Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 40

SCHOOL-DEVELOPED LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT PLAN

Stage 1 Physical Education


School Flinders High Teacher(s) Joshua Carey, William Bittner , Alexandra Bignell & Lyndal Riley

Other schools using this plan Not Applicable

SACE Year Enrolment Code Program Variant


School Code Code (AW)
Stage Subject Code No. of Credits (10 or
20)

2017 1 P H E 10

Endorsed by principal or delegate (signature) Not Applicable Date Not Applicable

School use only

Approved Not approved

Signature of principal or delegate Date

Resources used to support the learning plan


Stage 1 Physical Education
Assessment Overview
Complete the table below to show details of the planned tasks. Use numbers to show where students will have the opportunity to provide evidence for each of the specific
features for all assessment design criteria.

Assessment Type and Details of assessment Assessment Design Criteria Assessment conditions
Weighting (e.g. task type, word length, time
KU PSA IC AR allocated, supervision)

Assessment Type 1: FORMATIVE: TEAM HANDBALL/EUROPEAN HANDBALL QUIZ (Appendix A) KU1 AR 1 18 multiple choice questions to
Practical Students demonstrate their existing knowledge of European/Team Handball and invasion KU2 be completed in the final lesson
games to assess student readiness. This quiz will be completed prior to the unit to allow of the previous unit under
students to reflect on practical techniques and performance and make a self-assessment of teacher supervision and re-
their learning goals throughout the unit. The same quiz will be re-taken at the end of the unit taken in the final lesson of the
Weighting 50%
as a reflection to gauge what student now know in comparison. current unit.

SUMMATIVE (Appendix B). PSA 1 IC 2 AR 1 Video evidence of skills and


Students demonstrate and reflect on their skills, tactics, leadership, and group collaboration PSA 2 tactics during 2 sessions of the
over the course of team handball, through video analysis. They will undertake two, 15 unit where students reflect on,
minute gameplay videos over a period of three weeks. The first video will be taken after and make an assessment of the
basic rules have been established and the second after three weeks of tactical development their individual and team
through game play. Students will then compare both videos to show development made. progress in team handball.
They are encouraged to analyse their development in; team dynamics, structures, skills, off
the ball movements and tactics through a written report and citation to their individual
videos.

Assessment Type 2: FORMATIVE: EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY QUIZ/TEST (Appendix C) KU1 AR2 Individually completed quiz
Folio Students complete an individual quiz under exam/test conditions in order to assess their KU2 completed under test
current levels of understanding, knowledge, and readiness for learning prior to the conditions under teacher
commencement of the Exercise Physiology theory component of the unit. Based on material supervision during the lesson
that students should have been exposed to through Year 10 Physical Education, the prior to the start of the theory
Weighting formative quiz asks students to respond to prompts and questions in relation to the key component of the unit. 25
50 % topic areas of acute and chronic responses to exercise in relating to the muscular, minutes allocation.
circulatory, and respiratory body systems. The assessment will be carried out prior to the
beginning of the unit, and student results will inform and guide the teaching and learning
opportunities presented throughout the Exercise Physiology theory component of the unit.

SUMMATIVE (Appendix D) KU1 AR1 Written evidence should be a


THE NATURE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY - INTEGRATED TASK KU2 AR3 maximum of 750 words if
written or 5 minutes for a
Students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the physiological responses of
multimodal presentation.
the human body when participating in exercise by responding to a task provided through a
Relevant diagrams, graphs or
RAFT format. Students will choose one of four options for approaching the task as specified
images should be included and
through the RAFT. Through their response, students will place particular focus on
appropriately referenced.
demonstrating their understandings of the interconnection between the muscular,
circulatory, and respiratory systems; their acute and chronic responses to exercise; and the
impact that these responses have on the athlete. Students will base their response on notes
taken in class, but also include research undertaken outside of this. SACE guidelines for
referencing will be required. Each student will complete an individual response to the RAFT.

Four or five assessments. Please refer to the Stage 1 Physical Education subject outline.
Unit Outline

Week Lesson Learning Intention Content Progression - 50 minute lessons, 16 students

1 1 Prac Determine what students know about invasion games Begin in classroom. Introduce team handball as the sport for the next 6
(transfer from year 10 achievement standards) weeks of play and watch the clip on how to play benchball (5 mins)
Complete the pre assessment Game rules and tactical knowledge test
Know (Appendix A ) (10 mins)
vocabulary and tactics used in invasion games Transfer activity: Benchball (25 mins)- Soccer using benches in the
corners of the gym. Students are allocated numbers and begin in the
Understand that: middle 4 teams of 4. 2-3 players will be called at each time and the
tactical knowledge can be transferred between invasion remaining player/s must return to their team's goal (bench). After a goal
games and used to create an advantage is scored all teammates must return to the centre of the court in
preparation for the next round.
Be able to: After 15 minutes of play ask the questions: What sports does benchball
Transfer knowledge from invasion games into bench ball to relate to ?
guide their team to success What are some tactics being used to mount an attack?
What's the best way to defend?
Progression 1 after questioning : Change the soccer ball to a netball.
Students play the same game but with netball rules. Students cannot
move when they throw it. No contact.
Near the completion of lesson ask students: how did their tactics change,
or stay the same to meet the demands of the new game mode?
2 Prac Adapting the game Discuss learning intentions on the gym whiteboard board (3 mins)
Continue with last lessons game of Benchball (modified to netball), same
Know teams, play for 5 minutes.
Various tactics used in invasion games & handball After 5 minutes ask students how they can incorporate moving into the
game?
Understand that: Progression 1 (10 mins) : Same game style, however students are
tactical knowledge can be transferred between invasion allowed to move 3 steps once they receive the ball and before they can
games and used to create an advantage pass
Questioning: How did this affect the dynamic of the game?
Be able to: How did you have to adapt?
Modify and adapt team tactics to the changing format of How can we make it more difficult to score?
the game Progression 2: (15 minutes) The corner benches are replaced with small
soccer goals (or alternatives which gives height to the goal). Each time a
new round it called, 3 players will be called to play and the leftover
player (assuming there is 4 on a team) will act as a goalie.
Progression 3: (10 mins) The same rules apply however the goals will
now be removed from the corners and placed in the middle of 2 courts
(Gym cut in half). 2 4v4 games. Boundaries are introduced and the ball is
changed to a handball and the game starts with a jump ball.

3 Theory Know: Formative Theory Pre-Assessment conducted final lesson previous unit
The muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems perform
specific functions which are interdependent upon one BASED ON REVISION FROM YR 10/PRE ASSESSMENT
another PRESENT OVERVIEW OF UNIT
Understand that: - Muscular, Respiratory & Circulatory system responses to exercise with
Interactions between cells, tissues, organs and organ reference to energy systems
systems are essential to maintaining health and function in - Involvement of physiology testing in practical lessons to measure HR
the human body. - RAFT Summative Task
Be able to: - Unit based around the essential question of: What happens in the body
Explain the major functions of the muscular, respiratory and when we exercise?
circulatory systems and their role in the human body. Activity: Ask students essential question: What happens in the body when we
exercise? and have them put together a concept map of all current ideas that
they have.
- Class discussion and collating of ideas - create class map of the
physiological responses to exercise (this will be referred back to during,
and at the conclusion of, the unit).
- Can students group these responses into acute and chronic responses to
exercise? Relate them to energy systems?
Homework: Muscle man muscle naming exercise (research at home and bring
completed diagram to next class)
Resources:
- Unit overview powerpoint (plus handouts for students)

4 Theory Know: Muscular System


The basic structures and functions of the muscular system. Muscle man - naming muscles of the human body activity *flipped
Understand that: classroom* - students research at home and bring completed diagram to
Muscles are made up of slow and fast twitch fibres class.
Be able to: Muscle Structure
Locate and identify the types of muscles in the muscular Slow/Fast Twitch Fibres
system Sliding Filament Theory
What happens during exercise?
Controlled by a nervous stimuli
Reciprocal Inhibition (do Lab Experiment)
Sliding Filament Theory
RESOURCES:
Reciprocal Inhibition Lab pairs worksheet
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAJ-9nPSqwA Muscle structure and
contraction (sliding filament theory)
http://www.teachpe.com/anatomy/sliding_filament.php

