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Private School Inspection Report The Iranian School Academic Year 2016 – 2017 Page 1 of 22
Private School Inspection Report The Iranian School Academic Year 2016 – 2017 Page 1 of 22

Private School Inspection Report

The Iranian School

Academic Year 2016 2017

Page 1 of 22

The Iranian School

Inspection Date

February 12, 2016

to

February 15, 2016

Date of previous inspection

February 16, 2015

to

February 19, 2015

General Information

   

Students

 

School ID

58

Total number of students

 

310

Opening year of

 

%of students per

Main Curriculum

 

100%

school

1971

curriculum

Other Curriculum

 

0

     

KG

18

Principal

Nasser Hossin Zadeth

Number of students

Primary:

172

in other phases

Middle:

67

   

High:

53

School telephone

+971 (0) 2 6422183

Age range

4

to 18 years

 

School Address

Airport Road, Abu Dhabi

Grades or Year Groups

KG - Grade 12

 

Official email (ADEC)

Gender

Boys and Girls

 

School website

% of Emirati Students

0%

Fee ranges (per

 

Largest nationality

groups (%)

1.

Iranian 81%

 

Very Low category: AED

2.

Pakistani 15%

 

annum)

2,500 t0 AED 3,800

3.

Afghani 4%

 

Licensed Curriculum

 

Staff

 

Main Curriculum

Iranian

Number of teachers

17

Other Curriculum

 

Number of teaching

 

(if applicable)

assistants (TAs)

4

External Exams/

Grade 11,12 External

Teacher-student

KG/ FS

 

1:18

Standardised tests

Examinations (Iranian)

ratio

Other phases

1:17

Accreditation

----

Teacher turnover

47%

 

Introduction

Introduction
 

Inspection activities

Number of inspectors deployed

3

Number of inspection days

4

Number of lessons observed

82

Number of joint lesson observations

5

Number of parents’

 

questionnaires

270; (return rate: 87%)

Details of other inspection activities

The team conducted several meetings with senior leaders, subject leaders, teachers, parents and students. They analysed test and assessment results, scrutinised school policies, survey results and other documents. The interim leadership team were involved throughout the whole process and undertook joint lesson observations with inspectors.

 

School

School Aims

‘Developing successful students to meet the global needs.’

 

‘Our vision is to provide a successful model of

developed educational setting in which the latest scientific achievements in IT, Educational Technology, Psychology, and Management Quality systems are

School vision and mission

utilised’.

‘Our mission is to train students with up to date

educational and scientific capabilities as well as creative, innovative and analytical ones which are required for 21 st century skills’.

Admission Policy

The school has an inclusive admission policy.

Leadership structure

School owner and partner, principal (absent), vice principal, teacher representative, parent representative and student representative.

(ownership, governance and management)

The senior leadership at present is the vice principal, teacher representative and the school’s public relations officer.

SEN Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)

SEN Category

Number of students identified through external assessments

Number of other students identified by the school internally

Intellectual disability

0

0

Specific Learning Disability

0

0

Emotional and Behaviour Disorders (ED/ BD)

2

0

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

0

0

Speech and Language Disorders

0

0

Physical and health related disabilities

1

0

Visually impaired

0

0

Hearing impaired

1

0

Multiple disabilities

0

0

G&T Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)

G&T Category

Number of students identified

Intellectual ability

3

Subject-specific aptitude (e.g. in science, mathematics, languages)

2

Social maturity and leadership

1

Mechanical/ technical/ technological ingenuity

0

Visual and performing arts (e.g. art, theatre, recitation)

24

Psychomotor ability (e.g. dance or sport)

1

The overall performance of the school

The overall performance of the school

Inspectors considered the school in relation to 3 performance categories

Band A

High performing (Outstanding, Very Good or Good)

 

Band B

Satisfactory (Acceptable)

Band C

In need of significant improvement (Weak or Very Weak)

 
 

The school was judged to be:

Band C

Weak

   

Band A

Band B

Band C

High Performing

Satisfactory

In need of significant improvement

Performance Standards

Outstanding

Very Good

Good

Acceptable

Weak

Very Weak

Performance Standard 1:

           

Students’ achievement

Performance Standard 2:

           

Students’ personal and

social development, and their innovation skills

Performance Standard 3:

           

Teaching and assessment

Performance Standard 4:

           

Curriculum

Performance Standard 5:

           

