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Visual Literacy Experiences Grant Proposal

Ginger ONeal

University of West Georgia

Author Note

Ginger B. ONeal, Graduate Student, University of West Georgia

Abstract
In todays ever changing world our students are becoming more and more exposed to visual

images and graphics. Why not use this tool to our advantage as educators? Visual literacy may

be a new buzz term to some, but in reality it has been around for decades. Over a course of 5

days a group of teachers will be informed of visual literacy experiences, and the best ways to

enhance instruction. Over the course of the year teachers will implement those practices and not

any and all outcomes due to the implementation of various visual literacy practices. There will

be a couple follow up meetings to discuss and share all outcomes, positive or negative. The goal

of the professional development course is to create confident teachers willing to use visual

literacy practices on a consistent basis so that students will benefit from the exposure and

enhancement of the literacy competencies. Teachers will first implement a practice in one unit,

then a couple units, maybe even a couple of days during through the week. If we cant teach

them, we need to join them. Join them in the trenches where they struggle and pull them out

using innovative and proven practices.

Introduction
In todays ever changing world our students are becoming more and more exposed to visual

images and graphics. Why not use this tool to our advantage as educators? Visual literacy may

be a new buzz term to some, but in reality it has been around for decades. Over a course of 5

days a group of teachers will be informed of visual literacy experiences, and the best ways to

enhance instruction. Over the course of the year teachers will implement those practices and not

any and all outcomes due to the implementation of various visual literacy practices. There will

be a couple follow up meetings to discuss and share all outcomes, positive or negative. The goal

of the professional development course is to create confident teachers willing to use visual

literacy practices on a consistent basis so that students will benefit from the exposure and

enhancement of the literacy competencies. Teachers will first implement a practice in one unit,

then a couple units, maybe even a couple of days during through the week. If we cant teach

them, we need to join them. Join them in the trenches where they struggle and pull them out

using innovative and proven practices.

Demonstrated Need
It was just like any night before, Drew sat down to do his homework and within the first

few minutes felt the overwhelming emotions of frustration, hopelessness, and despair. Even

though Drew was in the third grade he wasnt even on a first grade reading level. He struggled

with sight words that he had seen over, and over, and over. Books he knew he should be able to

read, he couldnt.

No matter the hours of tutoring, the countless nights of homework, and the tears he shed,

he just could not read. And then he walked into Mrs. Sidwells reading class, and it all changed.

Mrs. Sidwell taught different than his other teachers. She taught conventional skills in

unconventional ways. To teach Social Studies she would introduce content with comics, there

were lots of images to help make connections that Drew was unable to make before. It wasnt

long before Drews confidence soared and he had a new found drive in mastering the skill that

had frustrated him for so long. Mrs. Sidwell and the use of visuals helped a struggling reader

overcome a hurdle that he thought he would never be able to overcome.

Demonstrated Need - Supporting data

Reading strategies have been around since the beginning of time, and this strategy is

nothing different. It is a way to reach students by addressing their strengths or areas of interest.

Teachers use visual approaches to grab the learners attention, but also bridge a gap of something

missing in their schematic approach. Several studies have been done to support the use of visual

literacy experiences and their impact on student achievement.

In the graph below you will see the results of the third grade students at Morgan County

Elementary School when taking the 2016 Georgia Milestones. The results are not completely
disheartening, they are not enlightening either. As a mother and educator, I would love to see the

percentages for the elementary school, the county and the state of Georgia all be extremely

higher. As you can tell from the table below, the results improved from 2015 to 2016. However,

only 62.8% of students reading on or above grade level is terribly scary. Our students deserve

better from us a educators and as parents.

(Retrieved: file:////Downloads/Morgan-County-Elementary-School-Morgan-County-en-

report.pdf)

When surveying teachers third grade teachers at Morgan County Elementary

about what they would like as their next in-service topic or area of focus teachers were all

excited about a new way of reaching their students that was sure to increase engagement.

Teachers and graphic organizers have long paved the way, however using the graphic organizer

along with images and text, the lesson just went to a whole new level. Of all 12 third grade

teachers that were questioned, it was a unanimous decision to take what they know and increase

engagement. The quality of the lesson is more important than the quantity of topics or standards

that are addressed. The staff is ready to take the best practices they are already using and add to

them to enhance learning.