2 1 Prac Incorporate the rules of handball into our modified game Discuss learning intentions and recap last week's progression/ game
rules (5 mins) Introduce the summative task which will begin next lesson
Know (Appendix B)
Various tactics used in handball Play last week's game (2 x 4x4 games, half gym) (5 mins)
Rules of handball Questions: How can we increase the speed of the game??
Progression 1 (10 mins): Introduce a bounce students can incorporate
Understand that: into their 3 steps.
Player boundaries and rules can be used to gain an offensive Questioning: How did this impact the game?
or defensive advantage and create turnover or breaks in How can we make it more difficult to score?
play Progression 2 (10 mins): Introduce a semi circle that attackers and
defenders cannot enter otherwise turn over. Can the goalie leave the
Be able to: space? Students decide
Incorporate a bounce to increase the speed of an offensive Where can we stand to create an defensive advantage?
play Question- how can we increase the pace of the game again and avoid
Use the goalie boundary and 3 second rule to an defensive people holding onto the ball for too long?
advantage Progression 3 (10 mins): students can only hold the ball stationary for
three seconds. If they hold it for longer, turn over.
Questions: How can we manipulate the 3 second rule to create a
defensive advantage ?
2 Prac Video Analysis - Summative Part 1 Recap the basic rules of handball which have been introduced gradually
over the past 3 lessons. Describe the learning intentions of today. Run
Know through summative Part 1 - Create teams and hand out Ipads. (10 mins)
The rules of handball
Where to stand for accurate filming of a sport 4v4 game (15 mins) - team 1 and 2 pair up with someone from team 2
Understand that: and 3. Team 1 and 2 play first team 3 and 4 film their chosen partner.
Video analysis is a beneficial technique to address the
strengths and weaknesses for both the individual being 4v4 game (15 mins) - swap roles
filmed and the filmer in regards to tactics, skills and off the
ball movements Discuss the benefits of filming in sports and describe what students will
Be able to: be doing over the next 3 weeks (tactics) before their second game
Film a 4v4 team handball game for 15 mins recording and analysis (5 mins).

3 Theory Know: Muscular System


Physical activity influences the muscular system. What happens during exercise?(Cont).
Understand that: Increased body temperature
Oxygen intake and physical activity cause the muscles to Lactic Acid and Carbon Dioxide produced
operate in different ways Oxygen supply to the muscles increases
Be able to: RESOURCES:
Explain the relationship between the muscular system as it https://sharemylesson.com/teaching-resource/powerpoints-related-human-
relates to different physical activities. body-197655
Ppts 5, 6, 7

4 Theory Know: Circulatory System


The pathway of blood through the major components of the YEAR 10 REVISION:
heart and throughout the body Blood vessels
The role of blood tissue Structure of the heart
Understand that: Blood flow path
Oxygen intake and physical activity cause the muscles to Heart Rate / Heart beat / Pulse
operate in different ways NEW TO YEAR 11:
Be able to: Stroke Volume
Trace the path of blood through the heart and body Cardiac Output
Label, correctly, all features of the heart Arterio-Venous Oxygen Difference
Describe how the heart works as a pump with 4 chambers Oxygen diffusion pulmonary and muscular What happens? Why does
Calculate Heart Rate it happen? How does it happen?. - students to workshop these questions
as a class with teacher facilitating - use resource as a learning tool to
explain concepts

3 1 Prac Positioning and defence stance 2 4x4 games (10 mins) same rules as previous lesson
Questions - How do should we stand when we defend an opponent?
Know
How to position your body towards an attacker Drill (5 mins) - 2 attackers 1 defender. Attackers throw the
Defense requires lateral movements ball to each other similar to piggy in the middle
Spreading hands increases coverage The purpose is for the defender not to steal the ball but to always have
their chest and torso facing the player with the ball. (Drill 1 (0.00-0.30)
Understand that Progression 1 (5 mins): 4 attackers 1 defender -. The defender must
By using lateral movements and positioning your body guard the attacker by moving as the attacker throws the ball and try and
to the defender it increases the coverage and decreases intercept (Drill 2 1.26-1.55)
the chance of a successful throw Progression 2 (10 mins)- 4 attackers 3 defenders - three attackers
set up in dynamic triangle formation - 1 attacker stands behind 3
Be able to defenders who work together to constrict space and intercept the
Use the defensive stance in a game situation to reduce pass to the last attacker (can adapt add another attacker or defender).
the effectiveness of an attack Give a demonstration. (Drill 3 (2.00-3.00) )
2 4x4 games (15 mins) - players are awarded 2 points if they score a
point from a successful intercept
Encourage the use of the defensive stance - pause game and freeze
players if you see the correct stance in action

2 Prac Defensive zone Recap on last week and discuss the learning intentions for this week (5
mins) - ask students how they should stand when they are guarding an
Know attacker - 2 key points (stance and lateral movement)
The structure of a defensive zone
2 4v4 games (teams based on varying skill ability (10 mins) (same rules
The strengths and weaknesses
as last week)
Ask students, how can we incorporate what we learn last week about
Understand that
our defensive stance last week and create a defensive formation in our
A defensive set up can minimise the space of the attackers,
4v4 games?
increase the likelihood of turnovers and decrease the offensive
Progression 1: give each 4v4 team 5-10 minutes to come up with a
team's ability to score
defensive strategy they think will work with help of the defensive
Communication between teammates is necessary to avoid
stance and movement learnt previously.
zone breakdowns and allow easy scoring
Progression 2: Back to 2 4v4 games (10 mins) - teams incorporate the
defensive strategy into their game
Be able to
Ask students whether their strategy worked, why or why not?
Create a defensive strategy in teams of 4
Incorporate a defensive zone into a 7v7 game
7v7 game (5 mins intro 10 mins gameplay) with 1 sub on each team
Communicate and move to avoid zone breakdowns in a game
Defensive set up (teacher led)
situation
Show students a popular defensive zone - ( example 31.00-32.20 of the
Women's International Handball)
Give a brief run through and demonstration
Game play - in this game the offensive team must give the defensive
time to set up in their zone ie no fast breaks
Questions - what are two benefits of this zone?
What is one or 2 downfalls?

3 Theory Know: Circulatory System


How physical activity influences the circulatory system What happens during exercise?
Understand: Blood flow/heart rate increases
The circulatory system is positively affected by exercise Stroke Volume increases
Be able to: Cardiac Output increases
Explain how physiological changes during exercise impact Arterio-Venous Oxygen Difference
the circulatory system Oxygen diffusion increases
Body temperature increases
Vasodilation
- Students to use butchers paper and markers etc to create visual
representations of concepts covered in groups of three.

4 Theory Know: Circulatory System


How heart rate monitoring technology can be used to Lab Experiment- Heart Rate Monitoring and Data Analysis
analyse the circulatory system - Student pairs wear HR monitors and measure HR during various levels of
Understand: physical activity through first 15 minutes of the lesson.
The effects and benefits of physical activity on the - Students record data in a table and work through lab questions to
circulatory system calculate heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output for all levels of
Be able to: activity.
Use heart rate monitoring technology to analyse the Questions:
circulatory system - Describe the changes in HR that you observed during the activities.
Analyse data to provide a conclusion on the impact of - Why is there a change in HR? What is happening in the body to cause
exercise on the circulatory system this? (students connect learning to knowledge of muscular system)
- Describe some other physiological changes to the body that you
observed along with the change to HR. Explain why these may be.
Discussion - what factors could influence the changes we see in our HR, stroke
volume, and cardiac output when we exercise?
RESOURCES
Heart Rate Lab task

4 1 Prac Developing strategies to improve scoring opportunities: Recap on last lesson and discuss the learning intentions for this week (5
Maintaining possession and player movement mins) - ask students how they can set up a defensive zone

Know 2 4x4 games (10 mins )