The protection, care, guidance and support of students

Performance Standard 6:

           

Leadership and

management

Summary Evaluation: The school’s overall performance
Summary Evaluation:
The school’s overall
performance

The Performance of the School

Evaluation of the school’s overall performance

The overall performance of the Iranian Private School is weak. The achievement of children in KG is weak in English, mathematics and science. It is acceptable in all other subjects. In the other phases, students’ attainment is acceptable or better in all subjects except social studies. Progress is weak in all grades for Islamic Education, social studies and in English at the primary phase. In Arabic it is very weak. It is acceptable or better in all other subjects. Students in the high school show at least good or better achievement in English, mathematics and science. Most students have positive attitudes to learning. Their behaviour is good and attendance is very good at 96%. The quality of teaching is weak in the majority of lessons in KG and primary. In the middle and high school most teaching is acceptable or better. The curriculum is weak. It is not modified to meet the needs of all groups of students. There is limited choice for older students. Parents are supportive and partnerships between home and school are good. Leadership and management are weak. The interim senior leadership team is faced with a significant challenge of teacher shortages. Health and safety procedures are weak.

Progress made since last inspection and capacity to improve

Progress in meeting the recommendations from the previous inspection report is

weak. Attainment in Islamic Education and Arabic is now acceptable in all phases. Teaching in high school has improved. Most of it is now good or better in English, mathematics and science. Teaching in KG and primary classes remains weak. Teaching in Arabic subjects also remains weak throughout the school except in Islamic Education in KG. Support for students with SEN and challenge for higher achievers in lessons shows insufficient improvement. Subject leaders’ monitoring roles are still not developed well enough to support more effective learning in KG and primary classes. Attendance has improved and there is a more positive climate amongst the school community based on mutual trust and respect for Islamic values. Older students show more self-reliance and there are more opportunities for them to take leadership roles within the school community. Learning technology resources have been increased. There are more smart boards in lessons and most teachers now use these effectively. Staffing has been reduced significantly since the last inspection and this has limited overall school

improvement. The school’s capacity for further improvement is weak.

Development and promotion of innovation skills

The promotion of innovation is weak. There are insufficient links between the content of subjects to reinforce students’ learning. Most students do not have sufficient opportunities to develop their own ideas other than in art where there are many opportunities for most to use their skills to make pots, design collages, prints and paintings. Opportunities for students to explore enterprise through subjects other than in mathematics are limited. For example, KG children have few chances to role play in shops, kitchens and other enterprises. Some new learning resources have been introduced. For example, mathematical place value pots to designate hundreds, tens and units were used innovatively to help Grade 4 students, understand the base 10 system more logically. High school students have the opportunity of designing a wave machine, which they created to simulate how sound waves travel. The school has some appropriate resources with which to promote innovation and initiative; these are not used effectively. For example, there is no robotics club, though the school has the resources to offer one. Use of technology in the classroom by students is limited.

The inspection identified the following as key areas of strength:

high school students’ improved performance in English, mathematics and

science students’ good behaviour and attitudes and respectful relationships; and very good attendance

a welcoming school community

 

high school students’ maturity, work ethic and support for their school

 

improved teaching in the high school.

 

The

inspection

identified

the

following

as

key

areas

for

improvement:

attainment and progress in all subjects

a clear vision for KG practice and use of learning outcomes

the monitoring and coaching role of subject leaders to improve students’

learning skills, planning for differentiation and assessment for learning in the classroom support for students with SEN and for those with gifts and talents in lessons

ensuring that Health and safety requirements are met

resolving the shortages in staffing.

Performance Standard 1: Students’ Achievement

Performance Standard 1: Students’ Achievement

Students’ achievement Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Islamic

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Education

Progress

Acceptable

Weak

Weak

Weak

Arabic

Attainment

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(as a First Language)

Progress

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Arabic

Attainment

N/A

Acceptable

Weak

Acceptable

(as a Second Language)

Progress

N/A

Very Weak

Very Weak

Very Weak

 

Attainment

Acceptable

Weak

Weak

Weak

Social Studies

Progress

Acceptable

Weak

Weak

Weak

 

Attainment

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

English

Progress

Weak

Weak

Acceptable

Good

 

Attainment

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Mathematics

Progress

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

Very Good

 

Attainment

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

Very Good

Science

Progress

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

Very Good

Language of instruction (if other

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

than English and Arabic as First Language)

Progress

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Other subjects

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

(Art, Music, PE)

Progress

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Learning Skills

       

(including innovation, creativity, critical thinking, communication, problem- solving and collaboration)

Weak

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

In KG, children’s achievement is weak in English, mathematics and science. It is acceptable in all other subjects. In the other phases, students’ attainment is acceptable or better in all subjects except social studies.

