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Manual Guide

Volume 1
System Architecture and Installation
Firmware Revisions 22.71/26.71
Turbine / Positive Displacemen
Liquid Flow Metering Systems with Meter Factor Linearization

Volume 2C Basic Operation


Volume 3C Configuration and
Advanced Operation

Volume 4C Modbus Database


Addresses and
Index Numbers

Volume 5
Technical Bulletins
Warranty & Licences
Manual Guide

Effective May 1999


About Our Company
Omni Flow Computers, Inc. is the worlds leading manufacturer and supplier of
panel-mount custody transfer flow computers and controllers. Our mission is to
Measure the Difference! continue to achieve higher levels of customer and user satisfaction by applying
the basic company values: our people, our products and productivity.
Omni flow computers - Our products have become the international flow computing standard. Omni
Our products are currently Flow Computers pursues a policy of product development and continuous
being used world-wide at:
improvement. As a result, our flow computers are considered the brain and
Offshore oil and gas
production facilities
cash register of liquid and gas flow metering systems.
Crude oil, refined Our staff is knowledgeable and professional. They represent the energy,
products, LPG, NGL and intelligence and strength of our company, adding value to our products and
gas transmission lines
services. With the customer and user in mind, we are committed to quality in
Storage, truck and
marine loading/offloading everything we do, devoting our efforts to deliver workmanship of high caliber.
terminals Teamwork with uncompromising integrity is our lifestyle.
Refineries;
petrochemical and
cogeneration plants.
Contacting Our Corporate Headquarters

"
Omni Flow Computers, Inc.
10701 Corporate Drive, Suite 300
Stafford, Texas 77477 USA

#
Phone: 281-240-6161
Fax: 281-240-6162

World-wide Web Site:


http://www.omniflow.com

E-mail Addresses:

!$" techsupport@omniflow.com
info@omniflow.com

Getting User Support


Technical and sales support is available world-wide through our corporate or
authorized representative offices. If you require user support, please contact the
location nearest you (see insert) or our corporate offices. Our staff and
representatives will enthusiastically work with you to ensure the sound operation
of your flow computer.

ALL.71+ ! 05/99 xi
Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Manual Guide

About the Flow Computer Applications


Omni 6000 and Omni 3000 Flow Computers are integrable into the majority of
liquid and gas flow measurement and control systems. The current firmware
revisions of Omni 6000/Omni 3000 Flow Computers are:
20.71/24.71: Turbine/Positive Displacement/Coriolis Liquid Flow Metering
Systems with K Factor Linearization (US/metric units)
21.71/25.71: Orifice/Differential Pressure Liquid Flow Metering Systems
(US/metric units)
22.71/26.71: Turbine/Positive Displacement Liquid Flow Metering Systems
with Meter Factor Linearization (US/metric units)
23.71/27.71: Orifice/Turbine Gas Flow Metering Systems (US/metric units)

About the User Manual


This manual applies to .71+ firmware revisions of Omni 6000 and Omni 3000
Flow Computers. It is structured into 5 volumes and is the principal part of your
flow computer documentation.

Target Audience
As a users reference guide, this manual is intended for a sophisticated audience
with knowledge of liquid and gas flow measurement technology. Different user
levels of technical know-how are considered in this manual. You need not be an
expert to operate the flow computer or use certain portions of this manual.
However, some flow computer features require a certain degree of expertise
and/or advanced knowledge of liquid and gas flow instrumentation and electronic
measurement. In general, each volume is directed towards the following users:
Volume 1. System Architecture and Installation
Installers
System/Project Managers
Engineers/Programmers
Advanced Operators
Operators
Volume 2. Basic Operation
All Users
Volume 3. Configuration and Advanced Operation
Engineers/Programmers
Advanced Operators
Volume 4. Modbus Database Addresses and Index Numbers
Engineers/Programmers
Advanced Operators
Volume 5. Technical Bulletins
Users with different levels of expertise.

xii ALL.71+ ! 05/99


Manual Structure
The User Manual comprises 5 volumes; each contained in separate binding for
easy manipulation. You will find a detailed table of contents at the beginning of
each volume.

Volume 1. System Architecture and Installation


Volume 1 is generic to all applications and considers both US and metric units.
This volume describes:
Basic hardware/software features
Installation practices
Calibration procedures
Flow computer specifications

Volume 2. Basic Operation


User Reference This volume is application specific and is available in four separate versions (one
Documentation - The User for each application revision). It covers the essential and routine tasks and
Manual is structured into procedures that may be performed by the flow computer operator. Both US and
five volumes. Volumes 1
and 5 are generic to all flow metric units are considered.
computer application
revisions. Volumes 2, 3 and
General computer-related features are described, such as:
4 are application specific. Overview of keypad functions
These have four versions
each, published in separate Adjusting the display
documents; i.e., one per Clearing and viewing alarms
application revision per
volume. You will receive the Computer totalizing
version that corresponds to Printing and customizing reports
your application revision.
The volumes respective to The application-related topics may include:
each application revision
are: Batching operations
Revision 20/24.71: Proving functions
Volume #s 2a, 3a, 4a PID control functions
Revision 21/25.71:
Audit trail
Volume #s 2b, 3b, 4b
Revision 22/26.71:
Other application specific functions
Volume #s 2c, 3c, 4c Depending on your application, some of these topics may not be included in your
Revision 23/27.71: specific documentation. An index of display variables and corresponding key
Volume #s 2d, 3d, 4d
press sequences that are specific to your application are listed at the end of
For example, if your flow
computer application
each version of this volume.
revision is 20/24.71, you will
be supplied with Volumes
2a, 3a & 4a, along with
Volume 3. Configuration and Advanced Operation
Volumes 1 & 5. Volume 3 is intended for the advanced user. It refers to application specific
topics and is available in four separate versions (one for each application
revision). This volume covers:
Application overview
Flow computer configuration data entry
User-programmable functions
Modbus Protocol implementation
Flow equations and algorithms

ALL.71+ ! 05/99 xiii


Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Manual Guide

Database Addresses and Index Numbers


Volume 4. Modbus
Volume 4 is intended for the system programmer (advanced user). It comprises
a descriptive list of database point assignments in numerical order, within our
firmware. This volume is application specific, for which there is one version per
application revision.

Volume 5. Technical Bulletins


Manual Updates and Volume 5 includes technical bulletins that contain important complementary
Technical Bulletins - information about your flow computer hardware and software. Each bulletin
Volume 5 of the User covers a topic that may be generic to all applications or specific to a particular
Manual is a compendium of
Technical Bulletins. They revision. They include product updates, theoretical descriptions, technical
contain updates to the user specifications, procedures, and other information of interest.
manual. You can view and
print updates from our This is the most dynamic and current volume. Technical bulletins may be added
website: to this volume after its publication. You can view and print these bulletins from
http://www.omniflow.com our website.

Conventions Used in this Manual


Typographical Several typographical conventions have been established as standard reference
Conventions - These are to highlight information that may be important to the reader. These will allow you
standard graphical/text to quickly identify distinct types of information.
elements used to denote
types of information. For
your convenience, a few
conventions were
CONVENTION USED DESCRIPTION
established in the manuals
layout design. These Sidebar Notes / InfoTips Sidebar notes or InfoTips consist of concise
highlight important information of interest which is enclosed in a gray-
Example: shaded box placed on the left margin of a page.
information of interest to the
reader and are easily These refer to topics that are either next to them, or
INFO - Sidebar notes are used to
caught by the eye. highlight important information in on the same or facing page. It is highly
a concise manner. recommended that you read them.

Keys / Keypress Keys on the flow computer keypad are denoted with
Sequences brackets and bold face characters (e.g.: the up
arrow key is denoted as [%]). The actual function of
Example: the key as it is labeled on the keypad is what
appears between brackets. Keypress sequences
[Prog] [Batch] [Meter] [n]
that are executed from the flow computer keypad are
expressed in a series of keys separated by a space
(as shown in the example).

Screen Displays
Sample screens that correspond to the flow
Example: computer display appear surrounded by a dark gray
border with the text in bold face characters and
Use Up/Down Arrows mono-spaced font. The flow computer display is
To Adjust Contrast; actually 4 lines by 20 characters. Screens that are
Left, Right Arrows more than 4 lines must be scrolled to reveal the text
To Adjust Backlight shown in the manual.

xiv ALL.71+ ! 05/99


CONVENTION USED DESCRIPTION
Headings
Sequential heading numbering is used to categorize
Example: topics within each volume of the User Manual. The
highest heading level is a chapter, which is divided
2. Chapter Heading into sections, which are likewise subdivided into
subsections. Among other benefits, this facilitates
2.3. Section Heading
information organization and cross-referencing.
2.3.1. Subsection Heading

Figure Captions Figure captions are numbered in sequence as they


Example: appear in each chapter. The first number identifies
the chapter, followed by the sequence number and
Fig. 2-3. Figure No. 3 of title of the illustration.
Chapter 2

Page Numbers Page numbering restarts at the beginning of every


chapter and technical bulletin. Page numbers are
Example: preceded by the chapter number followed by a
hyphen. Technical bulletins only indicate the page
2-8
number of that bulletin. Page numbers are located
on the outside margin in the footer of each page.

Application Revision and The contents of Volume 1 and Volume 5 are


Effective Publication Date common to all application revisions and are denoted
as All.71. Content of Volumes 2, 3 and 4 are
Examples: application specific and are identified with the
All.71 ! 03/98 application number. These identifiers are included
on every page in the inside margin of the footer,
20/24.71 ! 03/98
opposite the page number. The publication/effective
21/25.71 ! 03/98 date of the manual follows the application
22/26.71 ! 03/98 identification. The date is expressed as month/year
(e.g.: March 1998 is 03/98).
23/27.71 ! 03/98

Trademark References
The following are trademarks of Omni Flow Computers, Inc.:
Omni 3000
Omni 6000
OmniCom
Other brand, product and company names that appear in this manual are
trademarks of their respective owners.

ALL.71+ ! 05/99 xv
Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Manual Guide

Copyright Information and Modifications Policy


This manual is copyright protected. All rights reserved. No part of this manual
may be used or reproduced in any form, or stored in any database or retrieval
system, without prior written consent of Omni Flow Computers, Inc., Stafford,
Texas, USA. Making copies of any part of this manual for any purpose other than
your own personal use is a violation of United States copyright laws and
international treaty provisions.
Omni Flow Computers, Inc., in conformance with its policy of product
development and improvement, may make any necessary changes to this
document without notice.

Warranty, Licenses and Product Registration


Product warranty and licenses for use of Omni flow computer firmware and of

!
OmniCom Configuration PC Software are included in the first pages of each
Volume of this manual. We require that you read this information before using
your Omni flow computer and the supplied software and documentation.
If you have not done so already, please complete and return to us the product
registration form included with your flow computer. We need this information for
Important! warranty purposes, to render you technical support and serve you in future
upgrades. Registered users will also receive important updates and information
about their flow computer and metering system.