To maintain possession and receive a pass players must How can we maintain possession? Why would we want to maintain
move into space possession?
When and where to pass the ball to a team mates
advantage (in front) Drill (10 mins) - maintain possession 4 v 3 - 4 attackers must attempt to
maintain possession in a designated area. See how many passes they can
get in a row, swap defenders and reset when there is an intercept
Understand that Question - what must a player do when they want to receive the ball?
Maintaining possession allows the team to create gaps What's a sport does this relates to?
in the defence which can be used as an attacking Progression (10 mins) - 4v4 4 attackers form a semicircle 2 m back from
advantage the the goal semicircle and pass the ball between themselves. 3
Maintaining possessions can slow down the play and defenders line the semicircle and move position themselves to block the
give control to the offensive team attackers throw at goal (similar to defensive set up learnt in last lesson).
Once the attackers have created a gap then they can shoot (maintaining
Be able to their 2m from the semicircle) and try and get it past the goalie (give
Move effectively to maintain possession in a game demonstration).
situation and create gaps in the defence
7v7 game with 1 sub (10 mins) - players need 6 touches before they can
score a point

2 Prac Offensive plays, passing and jumping (crossing and drawing) Recap on last week and discuss the learning intentions for this week (5
mins) - Ask students why maintaining possession can be beneficial ?
Know
How to cross and draw Play 2 4x4 games - (10 mins) -
The three types of passes and when to use each Questions - What's some offensive strategies we can use to break the
Understand that defensive zone ?
Crossing and drawing the opponent creates gaps in the
defence which can be used to as an attacking advantage Drill Crossing and draw (5-10 mins) - 3 attacker, 1 defender, 1 goalie
Using appropriate passes in offensive situations can Attackers run down the court from the halfway mark, once the person
increase the chance of creating gaps, making a break with the ball gets to the defender they must do a quick pass to one of
and chance of scoring the 2 attackers and they have a shot.
Be able to This drawing and quick pass is called a cross
Use a range of passes in appropriate situations Note for students** although defenders cannot pull or intentionally
Use the cross and or draw in game situations push the the attacker. If they have the space in front then they may hold
their ground and not let the opponent through
Questions- what does this do to the defence?
What are the three types of passes we can use when passing?? Get
students to demonstrate (bounce pass, overarm pass or quick flick) (5
mins)
Why is quick passing important?
When is the bounce pass most effective?
Progression 1 (5-10 mins) - Add in another defender (Example 1.30-2.30)
7v7 game (10 mins) - When players are defending their sub can come on
and defend too. When they switch to offense he must go to the
boundary (swap over this role as you would a normal sub)

3 Theory Know: Respiratory System


How gas exchange takes place in the human body YEAR 10 REVISION:
The structures through which air passes as it travels through Function of the respiratory system
the respiratory system. Structure of the Respiratory System
Understand that: NEW TO YEAR 11:
The respiratory system plays an important role in the Path of air/oxygen
function of the human body Breathing Rate
There is a chemical reaction when air enters the body to Tidal Volume
enable effective breathing Ventilation
Be able to: VO2 (Oxygen Consumption) definition / explanation
Identify the respiratory system structure VO2 Max definition / explanation
Describe the main purpose of the respiratory system Students watch the Youtube clip resource and note what they learn about the
Explain how oxygen and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs abovementioned respiratory responses to exercise
- Make clear to students that they will be working through a table in the
next class where they will need to apply this information

RESOURCES
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyhYHlA7bZw

4 Theory Know: Respiratory System


How gas exchange takes place in the human body What happens during exercise?
The structures through which air passes as it travels through Breathing rate increases
the respiratory system. Tidal Volume
Understand that: Ventilation increases
The respiratory system plays an important role in the Lung Diffusion increases
function of the human body Oxygen consumption increases
There is a chemical reaction when air enters the body to Students further develop their learning from the previous task by
enable effective breathing creating and completing a table / concept map outlining the acute (short
Be able to: term) responses to exercise in the respiratory system..
Explain the factors which can impact lung capacity Teacher guided class discussion of answers - why these are the case and
build in with muscular and circulatory systems.
5 1 Prac Attacking the goals (scoring) and goalies
Recap on last week and discuss the learning intentions for this week (5
mins) - Ask students how to cross and when should they use each one of
Know the three passes
Where to stand when goalkeeping
That a player can jump over the semicircle legally if they 2 4v4 games (10 mins)
release the ball before they shoot the ball How can we increase our chance of scoring?
Understand that
Facing the attacking players and spreading out your Progression on last week's drill (10 mins)- 4 attackers 5 defenders and a
body as a goalie decreases the room in which a goalie. The attackers must perform continuous crosses and maintain the
offensive player can score possession until there is a gap in the defensive structure. The attack can
Jumping high and far over the goalie semicircle when then weave his way through and jump into the goalie semicircle to shoot.
shooting decreases the distance to the goal and opens Introduce or reinforce the rule, if the ball is thrown before the attacker
up unique angles creating scoring opportunities hits the ground then it it legal.
Questions - what is the best way to defend as a goalie?
What part of our body should we use to defend?
Be able to Same drill employing goalie tactics (5 mins)
Jump over the semicircle in appropriate game situations
Face the player as a goalie and decrease the room 7v7 game with 1 sub(10-15mins) - scoring by picking a defensive gap and
avaliable to score jumping over the goalie semicircle is worth 2 points, however if the
goalie saves the ball then the person who threw it must run to the side
wall and back (or something similar) before they can re-join

2 Prac Video Analysis Summative Part 2 Recap the last 3 weeks of tactical development by asking students.
Describe the learning intentions of today. Run through summative Part 2
Know - Same teams as part 1 hand out Ipads. (10 mins)
The tactical developments over the last three weeks
4v4 game (15 mins) - team 1 and 2 pair up with someone from team 2
Understand that and 3. Team 1 and 2 play first team 3 and 4 film their chosen partner.
Knowing and applying game tactics changes the
dynamics of the game providing structure, increased 4v4 game (15 mins) - swap roles
strategy and moments of advantage
Discuss the benefits of filming in sports and describe what students will
Be able to be doing over the next 3 weeks (tactics) before their second game
Use the tactics over the past three weeks while being recording and analysis (5 mins).
individually filmed in a game situation

3 Theory Know: Respiratory System


How gas exchange takes place in the human body Factors that impact lung capacity - what does this mean for exercise and
The structures through which air passes as it travels through performance?
the respiratory system. Students workshop this question with the teacher to examine how an
Understand that: increased or decreased lung capacity can impact on the athlete. *Bring
The respiratory system plays an important role in the discussion through to bring together students learning about muscular,
function of the human body circulatory, and respiratory systems.
There is a chemical reaction when air enters the body to
enable effective breathing Analysis of practical lesson footage
Be able to:
Explain the factors which can impact lung capacity

4 Theory Know: Introduce RAFT summative task (Appendix D)


The muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems perform - Instructions included on task sheet
specific functions which are interdependent upon one
another Students given time in class to plan assignment, begin planning, and
Understand that: draft.
Interactions between cells, tissues, organs and organ
systems are essential to maintaining health and function in
the human body.
Be able to:
Explain, using alternative perspectives, the major functions RESOURCES:
of the muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems and Summative Theory Assessment - RAFT Integrated Task (Appendix D)
their role in the human body.

6 1 Prac Know 4 v 4 round robin 1v2 & 3v4. 1v3 & 2 v4. 1v4 & 3 v3. Predetermined
Different tactics of the unit teams based on fairness
Understand that
Different teams will have a unique gameplay which (15 minute games)
requires modification of tactics and plays
Be able to
Adapt as a team to suit the variety of players
Use the tactics learnt to make successful plays

2 Prac Know Quick discussion based on effective umpiring (5 mins)


How to umpire a game of team handball
Understand that 7v7 game - both subs joint umpire for 5 minutes each time
Umpiring requires quick and confident calls and a good
understanding on the game rules to keep the play 2 halfs 15 minutes
running smoothly and hassle free
Be able to Retake pre-assessment (Appendix A) to assess what students have learnt
Umpire a game of team handball effectively and over unit
confidently
Reflect on their learning for the unit

3 Know: Continue with RAFT summative task


The muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems perform
specific functions which are interdependent upon one Students pair up and peer-assess each others work (only draft form)
another giving feedback and assessing against task description and marking
Understand that: criteria.
Interactions between cells, tissues, organs and organ
systems are essential to maintaining health and function in Teacher facilitates discussion around important features, feedback,
the human body. collaboration, referencing evidence, and editing.
Be able to:
Explain, using alternative perspectives, the major functions
of the muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems and
their role in the human body.