Progress is weak in all grades for Islamic Education and social studies and in English for primary students. In Arabic, it is very weak. It is acceptable or better in all other subjects. Students in the high school show at least good or better achievement in English, mathematics and science.

Grade 11 Iranian National external tests match the school’s internal assessments and

show that attainment for most students is broadly in line with age related curriculum expectations. Grade 11 English results are above Iranian standards, and when compared with other Iranian schools in UAE. Most students with SEN make weak progress because support in the classroom is weak. The progress made by higher attaining students and those with gifts and talents is also mostly weak because of the lack of challenge in most lessons.

In Islamic Education, attainment is acceptable and most students are working in line with Ministry of Education (MoE) curriculum standards. Progress is acceptable in KG and weak in all other phases. In KG, most students gain knowledge and understand part of the prophet’s life. Most acquire an understanding of the Quran at an age appropriate level and a few can say simple words and phrases correctly with expression. In Grade 2, most understand the values of perseverance and taking social responsibility. Most know about charity and cooperation, and the value of giving to a community. In the middle phase, most students understand the recitation rules they have learnt and can provide examples of verses from the Holy Qur’an. They make weak progress because there is no Islamic teacher and they teach themselves, unsupervised. In the high school phase, most students when provided with opportunity, demonstrate acceptable knowledge and understanding of Holy Quran.

Attainment in Arabic for second language speakers is acceptable in primary and high school phases and weak in middle school grades. In Grade 1, most students recognise, say and understand short statements. Most can identify and describe the items they use in a school bag. A few can spell the names of each item. In middle school grades, reading skills are below age related expectations. In Grade 12, most studentslistening, speaking and reading skills are in line with age related curriculum standards. Most students can read aloud well. They understand the meaning of what they have read. They can explain the meaning of specific points but they are not able to predict the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary. Most students listen well and respond to instructions, and a few can act out a short dialogue they have learnt. In the older grades, most students’ ability to hold a short conversation is weak and

often most students will use Farsi to end the conversation. There is very little writing and it is mostly of very weak quality. Progress is very weak in all phases because there is no teacher for Arabic.

In social studies, most students’ achievement is weak in primary, middle and high school. In KG, where children are developing an awareness of UAE heritage and culture, it is acceptabl. Most students in all grades have only a weak understanding of Emirati culture and history. Only a minority of students in the primary, and middle grades demonstrate knowledge about the special features of UAE. They know the names of some cities, villages and oases. Most have gained a basic knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of Arabian Gulf people, such as, their hospitality, generosity, courage, and helping those in need. In the older grades, most students are unable to discuss political features of the UAE, such as the constitution of the country, and why it is important.

In English, attainment and progress are weak in KG. Attainment is acceptable in primary and middle phases and good in high school. Only a few children in KG know a few words of appropriate vocabulary. Most students’ in primary make acceptable progress in speaking and reading. In Grade 4, the majority of students can read a few words and higher achievers can read a few simple sentences. In Grade 5, the majority of students are able to recognise and use simple verbs. They are not challenged to learn more complex words. Progress in writing is too slow in the primary grades, especially for higher achievers. Most students lack confidence to express themselves in writing more than a few words. The majority of students in the middle school make Acceptable progress in reading and in communicating ideas in speech and writing. By Grade 9 a minority of higher achievers read and write with good levels of fluency for their age. Most Grade 11 and Grade 12 students have good speaking, listening and reading skills. Writing skills are developing well with older students preparing confidently for IELTS (International English Language Tests).

In mathematics, achievement is weak in KG and acceptable in primary and middle school. Grade 11 mathematics results have improved over the last two years and progress has accelerated to very good in high school. Most KG children are working with numbers to 6. This is a low expectation representing under achievement; most children require more challenge. In numeracy, the proficiency of most students in primary and middle school matches curriculum grade expectations. Most Grade 1 students can add ten and units using number bundles. Most Grade 3 can use these bundles to identify 3 digit numbers, such as, 386,254, they do this with inquiry based approaches and share their results with their group. In Grade 8, most students can explain and solve algebraic expressions and attain age appropriate levels. Grade 10, 11 and 12 make very good progress because they work and share in depth their understanding by rationalisation and explanation. The large majority can factorise

quadratics, and solve quadratic equations using square roots. In the high school, students routinely challenge each other and seek to learn and improve their skills. This is less so in primary and middle phases where challenge is not as embedded in lessons.