Copyright 1991-1999 by Omni Flow Computers, Inc.


All Rights Reserved.

xvi ALL.71+ ! 05/99


Volume 1
User Manual

System Architecture
and Installation

Effective May 1999


Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 1

1. Overview of Hardware and Software Features..................................................... 1-1


1.1. Introduction .......................................................................................................... 1-1
1.2. Operators Panel .................................................................................................. 1-2
1.2.1. LCD Display ..........................................................................................................1-2
1.2.2. Electromechanical Totalizers.................................................................................1-2
1.2.3. Diagnostic and Program LEDs...............................................................................1-2
1.2.4. Active Alarm LED..................................................................................................1-2
1.2.5. Alpha Shift LED.....................................................................................................1-2
1.2.6. Operator Keypad ...................................................................................................1-2
1.3. Passive Backplane Mother Board....................................................................... 1-4
1.4. Back Panel Terminal Module............................................................................... 1-6
1.4.1. Back Panel Terminations.......................................................................................1-6
1.4.2. Extended Back Panel ............................................................................................1-7
1.5. Central Processor Module................................................................................... 1-8
1.6. Input/Output (I/O) Modules .................................................................................. 1-9
1.6.1. Photo-Optical Isolation ........................................................................................ 1-10
1.6.2. Digital I/O Modules.............................................................................................. 1-11
1.6.3. Serial Communication Modules ........................................................................... 1-12
1.6.4. Process I/O Combination Modules....................................................................... 1-16
1.7. Operating Power ................................................................................................ 1-17
1.8. Firmware and Software...................................................................................... 1-19
1.8.1. Interrupt-Driven CPU........................................................................................... 1-19
1.8.2. Cycle Time.......................................................................................................... 1-19
1.8.3. On-line Diagnostics and Calibration..................................................................... 1-19
1.8.4. PC Communications Interface ............................................................................. 1-19
1.8.5. OmniCom Configuration PC Software ............................................................... 1-20
1.8.6. Year 2000 Compliance ........................................................................................ 1-20
1.9. Initializing Your Flow Computer ........................................................................ 1-21

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

2. Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup ............................................. 2-1


2.1. Introduction...........................................................................................................2-1
2.2. Features of the I/O Combo Modules....................................................................2-1
2.2.1. Setting the Address of the Combo Modules........................................................... 2-2
2.2.2. Hardware Analog Configuration Jumpers .............................................................. 2-2
2.2.3. Process I/O Combo Module Addresses Versus Physical I/O Points ...................... 2-2
2.2.4. Assigning Specific Signal Inputs ........................................................................... 2-3
2.2.5. Sample Omni Flow Computer Configuration Charts .............................................. 2-4
2.3. The A and B Combo I/O Modules ........................................................................2-6
2.3.1. A and B Combo Module Non-Selectable or Selectable Address ............................ 2-7
2.3.2. The A Type Combo I/O Module............................................................................. 2-8
2.3.3. The B Type Combo I/O Module........................................................................... 2-10
2.4. The E/D and E Combo Modules.........................................................................2-11
2.4.1. The E/D Type Combo I/O Module ....................................................................... 2-11
2.4.2. The E Type Combo I/O Module........................................................................... 2-12
2.5. The H Type Combo I/O Module..........................................................................2-13
2.6. The HV Type Combo I/O Module .......................................................................2-15
2.7. The SV Type Combo I/O Module........................................................................2-16

3. Mounting and Power Options ................................................................................ 3-1


3.1. Mechanical Installation.........................................................................................3-1
3.1.1. Panel Mounting..................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1.2. Nema 4 / 4X Configurations .................................................................................. 3-2
3.1.3. Nema 7 Specification............................................................................................ 3-2
3.2. Input Power...........................................................................................................3-4
3.2.1. AC Power ............................................................................................................. 3-4
3.2.2. DC Power ............................................................................................................. 3-4
3.2.3. Safety Considerations ........................................................................................... 3-4
3.3. Power Terminals...................................................................................................3-5
3.3.1. CE Equipment Power Terminals ........................................................................... 3-5
3.3.2. Extended Back Panel Power Terminals ................................................................ 3-6
3.4. Power Supply Module Switching Regulator .......................................................3-8

ALL.71+ w 05/99 iii


Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 1

4. Connecting to Flowmeters..................................................................................... 4-1


4.1. Turbine Flowmeter (A or B Combo Module) ....................................................... 4-1
4.2. Wiring Flowmeter Signals to E Type Combo Modules ...................................... 4-2
4.3. Faure Herman Turbine Meters (E Combo Module).......................................... 4-3
4.4. Pulse Fidelity and Integrity Checking with E Type Combo Modules ................ 4-4

5. Connecting to Transducers and Transmitters ..................................................... 5-1


5.1. Wiring the Input Transducers.............................................................................. 5-1
5.2. Wiring of a Dry C Type Contact......................................................................... 5-2
5.3. Wiring RTD Probes .............................................................................................. 5-3
5.4. Wiring Densitometers .......................................................................................... 5-4
5.4.1. Wiring Densitometer Signals to an E/D Type Combo Module ................................5-4
5.4.2. Solartron Densitometers......................................................................................5-4
5.4.3. Sarasota Densitometers ......................................................................................5-6
5.4.4. UGC Densitometers ............................................................................................5-8
5.5. Wiring of Honeywell ST3000 Transmitters .................................................... 5-10
5.6. Wiring Micro Motion Transmitters.................................................................. 5-11
5.6.1. Connecting Micro Motion RFT9739 Transmitter to A Type or E Type Process
I/O Combination Modules .................................................................................... 5-11
5.6.2. Connecting Micro Motion RFT 9739 via RS-485 Serial Communications........... 5-12
5.6.3. Connecting Micro Motion RFT9739 via Serial RS-232-C to 485 Converter ........ 5-13

6. Connecting Analog Outputs and Miscellaneous I/O Including Provers............. 6-1


6.1. Analog Outputs .................................................................................................... 6-1
6.2. Digital Inputs/Outputs .......................................................................................... 6-2
6.2.1. Wiring a Digital Point as an Input or an Output ......................................................6-2
6.2.2. Connecting Various Digital I/O Devices .................................................................6-4
6.3. Provers ................................................................................................................. 6-5
6.3.1. Connecting Pipe Prover Detector Switches............................................................6-5
6.3.2. Interfacing to a Brooks Compact Prover..............................................................6-5
6.3.3. Controlling the Plenum Pressure of a Brooks Compact Prover ............................6-6

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

7. Connecting to Serial Devices................................................................................. 7-1


7.1. Serial Port Connection Options...........................................................................7-1
7.2. Connecting to Printers .........................................................................................7-2
7.2.1. Connecting to a Dedicated Printer (Port 1) ............................................................ 7-2
7.2.2. Connecting to a Shared Printer (Port 1) ................................................................ 7-3
7.2.3. Print Sharing Problems ......................................................................................... 7-3
7.3. Connecting to a Personal Computer and Modem ..............................................7-4
7.4. Peer-to-Peer Communications and Multi-drop Modes .......................................7-6
7.4.1. Peer-to-Peer RS-485 Two-wire Multi-drop Mode ................................................... 7-6
7.4.2. Peer-to-Peer via RS-232-C Communications ........................................................ 7-7
7.4.3. Keying the Modem or Radio Transmitter Carrier in Multi-drop Applications ........... 7-7
7.4.4. RS-485 Four-wire Multi-drop Mode ....................................................................... 7-8
7.5. Connecting to a SCADA Device...........................................................................7-9
7.6. Interfacing the Fourth Serial Port to an Allen-Bradley KE Module ...............7-10

8. Diagnostic and Calibration Features .................................................................... 8-1


8.1. Introduction...........................................................................................................8-1
8.2. Calibrating in the Diagnostic Mode .....................................................................8-2
8.2.1. Entering The Diagnostic Mode .............................................................................. 8-2
8.2.2. Display Groups in the Diagnostic Mode................................................................. 8-3
8.2.3. Leaving The Diagnostic Mode............................................................................... 8-3
8.3. Calibration Instructions........................................................................................8-4
8.3.1. Calibrating A Voltage or Current Analog Input....................................................... 8-4
8.3.2. Calibrating an RTD Input Channel......................................................................... 8-5
8.3.3. Calibrating a 4 to 20 mA Digital to Analog Output ................................................. 8-7
8.3.4. Verifying the Operation of the Digital I/O Points .................................................... 8-8

ALL.71+ w 05/99 v
Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 1

9. Flow Computer Specifications .............................................................................. 9-1


9.1. Environmental ...................................................................................................... 9-1
9.2. Electrical............................................................................................................... 9-1
9.3. Microprocessor CPU............................................................................................ 9-1
9.4. Backplane............................................................................................................. 9-2
9.5. Process Input/Output Combo Modules .............................................................. 9-2
9.6. Flowmeter Pulse Inputs ....................................................................................... 9-2
9.7. Detector Switch Inputs ........................................................................................ 9-3
9.8. Detector Switch Inputs of E Combo Module ...................................................... 9-3
9.9. Analog Inputs ....................................................................................................... 9-3
9.10. RTD Inputs............................................................................................................ 9-3
9.11. Analog Outputs .................................................................................................... 9-4
9.12. Control Outputs/Status Inputs ............................................................................ 9-4
9.13. Multi-bus Serial I/O Interface ............................................................................... 9-5
9.13.1. RS-232 Compatible ...............................................................................................9-5
9.13.2. RS-485..................................................................................................................9-5
9.14. Operator Keypad.................................................................................................. 9-5
9.15. LCD Display .......................................................................................................... 9-5
9.16. Electromechanical Counters............................................................................... 9-6
9.17. Operating Mode Indicator LEDs.......................................................................... 9-6
9.18. Security................................................................................................................. 9-6