4 Know: First 20 minutes of lesson - finalising RAFT summative assessment


The muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems perform requirements and last questions before submission
specific functions which are interdependent upon one
another Unit conclusion - revision points for end of year written examination.
Understand that:
Interactions between cells, tissues, organs and organ Final 15 minutes of lesson - students create 1 exam question each.
systems are essential to maintaining health and function in Teacher collates and runs a pop-quiz to round out the unit on Exercise
the human body. Physiology.
Be able to:
Explain, using alternative perspectives, the major functions
of the muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems and
their role in the human body
Justification
INTRODUCTION

This unit plan has been designed for a SACE stage 1 class of 16 students in a co-educational, state,
secondary school in the southern Suburbs of Adelaide. Students will be required to participate in a
European Handball unit for 6 weeks which is comprised of both theory and practical components.
This unit has been created on the foundation of Play Practice (Lauder, 2001), Teaching Games for
Understanding (TGfU) (Bunker & Thorpe, 1986) and elements of the Sport Education Physical
Education Program (SEPEP) (Siedentop, Hastie & Mars, 2011) by using a backwards design approach
to curriculum (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005). Theory for this unit will centre on exercise physiology -
specifically muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems - which falls under knowledge of body
systems as part of students knowledge of the nature of physical activity (South Australian Certificate
of Education Board of South Australia [SACE], 2017). Special emphasis has been dedicated to the
varying styles of formative and summative assessments throughout the unit, differentiated to cater
for all students in the class. The combination of frameworks, from which inspiration was drawn,
ensures the teaching and learning from the unit are of a high standard according to the South
Australian Teaching for Effective Learning framework (TfEL) (Department for Education and Child
Development [DECD], 2010). Additionally, through participation, students are expected to develop
Sport Literacy as the unit addresses the three facets of learning: in, through and about movement
(Arnold, 1979; Pill, 2010). This curriculum aims to provide students with authentic and enjoyable
experiences to promote lifelong physical activity.

CURRICULUM DECISIONS

The TGfU, Play Practice and SEPEP approaches to teaching Physical Education are used throughout
this unit to promote student learning. The TGfU model is incorporated in the unit to appeal to
students interest and engagement levels within practical lessons. While previous teaching theories
have focused on the importance of optimal biomechanical techniques (Mitchell, Oslin, & Griffin,
2013; Pill, 2013), this unit centres on building tactical awareness in an invasion game setting. It is
expected European Handball is a new sport to students, and as such, a substantial amount of
learning will need to occur in the lessons. Research has shown students are more likely to perform
skills to a higher degree of efficiency when understood from a tactical perspective as opposed to
simply recreating a skill outside of a game context (Davids, Button & Bennet, 2008; Griffey & Houser,
2007; Renshaw, Chow, Davids & Hammond, 2010). TGfU has been said to challenge the traditional
linear motor learning theory as the typical TGfU lesson progresses from a warm up like game into
an instructional isolation activity, with the aim that these specific tactics or skills are used in a final
game setting (Davids et al., 2008, Renshaw et al., 2010). Play Practice, is a similar approach and
when used appropriately, is a fantastic way to continually cement student learning by revisiting key
concepts, using guiding questions and positively incorporating mistakes to enhance student
understanding (Launder, 2001). The Play Practice model is evident in the first four practical weeks of
the unit. These lessons generally follow the same structure; where a modified game is played
focusing on a specific offensive or defensive concept, transition into a practice task or drill to isolate
the concept at hand and completed by moving back into an authentic game setting to reinforce the
learning objective.

The final primary framework used in this unit is the SEPEP approach. This framework was chosen as
a focus as it aims for students to develop and demonstrate sporting skills while paying attention to
the importance of student centred learning with the opportunity for real responsibilities and roles
within the lesson (Siedentop, Hastie & Van Der Mars, 2011). The Sport Education model is evident in
the unit specifically in the final practical lessons with round-robin tournaments of mixed-ability
teams. It is hoped students with higher understandings of, or confidence in, the game are able to act
as a captain or team leader, while other class members will perform supporting roles such as
equipment manager, referees or scorers. It was important students interacted collaboratively while
demonstrating initiative and leadership (SACE Board of SA, 2017) to facilitate connections between
sport and its cultural meaning (Alexander & Taggart, 1995; Pill, 2014; Siedentop et al., 2011). Sport
Literacy, which is the combination of these Physical Education teaching designs (Drummond & Pill,
2011; Pill, 2014), encapsulates the core of this unit which aims to develop sporting knowledge for
use as an individual and a member of the greater community.

SPORT LITERACY/ARNOLDS DIMENSIONS

Sport Literacy can be linked to Arnolds (1979) original dimensions of Physical Education teaching as
students learn information in three ways - in, through and about movement. The skill acquisition
elements explored in week 3 regarding effective ball placement is an example of students learning
how to best move for efficiency IN movement (Pill, 2014). Learning THROUGH movement refers to
the embodied experience associated with sport participation (Pill, 2014, p.64). The student run
round-robin tournaments are an example of this, with a focus on roles related to sport performance.
Arnolds final facet of learning, ABOUT movement, centres on the knowledge that sport is
structured in certain ways to bring about certain things (Pill, 2014, p.64) which is evident in the
Summative self assessment of game play and analysis of laboratory data analysis. By critically
analysing his or her own physiological response to game play, a student learns in, through and about
movement (Brown, & Penney, 2013). It is hoped students will combine theoretical concepts with
real world applications to further develop an understanding of the human bodys physiology in
relation to the wider community and how the analysis can be applied back to his or herself to
improve physical performance in the future.

LESSON STRUCTURE

Literature was collated from a number of sources to determine if massed or distributed practice was
most effective in understanding and retaining information, as well as developing new skills. This
information was then used to assess the optimal lesson format in terms of double and single lesson
structure. Originally, it was discussed that single lessons would be best used for theoretical
components, allowing maximal playing time during the double lessons. However, research shows
that distributed practice is more effective in retaining information, therefore producing fewer errors
(Haq and Kodak, 2014). Seabrook, Brown and Solity (2005, p.108) explain the benefits of distributed
practice have been found across a range of areas and with various age groups, stating that it has
been found with both recognition and recall, in both implicit and explicit memory and following both
intentional and incidental learning. Massed or crammed practice also presented a number of
negative impacts on student learning. This included that the structure and compressed nature of
massed practice generally does not produce the intended learning outcomes, nor does it allow for
adequate reflection or analysis of what has been taught (Davies, 2006). Based on these findings, it
was determined that this distributed form of practice would likely be value for the learning of both
practical and theoretical concepts throughout this unit plan. Therefore, one single lesson will
accommodate a practical lesson, while the other will be used for theory. The double lesson will
compile of both theory and practical elements to allow for this distributed practice each week.

PEDAGOGICAL APPROACH

A number of pedagogical approaches are used throughout this unit for both the practical and
theoretical components. These include a combination of student centred (through guided discovery
and questioning), teacher directed and game sense with the utilisation of the CHANGE IT model to
modify games. These pedagogical approaches have been linked to various TfEL domains to justify
their prevalence in the classroom. Lesson time and structure has also been informed by relevant
academic literature to determine how students will best learn and retain the skill and information.

STUDENT CENTRED LEARNING/GUIDED DISCOVERY

A student centred learning approach is beneficial facet which has been incorporated in this unit as it
encourages student exploration, promotes a deeper understanding and produces higher order
thinking. This aligns with TfEL framework domain 3.2 to foster deep understanding and skilful action
(DECD, 2010). Over the course of the unit, students will be provided with a vast range of
opportunities to develop their understandings of technical and tactical aspects of European
Handball, as well as theoretical components throughout the exercise physiology unit. The absorption
of this knowledge will be prompted by guided discovery in order to generate curiosity and student
exploration, creating an engaging learning environment where by students develop essential
problem solving skill through learning from mistakes (Harvel, 2010). By providing students with
minimal information based around rules, teachers will position themselves as facilitators rather than
dictators of the lesson. This will encourage student curiosity and develop problem solving through
the guided discovery approach, allowing students to create their own meaning (Harvel, 2010). This
guided discovery approach will also form the basis of various class discussions to encourage higher
order thinking through questioning.