Achievement in science is weak in KG, where children have too few opportunities to learn through discovery. Achievement is acceptable in primary and middle and very good in high school. In Grade 11 Iranian national tests, most students attain well above the age-related expectations. Chemistry is not taught as there is no chemistry teacher. In primary, most students make acceptable gains in scientific knowledge and skills, including experimentation. Grade 1 students, for example, were keen to find the reason why a flame went out when a glass jar was put over it. This steady progress continues through middle school grades where students develop confidence in using their skills. In high school, most students make very good progress by taking ownership of learning, researching and preparing experiments. For example, in a Grade 10 physics lesson about Newton’s Law of motion, two students demonstrated how a plastic bottle acts like a rocket engine when the air is trapped inside it and when pushed out the open end, causing the bottle to shoot forward. Investigational and inquiry skills are a strong feature of very good progress in high school lessons, with accurate recording and opportunities for students to rationalise, predict outcomes and formulate hypotheses.

Achievement in Farsi is acceptable in KG, primary and middle school. It is good in high school. KG children talk to their teachers and listen carefully to what they share; their emergent literacy skills are acceptable for their age. Progress varies between grades in primary and middle grades, but is acceptable overall. In Grade 4, for example, too many learners are passive and they do not read, share ideas and write enough. Learning for more able is not sufficiently challenging and the majority underachieve. Good progress in lessons is more regular in middle school and high school. Most students develop critical thinking and apply their knowledge and skills to new learning contexts. In Grade 11, most students are interested and engaged because they are given a free choice to choose a Persian classical poetry and literature to interpret and translate into more modern everyday language. In Grade 12, most students compare the moral virtue of very old and complex historical and mystical stories in the Persian Epic Poem the Shahname to more modern day events. They make good progress and attain good standards of reading, analysis of text and writing skills.

In other subjects, most KG children’s achievement is acceptable in art and physical education (PE). In the other phases, most students in almost all grades enjoy PE and make steady progress in developing skills and techniques in football, volleyball and badminton. In art, they develop skills and techniques at an acceptable pace. Most

students make acceptable progress in developing computer skills. For example, in a Grade 9 ICT class, most students competently used a photography application. They changed images, chose different colours and wrapped text around the new images created. They made acceptable progress and a few recorded what they had designed,

The development of learning skills is weak overall in KG and primary and acceptable in middle and high school. Most students in all grades are attentive and keen to learn; the large minority of students take on responsibility for their own equipment. The application of students’ learning to the real world is weak throughout the school. When given the opportunity, in good lessons, most students show they can work independently or collaborate with others, listen to their ideas and contribute their own. In some subjects, such as high school mathematics, discussion between students is fuelled by high order questioning from students and by the teacher, promoting critical thinking and opportunities to evaluate their contributions. Collaboration is a strong feature of high school learning in mathematics and science. The development of students; higher order thinking, problem solving and research skills across the school is weak except in high school where it is good. Independent learning skills are weak in KG classes, where children have few opportunities to make independent choices about pursuing their own interests and ideas. Most children are very reliant on their teachers to constantly help them with their learning. There is limited use of learning technology by students in lessons to support their learning.

Performance Standard 2: Students’ personal and social development, and their innovation skills

Students’ personal and social

       

development, and their innovation skills Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Personal development

Good

Good

Good

Very Good

Understanding of Islamic values and awareness of Emirati and world cultures

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Social responsibility and innovation skills

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Students’ personal development is good. Most students have positive attitudes towards their school and staff; in high school attitudes are very good. Most students are keen to learn especially when provided with opportunity to work in groups. Opportunities to be self-reliant and independent are insufficient KG. In the other phases, older students provide very good role models for younger students, as leaders who take initiative and decisions. Most students in all phases respect and follow school rules in and out of lessons. Overall behaviour is good, self-discipline is good and very good with students in high school. Relationships are good, with respect shown to one another and their teachers. There is a sense of community and friendship. Most students, including those in KG, demonstrate understanding of how to live a healthy life style in and out of school. They are aware of a balanced diet, oral hygiene and the importance of exercise. Student attendance is very good at 96%. Punctuality is very good.