vi ALL.71+ w 05/99
Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

Figures of Volume 1
Fig. 1-1. Features of the Operator Front Panel ................................................................................ 1-3
Fig. 1-2. Passive Backplane Motherboard Omni 3000 ..................................................................... 1-4
Fig. 1-3. Passive Backplane Motherboard Omni 6000 ..................................................................... 1-5
Fig. 1-4. Back Panel Terminations Omni 6000 and Omni 3000........................................................ 1-6
Fig. 1-5. Extended Back Panel - Omni 6000 (left); Omni 3000 (right) .............................................. 1-7
Fig. 1-6. Central Processor Module - Jumper Settings ..................................................................... 1-8
Fig. 1-7. Matching the I/O Modules to the Back Panel Terminations ................................................ 1-9
Fig. 1-8. Photo-optical Isolation - How It Works ............................................................................. 1-10
Fig. 1-9. Digital I/O Module Model # 6011 - Jumper Settings ......................................................... 1-11
Fig. 1-10. RS-232/485 Module #68-6205 Showing Selection Jumpers and LED Indicators .............. 1-12
Fig. 1-11. Layout of Jumper Blocks Showing RS-232/485 Formats.................................................. 1-13
Fig. 1-12. Back Panel Wiring of the RS-232/485 Module #68-6205 ................................................. 1-14
Fig. 1-13. Dual RS-232 Serial I/O Module Model - Jumper Settings................................................. 1-15
Fig. 1-14. Power Supply Module Model # 68-6118........................................................................... 1-18
Fig. 2-1. Sample Configuration Chart (Blank) - Omni 3000.............................................................. 2-4
Fig. 2-2. Sample Configuration Chart (Blank) - Omni 6000.............................................................. 2-5
Fig. 2-3. The A and B Combo I/O Module - Configuration Jumpers ................................................. 2-6
Fig. 2-4. A and B Combo Module - Non-Selectable / Selectable Address......................................... 2-7
Fig. 2-5. A Type Combo Module - Flow Pulse Jumper Settings (Channel 3 or Channel 4) ............... 2-8
Fig. 2-6. A Type Combo Module - Analog Input Jumper Settings..................................................... 2-9
Fig. 2-7. B Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings - Frequency Densitometer Setup .................... 2-10
Fig. 2-8. E/D Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings.................................................................... 2-11
Fig. 2-9. E Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings ....................................................................... 2-12
Fig. 2-10. H Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings ....................................................................... 2-13
Fig. 2-11. HV Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings..................................................................... 2-15
Fig. 2-12. Omni Multivariable Interface (SV Type Combo) Module Model 68-6203 - Jumper
Settings ........................................................................................................................... 2-16
Fig. 3-1. Panel Mounting - Omni 6000 (upper), Omni 3000 (lower) .................................................. 3-1
Fig. 3-2. Input Power Terminals - Omni 3000 (upper), Omni 6000 (lower) ....................................... 3-5
Fig. 3-3. Input Power Terminals - Extended Back Panel (Omni 6000 only) ...................................... 3-6
Fig. 3-4. Example of Typical Back Panel Assignments (Omni 6000)................................................ 3-7
Fig. 3-5. Example of Typical Back Panel Assignments (Omni 3000)................................................ 3-7
Fig. 3-6. Power Supply Module Model 68-6118................................................................................ 3-8

ALL.71+ w 05/99 vii


Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Figures of Volume 1

Fig. 4-1. Connecting to a Turbine Pre-amp (A or B Combo Modules) ...............................................4-1


Fig. 4-2. Wiring to Turbine Pre-Amps (E Type Combo Modules Only)..............................................4-2
Fig. 4-3. Wiring of Faure Herman Pre-amp Using Omni 24 VDC .....................................................4-3
Fig. 4-4. Wiring of Faure Herman Pre-amp Using External 24 VDC...............................................4-3
Fig. 4-5. Connecting Dual Coil Turbines for Pulse Fidelity Checking ................................................4-4
Fig. 5-1. Wiring the 4-20 mA Inputs (Input Channels 1 & 2 shown)...................................................5-1
Fig. 5-2. Wiring for Dry C Type Contact ...........................................................................................5-2
Fig. 5-3. Wiring a 4-Wire RTD Temperature Probe ..........................................................................5-3
Fig. 5-4. Wiring a Solartron Densitometer with Safety Barriers to a B Type I/O Combo Module ...5-4
Fig. 5-5. Wiring a Solartron Densitometer without Safety Barriers to a B Type I/O Combo
Module...............................................................................................................................5-5
Fig. 5-6. Wiring a Sarasota Densitometer with Safety Barriers to a B Type I/O Combo Module....5-6
Fig. 5-7. Wiring a Sarasota Densitometer without Safety Barriers to a B Type I/O Combo
Module...............................................................................................................................5-7
Fig. 5-8. Wiring a UGC Densitometer with Safety Barriers to a B Type I/O Combo Module..........5-8
Fig. 5-9. Wiring a UGC Densitometer without Safety Barriers to a B Type I/O Combo Module .....5-9
Fig. 5-10. Wiring of a Honeywell Smart Transmitter ...................................................................... 5-10
Fig. 5-11. Wiring of a Micro Motion RFT9739 Field-Mount (Explosion-Proof) Transmitter.............. 5-11
Fig. 5-12. Wiring of a Micro Motion RFT9739 Field-Mount (Explosion-Proof) Transmitter Via
Two-wire RS-485 Communications (Serial I/O Module #68-6205) .................................... 5-12
Fig. 6-1. Wiring Devices to the Flow Computers Analog Outputs.....................................................6-1
Fig. 6-2. Wiring of a Digital I/O Point as an Input .............................................................................6-2
Fig. 6-3. Wiring of a Digital I/O Point as an Output ..........................................................................6-3
Fig. 6-4. Connecting Digital I/O Devices to the Flow Computer ........................................................6-4
Fig. 6-5. Wiring to a Brooks Compact Prover ................................................................................6-5
Fig. 6-6. Controlling the Plenum Pressure of a Brooks Compact Prover ........................................6-6
Fig. 7-1. Connecting a Printer to Serial Port #1 of the Flow Computer..............................................7-2
Fig. 7-2. Connecting Several Flow Computers to a Shared Printer...................................................7-3
Fig. 7-3. Direct Connect to a Personal Computer - DB25 Female Connector (Using Port #2 as an
example)............................................................................................................................7-4
Fig. 7-4. Direct Connect to a Personal Computer - DB9 Female Connector .....................................7-5
Fig. 7-5. Connecting Port #2 to a Modem.........................................................................................7-5
Fig. 7-6. Wiring of Several Flow Computers using the Peer-to-Peer Feature via RS-485
Communications in Two-wire Multi-drop Mode ...................................................................7-6
Fig. 7-7. Wiring of Several Flow Computers in the Peer-to-Peer Mode using RS-232-C
Communications. ...............................................................................................................7-7

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

Fig. 7-8. Wiring of Multiple Flow Computers to a PLC Device Via RS-485 Communications in
Four-wire Multi-drop Mode................................................................................................. 7-8
Fig. 7-9. Typical Wiring of Port #3 to a SCADA Device via Modem ................................................. 7-9
Fig. 7-10. Wiring Serial Port #4 to Allen-Bradley KE Communications Module.............................. 7-10
Fig. 8-1. Figure Showing Calibration of RTD Input Channel............................................................. 8-6

ALL.71+ w 05/99 ix
Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

1. Overview of Hardware and Software


Features

1.1. Introduction
BASIC FEATURES - Omni Omni 3000 and Omni 6000 Flow Computers are reliable, easy to use,
flow computers are uniquely versatile measurement instruments. They are factory-programmed for
applicable to liquid and gas
flow measurement, control
single or multiple meter run configurations to measure crude oils, refined
and communication systems, products, NGLs, LPGs, ethylene, propylene, natural gas, and specialty gases.
and custody transfer Measurement of other flowing products can also be provided.
operations. Its basic features
are: Extensive communications capability enables the Omni 6000 to be used in a
q 32-bit processing with variety of Master/Slave configurations for high-speed data transfer applications,
math co-processor for and as a large communication submaster. The flow computer can also be
fast, multi-tasking hardware configured as a medium-size Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) with
execution
significant digital I/O capability.
q 500 msec calculation
cycle Your Omni Flow Computer connects to various sensors monitoring pipeline flow
q Plug-in, assignable digital, in your transmission, petrochemical or process measurement application. It
serial and combination I/O
modules
calculates, displays and prints data that will be used for operational or billing
q Point-to-point digital
functions.
transmitter interface
The computer is configured to match your piping system requirements. Its non-
q 14-bit A/Ds, temperature
restrictive bus design permits any combination of inputs and outputs to meet
trimmed
q No I/O multiplexers, no
most metering, flow and valve control, and communication requirements.
potentiometers Plug-in modules furnish the input and output channels as needed and provide
q Photo-optical Isolation of an assurance of maximum product life by higher accuracy measurement
each I/O point
technologies such as meter pulse fidelity checking, and Rosemount and
q Meter pulse fidelity
checking Honeywell digital transmitter interface modules. Up to 4 serial ports in some
q Optional Honeywell and models are available for printing reports and other communications tasks. All
Rosemount digital I/O modules are quality tested and temperature trimmed to optimize the 14-bit
transmitter interface analog resolution, and burned-in before shipment for field installation.
modules
q Dual LEDs indicate
active/fused digital I/O
q Selectable digital I/O,
individually fused
q Standard, field-proven
firmware no need for
custom programming
q User-configurable control
logic
q Up to 4 flow/pressure
control loops
q User-configurable
variables for displays and
reports
(Continues)

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.2. Operators Panel


BASIC FEATURES - The operators panel shown (Fig. 1-1) is standard for all applications and is
(Continued) used to display and enter all data. All data can also be accessed via any of the
q Data archive and report serial ports.
storage
q Modbus peer-to-peer
communications to
38.4kbps for PLC/DCS 1.2.1. LCD Display
q Real-time dial-up for
The 4-line by 20-alpha-numeric character, back-lit Liquid Crystal Display is
diagnostics
updated every 200 ms. It displays all messages and system variables in English
q International testing
q Includes OmniCom
language engineering units. Backlighting and display viewing angle are
configuration software adjustable from the keypad (press [Setup] then [Display] and follow the
q Three year warranty displayed instructions).

1.2.2. Electromechanical Totalizers


Three non-resetable, 6-digit electromechanical counters are included on the
front panel for non-volatile backup totalizing. They can be programmed to count
gross, net, mass or energy units at any rate up to 10 counts per second.

1.2.3. Diagnostic and Program LEDs


These dual-color LEDs indicate when the user is in the Diagnostic Mode
calibrating the I/O modules, or when in the Program Mode changing the
configuration of the computer. The LEDs change from green to red after a valid
password is requested and entered. The computer is in the normal Display
Mode when neither of these LEDs are on.

1.2.4. Active Alarm LED


New unacknowledged alarms cause this LED to glow red. This changes to
green as soon as the alarm is acknowledged by pressing the [Cancel/Ack] key
on the keypad.