Where applicable throughout this unit, theoretical concepts have also been based on students
results from practical components. For example, when discussing acute and chronic adaptations to
physical activity or throughout a particular sport, students results from the heart rate monitors will
be analysed to determine how their own heart rate changed throughout the game. Creating the link
to TfEL domain 4.3, this method allows students to make connections between the theoretical
concept, and their own acute adaptations to physical activity, creating more meaning and
developing a deeper understanding (DECD, 2010).

TEACHER-DIRECTED LEARNING

Teacher-directed approach has been embedded throughout the unit when the teacher used explicit
instructions, feedback or information to assist learning. This style of learning directly links to TfEL
framework domain 2.4, by ensuring students feel supported, challenged and assured throughout
their learning (DECD, 2010). Combined with the questioning/guided discovery approach, the teacher
directed approach has been utilised particularly during theoretical lessons as students are given new
information and concepts most of which, students are expected to have limited to no pre-existing
knowledge of. This approach is also linked to TfEL domain 2 as it is beneficial when covering safety
aspects of the unit as these are not negotiable and need to be clearly emphasised to students (DECD,
2010). However, when analysing the unit in terms of best practice teaching this is not the preferred
pedagogical approach as it does not promote the development of higher order and cognitive
thinking to the levels that a more student-centred or guided discovery approach does (Parker &
Curtner-Smith, 2012).

GAME SENSE

The game sense approach was the predominant framework used to design the practical component
of the unit in the hope students will have the opportunity to practice and further develop skills in
game situations. Aligning with TfEL framework domains 4.1 and 4.3 (DECD, 2010), this approach aims
to develop students tactical learning during game play, therefore, providing them with a better
understanding of the game intelligence (Pill, 2013). As said above, through immediate game play at
the beginning of the unit with a modified version of the end game, teachers are able to use this as a
pre-assessment in order to gauge student performance, pre-existing understanding of invasion
games as well as their readiness levels(Doubet & Hockett, 2015). Using this game sense method
encourages students to become intricate problem solvers in situations that are similar to real game
situations. This also promotes learning environments which are favourable when using a dynamic
systems perspective (Pill, 2013). Mosstons spectrum of teaching styles, similar to the game sense
approach has a focus on assisting students in developing higher order and cognitive thinking
(Mosston & Ashworth, 2008). The use of a guided discovery approach is achieved predominantly
through putting students in situations aimed at developing their effective decision making (Mosston
& Ashworth, 2008).

DIFFERENTIATION

Throughout the unit, elements of both practical and theoretical concepts are able to be
adapted/modified using the following methods, to accommodate for students level of readiness,
interests, needs and abilities (Jarvis, 2010).

CHANGE IT

The approach not only links with how the content it taught, but also how practical lessons may be
differentiated to suit students readiness, interests and abilities. It focus is on changing specific
elements of the game in order to adapt to more complex games, to a beginners level and vice versa.
These changeable elements include coaching or teaching styles, how to score in terms of making it
easier or harder, the playing area, the number of players, secondary game rules, equipment,
inclusion and the time it is played for (Australian Sports Commission, 2016). This was used in lesson
1 when progressing the initial invasion game from Bench-ball to the developed game of European
Handball to allow students to focus on specific elements of the game at a time, rather than being
overwhelmed with rules and fundamental game skills. This approach addresses TfEL framework
domain 4.1 (DECD, 2010), to better build on students understandings. This will be achieved by
allowing time for students to grasp the fundamental aspects of each game before progressing to
make it more complex/similar to the game. These alterations may also be made during practical
lessons throughout the unit to adapt to students needs and support students while they develop
deeper understandings. Flexibility is needed in this approach as some students may grasp concepts
and develop their abilities at a faster rate than others (Sousa & Tomlinson, 2011).
STUDENT INTERESTS

Throughout the unit, much of the content has been aimed at students interest to create engaging
lessons that can transfer knowledge from areas/concepts where students have prior understandings.
Linking to the TfEL domain 4.2 (DECD, 2010), the emphasis on student interest helps to create links
and build a deeper understanding of how the content can be transferred/adapted to other contexts.
Jarvis (2013) explains that teachers can capitalise on student interest to create engaging lessons that
students are motivated to participate and achieve in. She states that students are likely to have
developed considerable background knowledge, including vocabulary knowledge, through a range of
prior experiences related to topics of interest (p.59). Therefore, by relating concepts in the
classroom, such as the RAFT task, to students individual interests, teachers are enhancing student
learning and developing meaningful connections and understandings to contexts outside of the
classroom (promoting authenticity).

GROUP DYNAMICS

It is important that throughout the practical tasks, teams or groups comprised of students of mixed
ability, as opposed to the static low, middle and high ability grouping (Jarvis, 2010). This prevents
any one team from consistently dominating the play time, resulting in opposition players to have
less time with the ball and hinder the development their own technical and tactical skills (Lentillon-
Kaestner & Patelli, 2016). Teams will be flexible and able to change over the course of the unit as
each students skills progress. Creating teams of mixed ability will not only level the playing fields,
but it will also allow for valuable peer teaching opportunities. Peer teaching enhances the level of
challenge for students who excel as they are provided with the opportunity to teach or become a
facilitator of learning for students of a lower ability level (Tomlinson, 2004). It also prevents students
with disabilities or special needs from continuously being placed in the low ability group with the
same students, giving them equal opportunity to succeed and work with other students in their class
(Jarvis, 2010). This factor was also considered when allocating group work/discussions during theory
lessons. For these tasks, group dynamics were varied to create equal opportunities for students to
learn. Students were either grouped according to their ability and readiness levels. This allows the
teacher to slightly alter the level of challenge while ensuring the learning objectives remain the
same. Anchor activities will be available as groups may finish the core activities at different rates
(Jarvis, 2013). The other grouping method involves mixed ability groups. Similar to the benefits of
the practical task grouping, this allows for the opportunity of peer teaching, creating more challenge
for students who require it (Sousa & Tomlinson, 2011).

CLEAR LEARNING INTENTIONS

At the beginning of each practical and theory lesson the learning intentions in the form of know,
understand and do will be discussed to ensure students will know exactly what they are aiming to
achieve by the lessons completion (Wiggins & Mctighe, 2011). By having the end point in mind,
students are able to relate the lesson content to a particular understanding giving students the
ability to find connections within their learning and promote critical thinking. This eliminates any
hazy lessons and gives rise to high quality curriculum (Tomlinson 2014, pp 61-62) . Further to this,
each lesson will include a brief recap of the content learnt in the lesson previous, or in some cases
the year (year 10), to ensure students can recall and demonstrate what was covered so they can
transfer their knowledge to the new concepts. This also allows the teacher to identify which
students need further guidance or what students need to be extended in particular areas.

READINESS

An important part of this unit is acknowledging that students will have a varying amount of previous
experience in both handball and exercise physiology. This varying experience will determine the way
students interact with the units content. If left unaddressed then a student may either struggle or
disengaged during a lesson leading to behavioural problems and poor learning outcomes. To cater
for this, we have introduced pre-assessment at the beginning of the unit in both the theory and
practical to determine each student's readiness. Readiness, as explained by Sousa & Tomlinson
(2011, p.85), is defined as an individuals current proximity or proficiency with a specific set of
knowledge, understandings and skills based designated to a particular segment of study. With the
level of readiness determined, the teacher can differentiate the lesson slightly to ensure students
are progressing in their zone of proximal development (Jarvis, 2015). This will be incorporated into
learning activities during the theory and certain tasks, such as the drills and grouping, in practicals.
This links in with TfEL domain 4.1 which states the content should build on learners
understandings It is important to note that when differentiating a lesson, students learning
outcomes should remain the same but the way students complete the task (level of guidance) will be
different. Further to this Doubet & Hockett (2015) discovered students readiness levels are dynamic
and fluctuate depending on the topic and individual progress requiring readiness to be continuously
assessed through observations, questioning and formative assessment.

ASSESSMENT

PRE-ASSESSMENT

The unit utilises pre-assessment prior to the first lesson for both the practical and theory
components. Provided in the form of a quiz or test, students are required to answer a series of
purposefully designed questions to assess their current level of knowledge and understanding across
topics previously covered in years 9 and 10, as well as some questions that students are not yet
expected to know. Including both types of question enables the teacher to ascertain the degree to
which students have retained their learning from previous years, as well as determine whether there
are students with existing understandings more advanced than would be expected at SACE Stage 1.
Carrying out this pre-assessment helps to determine students levels of readiness, and guides the
future planning of lesson content sequences, learning tasks, and differentiation for students of
differing readiness levels (Tomlinson, 2004). Moreover, the inclusion of pre-assessment complies
with domain 4 of the TfEL framework, which encourages teachers to know what students can do in
subdomain 4.1, and build on learners understandings within subdomain 4.1 (DECD, 2010).