Table 1. In table 1 you will see what several teachers thought about visual literacy and the

implementation of its practices into our curriculum.

Incoming Incoming 3rd Grade 3rd Grade 3rd Grade SPED


Principal Academic Coach Reading/ELA Math/Science Collab Teacher
Teacher Teacher

I had several My focus is I would be Charts and My kids NEED


teachers mindfulness, the lying if I said graphs are a as many visuals
implement focus of being teaching vital part of to support their
visuals with mindful of what reading is fun both of my learning as
various different students are doing and exciting. I primary content possible. The
content areas. It with their bodies, would love a areas. different
seemed to work breathing, and visually Teaching mediums allow
well and I am in focus. I feel that engaging students to use for them to see
full support of incorporating strategy to give these visuals to the same
learning more mindfulness and new life to our enhance their information in
about the visual literacy with reading comprehension various ways to
practices of our most troubled curriculum. of a topic is of allow for
visual literacy. students will show the utmost complete
great gains. importance. understanding.

Demonstrated Need - Literature Synthesis

Nancy Frey, a woman on the cutting edge of visual literacy, puts it best when she says

Adolescence has often been described as a journey of self-discovery, a time when adolescents

measure the width and breadth of the world and figure out where they fit in that world. Literacy

narratives are a step on the journey of self-discovery. (Frey, 2006, pg. 14) All of our students

are learning at their own pace, in their own way. Allowing them to write literacy narratives,

comics, or incorporating more visuals to enhance the learning environment are just simple ways

to strive to meet the needs of our students.

In the resources section at the end of this proposal there is a list of 10-15 resources that

were used to gather ideas, information, and supportive data to show the need and practices of

visual literacy. Without these various peer reviewed articles, texts, and sites I would not have
enough knowledge to be able to plan and implement a complete professional development

course. The studies that have previously been done in primary grades, elementary, middle and

high, as well as a variety of educational settings provide a well-rounded view of what practices

work best for different ages, content areas, and learning abilities. These studies helped me to

form a solid set of goals and objectives on which to build the curriculum of the visual literacy

course around.

Goals and Objectives Overview

To have a solid professional development plan you must have a solid set of goals and

objectives to build your curriculum around. In the sections to follow you will see the driving

goals and objectives for the visual literacy experiences professional development curriculum.

The goals and objectives were created with teacher performance as well as student success in

mind.

Goals

For the professional development course there are two goals. One goal is focused on

increasing knowledge, and the other goal is focused on increasing technology integration. The

first goal is as follows:

Increase in Knowledge

The goal is to increase the amount of 3rd grade teachers at Morgan County Elementary

School that are using visual literacy experiences given their specific content area atleast

two to three times a week.

The second goal is listed below:

Increase in Technology Integration


The goal is to increase the tools that teachers use to gather material to enhance resources

by 3-4 more resources per unit.

These goals were written with the end result in mind. They are SMART goals meaning

that they are specific, measurable, attainable, and most important relevant to the topic and

subject at hand. Once the goals were created then objectives were written to give a guideline as

to how the goals would be met. Those objectives are in the section below.

Objectives

To achieve the goal of increasing the number of teachers using visual literacy practices

several objectives were created to make sure our goal was met. Those objectives start with the

learning of the meaning and components of visual literacy all the way to how to develop or find

their own visual literacy tools to enhance instruction. The objectives for the goal of increasing

knowledge are as follows:

Objectives:

1. Teachers will learn components of visual literacy experiences.

2. Teachers will learn various visual literacy approaches to teaching a lesson. (I.e.

Think-Aloud, 4Ws, Five Card Flickr, Image Analysis, etc.)

3. Teachers will learn higher order thinking questions to develop the instructional

complexity of the lesson. (I.e. What do you see going on in this picture? What makes

you say that? What more can we find?)\

4. Teachers will learn how to develop visual literacy experiences for specific content

areas: Reading/ELA, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Writing.