1.2.5. Alpha Shift LED


INFO - Pressing the [Alpha This LED glows green to show that the next key only will be shifted. A red LED
Shift] key twice will put the indicates that the shift lock is on.
shift lock on. The shift lock is
canceled by pressing one
more time or automatically
after the [Display/Enter] key 1.2.6. Operator Keypad
is pressed.
Control of the flow computer is via the 34-button alphanumeric membrane
Help System - These
keypad, with tactile domes and audio feedback. Through the keypad you have
computers are equipped with the capability to configure your system, access and modify calibration data on-
a powerful context-sensitive line, and view or print process data. Configuration data can also be entered
help system. Press the remotely by serial port and is stored in battery backed-up CMOS SRAM
[Help] key (bottom right)
memory. Passwords and an internal program inhibit switch provide tamper-
twice to activate the help
displays. Cancel the help proof security.
screens by pressing the
[Prog] key.

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

DIAGNOSTIC LED LCD DISPLAY


Glows green when in the Is 4 lines by 20
Diagnostic Mode. Glows characters. Backlight and
red when a valid viewing angle are
password is entered. adjustable via the keypad.
Flowrate BBL/Hr
FT-101 1550.5
PROGRAM LED Cumulative BBLS THREE 6-DIGIT,
Glows green when in the ELECTROMECHANICAL
FT-101 234510 COUNTERS
Program Mode. Glows red
when a valid password is These non-resetable
entered. counters are assigned via
the keypad.
Total A Total B Total C
DIAG/PROG KEY
000682 009456 023975 ACTIVE ALARM LED
Used to access
Diagnostic and Program Glows red when a new
Modes. Diagnostic Active Alarm alarm occurs. Glows
green when an
Program Alpha Shift acknowledged alarm
ARROW KEYS exists.
Used to move the cursor
and scroll displays. Also Diag Alpha
used as software zero Prog Shift ALPHA SHIFT LED
and as span control Net Energy
Glows green for a single
Gross Mass SG/API Control
during calibration. character shift. Glows red
A B C D E F when the shift lock is on.
& % 7 8 9 /

OPERATOR KEYPAD Temp Press Density D.P. Orifice Meter


Has 34 keys, domed G H I J K L THREE-FUNCTION KEYS
membrane with tactile # $ 4 5 6 * These activate process
and audio feedback. variable or alpha-numeric
Time Counts Factor Preset Batch Analysis
character functions.
M N O P Q R
: 1 2 3 =
SPACE/CLEAR /
CANCEL/ACK KEY Print Prove Status Alarms Product Setup DISPLAY/ENTER / HELP
Used to clear data and S T U V W X KEY
insert spaces in the ; , 0 . - + Used to enter a key press
Program Mode. It is also sequence and to access
Cancel / Ack Input Output Help
used to cancel key press the Help System.
Space Y Z Display
sequences and, in the
Clear ( ) Enter
Display Mode,
acknowledge alarms.

Fig. 1-1. Features of the Operator Front Panel

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.3. Passive Backplane Mother Board


INFO - Passive backplane Mounted on the passive backplane are DIN standard connectors which are
simply means that no active bussed in two sections. The front section is a high performance, 16-bit bus
circuitry is contained on it.
The active circuitry is
which accepts the Central Processor Module. The Omni 6000 computer has 3
contained on the modules other connectors available in this section to accept memory expansion and
that plug into it. future product enhancements.
The rear 8-bit I/O bus section comprises 10 connectors on the Omni 6000 and 4
on the Omni 3000, which can accept any type of optically isolated I/O module
manufactured by Omni. The rearmost connector on both computers accepts the
system AC/DC power supply module. Dual ribbon cable assemblies (Omni
6000) and a single ribbon cable (Omni 3000) connect the I/O connectors on the
backplane to the back panel terminals. (See Fig. 1-2 below and Fig. 1-3 on
facing page.)

CAUTION!
These units have an integral
cabinet latching mechanism
which first must be
disengaged by lifting the
bezel upwards, before
withdrawing the unit from the
case.

Fig. 1-2. Passive Backplane Motherboard Omni 3000

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

CAUTION!
These units have an integral
cabinet latching mechanism
which first must be
disengaged by lifting the
bezel upwards, before
withdrawing the unit from the
case.

Fig. 1-3. Passive Backplane Motherboard Omni 6000

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.4. Back Panel Terminal Module


The AC receptacle of the Omni 6000 and Omni 3000 back panel is a power line
filter with a separate AC fuse holder. The AC power is contained on a separate
four-conductor cable which plugs into the power supply. The power supply used
with this version is a Model 68-6118; no physical fuses (see 1.7. Operating
Power).

1.4.1. Back Panel Terminations


The Omni 6000 terminal blocks are identified TB1 through TB10 with terminals
marked 1 through 12 for each block. These provide 120 circuit paths to the
passive backplane. The DC terminals are on TB11.
The Omni 3000 terminal blocks are identified as TB1 through TB4, with
terminals marked 1 through 12 for each block. These provide 48 circuit paths to
the passive backplane. The DC terminal is on TB5.

Back Panel Fuses - All DC


fuses are 3 amp fast-blow
manufactured by Littlefuse,
Model 225.003. All AC fuses
are amp slow-blow
manufactured by Littlefuse,
Model 229.500.

Fig. 1-4. Back Panel Terminations Omni 6000 and Omni 3000

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

1.4.2. Extended Back Panel


Several flow computer mounting options are available with the extended back
panel. Screw type terminals are provided for AC and DC power. Extended 64-
conductor ribbon cables and the AC cables are provided with a standard length
of 5 feet.
For the Omni 6000 (dimensions: 3 x 18), this panel incorporates all the
terminal blocks TB1 through TB10, with terminals marked 1 through 12. In
addition to the terminal blocks, extra DC (fused), return and shield terminals are
provided for TB1 through TB8.
The Omni 3000 extended back panel (dimensions: 3 x 8) also incorporates
all the terminal blocks TB1 through TB4, with terminals marked 1 through 12. In
addition to the terminal blocks, extra DC (fused), return and shield terminals are
provided for TB1 and TB2.

Extended Back Panel


AC/DC Fuses - All DC fuses
are amp fast-blow
manufactured by Littlefuse,
Model 225.250. The AC fuse
is amp slow-blow
manufactured by Littlefuse,
Model 239.500. The fuse for
the back panels AC
receptacle is a 5x20mm,
amp slow-blow.

Fig. 1-5. Extended Back Panel - Omni 6000 (left); Omni 3000 (right)

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.5. Central Processor Module


This module contains the Motorola 16/32-bit microprocessor operating at 16
MHz, a maximum of 512 kbytes of SRAM memory, 1 Mbyte of EPROM
program memory, math coprocessor and time of day clock. Positions U3 and
U4 on the Central Processor Module contain the program EPROMs. The
hardware real-time clock will continue to operate even when power loss to the
computer occurs. Time of power failure is logged and printed when the power is
restored.

CAUTION! Math
Processor
Central Program Program Archive
POTENTIAL FOR DATA Processor EPROM RAM RAM
LOSS!
RAM Battery Backup -
Omni flow computers leave
the factory with a fully
charged Ni-Cd battery as
RAM power backup. RAM
data, including user
configuration and I/O Backup
calibration data, may be lost Batttery
if the flow computer is
disconnected from external
power for more than 30 days.
Observe caution when
storing the flow computer
without power being applied EPROM Size
for extended periods of time. 1 OR 4 Meg Bit System Watchdog
The RAM back-up battery is Select 4 Meg J3 In = Enabled
rechargeable and will be fully As Shown J3 Out = Disabled
charged after power has J1 J2 (Always Enabled)
been applied for 24 hours. J3

Fig. 1-6. Central Processor Module - Jumper Settings

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

1.6. Input/Output (I/O) Modules


Omni flow computers utilize an I/O bus system. All I/O is modular and plug-in
for easy field maintenance and replacement. I/O circuitry is also photo-optically
isolated from all field wiring which makes it relatively immune to electrical noise
and prevents damage to the electronics.
Your Omni Flow Computer has a combination of 3 types of I/O modules:
o Digital I/O Modules
o Serial I/O Modules
o Process I/O Combo Modules
A and B Type Combo Modules
E and E/D Type Combo Modules
H Type Combo Modules

Almost any combination of I/O mix can be accommodated in the flow computer.
The only limitations are the number of I/O connectors (4 on Omni 3000, 10 on
Omni 6000) and the number of wires connecting them to the back panel field
wiring terminals (48 for Omni 3000, 120 for Omni 6000).
Your Omni Flow Computer has a standard order in which the modules are
plugged-in (Fig. 1-7; also see Fig. 1-2 and Fig. 1-3). This provides a standard
termination layout.
INFO - Mother board
connectors do not have a
specific address. These are
pre-established at the
factory. Each Omni Flow
Computer will be supplied
with a termination diagram
Omni 6000 Omni 3000
indicating these settings. TB1 TB2 TB3 TB4 TB5 TB1 TB2
1 1
Serial I/O 1 & 2

Serial I/O 3 & 4

Serial I/O 1 & 2


Digital I/O 1 - 12

Digital I/O 13-24

Combo I/O # 1

Digital I/O 1-12

12 12
13 13
Combo I/O # 6
Combo I/O # 5

Combo I/O # 2
Combo I/O # 2

Combo I/O # 4
Combo I/O # 3

Combo I/O # 1

24 24
TB6 TB7 TB8 TB9 TB10 TB3 TB4

Fig. 1-7. Matching the I/O Modules to the Back Panel Terminations

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.6.1. Photo-Optical Isolation


Photo-Optical Isolation - The microprocessor circuitry is isolated via photo-optical devices from all field
Transducer signals are wiring to prevent accidental damage to the electronics, including that caused by
converted by the LED into
high frequency pulses of
static electricity. Photo-optical isolation also inhibits electrical noise from
light. These are sensed by inducing measurement errors. Independent isolation of each process input
the photo-transistor which provides high common-mode rejection, allowing the user greater freedom when
passes the signal to the flow wiring transmitter loops. Furthermore, it minimizes ground loop effects and
computer. isolates and protects your flow computer from pipeline EMI and transients.
Note that no electrical
connection exists between
the transducers and the
computer circuits.

Pipeline Opto Coupler IC Isolated


Transducer Transducer
Signals That Signals
May Pass On Passed On
Damaging To Sensitive
Transient Computer
LED Photo Circuits
Noise Transistor

Fig. 1-8. Photo-optical Isolation - How It Works

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

1.6.2. Digital I/O Modules


INFO - Some Digital I/O Digital I/O modules provide discrete inputs and outputs to control provers,
modules have 12 samplers, injection pumps, motor operated valves (MOVs) and to provide remote
replaceable fuses; one fuse
totalizing. Each digital module provides 12 digital I/O points with each point able
for each I/O point. Other
modules have electronic to be configured as either an input or output. The Omni 3000 normally has one
fuses that trip when digital I/O module. Whereas, the 6000 can have a maximum of two digital
overloaded and modules, resulting in 24 digital I/O points. The digital I/O module normally
automatically reset when occupies I/O Slots 1 and 2 on the Omni 6000 backplane, and I/O Slot 1 on Omni
the fault condition is
removed. 3000.
Address jumpers on the digital I/O module are used to configure the module as
either module D1 or D2. Digital I/Os 1 through 12 are allocated to module D1
and 13 through 24 are allocated to D2.