The pre-assessment provides opportunities for students to review their own level of existing
understandings, whilst offering them with a brief insight into the content and focus of the upcoming
unit that may aid in preparation for learning. The pre-assessment tasks within the theory and
practical components of the unit fall under the banners of assessment as, and assessment for
learning; as this both begins the learning process in students and helps guide the path for future
learning (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006; Wiliam, 2011). Furthermore, in the case of the practical
European Handball quiz, the pre-assessment task provides an opportunity for the teacher to collect
baseline data in relation to individual students knowledge and understandings about European
Handball. This becomes valuable again when repeating the quiz with students at the end of the unit,
with results able to be used to measure student growth of learning and understanding of the sport.
This can then become a lightly weighted summative task that aids in guiding the grading process at
the end of the unit.

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Ongoing formative assessment is utilised throughout the unit in both practical and theory
components. Two key avenues for conducting formative assessment through the unit are teacher
observations and questioning. Both observations and question come through naturally as part of the
Game Sense pedagogical approach for practical lessons, and through a student-centred, guided
discovery approach within theory lessons. Anderson, Krathwohl and Bloom (2001) suggest that
student achievement and success can be assessed across the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor
domains of learning, and teachers are able to assess this through observation and questioning
strategies. Observation of student performance during practical sessions allows the teacher to
formatively assess student learning across all three domains. Examples of this could be observing
student ability to make appropriate tactical and decisions and technically execute during game play
(psychomotor); though subjective (Huitt, 2004), gauging cognitive learning through students
demonstrating levels of understanding through questioning; and affective development observable
through students displaying leadership, collaboration, and values of fair play. Furthermore, utilising
questioning as a way of conducting formative assessment through theory lessons connects with
domain 3 of the TfEL framework: develop expert learners through subdomain 3.4: promote
dialogue as a means of learning (DECD, 2010).

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

The choices of summative assessment within the unit have been based on specific features of the
performance standards for Stage 1 SACE Physical Education (SACE, 2017). To ensure this, summative
assessment tasks have been designed through backward design, by first selecting key areas of focus
from the performance standards and building the tasks in a way that will give students opportunities
to demonstrate achievement against these (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005). The practical and theory
summative assessment tasks are designed in conjunction with each other in order to cover as many
of the appropriate design criteria specific features without overlap, in order to best enable students
to demonstrate their learning across all specific features by the end of the Stage 1 subject (SACE,
2017).

The inclusion of a RAFT activity within the summative theoretical assessment facilitates
differentiation by student interest (Tomlinson, 2014). This assessment task enables students to have
choice in the way that they approach and present their work, though the focus on key concepts and
demonstration of achievement towards these remains the same. Giving students choice and
flexibility in their approach to assessment tasks is shown to increase students feelings of ownership
and empowerment regarding their work, which can lead to higher achievement and meaningful
engagement with the assessment piece (Sewell & Denton, 2011). The TfEL framework aligns with
this decision through sub-domains 2.1: create democratic relationships and 2.3: negotiate learning
(DECD, 2010). Furthermore, the theory summative assessment task allows students choice in their
mode of presentation, connecting with TfEL domain 4: personalise and connect learning subdomain
4.4: communicate learning in multiple modes (DECD, 2010). The summative assessment planned for
the practical component of the unit is purposefully designed as a theoretical assessment of
practical performance, rather than a performance and skill based assessment. Students are marked
on the quality of their analysis and understanding of their own performance, rather than the quality
of movement shown during the practical. Further, utilising video analysis of student's own
performance for the practical assessment component touches on subdomain 4.3 of the TfEL
framework: apply and assess learning in authentic contexts (DECD, 2010). Including a theoretical-
focused practical assessment

CONCLUSION

This unit demonstrates how TGfU and Play Practice approaches, when combined with SEPEP and
various other curriculum frameworks, can promote students to develop higher order thinking during
their participation in Stage 1 Physical Education. This unit has aimed to develop students
fundamental knowledge and understanding of the game of European Handball through a number of
practical and theoretical components, assessment tasks and teaching pedagogies. By linking the unit
to the curriculum and shifting the focus to tactical awareness in invasion games, students will learn
and develop valuable transferable skills that are necessary to progress to SACE stage 2. Various
pedagogical approaches decisions were made when designing the unit. Student centered, guided
discovery, teacher directed and game sense have been implemented with the aim to promote best
teaching practice through developing students higher-order thinking and skill performance. In both
practical and theory lessons, students will transition between traditional game and guided discovery
where the whole class will be introduced to a specific tactical skill. The guided discovery approach
will be implemented in these modified game scenarios to deeply engage students to explain the
why and not just the what to better understand new information. Assessment tasks have been
thoughtfully constructed in order to determine student progress over the six weeks. Through
ongoing formative assessment teachers are best able to gauge student development and prepare
them for the summative tasks. Special emphasis was given to differentiation concepts to cater to all
students levels of readiness, particularly in the decision to use a RAFT for the theoretical summative
assignment. By providing students the freedom to choose, to some degree, the assessment they
undertake, should promote a sense of independence and engagement in the topic.
Overall this unit was developed around the central idea that students should be given opportunities
for meaningful, authentic and differentiated participation in both the practical and theoretical
components of physical education to achieve success, not only in Stage 1 SACE, but to promote
lifelong physical activity.