The next set of objectives is the increase technology integration, by having the teachers increase

the number of resources they use with each unit. The objectives below show how the staff at

Morgan County Elementary will go about doing so. Teachers will be shown various practices

that go along with the experiences of visual literacy and then they will be shown various

resources to find more visuals to coincide with their topics of instruction. The objectives for

increasing technology integration are as follows:

Objectives:

1. Teachers will learn various internet resources to pull Copyright images to support
content. (I.e. www.commonsense.org)

2. Teachers will learn use Flickr to create sets of 5-6 photographs to use for Five
Card Flickr for a Social studies content areas.

3. Teachers will learn to use Google Classroom to allow for electronic dispersing of
assignments, as well as electronic retrieval and assessing of student work.

4. Teachers will learn how to create a Content and Grade Level specific Google
Drive to compile resources.

How are we going to have teachers achieve these goals and meet these objectives? With these

goals and objectives in mind the planning began.

Plan of Operations Overview

The visual literacy professional development curriculum is one that it exciting to plan!!

Below are the goals for the professional development curriculum that is to be conducted with a

group of 3rd grade elementary students.

Increase in Knowledge
The goal is to increase the amount of 3rd grade teachers at Morgan County Elementary School

that are using visual literacy experiences given their specific content area atleast two to three

times a week.

Increase in Technology Integration

The goal is to increase the tools that teachers use to gather material to enhance resources by 3-4

more resources per unit.

Plan of Operations - Schedule

The course has been planned for a week during the summer to maximize time and focus

of the educators involved. The order of events is listed below to enhance the learning and drive

the focus for the weeks instruction. The plan is to educate, excited, enlighten teachers during

the week to make this practice a vital part of their instruction as much as possible.

For the week of the training we will follow the the plan below:

1. Greeting/Ice Breaker

2. Introduction/Review of Various types of Literacy (explain our focus will be that of

Visual Literacy)

Visual literacy is the ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from information

presented in the form of an image, extending the meaning of literacy, which commonly

signifies

interpretation of a written or printed text. (Apkon, 2015)

3. We will now perform a data dig for the MAP assessment results for last years students,

this

years students, and even the students entering third grade th 2017/2018 school year.

(Results
will be gathered from the Assistant Superintendent of curriculum and Instruction, Chip

Meyers.) We will use our findings of the data to lead into how visual literacy in a variety

of ways, in a variety of content areas, using a variety of platforms.

4. Once we discuss the meaning of visual literacy teachers will be shown a variety of

examples of

ways to use visually literate practices in their content area, no matter the unit or concept.

(These

various suggestions will be shared via Google Classroom so that students (the 3rd grade

teachers) have access to them throughout the year.

*Five Card Flickr

*Visual Note-taking (using apps such as iPad Pro w/ Apple Pencil, AdobeDraw,

Microsoft Surface Studio, etc.)

*Writing based on a posted/shared Image

*Cooking with Image and minimal text

*Video Game Coding

*Creating Book Trailers

*Comic Creation

*Interpreting Maps, Charts, and Diagrams throughout various texts

*Visual Literacy Placemat

5. After being briefly introduced to the concept of visual literacy the Reading/ELA

teachers will

group together, the Math/Science teachers will group together and brainstorm ways that

the different approaches can be implemented into the previously created units. Teachers
can go through each unit and plug in visually literate experiences based on the ones they

have seen or been trained upon or search for more based on the ones or styles that they

feel will be most beneficial to their students!!

6. Once teachers have had a chance to familiarize with the material and search for their

own

resources we will reconvene and share what their likes/dislikes were. We will share our

take-aways and how we are going to implement visual literacy experiences as soon as the

first week of school

Plan of Operations - Timeline

The timeline for the course would be to have the week long session during June just after

school has dismissed for the 2017-2018 school year. Preferably that very first week so that

teachers are still focused on what lessons and standards have been taught throughout the year.

We will meet in September to discuss how the teachers have implemented one of the visual

literacy practices as well as answer any questions. Not only will we meet face to face twice over

the course of the year, September and January, I will be sending bi-weekly emails with tips and

factoids to let teachers know that they are supported and encouraged!!