JP1 In = Dig. 1 Rising Edge Trigger


Interrupt Request (IRQ) JP2 In = Dig. 1 Falling Edge Trigger
Select Jumpers for JP3 In = Dig. 2 Rising Edge Trigger
Pipe Prover Detector JP4 In = Dig. 2 Falling Edge Trigger
(Non-Double Chronometry)
NOTE: If D2 remove all jumpers

Module Address
Jumper

Select D1 Select D2

Green LED On
Point Active

I/O Point LEDs - Each


digital I/O point has 2 LEDs. I/O Point
One LED illuminates green F3 F2 F1 #01
when the I/O point is active Dual (Red/Green)
Fuse Blown LED
and the other illuminates
green or red when a fault F6 F5 F4
condition exists. The fault
LED illuminates green when
F9 F8 F7 Red On = Sourcing
an input over voltage Current
condition exists. An output Green On = Sinking
short circuit causes the fault Current
Individual Fuses F12 F11 F10
LED to illuminate red. for Each I/O Point
#12

Digital I/O Point


LED Indicators

Fig. 1-9. Digital I/O Module # 6011 Jumper Settings

IRQ, (Interrupt request) jumpers are provided on digital I/O modules for
interfacing to pipe prover detector switches. This feature applies only to liquid
measurement applications.
These jumpers are only used to configure digital I/O point 1 or digital I/O point 2
on module D1. All IRQ jumpers should be removed from D2 if a D2 module is
installed.

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.6.3. Serial Communication Modules

RS-232/485 Serial I/O Module Model # 68-6205


INFO - Up to 12 flow Serial I/O Module # 68-6205 is capable of handling two communications ports
computers and/or other Each serial communication port is individually optically isolated for maximum
compatible serial devices can
be multi-dropped using
common-mode and noise rejection. Although providing RS-232C signal levels,
Omnis proprietary RS-232-C the tristate output design allows multiple flow computers to share one serial link.
serial port. Thirty-two Communication parameters such as baud rate, stop bits and parity settings are
devices may be connected software selectable.
when using the RS-485
mode. Typically, one serial In addition to RS-232, jumper selections have been provided on each port to
I/O module is used on the allow selection of RS-485 format. With this option, a total of two RS-485 ports
Omni 3000, providing two
ports. A maximum of two
are available on each module.
serial modules can be
installed in the Omni 6000,
providing four ports.

Multivariable Transmitting
Devices - In addition to the
Serial I/O Module # 68-6205,
the flow computer must also
have an SV Module to
communicate with Address Selection
multivariable transmitters. Jumpers
This serial module is
jumpered to IRQ 3 when Address S1
used in combination with an Selected
SV Module. Without an SV
Module, the jumper is placed
at IRQ 2. The SV Module
can only be used with this
Address S2
serial module (68-6205) and
Selected
is not compatible with the
Serial I/O Module # 68-6005.
For more information, see
Technical Bulletin # TB-
980503. LED Indicators
IRQ 2 Selected

Port #2 (4) Port #1 (3)


Jumpers Jumpers

Fig. 1-10. RS-232/485 Module #68-6205 Showing Selection Jumpers and


LED Indicators

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

The RS-232/485 Module has been designed so that RS-232 or RS-485


communications standards can be selected by placement of 16-pin resistor
networks into the correct blocks. The following diagrams show the locations of
blocks JB4, JB5, JB6 for Port #1, and JB1, JB2, JB3 for Port #2 for each
format.

RS-232
JB1 or JB4 JB2 or JB5 JB3 or JB6

RS-485 RS-485 2-WIRE

RS-485
TERMINATED

RS-485 2-WIRE TERMINATED RS-485 2-WIRE NON-TERMINATED


JB1 or JB4 JB2 or JB5 JB3 or JB6 JB1 or JB4 JB2 or JB5 JB3 or JB6
Terminated/Non-
terminated RS-485 - The
RS-232/485
RS-485 devices located at NON-TERMINATED
each extreme end of an RS- RS-485
RS-232 RS-232/485 4-WIRE RS-232 RS-232/485 4-WIRE
485 run should be TERMINATED
terminated. Note that the
device located at an extreme
end may or may not be an
Omni Flow Computer.

RS-485 4-WIRE TERMINATED RS-485 4-WIRE NON-TERMINATED


JB1 or JB4 JB2 or JB5 JB3 or JB6 JB1 or JB4 JB2 or JB5 JB3 or JB6

RS-232/485
RS-485 2-WIRE NON-TERMINATED RS-485 2-WIRE

RS-232 RS-485
RS-232 TERMINATED

Fig. 1-11. Layout of Jumper Blocks Showing RS-232/485 Formats

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

Omni 6000
(Omni 3000)
Terminal RS-485 RS-485
RS-232-C
TB3 (TB2) 2-Wire 4-Wire
1 TX B TX-B
2 TERM
Note: Users of Micro First
Motion RFT 9739 devices 3 RX RX-A
connected the peer-to-peer Serial
port (Port #2) of the Omni, Port 4 GND GND GND
please note that the resistor
5 RTS A TX-A
networks should be
positioned for 2-wire RS-485 6 RDY RX-B
and that Terminal (A) from
the RFT 9739 should be 7 TX B TX-B
wired to Omni 7 and (B) from
the RFT must be wired to 8 TERM
Terminal 11.
Second 9 RX RX-A
Serial
Port 10 GND GND GND
11 RTS A TX-A
12 RDY RX-B

Fig. 1-12. Back Panel Wiring of the RS-232/485 Module #68-6205

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

Dual RS-232-Compatible Serial I/O Module Model # 68-6005


INFO - Up to 12 flow Dual channel serial communication modules can be installed providing two RS-
computers can be multi- 232-C ports. Each serial communication port is individually optically isolated for
dropped to one RS-232C
serial device. Typically, one
maximum common-mode and noise rejection. Although providing RS-232C
serial I/O module is used on signal levels, the tristate output design allows multiple flow computers to share
the Omni 3000, providing two one RS-232 device. Communication parameters such as baud rate, stop bits
ports. A maximum of two and parity settings are software selectable.
serial modules can be
installed in the Omni 6000,
providing four ports.

Serial Ports 1 & 2


Use the S1 Module

S1
Setting

Serial Ports 3 & 4


Use the S0 Module

S0
Setting

RTS Out
Chan. B
TX Out
RTS Out
Chan. A
TX Out

LED Indicators

RX In
Chan. A
RDY In
RX In
Chan. B
RDY In

Fig. 1-13. Dual RS-232 Serial I/O Module Model - Jumper Settings

Serial Port Assignments


The first port can be configured as a Modbus protocol port. It can also be
configured as a printer port. The printer can be shared between multiple flow
computers. Reports can be printed on a daily, batch end, timed interval or on
demand basis. A reprint function provides backup should you experience printer
problems at any time. Customized report templates are input using the
OmniCom Configuration PC Software.
The second, third, and fourth ports are independent Modbus protocol channels.
The complete database of the flow computer is available for upload and
download. The OmniCom configuration program provided by Omni can use any
of these ports.
The fourth RS-232C can also be set up to communicate with Allen-Bradley PLC
devices.

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.6.4. Process I/O Combination Modules


Meter runs utilize plug-in modules which include all necessary analog/digital
(A/D) converters and control circuitry. User selection of process I/O is available
with combo cards that can be a mix of meter pulse, frequency densitometer,
4-20 mA, 4-wire 100 ohm RTD inputs, and 4-20 mA outputs.
All process measurements such as temperature, pressure, density, and flow are
input via these process I/O combo modules. Each module will handle 4 inputs
of a variety of signal types and provides one or two 4-20 mA analog outputs
(except the SV Module which has six 4-20 mA outputs).
Seven types of combo I/O modules are available: A, B, E, E/D, H, HV and SV.
All modules accept analog and pulse frequency type inputs, except for the H
and HV Modules which interface digitally with Honeywell Smart Transmitters,
and the SV Module which interfaces serially with RS-485 compatible
multivariable transmitters.
The A and B Types use identical I/O boards. Likewise, the E and E/D Modules
are also identical, except for the position of a configuration jumper which
selects the type and address of each module.
INFO - The flow computer Each of the combo modules installed must have a different identity i.e., you
allocates the physical I/O cannot have two or more modules of the same type and address. Valid IDs are:
point numbers according to
the module IDs, not the
A1 through A6, B1 through B6, E/D-1 through E/D-6, E1 through E6, H1 through
position occupied on the H6, and SV1 through SV2. Only one HV Module can be installed.
backplane.
Modules are plugged into DIN type connectors on the passive backplane. Each
backplane connector has 12 circuits which connect to the back panel terminal
strips via ribbon cables. Combo I/O modules are plugged into the backplane
starting at I/O Position #5 (Omni 6000) or I/O Position #3 (Omni 3000) and
working towards Position #10 (Omni 6000) or Position #4 (Omni 3000). The
preferred order is lowest number A Type to highest number H Type, them SV
and HV Modules.
The following chapter deals in more detail with process I/O combo modules and
includes illustrations and jumper settings. (See Chapter 2 Process I/O Combo
Module Setup.)

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

1.7. Operating Power


Operating Power - The Omni flow computers can be AC or DC powered.
indicated power is maximum
and includes the power used When AC powered, 120 VAC 50 Watts is applied to the AC plug. For powering
by transmitter loops, etc. It transmitter loops when AC powered, approximately 500 mA at 24 VDC is
will vary depending on the available from the DC terminal block. The flow computer can be special ordered
number of modules installed,
the number of current loops for operation on 220-250 VAC supplies. This requires a modified power supply
and any digital output loads unit and a different cord set. AC power to the unit is fused by a 0.5 Amp (5x20
connected. mm) slow-blow fuse located in the AC power receptacle.
To DC power the flow computer, apply 18 to 30 VDC, 50 Watts to the DC
terminal block. DC power into or out of the back panel DC power terminals is
CAUTION! fused by a 3 Amp, 2 AG fast-blow fuse located on the back panel next to the
POTENTIAL FOR DATA DC power terminals.
LOSS!
RAM Battery Backup - All analog and digital circuits within the flow computer are powered from a 5-
Omni flow computers leave volt switching regulator located on the power supply module. This is located in
the factory with a fully the rear most connector on the computer backplane. The DC power which
charged Ni-Cd battery as supplies the switching regulator either comes directly from the DC terminals on
RAM power backup. RAM
data, including user
the back panel of the flow computer (18-30 VDC) or by rectifying the output of
configuration and I/O the integral 120 VAC (240 VAC) to 20 VAC transformer. Regulated 5-volt power
calibration data, may be lost is monitored by a 3-4 second shutdown circuit located on the power supply
if the flow computer is module. When power is applied to the computer there will be a delay of 3 to 4
disconnected from external
power for more than 30 days.
seconds before the unit powers up.
Observe caution when A recommended maximum of 500 mA of transducer loop power is available
storing the flow computer
without power being applied with a fully loaded Omni system of 6 combo I/O modules, 2 digital I/O modules
for extended periods of time. and 2 dual serial I/O modules. The Omni must be DC powered if this 500 mA
The RAM back-up battery is limit is to be exceeded.
rechargeable and will be fully
charged after power has The maximum system configuration of the Omni is 24 process inputs, 12
been applied for 24 hours. process outputs, 24 digital I/O points, and 4 serial I/O channels dissipates
approximately 24 Watts. This causes an internal temperature of 15F (8.33C)
over the ambient. The unit should not be mounted in a cabinet or panel where
the ambient inside the cabinet will exceed 110F (43.33C).

