8 to 13 for flexible pavements.
Low strength: characterized by a K value of 40 MN/m and C
representing all K values above 25 to-60 MN/m for rigid
pavements, and by CBR 6 and representing all CBR values
above 4 to 8 for flexible pavements
Ultra low strength: characterized by a K value of 20 MN/m D
and representing all K values above 25 MN/m for rigid
pavements,and by CBR 3 and representing all CBR values
below 4 for flexibl e pavements

(iii) Maximum allowable tyre pressure category: Code


High: no pressure limit W
Medium: pressure limited to 1.5 MPa X
Low: pressure limited to 1.00 MPa Y
Very low: pressure limited to 0.50 MPa Z

(iv) Evaluation method Code


Technical evaluation: representing a specific study of the T
pavement characteristics and application of pavement
behaviour technology.
Using aircraft Experience: representing knowledge of the U
specific type and mass of aircraft satisfactorily being under
regular use.

(v) Examples of pavement strength reporting

Example 1: If the bearing strength of a rigid pavement,


built on a medium strength subgrade, has been assessed
by technical evaluation to be PCN 80 and there is no tyre
pressure limitation, then the reported information would
be:
PCN
80/R/B/W/T

Example 2: If the bearing strength of a composite


pavement behaving like a flexible pavement and resting on
a high strength subgrade, has been assessed by using
aircraft experience to be PCN 50 and the maximum tyre
pressure allowable is 1.00 MPa, then the reported
information would be:

PCN50/F/A/Y/U
Example 3: If the bearing strength of a flexible pavement
resting on a medium strength subgrade, has been
assessed by technical evaluation to be PCN 40 and the
maximum tyre pressure allowable is 0.80 MPa, then the
reported information would be:

PCN40/F/B/0.80 MPa/T

Example 4: If a pavement is subject to B 747-400 all-up


mass limitation 390,000 Kg then the reported information
would include the following note:
Note: The reported PCN is subject to a B 747-400 all-up mass
limitation of 390,000 Kg.

3.2.9 Runway width


3.2.9.1 The physical width of the each runway is determined and provided in
whole numbers of meters.
3.2.10 Runway strip
3.2.10.1 The dimension of runway strip is reported in whole numbers of meters.
3.2.11 Runway slope
3.2.11.1 Runway Slope is expressed as a percentage, to the nearest one tenth of a
percent, indicating the direction of descent. Where there are significant multiple slope
changes along the runway, slopes over individual segments will be provided over the
length of the runway.
3.2.12 Declared distances
a) Declared distances are the available operational distances notified
to a pilot for take-off, landing or safely aborting a take-off. These
distances are used to determine whether the runway is adequate for the
proposed landing or take-off or to determine the maximum payload
permissible for a landing or take-off.
b) The following distances are reported in meters for each runway
direction:
i. take off run available (TORA);
ii. take off distance available (TODA);
iii. accelerate-stop distance available (ASDA);
iv. landing distance available (LDA);
c) Calculation of declared distances. The declared distances are
calculated in accordance with the following:
i. Take-off run available (TORA) is the length of runway
available for the ground run of an aeroplane taking off. This is
normally the full length of the runway, and neither the SWY nor
CWY are involved.
TORA = Length of RWY

ii. Take-off distance available (TODA) is the distance


available to an aeroplane for completion of its ground run, lift-off
and initial climb to 35 ft. This will normally be the full length of
the runway plus the length of any CWY. TODA = TORA +
CWY
iii. Accelerate-stop distance available (ASDA) is the length
of the take-off run available plus the length of any SWY. Any
CWY is not involved.
ASDA = TORA + SWY
iv. Landing distance available (LDA) is the length of runway
available for the ground run of a land ing aeroplane. The LDA
commences at the runway threshold. Neither SWY nor CWY are
involved.
LDA = Length of RWY (if threshold is not displaced).
3.2.13 Survey of take-off area
3.2.13.1 The obstacle data is determined and notified based on the survey of the
full take-off area in accordance with the applicable take-off Obstacle Limitation Surface
(OLS).
3.2.14 Intersection departure take-off distances available
3.2.14.1 At an aerodrome where air traffic procedures include regular taxiway
intersection departures, the take-off distances available from each relevant taxiway
intersection is determined and declared. The method of determining the take-off
distances available at an intersection is similar to that used at a runway end. This is to
ensure that the same performance parameters (for
example, line-up allowance) may be consistently applied for the line-up manoeuver,
whether entering the runway at the runway end or from some other intersection.
Declared distances for an intersection will be measured from a perpendicular line
commencing at the taxiway edge that is farther from the direction of take-off. Where
take-offs may be conducted in either direction, the starting point of the declared distances
for each direction will
be the perpendicular line commencing from the respective edges of the taxiway farther
from the direction of take-off.
3.2.15 Threshold elevation
3.2.15.1 The elevation of the mid point of each runway threshold is measured in
meters (to the accuracy of one- half meter) and feet (to an accuracy of one foot).