Evaluation Plan Overview

To evaluate how the professional development in-service went we will send out a Google

Form on the final day of the program. We are will do this for two reasons: to ensure completion,

but more importantly to make sure that when filling out the form the information is fresh on their

minds. The success of implementation is directly related to the teachers' confidence in the

content and process of implementation. If the results of the survey are negative or show that the
faculty needs more support or examples we will make a plan to address those issues. We will

also film the presentation in its entirety so that teachers can refer back to at any particular time.

https://docs.google.com/a/morgan.k12.ga.us/forms/d/1VtiOVkUWfxag5Uw0wPfAPfToAT1DM

JEsucvd44Nvb54/edit?usp=forms_home&ths=true

The 3rd grade teachers will also fill out a quarterly survey to share their findings of how visual

literacy helped increase student's reading ability and scores for MAP testing.

Evaluation Plan - External Evaluator

The external evaluator role will be conducted by Mrs. Jean Triplett, the Assistant

Superintendent and Director of Curriculum and Instruction for Morgan County. She will be

responsible for the following:

1. Conduct observations and consultations before, during, and after course completion.

2. Distribute/correlate results from the Google Forms Survey completed daily and at the end

of the week of the course.

3. Review, share, and make suggestions as to what modifications could be made for

subsequent course deliveries.

4. Provide assistance where needed.

5. Attending any planning meetings and evaluation meetings.

6. Communicate and meet regularly with the Project Director throughout the course and

evaluation process.

Mrs. Triplett was chosen as the external evaluator due to her overwhelming

qualifications. She is knowledgeable about the demographics, abilities, and make-up of both
students and faculty. She is also familiar with a variety of instructional practices, and the

benefits of a well run professional development program.

Evaluation Plan - Data and Collection Strategies

In Table 2 below you will see the means for collecting data throughout the course of the

session. Mrs. Triplett will be gathering the data and then presenting the results in a format that is

feasible and easily understood. The focus will be to meet the objectives, and gather the data to

show that the goals and objectives have been met.

Table 2

Evaluation Criteria Data Collection Data Collection Times

Knowledge of Visual *Workshop Effectiveness *Daily


Literacy Practices Survey
*MAP Test *August, December, May
*Narrative of Use and *Last day of course, final
Implementation follow-up meeting

Increase of Technology *Workshop Effectiveness *Daily


Practice with a focus on Survey
Visual Literacy Practices *MAP Test *August, December, May
*Narrative of Use and *Last day of course, final
Implementation follow-up meeting

Collaboration with Peers to *Workshop Effectiveness *Daily


create Survey
*MAP Test *August, December, May
*Narrative of Use and *Last day of course, final
Implementation follow-up meeting

Using all of the data collected throughout the course will help to drive instruction and

implementation of further practices. If the results are what we hope them to be then we plan to

open the course to new teachers and highly encourage the attendance of any staff that does not

attend the initial teachings of visual literacy. It is the hope of the curriculum development team
to use the course as a launch pad for courses to come. It is our goal to assess the process and the

results of the outcome to make sure our instructional practices are what is best for our students.

Evaluation Plan - Process vs. Outcome

The focus should be on the process more so than the outcome. While we want optimum

outcome it is imperative that we dont discount the process in which it takes to get there. The art

of learning to walk is a process in which the end result is a rewarding practice in which we use to

get from one place to another. However, the process of learning how to walk takes diligent

practice with many trips, slips, and falls along the way. This is also true in the art of learning to

read. The same diligence is needed to master the art of reading and that journey is different for

everyone. No matter the length or struggle throughout the journey the focus should be placed on

the process and determination, rather than just the end result. There is growth in the struggle,

and growth is what we need. According to a Bolton-Gary (2012), Comics can be used to

establish a positive affective context and interest in the theories of teaching and learning, and

encourage students to continue to reflect and think critically on the best practices for learning

and engagement. (p.394).

It is so much better as both an educator and a student to give something your all, and fail

but learn rather than to not give it your all and fall short of doing either. In an article written by

Shivers and Levenson, very interesting results were found when using the practices of visual

literacy to enhance the practice of argumentative and persuasive writing. According to Shivers

(2017), through the assignments, we found that the practice of visual literacy lends itself to the

development of skills related to argument by requiring students to gather details for

interpretation and explanation and present them in a persuasive and compelling way. Works of

art are a good place to start because they are complex representations meant to stimulate
perception and idea production. (pg. 82). What a fun way to allow for creativity, expression,

and individuality!!! The fact that this article is so recently published gives even more support

and fidelity in incorporating this practice into our daily lessons in primary grades all the way up

to secondary institutions.