References
Alexander, K., & Taggart, A. (1995). SEPEP: Sport education in physical education program. Australian
Sports Commission.
Anderson, L. W., Krathwohl, D. R., & Bloom, B. S. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and
assessing: A revision of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives. Allyn & Bacon.
Arnold, P. J. (1979). Meaning in movement, sport, and physical education. Heinemann.
Australian Sports Commission. (2016). Change it. Retrieved from
https://sportingschools.gov.au/resources-and-pd/schools/playing-for-life-resources/change-it
Brown, T., & Penney, D. (2013). Learning in ,through and about movement in senior physical
education? The new Victorian Certificate of Education Physical Education. European Physical
Education Review, 19(1), 39-61.
Bunker D and Thorpe R (1986) The curriculum model. In: Thorpe R, Bunker D and Almond L (eds)
Rethinking Games Teaching. Loughborough, UK: Loughborough University of Technology.
Davids, K. W., Button, C., & Bennett, S. J. (2008). Dynamics of skill acquisition: A constraints-led
approach. Human kinetics.
Davies, M. (2006). Intensive teaching formats: A review. Issues in Educational Research, [online] 16(1),
pp.1-20. Available at: http://www.iier.org.au/iier16/davies.html
DECD. (2010). South Australian Teaching for Effective Learning framework guide. Adelaide, Australia:
DECD.
Doubet, K., & Hockett, J. A. (2015). Differentiation in Middle and High School : Strategies to Engage All
Learners. Alexandria, Virginia: ASCD.
Griffey, D. C., & Housner, L. D. (2007). Designing effective instructional tasks for physical education and
sports. Human Kinetics.
Haq, S. and Kodak, T. (2014). Evaluating the effects of massed and distributed practice on acquisition
and maintenance of tacts and textual behavior with typically developing children. Journal of Applied
Behavior Analysis, 48(1), pp.85-95. Available at:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.ezproxy.flinders.edu.au/doi/10.1002/jaba.178/full
Harvel, C. (2010). Guided discovery learning. In K. Lee (Ed.), Faith-based education that constructs: A
creative dialogue between constructivism and faith-based education (pp. 169-172). Wipf and Stock
Publishers.
Huitt, W. (2004). Bloom et al.'s taxonomy of the cognitive domain. Educational psychology interactive,
22.
Jarvis, J. (2010). Differentiation for the many, not the few, SERUpdate, 20(2), p.3-13. Available at:
http://libpet.flinders.edu.au/cgibin/FLEX_course_reserve_builder.cgi?course_code=EDUC4720_2017
_NS1
Jarvis, J, (2013). 'Differentiating learning experiences for diverse students', in P, Hudson. (ed.), Learning
to teach in the primary school, Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, Vic., pp. 52-70.
Jarvis, J. (2015), 'Inclusive classrooms and differentiation', in Weatherby-Fell, N, (ed.), Learning to teach
in the secondary school, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 154-172.
Launder, A (2001) Play Practice: The Games Approach to Teaching and Coaching Sport. Adelaide:
Human Kinetics.
Lentillon-Kaestner, V., & Patelli, G. (2016). Effects of Grouping Forms, Student Gender and Ability Level
on the Pleasure Experienced in Physical Education. Journal Of Teaching In Physical Education, 35(3),
251-262.
Mitchell, S. A., Oslin, J. L., & Griffin, L. L. (2013). Teaching sport concepts and skills: A tactical games
approach for ages 7 to 18. Human Kinetics.
Mosston, M. & Ashworth, A. (2008). Teaching Physical Education. The Spectrum Institute for Teaching
and Learning. Available at: http://spectrumofteachingstyles.org/NEW2/wp-
content/themes/sots/img/Teaching_Physical_Edu_1st_Online.pdf
Parker, M. and Curtner-Smith, M. (2012). Preservice teachers use of production and reproduction
teaching styles within multi-activity and sport education units. European Physical Education Review,
[online] 18(1), pp.127-143. Available at:
http://journals.sagepub.com.ezproxy.flinders.edu.au/doi/abs/10.1177/1356336X11430655
Pill, S. (2010). Sport literacy-Its not just about learning to play sport via textbook techniques. Journal
of Student Wellbeing, 4(2).
Pill, S. (2013). Game sense to sport literacy. Hindmarsh, SA: Australian Council for Health, Physical
Education and Recreation.
Pill, S. (2014). Sport Literacy: Providing PE teachers a principled position for sport teaching in PE and a
process through which to frame that teaching according to situated contextual needs. Positive
Feedback Can Change Life, 3(1), 54-75.
Renshaw, I., Chow, J. Y., Davids, K., & Hammond, J. (2010). A constraints-led perspective to
understanding skill acquisition and game play: A basis for integration of motor learning theory and
physical education praxis?. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 15(2), 117-137.
SACE Board of SA. (2017). Physical Education subject outline 2013 Stage 1& Stage 2. Adelaide, SA:
Government of South Australia.
Seabrook, R., Brown, G. and Solity, J. (2005). Distributed and massed practice: from laboratory to
classroom. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 19(1), p.108. Available at:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.ezproxy.flinders.edu.au/doi/10.1002/acp.1066/epdf
Sewell, W., & Denton, S. (2011). Multimodal literacies in the secondary English classroom. English
journal, 61-65.
Siedentop, D., Hastie, P. A., & Van der Mars, H. (2011). Complete guide to sport education. Human
Kinetics.
Sousa, D. & Tomlinson, C. (2011). Differentiation and the brain: how neuroscience supports the learner-
friendly classroom, Solution Tree Press, Bloomington, Ind.
Tomlinson, C. A. (2004). 'The how to's of planning lessons differentiated by readiness', in Tomlinson,
Carol A, How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms, 2nd edn, Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Va, pp. 45-51.
Tomlinson, C, A., (2014). 'Good curriculum as a basis for differentiation', in Tomlinson, Carol A, The
differentiated classroom: responding to the needs of all learners, 2nd edn, ASCD, Alexandria, Virginia
,. 60-79.
Tomlinson, C. A., & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating differentiated instruction & understanding by design:
Connecting content and kids. ASCD.
Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design. Ascd.
Wiggins, G P., & McTighe, J. (2011). 'Essential questions and understandings', in Wiggins, Grant P &
McTighe, Jay, The understanding by design guide to creating high-quality units, ASCD, Alexandria,
Va., 70-88
Wiliam, D. (2011). What is assessment for learning?. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 37(1), 3-14.
Appendices
Team Handball Pre Test Appendix A

This pre assessment can be conducted by using clickers (for anonymity), Kahoots (as a game) or
hardcopy circled to keep in a students file.

Please select what experience you have had with European/Team Handball:
a) None
b) Played at school/in class
c) Play/ed socially
d) Play/ed in league/state or higher level

From this, please complete the follow questions. If you ticked NONE for experience/knowledge of
handball please still answer all of the questions. Your results from this are not assessed, they are
used to see what areas we need to cover in class.

1.) How many players are on the court for each 6.) How many points is a goal worth?
team? a) 4
a) 5 b) 3
b) 6 c) 2
c) 7 d) 1
d) 8
7.) The goalie is the only person allowed to use
2.) How long is a standard game? their hands and feet
a) Two 30-minute halves a) True
b) Four 15-minute quarters b) False
c) Two 40-minute halves
d) Four 20-minute halves 9.) Team Handball is played at an Olympic Level
a) True
3.) How many steps can be taken with the ball in b) False
possession?
a) 2 10.) What skills from other sports are used in
b) 5 Handball?
c) 1 a) Basketball, soccer, football,
d) 3 hockey
b) Lacrosse, volleyball, soccer,
4.) You are allowed to take a shot while inside hockey
the goalie box. c) Soccer, water polo, hockey,
a) True basketball
b) False d) Water polo, hockey, football,
soccer
5.) What starts the game?
a) Throw off 11.) Short passes are more effective than long
b) Jump ball passes
c) Teammate pass a) True
d) Throw in b) False
12.) Where are shots NOT allowed to be taken 16.) You are allowed to dive on the floor for a
from? free/stationary ball
a) Inside the goalie box a) True
b) Behind half court b) False
c) In front of the goalie box
d) Only A and B 17.) If you take more than 3 steps without
dribbling the ball or passing to another
14.) Handball is a non-contact sport teammate possession is lost:
a) True a) True
b) False b) False
18.) Handball is a fast game with lots of
15.) The goal circle is also called movement
a) The circ a) True
b) Goal area b) False
c) The crease
d) The end-zone
Summative Practical Task sheet - Analysis of skill progression Appendix B

Year 11 HPE Practical Summative Assessment Task Sheet

Name/Date

Task Topic Analysis of skill progression over the course of the unit.

PSA1 Proficiency in practical skills and techniques in different physical activities.

Curriculum Content PSA2 Interpretation and effective application of skills, specific concepts, ideas, strategies, and techniques.
descriptors covered
IC2 Collaboration with others in team activities.

AR1 Analysis of, and reflection on, practical techniques and performance.

Task Descriptions Display a number of technical and tactical skills that are required in a game of handball to assess individual and whole class
improvement over the course of the unit.

Part 1
Vidoe 1 4v4 Teams will be videoed playing a game of European Handball for a 15 minute period using the Ipads provided. This will be
conducted during week 2 lesson 2 of the unit plan once basic rules have been established. It is essential that all students have equal
playing time in order to analyse their playing skills.

Students will be organised in predetermined teams to allow an even playing field and increase inclusion. Team 1 will play team 2
for 15 minutes while the other teams vidoe a specific individual and vice versa. Although it may seem more efficient to film the two
teams as a whole, this allows students to assess individual movements, skills and positioning in comparison to others.
Part 2
Video 2 This will be completed in week 5 lesson 2 during the final stages of the unit after tactical plays and positions have been introduced.
Students will again be videoed for 15 minutes playing (same format as last time) the game to assess the progression of tactics and
skills, both individual, and the class as a whole.

Task Breakdown Part 3 Analysis:


What do I need to
do? 1. Analyse your own performance during the first lesson (relate to specific points in the video). You should consider your
technical and tactical skills in terms of movement (spacial awareness), movement of the ball, technique and supporting
your team.

2. You will need to compare this to the recent video taken to determine improvements. Consider the points mentioned
above, how you have improved in these areas, why this is an improvement and why is it important to the flow of the
game?
(it is recommended that you present your findings in a table).

3. Your final task is to look at the progression of the class as a whole. This should consider improvements in teamwork, ball
movement around the court, team support and strategies. Compare the two videos and discuss your findings.
Appendix C
Appendix D
SACE STAGE 1 PHYSICAL EDUCATION
ASSESSMENT TYPE 2: FOLIO INTEGRATED TASK - Principles and Issues
The Nature of Physical Activity: Body Systems (Exercise Physiology)

Name / Date

Task Topic The Nature of Physical Activity - Body Systems (Exercise Physiology)

Curriculum Content KU1 - Knowledge and understanding of the nature of physical activity.
Descriptors Covered KU2 - Knowledge and understanding of appropriate terminology.
AR1 - Analysis of, and reflection on, performance.
AR3 - Use of information from different sources, with appropriate acknowledgement.