Students have an acceptable understanding of Islamic values, most students are well-mannered, respectful, help one another and enjoy friendships during break times. They are courteous to each other and school visitors. During assembly, they sing the national anthem and respect the UAE flag. Students lead assembly, and share prayers from the Qur’an. There is an exhibition of UAE culture and heritage in the school hall for students to see and investigate, they show a basic awareness of the historical timeline of the UAE and appreciate the ambition and role of UAE leaders in moving the country toward the future. Most students have a limited awareness of other cultures and traditions.

Students can participate in different activities, such as, football, volleyball and

badminton during the school day. The school council leaders have a strong representation and help and support fellow students at the start of the day, at break time and during school dispersal. They undertake their role in a sensible and measured way, offering friendship and good advice to their fellow students. The environmental group works throughout the school to ensure all areas are clean and tidy, they check areas and fix problems. There are very limited opportunities for students to initiate ideas or their own projects or enterprises.

Performance Standard 3: Teaching and Assessment

Performance Standard 3: Teaching and Assessment

Teaching and Assessment Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

 
 

Teaching for effective learning

Weak

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

 

Assessment

Weak

Weak

Acceptable

Acceptable

 

The overall quality of teaching during the inspection was deemed weak. The majority of the school population is in primary and KG where the majority of teaching was judged to be weak. Most teaching in middle and high school was acceptable or better. The teaching of mathematics and science in high school was very good and in a few science lessons, it was outstanding.

 

Most teachers have secure subject knowledge. It is weaker in social studies. The understanding of how KG children learn most effectively is weak. Most teachers in middle and high school, apply their knowledge well, with lessons that interest students and learning methods that keep them actively involved and challenged. This is mostly seen in English, mathematics and science teaching in high school. For example, in a Grade 12 mathematics lesson, the teacher gave students the opportunity to lead parts of the lesson whilst he assessed responses and led with students detailed questioning about what they had been learning. In KG, teachers are not qualified and have a weak understanding of how young children learn. In the majority of lessons teachers speak too much and students’ learning time is compromised.

The majority of teachers’ planning is weak, because planning does little to meet the different needs of groups of students. In good and very good lessons learning

objectives are clear and precise and tasks are matched to students’ learning needs.

Most teachers use ICT well in lessons to introduce new topics, demonstrate simulations to help understanding and allow a few students to short and focused share power point presentations. Other resources are not used as well. For example, in PE lessons, often just one football is used and this limits dribbling, passing and shooting practice skills. There is no designated SENCO but the pastoral team identify students with SEN. Support in the classroom is weak, because teachers do not always plan for their needs in lessons. There is a lack of challenge for more able students.

Overall, the interaction between teachers and students is very good in high school. In English, mathematics and science lessons, most teachers encourage students well, creating a positive work ethic and a learning platform to extend all abilities.

Most middle and high school teachers use questions well to extend vocabulary and engage learners. Most teachers in the primary phase do not always aim their questions at individual students or use enough directed questions to challenge the more able and monitor learning for all students.

Most teaching does not develop skills in critical thinking, problem solving, or innovation. Science teaching in the high school is the exception, because students are encouraged to re-think solutions and design alternative approaches, such as the

example of the ‘wave machine design’. Teaching, often does not refer closely

enough to the outside world, to engage students more actively in understanding

what and why they are learning.

Assessment procedures are weak overall. In middle and high school, they are acceptable with good practice in high school English, mathematics and science. KG teachers do not have a secure understanding of the expected curriculum outcomes for young children and this compromises the planning for assessment. KG baseline assessments are not tracked during the year. Internal assessments are used from Grades 1 to 9 but are not clearly benchmarked against Iranian national standards. There is too much reliance on internal moderation. Analysis of results by senior leaders is beginning to take place, but is not embedded. Analysis by teachers is weak and targets for improvement are not identified in the primary phase. In high school, targets are shared with students in English, mathematics and science and most students make good or better progress.