As an educator it is hard not to get bogged down in the data and outcome rather than the

journey through each lesson. However, we must take time to bask in the growth and learning in

the minute details of the process. That is where the growth comes and that is where we need to

focus. Ultimately our students are more than a test score and more than a number. If we only

focus on a number we miss the valuable relationship between educator and student as well as the

relationship between journey and growth.

Partnerships

Education is not an independent process whatsoever. Even online courses require

support and collaboration due to the requirements of each and every class. Individualized

instruction, albeit self-paced, still requires a need of help and support to optimize learning and

full potential. This professional development course is no different. Below are the partners and

support system that, once funded, will allow us to make sure this course is conducted to the best

of our ability.

Partners

Our Partners in Education are so supportive in our efforts to do what is best for our

students. At the county level I would work directly with Nancy Willis our grant writer to help

make ensure we use all resources possible, the Instructional Technology Department, school

administration, and our academic coach Jennifer Evans. In the community we will enlist the

help of a long-standing printing company to help print images, maps, charts, diagrams for our
teachers at a discounted rate!! (So exciting!) The session will be conducted at Morgan County

Elementary School so there is no need to worry about facility usage, however I must make sure

to meet with administration to make sure we are scheduled at a time where things are not

overlapping. We will work with community business like NuART to print posters needed for

instruction, or we could support our local middle school by using their poster maker. We will

also work with Ingles, Padgett and Whetzel, and Paschals Orthodontics to help pay for food and

snacks during the week of the course.

Without these partnerships our professional development course would not be able to

survive or meet its full potential. It is with the support of our school system and community that

we are able to meet the needs of the program. For their support the design staff and I are very

thankful.

Partnerships - Participant Recruitment

Our program is only as good as its members. We will not be able to entice teachers to

want to come to our program if we do not show that it is worth their while. Below you will see

how we plan to make teachers want to come to our program and value the ideas behind the

programs implementation.

As the program coordinator, I plan to energetically recruit members of the 3rd grade team

as well as the other members of the staff at Morgan County Elementary. We will share the fact

that each participant will receive a $500 stipend for attending the program, because we all know,

money talks. We will also be providing lunch for all attendees, which is the second way to a

person's heart. Door prizes that we hope to have donated by our community supporters will act

as a pleasant and unexpected surprise for our devoted family of educators. Finally we will share

several research supported finding that show that visual literacy enhances the learning of all
students, both young and old. All of these strategies, coupled by the high recommendation of

building level administrators I feel confident we will have a packed house!!

Ultimately our goal is to increase knowledge, excitement, and the implementation of

visual literacy practices. We need as many educators as possible to buy into the topic in order

for our professional development session to be beneficial and effective. The possibility that this

professional development course may even occur is excitement enough for me!!

Conclusion

Morgan County is an incredible school system in which to work. The staff is a family of

devoted educators that serve as coaches, mentors, and support systems to a variety of students

who come from all walks of life. This group of educators go above and beyond to provide the

best instruction to each and every one of their students. This course is no different.

This course is designed with one idea in mind, and that is to increase the level of

knowledge, usage, and support of visual literacy experiences. The course will show the meaning

of visual literacy experiences, a variety of useful and engaging practices, as well as develop a list

or group of resources to pull from in order to support instruction for the duration of the year.

According to Goddard (2007), Educators must be committed to engaging collaboratively to

ensure increased performance. (pg. 881) The goal is that by teaching the educators the

meaning and practices of visual literacy, that they will then collaborate to make resources for

various content areas that best support their grade levels and topics of instruction.

Writing this grant has given me a new perspective into the world and operations of the

educational system. It is my goal that as a media specialist at the middle grades level in the

coming fall that I can strengthen my grant writing skills and begin to fund many professional
development sessions that will support engagement, instruction, and the best practices for our

students.

Appendix A

Budget Summary

Description Cost Total Expenses

Personnel Project Director $5,000.00

Assistant Director $3,000.00

Workshop Facilitator $2,400.00

External Evaluator $3,500.00 $13,900.00

Fringe Health Care, Retirement, $2,780.00


etc.