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

CAUTION
The Power Low and +5 v
Adjust are factory
adjustments that require the
use of special equipment.
DO NOT attempt to adjust.

AC Connector

Fig. 1-14. Power Supply Module Model # 68-6118

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

1.8. Firmware and Software


Omni flow computers are supplied with pre-programmed firmware and PC
configuration software which permit a single unit to perform a great diversity of
combined flow measurement tasks, such as:
o Multiple Meter Run Totalizing, Batching, Proving, and Data Archiving
o Flow and Sampler Control
o Direct Interface to Gas Chromatographs and Smart/Multivariable
Transmitters
o Selectable Communications Protocols to Directly Interface to DCS, PLC
and SCADA Host Systems
The flow computer database numbers thousands of data points and provides
the tightest communications coupling yet between SCADA and the metering
system.

1.8.1. Interrupt-Driven CPU


This is a very important aspect to firmware. It provides for a multi-tasking
environment in which priority tasks can be undertaken concurrently with
unrelated activity. This provides for high-speed digital signals to be output at the
same time as measurement computations and serial communications to a
printer or host computer, without degradation in speed or tasking.
All custody transfer measurement programs are stored in EPROM or Flash
Memory. This prevents damage due to electrical noise, or tampering with the
integrity of calculation specifications. SRAM programming can also be
accommodated.

1.8.2. Cycle Time


All time-critical measurement functions are performed by the flow computer
every 500 msec. This provides greater accuracy of measurement calculations
and permits a faster response by pipeline operations in critical control functions,
such as opening or closing valves.

1.8.3. On-line Diagnostics and Calibration


Extensive diagnostic software is built into the system which allows the
technician to locally or remotely debug a possible problem without interrupting
on-line measurement. Calibration of analog signals is performed through the
keypad and software. The system has only two potentiometers, both of which
are on the power supply and are factory set and need no adjustment.

1.8.4. PC Communications Interface


The wide use of PCs and video display units makes it possible to provide
software for off-line/on-line access to measurement, configuration and
calibration data. Collection of historical reports, including alarms, interval
reports of any time sequence, liquid batch and prove reports, and full remote
technical intervention capabilities are also provided.

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Chapter 1 Overview of Hardware and Software Features

1.8.5. OmniCom Configuration PC Software


INFO - Full details about the On-line or off-line configuration of your Omni Flow Computer is possible using
OmniCom configuration an IBM PC compatible running the OmniCom program supplied with your flow
program are documented in
Appendix C.
computer. This powerful software allows you to copy, modify and save to disk
entire configurations. The program also allows you to print customized reports
by inputting report templates that are uploaded to the flow computer.

1.8.6. Year 2000 Compliance


INFO - The current firmware Omni flow computer firmware has been tested in conformance to Year 2000
has been fully tested and requirements. It will accurately process time- and date-related data after
assured to be in
conformance to Year 2000
December 31st, 1999. Software and hardware designed to be used before,
requirements. For more during and after the calendar year 2000 will operate appropriately relating to
information, please contact date information. All calculating and logic of time-related data will produce the
our technical support staff. expected results for all valid date values within the application.

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

1.9. Initializing Your Flow Computer


A processor reset signal is automatically generated when:
CAUTION!
1) Power is applied.
POTENTIAL FOR DATA
LOSS! 2) The processor reset switch at the rear of the front panel is toggled.
RAM Battery Backup - 3) The watchdog timer fails to be reset by firmware every 100 milliseconds.
Omni flow computers leave
the factory with a fully The flow computer will perform a diagnostic check of all program and random-
charged Ni-Cd battery as
access memory whenever any of the above events occur.
RAM power backup. RAM
data, including user The program is stored with a checksum in Non-volatile Read-only Memory. The
configuration and I/O
calibration data, may be lost
program alarms if the calculated checksum differs from the stored checksum.
if the flow computer is The most obvious cause of such a problem would be a bent pin on a program
disconnected from external memory chip. The validity of all data stored in RAM memory is checked next.
power for more than 30 days. This data includes totalizers, configuration data and historical data. Any
Observe caution when
storing the flow computer
problems here will cause the computer to initialize the RAM and display the
without power being applied following message:
for extended periods of time.
The RAM back-up battery is
rechargeable and will be fully RAM Data Invalid
charged after power has Reconfigure System
been applied for 24 hours. Using OMNI as
Initial Password

If due to the RAM area in the computer not agreeing with the checksum area,
the computer will display the following message:

RAM & Calibrate Data


Invalid, Reconfigure
& Re-calibrate Using
OMNI as Password

Assuming that the EPROM memory and RAM memory are valid, the flow
computer then checks the software configuration against the installed I/O
modules and displays a screen similar to the following:
INFO - For information on
adjusting module Module S-Ware H-Ware
configuration settings, see A-1 Y Y
Volume 3.
B-1 Y N
D-1 Y Y
S-1 N Y
Revision No. 023.70
EPROM Checksum 1B36

A N in the hardware column indicates that a module has been removed since
the software was configured. A N in the software column indicates that a
module has been added. In either case you should make the columns agree by
adding or removing modules or re-configuring the software.

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

2. Process Input/Output Combination


Module Setup

INFO - User selection of


process I/O is available with
combo cards that can be a
mix of meter pulse, frequency
2.1. Introduction
densitometer, 4-20mA, 4- All process measurement signals are input via the process I/O combination (or
wire 100 ohm RTD inputs,
and fused 4-20mA outputs.
combo) modules plugged into the backplane of the computer. There currently
are 7 types of combo modules available: A, B, E, E/D, H, HV, and SV Types.
Combo Module Input
The 7 types of modules are actually manufactured using only 4 types of printed
Features - The input circuit modules. The first can be configured as either an A or B Module; the
characteristics of each second is used for an E or E/D Module; the third printed circuit is used for an H
combo module are as follows or HV Type Module; and the fourth for an SV Module.
(see table on right):
A Type: Each input can be
1-5v; 4-20mA. Inputs #1
and #2 also accept RTD.
Inputs #3 and #4 also
2.2. Features of the I/O Combo Modules
accept flow pulse signals. Each combo module (except the SV Module) will handle 4 inputs of a variety of
B Type: Inputs #1, #2 & #3 signal types and provides one or two 4-20 mA analog outputs. The SV Module
can be 1-5v; 4-20mA.
Inputs #1 and #2 also
has two ports and six 4-20 mA analog outputs. Only the E Combo Module has
accept RTD. Input #3 also Level A pulse fidelity checking and double chronometry proving capabilities.
accepts flow pulses and The input/output capabilities and some of the features of the combo modules
Input #4 is fixed as a are expressed in the following table.
frequency density input.
E/D Type: Inputs #1 and #2
can be 1-5v; 4-20mA and
RTD. Inputs #3 and #4
are frequency density.
INPUT/OUTPUT CAPABILITIES AND FEATURES OF EACH I/O COMBO MODULE T YPE
E Type: Inputs #1 and #2 DOUBLE
can be 1-5v; 4-20mA and ANALOG LEVEL A CHRONO-
TYPE INPUT #1 INPUT #2 INPUT #3 INPUT #4
RTD. Inputs #3 and #4 OUTPUTS FIDELITY METRY
accept flow pulses. PROVING
H Type: All inputs are Two
Honeywell DE Protocol. A 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD 1-5v; 4-20mA; Flow Pulses No No
4-20mA
HV Type: All inputs are
1-5v; 4-20mA Frequency One
Honeywell Multivariable B 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD No No
Flow Pulse Density 4-20mA
DE Protocol.
SV Type: Each port (#1 and Two
E/D 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD Frequency Density No No
#2) is capable of RS-485 4-20mA
multi-drop to various Two
multivariable transmitters. E 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD Flow Pulses Yes Yes
4-20mA
Two
H Honeywell DE Protocol No No
4-20mA
Two
HV Honeywell Multivariable DE Protocol No No
4-20mA
PORT #1 PORT #2
Six
SV RS-485 Multi-drop to Various Multivariable Transmitters No No
4-20mA

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

2.2.1. Setting the Address of the Combo Modules


Jumpers are provided on each combo module which allow the user to select the
address needed to access the module. Changing the software functions of the
module is also done by moving the appropriate jumper; i.e., A or B Type, E or
E/D Type.

2.2.2. Hardware Analog Configuration Jumpers


Other jumpers are provided on each module which select the correct hardware
analog configuration for the type of signal that each input channel will accept.
This allows the same basic hardware module to accept signals such as 4-20
mA, 1-5 VDC, 100 ohm RTD probes and voltage or current pulses from a
turbine, PD meter or digital densitometer.

2.2.3. Process I/O Combo Module Addresses Versus


Physical I/O Points
A flow computer will usually have several combo modules installed depending
IMPORTANT! on the number of flowmeter runs to be measured. If for example, 2 A Type, 2 B
Combo I/O modules are Type, 1 E/D Type and 1 E Type Modules were installed, they would normally be
sorted alphabetically and by numbered A1, A2, B1, B2, E/D1 and E1. Other address combinations are
low- to-high address. Adding acceptable (e.g.: A2, A3, B1, B4, E/D2 & E2 ) as long as each has a unique
or removing cards may
change the existing sort if the identity. In the above example where 6 modules (A1, A2, B1, B2, E/D1 & E1)
Check I/O function is are installed, the physical I/O points are mapped as follows. (Note that E/D
executed. modules come before the E modules!)
To standardize, Omni recommends that combo modules should always be
installed starting with the lowest number A Type Module in I/O Slot #5 (Slot #3
in Omni 3000) as shown, with additional modules being installed in ascending
order towards Slot #10 (Slot #4 in Omni 3000).