PURPOSE
This task provides the opportunity demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the physiological
responses of the human body when participating in exercise. Particular focus is placed on the
interconnection between the muscular, circulatory, and respiratory systems; their acute and chronic
responses to exercise; and the impact that these responses have on the athlete.

DESCRIPTION OF ASSESSMENT
The task is presented through a RAFT format. You are to select one of the rows from the RAFT table
below which outline four options for presentation method for your assignment. For example, if you
choose the third row of the RAFT, you will write your assignment from the perspective of an exercise
physiologist speaking to European handball players in a team meeting on the topic of the demands
and responses of the body during game play and training.
Whichever RAFT row you choose, you will be required to demonstrate your understanding and
ability to apply the exercise physiology concepts covered in our theory lessons to a specific sport
context. It is your choice to decide on the sporting context (except when choosing the European
handball option) and you must give specific details of the demands of this on the body within your
report.
Although some options for presentation are creative, factually correct information and terminology
must be used throughout your response with appropriate referencing to acknowledge resources
used.

Key features to consider in your task:


- Outline all appropriate responses to exercise across the muscular, circulatory, and
respiratory systems.
- Specific reference to type of exercise and factors that influence physiological response.
- Use of accurate terminology.
- Appropriate language for role in chosen task.
- Appropriate referencing of any resources used for research.
Choose one row from the following RAFT table to use as the framework of your task:
Role Audience Format Topic

Yr11 Physical Education Physical Education Teacher Written Report What happens in the body when we
student exercise?

Human muscle or muscle Rest of the body (heart and SOS message! Help! We are under stress!
group lungs in particular)

Exercise Physiologist / European Handball Player / Individual Meeting / Team The demands and responses of your body
Fitness Trainer Team meeting presentation during training and game play.

Oxygen particle Self Diary / Journal / Journey log My voyage from the atmospheric air through
the exercising body

ASSESSMENT CONDITIONS
This task should come to a maximum of 750 words if written or 5 minutes for an oral or multimodal presentation. Appropriate headings and referencing
should be included.

You will have two weeks to complete the task; working on this will generally be within your own time. You will be given time during three theory lessons to
work on this with access to ICT.
Performance Standards for Stage 1 Physical Education - FOLIO INTEGRATED TASK - PRINCIPLES AND ISSUES
- Knowledge and Understanding Practical Skills Application Initiative and Collaboration Analysis and Reflection

A Comprehensive knowledge and A high level of proficiency in practical skills Constructive initiative and Insightful and proactive analysis of, and reflection on,
understanding of the nature of physical and techniques in a variety of physical leadership in areas of practical techniques and performance.
activity. activities. physical activity. In-depth analysis of an issue related to physical activity and
Clear and accurate knowledge and Accurate interpretation and highly effective Proactive collaboration in clearly relevant to local, regional, national, or global
understanding of appropriate application of skills, specific concepts, ideas, team activities. communities.
terminology. strategies, and techniques. Thorough and focused use of information from different
sources, with appropriate acknowledgment.

B Well-considered knowledge and Proficiency in practical skills and techniques Capable initiative and Well-considered and mostly proactive analysis of, and
understanding of the nature of physical in most physical activities. leadership in areas of reflection on, practical techniques and performance.
activity. Mostly clear interpretation and effective physical activity. Well-considered analysis of an issue related to physical
Mostly clear knowledge and application of skills, specific concepts, ideas, Active collaboration in team activity and relevant to local, regional, national, or global
understanding of appropriate strategies, and techniques. activities. communities.
terminology. Mostly focused use of information from different sources,
with appropriate acknowledgment.

C Considered knowledge and Competent practical skills and techniques in Some initiative and Considered and sometimes proactive analysis of, and
understanding of the nature of physical different physical activities. contribution to leadership in reflection on, some aspects of practical techniques and
activity. Competent interpretation and generally areas of physical activity. performance.
Competent knowledge and effective application of skills, specific Appropriate collaboration in Considered analysis of an issue related to physical activity
understanding of appropriate concepts, ideas, strategies, and techniques. team activities. that has some relevance to local, regional, national, or global
terminology. communities.
Competent use of information from different sources, with
appropriate acknowledgment.

D Some recognition and awareness of the Inconsistent practical skills and techniques in Occasional demonstration of Consideration and description of some aspects of practical
nature of physical activity. one or more physical activities. initiative in areas of physical techniques and performance.
Some recognition and understanding of Inconsistent interpretation and application of activity, with support. Some consideration and description of an issue related to
basic terminology that may be skills, specific concepts, or ideas. Occasional collaboration in physical activity, but with limited relevance to local, regional,
appropriate. team activities. national, or global communities.
Some use of information from more than one source, with
some attempted acknowledgment.

E Awareness of one or more aspects of Emerging practical skills and techniques in Emerging recognition of the Description of one or more aspects of practical techniques or
the nature of physical activity. one or more physical activities. need for initiative. performance.
Limited awareness of basic terminology Limited interpretation and application of Emerging collaborative skills Identification and some description of an issue related to
that may be appropriate. skills, specific concepts, or ideas. in team activities. physical activity.
Attempted use of information from a source, with limited
acknowledgment.
Performance Standards for Stage 1 Physical Education
Knowledge and Understanding Practical Skills Application Initiative and Collaboration Analysis and Reflection

A Comprehensive knowledge and A high level of proficiency in practical Constructive initiative and leadership Insightful and proactive analysis of, and reflection on, practical
understanding of the nature of physical skills and techniques in a variety of in areas of physical activity. techniques and performance.
activity. physical activities. Proactive collaboration in team In-depth analysis of an issue related to physical activity and
Clear and accurate knowledge and Accurate interpretation and highly activities. clearly relevant to local, regional, national, or global
understanding of appropriate terminology. effective application of skills, specific communities.
concepts, ideas, strategies, and Thorough and focused use of information from different
techniques. sources, with appropriate acknowledgment.

B Well-considered knowledge and Proficiency in practical skills and Capable initiative and leadership in Well-considered and mostly proactive analysis of, and reflection
understanding of the nature of physical techniques in most physical activities. areas of physical activity. on, practical techniques and performance.
activity. Mostly clear interpretation and Active collaboration in team Well-considered analysis of an issue related to physical activity
Mostly clear knowledge and understanding effective application of skills, specific activities. and relevant to local, regional, national, or global communities.
of appropriate terminology. concepts, ideas, strategies, and Mostly focused use of information from different sources, with
techniques. appropriate acknowledgment.

C Considered knowledge and understanding Competent practical skills and Some initiative and contribution to Considered and sometimes proactive analysis of, and reflection
of the nature of physical activity. techniques in different physical leadership in areas of physical on, some aspects of practical techniques and performance.
Competent knowledge and understanding activities. activity. Considered analysis of an issue related to physical activity that
of appropriate terminology. Competent interpretation and Appropriate collaboration in team has some relevance to local, regional, national, or global
generally effective application of skills, activities. communities.
specific concepts, ideas, strategies, and Competent use of information from different sources, with
techniques. appropriate acknowledgment.

D Some recognition and awareness of the Inconsistent practical skills and Occasional demonstration of Consideration and description of some aspects of practical
nature of physical activity. techniques in one or more physical initiative in areas of physical activity, techniques and performance.
Some recognition and understanding of activities. with support. Some consideration and description of an issue related to
basic terminology that may be Inconsistent interpretation and Occasional collaboration in team physical activity, but with limited relevance to local, regional,
appropriate. application of skills, specific concepts, activities. national, or global communities.
or ideas. Some use of information from more than one source, with
some attempted acknowledgment.

E Awareness of one or more aspects of the Emerging practical skills and Emerging recognition of the need for Description of one or more aspects of practical techniques or
nature of physical activity. techniques in one or more physical initiative. performance.
Limited awareness of basic terminology activities. Emerging collaborative skills in team Identification and some description of an issue related to
that may be appropriate. Limited interpretation and application activities. physical activity.
of skills, specific concepts, or ideas. Attempted use of information from a source, with limited
acknowledgment.