Participant Cost Stipend for 20 participants $10,000.00 $10,000.00

Support Personnel N/A

Travel GaETC Registration $1,000.00


(*Early bird)

Lodging N/A

Food $100

Mileage $72.08 $1,172.08


(136 miles x $0.53 x 5
attendants)

Additional Cost Box Lunch $1,125


(25 Lunches x 5 days x $9)

Snacks for Follow Up $100


Days ($50/day)
Whose Teeth are These? $235.15
By Wayne Lynch
($8.79 x 25 participants)

Dont Let the Pigeon Drive $269.37


the Bus by Mo Willems
($10.07 x 25 participants)

Teaching Visual Literacy: $702.45 $2,431.97


Using Comic Books,
Graphic Novels, Anime,
Cartoons, and More to
Develop Comprehension
and Thinking Skills by
Douglas Fisher and Nancy
Frey
($26.26. x 25 participants)

Indirect Costs $1,342.72

Grand Total $31,626.77


Appendix B

Budget Narrative

The budget for the Visual Literacy Experiences Professional Development course is

shown above. The estimated grand total for the course is $31,626.77. The cost for personnel for

the week long course as well as the follow-up sessions is $13,900.00 of the total cost. Fringe

benefits, health care and retirement, are $2,780. The healthy stipend of $500 per participant is

$10,000 of the estimated total. Travel and any additional costs such as lunches, snacks, books is

projected to be about $3,604.05. There are no packets or binders necessary. All documents and

materials will be shared through Google Classroom so teachers have electronic reference to them

throughout the year.

Appendix C
Capacity (Project Team and Facilities)

A program is only as good as the members used to facilitate said program. Below you

will see a list of stellar educators that have collaborated to write a jam-up professional

development course to support instruction and better the educators that will be participating.

They have worked hard to develop a solid curriculum built on solid practices with engaging

lessons to meet the needs of the teachers and students involved.

Team Members

The individuals below be an active and integral part of the Visual Literacy Experiences

Professional Development:

Jean Triplett - External Evaluator

Tiffany Markley - Technology Specialist

Lara Still - Building Level Administration

Kay McLeod - Building Level Administrator/Intervention Specialist (Recently added)

Jennifer Evans - Building Level Academic Specialist

Ginger O'Neal - Visual Literacy Experiences Program Coordinator

Rico Cooper - Facilities Specialist (Recently Added)

Job Description Chart

Team Member Job Description

Jean Triplett, External Evaluator *Evaluate Course curriculum


*Evaluate Course during
*Evaluate Course at completion
Tiffany Markley, Technology Specialist *Provide Devices if Needed
*Infrastructure up and running properly
*Prepare Presentation cart/projector/screen

Lara Still, Building Level Administration *Key Recruitment Officer


*Attendant

Kay McLeod, Building Level *Recruitment Officer


Administrator/Intervention Specialist *Attendant
*Create/assign Interventions for various
tier levels

Jennifer Evans Building Level Academic *Recruitment Officer


Specialist *Attendant
*Help in creating/assigning Interventions
for various tier levels
*Co-presenter

Ginger ONeal Visual Literacy *Presenter/Specialist


Experiences Specialist

Rico Cooper Facilities Specialist *Opening/Closing Building


*Table/Chair Set-up
*Table Chair Break-down
Data Collection

Data collection is imperative in the implementation of the course. The data collected will

be gathered and used to drive instruction throughout the duration of the course as well as

subsequent sessions of the course. The types of data to be collected are explained below.

After each day of instruction the teachers will complete the survey to give their feelings

and opinions about the days instruction. The program developer and instructor will use the

results to drive instruction and enhance instruction for the next day. The link is below.

https://docs.google.com/a/morgan.k12.ga.us/forms/d/1VtiOVkUWfxag5Uw0wPfAPfToAT1DM

JEsucvd44Nvb54/edit

Several teachers at random would be selected to be interviewed each day. The results of

these interviews would be used in conjunction with the results of the Google Form completed by

all attendants. The teachers will also be interviewed using questions like:

1. Using one word, describe the practice of visual literacy.

2. Do you see yourself using the practice of visual literacy in your teaching?

3. How comfortable are you with using the practices you have learned?

4. If you could change something about the course, what would it be?

5. What is your favorite thing about this course?


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