PROCESS I/O COMBO MODULE ADDRESSES VERSUS PHYSICAL I/O POINTS


M ODULE IDENTITY INPUTS OUTPUTS BACKPLANE POSITION PHYSICAL TERMINALS

A1 1-4 1&2 Slot 5 TB5 1-12

A2 5-8 3&4 Slot 6 TB6 1-12

B1 9-12 5 Slot 7 TB7 1-12

B2 13-16 6 Slot 8 TB8 1-12

E/D1 17-20 7&8 Slot 9 TB9 1-12

E1 21-24 9 & 10 Slot 10 TB10 1-12

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

2.2.4. Assigning Specific Signal Inputs


The Omni factory pre-assigns the physical I/O points of each flow computer
based on information supplied at time of order. This configuration information is
stored in battery backed-up static CMOS RAM. If you wish to change or add to
these assignments, refer to the section Program Setup in Volume 3, Chapter
2 Flow Computer Configuration and follow these basic rules:
1) Digital densitometer signals can only be assigned to the fourth channel of
each B Type Combo Module, or the third and fourth channel of each E/D
Module.
2) RTD signals can only be assigned to the first or second channel of each
A, B, E/D or E combo module. Whenever possible, avoid using the
second RTD excitation current source of an A Type Combo Module as
this makes the second 4-20 mA output on that module inaccessable.
3) Pulse signals from flowmeters can be assigned only to the 3rd channel of
each combo module and/or the 4th channel of each A Combo Module and
E Combo Module (E/D Combo Modules excepted).
4) Pulse signals to be used for Pulse Fidelity Checking must be connected
to the 3rd and 4th channel of an E Combo Module with the third channel
assigned as the flow input.
5) Use the 3rd and 4th input channels of an E Combo Module for double
chronometry proving.
INFO - The message I/O 1) Physical I/O points may be assigned to more than one variable (i.e.,
Type Mismatch is common temperature or pressure sensors) but variable types cannot be
displayed if you try to assign
the same physical I/O point
mixed (i.e., the same physical point cannot be assigned to temperature
to more than one type of and pressure, for example)
variable.

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

2.2.5. Sample Omni Flow Computer Configuration


Charts
The charts (below and facing page) are examples of the configuration chart
supplied with your flow computer. It shows the type of combo modules installed,
the assigned process variables, the I/O point numbers and the jumper settings
for each input channel. To avoid confusion, we recommend that you plan any
changes to the physical I/O setup on such a chart before making any changes.

Fig. 2-1. Sample Configuration Chart (Blank) - Omni 3000

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

CUSTOMER________________________ P.O.#____________
S.O.#_______
SOFTWARE________________________ COMPUTER
S/N__________________
MODEL #_________________________
TAG#__________________________

Fig. 2-2. Sample Configuration Chart (Blank) - Omni 6000

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

2.3. The A and B Combo I/O Modules


All I/O signals of the combo module are converted to the form of high frequency
pulse trains (0 to 25 kHz). These pulse trains are passed through opto-couplers
providing electrical isolation.
All 4 process inputs can accept analog input voltages which are first buffered
with a 1 megohm input buffer and then converted to pulse frequencies using
precision voltage-to-frequency converters. With 2 averaged 500 millisecond
samples, analog conversion resolution is 14 binary bits. Linearity is typically
0.01% and the temperature coefficient is trimmed to better than 15
PPM/F. Current inputs such as 4-20 mA are converted to 1-5 VDC by
jumpering-in a 250 ohm shunt resistor.
The conversion gain of Input Channels 1 and 2 can also be increased by a
factor of 10, allowing low level RTD signals (0.20 - 0.55 VDC) to be accepted.
Input Channels 3 and 4 can also be jumpered to accept pulse signals (0-12
kHz). In this case, the input stage is configured as Schmitt Trigger, whose
threshold is 3.5 VDC and hysteresis 0.5 VDC. The voltage-to-frequency
converter is bypassed in this mode. Input Channel 4 can also be jumpered for
AC coupling and a 1-volt trigger threshold, making it suitable for interfacing to
Solartron type densitometers.
Analog Outputs #1 and #2 are obtained in the reverse fashion. A software-
controlled pulse train (100 Hz to 5.0 kHz) is passed through opto-couplers and
converted to a current using precision frequency-to-current converters.
Resolution of these outputs is approximately 12 binary bits. The second analog
output is not available when the module is jumpered as a B Type.

Channel #4 Pulse
Input Threshold
AC / DC Coupling
A/B Module Type Channel # 4 Input
Select Jumper

Input Channel #4

Input Channel #3

Input Channel #2

Input Channel #1
Module Address
Jumpers
2nd. RTD Excitation Source
or Input Type Select
2nd Digital-Analog Output Jumpers

Fig. 2-3. The A and B Combo I/O Module - Configuration Jumpers

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

Two RTD excitation current sources (3.45 mA) are available on the combo
module. The second RTD excitation source will not be available if the second 4-
20 mA analog output is in use (see setting of JP12). This is a function of the
number of circuits available from the back panel terminal to each combo
module. On a B Type module the second analog output is not available,
therefore this second RTD excitation source is always available.

2.3.1. A and B Combo Module Non-Selectable or


Selectable Address
The Combo Type A or B Module can either have a non-selectable address or a
selectable Address.
The non-selectable address type is featured in older versions of the Omni Flow
Computer. The address is programmed into the Programmable Array Logic
(PAL) integrated circuit and is factory set. The module address can only be
changed by replacing the PAL chip.
The selectable type address is featured in current versions of the Omni.
Normally, it is preset at the factory, however it allows the user to change the
address simply by selecting the correct type and address on the selection
jumpers.

Non-Selectable Address

Selectable Address

TYPE B SELECT ONLY

COMBO ADDRESS SELECT


(A0 SHOWN)

Fig. 2-4. A and B Combo Module - Non-Selectable / Selectable Address

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

2.3.2. The A Type Combo I/O Module


INFO - The second analog The A Type Module is the most common configuration. It accepts 4 process
output is not available in inputs and provides two 4-20 mA analog outputs. Each module is connected to
cases where JP12 is used to
select the second RTD
the back panel terminal blocks via 12 wires on the ribbon cables. The actual
excitation current source. terminal block used depends upon which backplane connector (TB?) the module is
You may be able to avoid plugged into.
using the second RTD
excitation source and save A Combo Module Back Panel Terminal Assignments
losing an analog output by
using an unused excitation TB? Terminal 1 Input Channel #1 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
source on another combo TB? Terminal 2 Input Channel #1 (Isolated Signal Return)
module. TB? Terminal 3 Input Channel #2 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
TB? Terminal 4 Input Channel #2 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 5 Input Channel #3 (1-5v, 4-20mA, Flowmeter Pulses)
TB? Terminal 6 Input Channel #3 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 7 Input Channel #4 (1-5v, 4-20mA, Flowmeter Pulses)
TB? Terminal 8 Input Channel #4 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 9 RTD Excitation Current Source #1
TB? Terminal 10 Signal Return Terminals 9, 11 & 12 (Internally connected to DC power return)
TB? Terminal 11 Analog Output #1 (4-20mA)
TB? Terminal 12 Analog Output #2 (4-20mA) or RTD Excitation Current Source #2 (See
JP12 Setting)

Chan 4 Threshold
JP11 JP11 In = 3.5 VDC Out = 1.2 VDC

Select P
(Pulse Type 4-20mA Jumper Out
Input - Channel (Pulse Type Input)
3 or 4)
JP11

Select Module Type


JPB Out = A Type

Address Select
(Address #2 Shown)
JP12
Module A0 A1 A2
#1 Out Out Out
#2 In Out Out RTD2 D/A2
#3 Out In Out
JP12 In D/A2
#4 In In Out
Position
#5 Out Out In
#6 In Out In JP13 In DC
Coupled Position

Fig. 2-5. A Type Combo Module - Flow Pulse Jumper Settings (Channel 3
or Channel 4)

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

JP11
Select A
(Analog Type)
Input

JP11

4-20 mA Jumper In
(Remove for
1-5VDC Input)

JP13 In DC Coupled
Position for Preamp
Turbine Meter Input Configured for Configured for Configured for
(Channel 4) RTD Input 4-20 mA Input 1-5 VDC Input

Fig. 2-6. A Type Combo Module - Analog Input Jumper Settings

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

2.3.3. The B Type Combo I/O Module


INFO - You will need either a The B Type Combo Module also handles 4 process inputs but Input Channel 4
B Type Combo Module or is now used to measure the periodic time of a digital densitometer. The module
E/D Type Combo Module
when using digital
always has Input Channel 4 jumpered as a frequency input. Signal coupling can
densitometers connected to be AC or DC with trigger threshold adjustable for 1.5 or 3.5 Vpp sensitivity.
the flow computer. Each module is connected to the back panel terminal blocks via 12 wires on the
With a B Type Combo ribbon cables. The actual terminal block used depends upon which backplane
Module, Analog Output #2 is connector (TB?) the module is plugged into.
never available because the
periodic time function uses
the internal timer counter that B Combo Module Back Panel Terminal Assignments
is normally used to generate
the second analog output. TB? Terminal 1 Input Channel #1 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
TB? Terminal 2 Input Channel #1 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 3 Input Channel #2 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
TB? Terminal 4 Input Channel #2 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 5 Input Channel #3 (1-5v, 4-20mA, DC Coupled Flowmeter Pulses)
TB? Terminal 6 Input Channel #3 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 7 Input Channel #4 (AC Coupled Densitometer Frequency)
TB? Terminal 8 Input Channel #4 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 9 RTD Excitation Current Source #1
TB? Terminal 10 Signal Return Terminals 9, 11 & 12 (Internally connected to DC power return)
TB? Terminal 11 Analog Output #1 (4-20mA)
TB? Terminal 12 RTD Excitation Current Source #2

Channel 4 Threshold
JP11 JP11 Out = 1.2 VDC (Solartron
& Sarasota)
Select P JP11 In = 3.5 VDC (UGC)
(Pulse Type
Input)

JP11

Select Module Type


JPB Out = A Type

Address Select
(Address #2 Shown)
JP12
Module A0 A1 A2
#1 Out Out Out
#2 In Out Out RTD2 D/A2
#3 Out In Out
#4 In In Out JP12 In RTD2 Pulse (Frequency) Type
#5 Out Out In Position Densitometer Requires AC
#6 In Out In Coupling - Channel 4

Fig. 2-7. B Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings - Frequency


Densitometer Setup

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

2.4. The E/D and E Combo Modules


The hardware of E/D and E Combo Modules are similar to that of the A and B
Modules (discussed previously) except that these modules provide 2 analog
input channels which can be configured by jumpers for 1-5 volt, 4-20 mA or 4-
wire RTDs, and 2 pulse input channels which can be used to input flowmeter
pulses or densitometer frequency signals. Two 4-20 mA analog outputs are
always available on these modules. The module hardware can also be
configured by the application software to provide Level A Pulse Fidelity
Checking on the two pulse input channels.