Performance Standard 4: Curriculum

Performance Standard 4: Curriculum

Curriculum Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

 

Curriculum design and implementation

Weak

Weak

Weak

Weak

Curriculum adaptation

Weak

Weak

Weak

Acceptable

The curriculum follows the Iranian national curriculum. Implementation of the curriculum is weak in KG, primary, middle and high school. The curriculum choices are too narrow. There is a limited range of subjects in the higher grades because of the shortage of teachers in Arabic, Islamic and chemistry and a small number of students in high school. For example, the full Iranian high school curriculum of four academic pathways cannot be offered to Grades 11 and 12 students. There are two curriculum pathways; humanities and science, these are available in Grade 11 but only the science pathway in Grade 12. High school students are not offered the opportunity to study ICT or robotics. The Arabic and Islamic education curriculum, lacks sufficient breadth and balance. For example, Grade 12 students, do not have the MoE stipulated hours for Arabic, because there is no teacher of Arabic. Science is not delivered to the required hours as specified by the Iranian curriculum because of teacher shortages. Chemistry is not an option this year. Science students are required to self-teach, in Grades 11 and 12 and must study the chemistry curriculum on-line. This has a significant impact, on the future success, of young people’s application, to university. Arabic classes are unsupervised by teachers. Often, higher- grade students cover for absence teachers and this compromises their access to the curriculum, as well as creating unacceptable safeguarding risks.

Most lessons do not have planned curricular links and this limits innovation and enterprise opportunities. The curriculum was reviewed at the start of the academic year to address the shortage of staffing and design a curriculum that was as appropriate as it could be with the significant shortage of teachers. Throughout the school, textbooks outline the knowledge to be studied in each grade and help support continuity of learning between each grade. The planning of the KG curriculum is weak and is not clearly referenced to precise and age appropriate learning outcomes for KG children. There is weak support for students with SEN in lessons and stretch and challenge for more able students.

The school’s adaptation of the curriculum to meet students’ needs is weak. It takes insufficient account of the needs of and existing achievement of students on entry,

especially those in KG to ensure clear identification of start points. Programmes have been designed to support students with SEN, but these are not always implemented in lessons. Planning to modify the curriculum to meet different groups of students is weak. More able students are often underachieving, because the curriculum that is planned for them, is not sufficiently challenging.

In Grades 11 and 12, students take ownership of their learning through project or seminar based learning approach. Most high school students investigate, research, study on-line tutorials, take on-line tests, prepare power point presentations, and produce visual stimuli to present topics in science and maths in class. This approach helps students to develop critical thinking, problem solving, IT and communication skills in a meaningful and interesting context.

A range of extra-curricular activities, such as subject seminars, enrichment classes, visits to universities and places of interest, such as Emirates Park Zoo in Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi university, sporting clubs and Quran reading competitions enhance students’ experience of curriculum. Enterprise opportunities to enhance understanding and project based work is more limited.

Performance Standard 5: The protection, care, guidance and support of students

The protection, care, guidance and support of students Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

 

Health

and

safety,

including

       

arrangements

for

child

protection/

Acceptable

Weak

Weak

Weak

safeguarding

 

Care and support

 

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

The care, welfare and safeguarding of students is weak. Older students teach Arabic and Islamic education to other students without teacher supervision. Grades 1, 2 and 3 class sizes are above the ADEC requirement of 30 students. The child protection policy is effective and the students are represented as part of the school’s leadership team. Toilets are well maintained and hygienic. Two large water tanks are not sufficiently fenced and secured to prevent access by students from the adjacent playground. Fire extinguishers are valid and fire drill and evacuations are practised regularly. The security team is thorough and challenge all visitors to the school to ensure everyone is safe and secure. Most buses are new and regularly maintained.

There are no lifts and enough ramps to assist the disabled. The promotion of safe

and healthy lifestyles is good. The school’s licensed nurse, promotes healthy living,

by providing guidance in the classroom. Medical records are diligently maintained in

lockable storage cabinets. Well-being programmes ensure that students have a good understanding of what constitutes a healthy life style.

Staff student relationships are good and very good in high school. The counsellors and leadership team ensure the pastoral needs of students are met. Older students provide very good role models for younger students. There is mutual respect between leaders, teachers, students and parents. This is built upon trust, care and a sense of goodwill towards one another. There is a positive behaviour policy which is supported by the whole school community and results on good behaviour in and out of the classroom. The school sets high expectations of regular attendance and punctuality. The identification of students with SEN and students with gifts and talents is acceptable. Support programmes are in place for identified students, and they are delivered by the pastoral team. Support in the classroom by most teachers is weak. The majority lack confidence and knowledge in meeting the needs of students with SEN. A few gifted and talented students have been identified; support in football is good but for most it is limited.