3.2.16 Aerodrome Obstruction Charts Type A


3.2.16.1 Information on the currency of Type A chart in the form of date of
preparation or edition / issue number will be provided.
3.2.17 One direction runways
3.2.17.1 Where a runway direction cannot be used for take-off or landing, or both,
the appropriate declared distance(s) are shown as nil along with an appropriate note, for
example, TKOF 14 and LAND 32 not AVBL due surrounding terrain.
3.2.18 Navigation aids
3.2.18.1 The location coordinates and operating frequency of navigational aids
provided at an aerodrome are notified in degrees, minutes and tenths of a minute, based
on the World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS-84).
3.2.19 Obstacle Data
3.2.19.1 Regulations fo r obstacle identification, restriction and limitation are
detailed in a Government of India notification SO 988, as amended from time to time.
Standards for obstacle identification, restriction and limitation are detailed in Chapter 5
of this manual.
3.2.20 Pre-flight altimeter check location
3.2.20.1 A pre- flight altimeter check point location will be established on each
apron of an aerodrome.
3.2.20.2 The elevation of pre- flight altimeter check point will be given as the
average elevation, rounded to the nearest meter and/or foot, of the apron which will be
within 3 m (10ft) of the average elevation for that location.
3.2.21 Aeronautical data

3.2.21.1 Aerodrome related aeronautical data is reported in accordance with the


accuracy requirements as defined in the Tables 3-1 through 3-5 below. Positional data is
determined through survey (e.g. runway threshold), and mathematical calculations of
points in space (e.g. control area boundaries) and fixes from the known surveyed points.

Table 3-1: Latitude and longitude


Latitude and longitude Accuracy Data type &
classification
Aerodrome reference point 30 m, surveyed, routine

NAVAIDS located at the aerodrome 3 m, surveyed, essential

Obstacles at the aerodrome 3 m, surveyed, essential

Obstacle in the circling area 30 m, surveyed

Significant obstacles in the approach and take-off area-


- within aerodrome; 3 m, surveyed, essent ial
- up to 3 km; 10 m, surveyed
- beyond 3 km, up to 10 km; 30 m, surveyed
- beyond 10 km, up to 15 km 50 m, surveyed
Runway threshold and runway end 1 m, surveyed, critical

Aircraft stand-points 3 m, surveyed, routine

Table 3-2: Elevation/Altitude/Height


Aerodrome Elevation 0.5 m/ 1 ft, surveyed, essential

Runway threshold, non-precision approaches 0.5 m/ 1 ft, surveyed, essential

Runway threshold, precision approaches 0.25 m/ 1 ft, surveyed, critical

Obstacles in the approach and take-off areas 1 m/ 1 ft, surveyed, essential

Obstacles in the circling areas and at the aerodrome 1 m/ 1 ft, surveyed, essential

DME 3 m/ 10 ft, surveyed, essential

Table 3-3: Magnetic variation


Aerodrome magnetic variation 1 degree, surveyed, essential

Table 3-4: Bearing


Runway bearing 1/10 degree, surveyed, routine

Table 3-5: Length/Distance/Dimension


Runway length 1 m, surveyed, critical

Stopway length 1 m, surveyed, critical

Landing distance available 1 m, surveyed, critical

ILS markers-threshold distance-


- middle marker; 10 m, surveyed
- outer marker; 30 m, surveyed

ILS DME antenna-threshold, distance along centre line 3 m, calculated, essential


Note: All data within the airport boundary and in the vicinity is with reference to the
Aerodrome Reference Point (ARP).

Geographical coordinates indicating latitude and longitude are determined and reported to
the aeronautical information services units in terms of the World Geodetic System- 1984
(WGS-84) geodetic reference datum, identifying those geographical coordinates which
have been transformed into WGS-84 coordinates by mathematical means.

The order of accuracy of the field work would ensure that the resulting operational
navigation data is within the accuracy limits as indicated in tables 3-1 through 3-5 above.

Elevation, referenced to mean sea level, of the surveyed ground positions at aerodromes
will be determined and reported to the aeronautical information services units.