Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 2

Wulf & Eadwacer

Lodum is mnum swylce him mon lc gife;


willa h hine ecgan gif h on rat cyme.
Ungelc is s.
Wulf is on ege, ic on erre.
5 Fst is t glond, fenne biworpen.
Sindon wlrowe weras r on ge;
willa h hine ecgan gif h on rat cyme.
Ungelce is s.
Wulfes ic mnes wdlstum wnum hogode,
10 onne hit ws rnig weder ond ic rotugu st,
onne mec se beaducfa bgum bilegde,
ws m wyn t on, ws m hwre ac l.
Wulf, mn Wulf! wna m ne
soce gedydon, ne seldcymas,
15 murnende md, nales metelste.
Gehrest , adwacer? Uncerne eargne hwelp
bire wulf t wuda.
t mon ae tslte tte nfre gesomnad ws,
uncer giedd geador.

Wulf and Eadwacer is one of the most enigmatic Old English poems, since the story it alludes
to is not known to us. It has given rise to many theories, of which perhaps the most widely
credited is that the speaker (a woman, as rotugu in l. 10 tells us) is being held prisoner on an
island by Eadwacer, while Wulf (her lover or husband) is in exile, perhaps being hunted by the
speaker's people. For accounts of the scholarship on the poem, see Anne L. Klinck, The Old
English Elegies: A Critical Edition and Genre Study (Montreal, 1992) and Bernard J. Muir,
ed., The Exeter Anthology of Old English Poetry (Exeter, 1994).

[http://www.oldenglishaerobics.net/wulf.html]
Wulf & Eadwacer (Translation from Wikipedia)
It is to my people as if someone gave them a gift.
They want to kill him, if he comes with a troop.
It is different for us.
Wulf is on one island I on another.
That island, surrounded by fens, is secure.
There on the island are bloodthirsty men.
They want to kill him, if he comes with a troop.
It is different for us.
I thought of my Wulf with far-wandering hopes,
Whenever it was rainy weather, and I sat tearfully,
Whenever the warrior bold in battle encompassed me with his arms.
To me it was pleasure in that, it was also painful.
Wulf, my Wulf, my hopes for you have caused
My sickness, your infrequent visits,
A mourning spirit, not at all a lack of food.
Do you hear, Eadwacer? A wolf is carrying
our wretched whelp to the forest,
that one easily sunders which was never united:
our song together.

Wulf & Eadwacer (Translation by Richard Hamer)


It is as though my people had been given
A present. They will wish to capture him
If he comes with a troop.
We are apart.

Wulf is on one isle, I am on another.


Fast is that island set among the fens.
Murderous are the people who inhabit
That island. They will wish to capture him
If he comes with a troop. .
We are apart.

Grieved have I for my Wulf with distant longings.


Then was it rainy weather, and I sad,
When the bold warrior laid his arms about me.
I took delight in that and also pain.
O Wulf, my Wulf, my longing for your coming
Has made me ill, the rareness of your visits,
My grieving spirit, not the lack of food.
Eadwacer, do you hear me? For a wolf
Shall carry to the woods our wretched whelp.
Men very easily may put asunder
That which was never joined, our song together.