Performance Standard 6: Leadership and management

Leadership and management Indicators

The effectiveness of leadership

Weak

Self-evaluation and improvement planning

Weak

Partnerships with parents and the community

Acceptable

Governance

Weak

Management, staffing, facilities and resources

Weak

The effectiveness of leadership is weak. The principal left the school at the end of the last semester. The vice principal, senior teacher and the public relations officer (PRO) are leading the school, in the interim. There is a weak strategic vision, with leadership focusing on the day to day challenges of managing a school, with a significant shortage of teachers. Relationships are good and the majority of teachers know what is expected of them. There is a positive collective spirit. A commitment to the UAE national and Emirate priorities has been diluted without sufficient

teachers for Islamic Education and no teacher of Arabic. Weak progress has been made to meet the requirements of the previous inspection’s recommendations. Capacity to improve is weak.

Self-evaluation teams have been established since the last pre inspection visit and a self-evaluation online form has been completed with judgments made for each performance standard. These are inflated because not enough depth of analysis had been undertaken to evaluate each element in each performance indicator by each team. Moderation of assessment outcomes has started in association with Dubai Iranian schools. School improvement planning is adequate and is based on simple self-evaluation. The main areas for improvement are drawn from the previous inspection report. Appropriate actions and achievable goals, which address the

school’s and UAE’s national priorities have been identified.

The role of subject leaders is underdeveloped because of the significant shortage in staffing and leadership roles. This is impacting on the quality of monitoring of learning and coaching of teachers in the classroom. In KG there has been little change to support staff understand better how young children learn best.

The school is very well supported by well-informed parents. Most are aware of and are very concerned about the shortage of teachers and the impact it is having on

their children’s education. They value the interim leadership’s efforts to ensure the

school runs smoothly on a day to day basis. A good level of response to the parents questionnaire fully supported the good partnership that exists between the school and the home. Communication strategies used to keep parents informed about their child’s achievements, such as email, social media and phone contacts are acceptable. Reporting is regular and informative and is acceptable. Links with the community are acceptable with visits to the Emirates Park Zoo by KG children and links with the Al Ain and Dubai family of schools.

Governance includes representation from parents and the Director of Academics for Iranian schools in UAE and students. They meet monthly and discuss the priorities for improvement. The Director holds leadership to account when evaluating present performance. Health and safety learning walks are not regular and ability to evaluate hazards and practice is very weak.

The school is satisfactorily managed daily and runs smoothly despite the difficulties with staffing. Staff shortages have affected the health and safety of students in the classroom and school grounds. KG play and activity is weakened by poor access to readily available learning resources, such as large books, role play areas, such as shops and kitchens, 3D shapes, water and sand trays.

What the school should do to improve further:

What the school should do to improve further:
  • 1. Raise attainment and progress in all subjects by:

    • i. appointing an Islamic teacher for middle phase, Arabic and a chemistry and mathematics teacher for high school

ii.

improve planning for differentiated groups and clearly identifying appropriate tasks

  • 2. Develop a clear vision of KG practice and use of learning outcomes by:

    • i. training and supporting the KG leader and teachers in understanding how young children learn best plan the classroom space to accommodate small group work, activity based learning and access to more literacy, numeracy, role play, water and sand play, jig saws, puzzles and construction resources planning of activities that are linked to KG outcomes to support more accurate assessment and observations

ii.

iii.

  • 3. Develop the monitoring and the coaching role of subject leaders to improve students’ learning skills, and assessment for learning in the classroom by:

i.

coaching teachers how to develop students’ critical thinking,

ii.

enterprise, innovation and application of learning to the real world focusing visits on what students are doing and how well teachers

iii.

interact and question students providing feedback which includes a balance of strength and an area of improvement

  • 4. Further improve support for students with SEN and for those with gifts and talents in lessons by:

i.

Planning tasks which are to be undertaken by SEN students or those

ii.

with gifts and talents Ensuring awareness by students and teachers of the individual

iii.

education plan and its targets providing professional development for teachers to support their understanding of the different types of SEN strategies to support and engage those with gifts and talent

  • 5. Urgently, ensure Health and safety requirements are met and address risks that include: lack of appropriate supervision for students in Islamic and Arabic lessons; primary class sizes of more than 30; the access to two large water tank areas adjacent to the KG and girls’ play area.