2.4.1. The E/D Type Combo I/O Module


The E/D Type Combo Module is simply an E Combo Module with the JPD
jumper in place. Input Channels 1 and 2 are analog input channels which can
be configured by jumpers for 1-5 volt, 4-20 mA, or 4-wire RTDs. Input Channels
3 and 4 are always configured to measure periodic time and accept pulse
signals from digital densitometers. Each module is connected to the back panel
terminal blocks via 12 wires on the ribbon cables. The actual terminal numbers
used depend upon which backplane connector (TB?) the module is plugged into.

E/D Combo Module Back Panel Terminal Assignments


TB? Terminal 1 Input Channel #1 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
TB? Terminal 2 Input Channel #1 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 3 Input Channel #2 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
TB? Terminal 4 Input Channel #2 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 5 Input Channel #3 (AC or DC Coupled Digital Densitometer Pulses) *
TB? Terminal 6 Input Channel #4 (AC or DC Coupled Digital Densitometer Pulses) *
TB? Terminal 7 Not Used
TB? Terminal 8 RTD Excitation Current Source #2 *
TB? Terminal 9 RTD Excitation Current Source #1 *
TB? Terminal 10 Signal Return for signals marked (*) (Internally connected to DC power return)
TB? Terminal 11 Analog Output #1 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 12 Analog Output #2 (4-20mA) *

Input Threshold Select


JP8 and JP1
In = +3.5 Volt DC / Out = +1.2 Volt DC JP8 THRES JP5 JP6
JP3 JP4

Select Module Type RTD 4-20 RTD 4-20


JPD In = E/D Module INPUT 1 INPUT 1

JP5 JP6

JP8 THRES RTD 4-20


JP1 THRES INPUT 2

JP2 JP7

AC DC AC AC DC AC
INPUT 4 INPUT 3
Address Select
(Address #2 Shown) JP5 JP6

Module A0 A1 A2
JP2 RTD 4-20
#1 Out Out Out
INPUT 2
#2 In Out Out JP7
#3 Out In Out AC DC AC
#4 In In Out INPUT 4 AC DC AC 4-20 mA
AC Coupling INPUT 3 DC Coupling Selected
#5 Out Out In
Select Select
#6 In Out In

Fig. 2-8. E/D Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

2.4.2. The E Type Combo I/O Module


The E Type Combo Module is simply an E/D Combo Module with the JPD
jumper out. Double chronometry timers are provided in this module
configuration, allowing either pulse train to be proved. Input Channels 1 and 2
are analog input channels which can be configured by jumpers for 1-5 volt, 4-20
mA, or 4-wire RTDs. Input Channels 3 and 4 are always configured to accept
flowmeter pulses. Both RTD excitation current sources are also always
available. Each module is connected to the back panel terminal blocks via 12
wires on the ribbon cables. The actual terminal numbers used depend upon
which backplane connector (TB?) the module is plugged into.

E COMBO MODULE BACK PANEL T ERMINAL ASSIGNMENTS


TB? Terminal 1 Input Channel #1 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
TB? Terminal 2 Input Channel #1 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 3 Input Channel #2 (1-5v, 4-20mA, RTD)
TB? Terminal 4 Input Channel #2 (Isolated Signal Return)
TB? Terminal 5 Input Channel #3 (AC or DC Coupled Flowmeter Pulses) *
TB? Terminal 6 Input Channel #4 (AC or DC Coupled Flowmeter Pulses) *
TB? Terminal 7 Double Chronometry Detector Switch In (Active Low) *
TB? Terminal 8 RTD Excitation Current Source #2 *
TB? Terminal 9 RTD Excitation Current Source #1 *
TB? Terminal 10 Signal Return for signals marked (*) (Internally connected to DC power
return)
TB? Terminal 11 Analog Output #1 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 12 Analog Output #2 (4-20mA) *

Input Threshold Select


JP8 and JP1
In = +3.5 Volt DC / Out = +1.0 Volt DC JP8 THRES JP5 JP6
JP3 JP4

Select Module Type RTD 4-20 RTD 4-20


JPD Out = E Module INPUT 1 INPUT 1

JP5 JP6

JP8 THRES RTD 4-20


JP1 THRES INPUT 2

JP2 JP7

AC DC AC AC DC AC
INPUT 4 INPUT 3
Address Select
(Address #2 Shown) JP5 JP6

Module A0 A1 A2
JP2 RTD 4-20
#1 Out Out Out
INPUT 2
#2 In Out Out JP7
#3 Out In Out AC DC AC
#4 In In Out INPUT 4 AC DC AC 4-20 mA
AC Coupling INPUT 3 DC Coupling Selected
#5 Out Out In
Select Select
#6 In Out In

Fig. 2-9. E Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

2.5. The H Type Combo I/O Module


The H Type Combo Module is a special module which is used to communicate
using the Honeywell DE Protocol with 4 Honeywell Smart Transmitters. It
operates on a point-to-point basis. Honeywell Model ST3000 temperature,
pressure and differential pressure transmitters can be used. Transmitters
operating in the analog mode are automatically given a wake-up pulse and
switched into the DE Mode, as soon as they are connected and assigned a
meter run function. Two analog outputs are always available on this module.
Each module is connected to the back panel terminal blocks via 12 wires on the
ribbon cables. The actual terminal numbers used depend upon which backplane
connector (TB?) the module is plugged into.

H Combo Module Back Panel Terminal Assignments


TB? Terminal 1 Input Channel #1 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 2 Input Channel #1 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 3 Input Channel #2 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 4 Input Channel #2 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 5 Input Channel #3 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 6 Input Channel #3 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 7 Input Channel #4 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 8 Input Channel #4 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 9 Not Used
TB? Terminal 10 Signal Return for signals marked (*) (Internally connected to DC power
return)
TB? Terminal 11 Analog Output #1 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 12 Analog Output #2 (4-20mA) *

Module Address
Jumpers

Green LED
Indicates Any
Activity

Red LED Indicates


OMNI is
Transmitting

Transmitter Loop
Status LEDs

Fig. 2-10. H Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

Four sets of LED indicators show the status of each transmitter loop. The red
LED flashes when the flow computer is transmitting data to the transmitter, such
as a change of range, etc. The green LED shows that data is being received by
a channel. Note that each communication channel uses 2 wires and operates in
the half duplex/simplex mode which means that the green LED shows the flow
computers transmissions also. Each transducer is operated in the 6-byte
broadcast mode. In this mode, the process variable is updated approximately
every 300 msec. The database of the transducer is compared against the flow
computers database every 1 or 2 minutes, depending on the type of transducer.
Any changes to the transducer database which will affect the integrity of the
measured variable must be made via the flow computer.
These entries are:
o Transducer Zero (Lower Range Value)
o Transducer Full Scale (Upper Range Value)
o Transducer Damping Code (Filter Time Constant)
o Transducer Tag Name
The flow computer will not allow any other devices to alter these variables.
Should they be altered, by the Honeywell Smart Field Communicator (SFC) for
example, they will be restored to their original value as shown in the flow
computer (transducer tag name excepted).

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

2.6. The HV Type Combo I/O Module


The HV Type Combo Module is simply an H Module with the JP1, JP2 and JP3
address jumpers in the right-most setting (Address 15). The HV Combo Module
is used to communicate with Honeywell SMV3000 multivariable transmitters
via the DE Protocol. Operation of the LEDs is similar to the normal H Module.
Since only one multivariable transmitter is needed per meter run and since
there are a maximum of four meter runs, there will never be a need for more
then one HV Combo I/O Module.
Two analog outputs are always available on this module. Each module is
connected to the back panel terminal blocks via 12 wires on the ribbon cables.
The actual terminal numbers used depend upon which backplane connector
(TB?) module is plugged into.

HV Combo Module Back Panel Terminal Assignments


TB? Terminal 1 Input Channel #1 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 2 Input Channel #1 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 3 Input Channel #2 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 4 Input Channel #2 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 5 Input Channel #3 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 6 Input Channel #3 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 7 Input Channel #4 (Transmitter Positive Terminal)
TB? Terminal 8 Input Channel #4 (Transmitter Negative Terminal)
TB? Terminal 9 Not Used
TB? Terminal 10 Signal Return for signals marked (*) (Internally connected to DC power
return)
TB? Terminal 11 Analog Output #1 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 12 Analog Output #2 (4-20mA) *

Module Address
Jumpers

Green LED
Indicates Any
Activity

Red LED Indicates


OMNI is
Transmitting

Transmitter Loop
Status LEDs

Fig. 2-11. HV Type Combo Module - Jumper Settings

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Chapter 2 Process Input/Output Combination Module Setup

2.7. The SV Type Combo I/O Module


The SV I/O Combo Module has two RS-485 serial ports which are used to
communicate with devices such as Rosemount 3095 multivariable transmitters
via the Modbus Protocol. Dual LEDs on each port provide status of the
communications. The module also has six 4-20 mA outputs.
SV Modules and Other
Combo Module Types - SV Combo Module Back Panel Terminal Assignments
The flow computer can
handle only two SV Modules TB? Terminal 1 Port #1 B (RS-485)
and three other A, B, E/D, E TB? Terminal 2 Port #1 A (RS-485)
or H I/O Combo Modules. An TB? Terminal 3 Port #2 B (RS-485)
HV module can also be
TB? Terminal 4 Port #2 A (RS-485)
installed in lieu of one of
these I/O combo modules. TB? Terminal 5 Signal Return for D/A Outputs signals marked (*)
TB? Terminal 6 Signal Return for D/A Outputs signals marked (*)
TB? Terminal 7 Analog Output #5 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 8 Analog Output #6 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 9 Analog Output #3 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 10 Analog Output #4 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 11 Analog Output #1 (4-20mA) *
TB? Terminal 12 Analog Output #2 (4-20mA) *

Jumper In = 1st MV Module MV Address


Jumper Out = 2 nd MV Module Selection Jumpers

IRQ 2 Always Selected

LED Indicators

PORT 1 (3)

PORT 2 (4)

RTS Always Selected Transmitting (TX)/Ready-to-


Send (RTS) LEDs Red
Receiving LEDs Green
Both Jumpers In = Port Terminated
Both Jumpers Out = Port Unterminated

MV RS-485
Termination Jumpers

Fig. 2-12. Omni Multivariable Interface (SV Type Combo) Module Model
68-6203 - Jumper Settings

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

3. Mounting and Power Options

3.1. Mechanical Installation


Omni offers a variety of enclosure options which can all be customized based
on customer specified requirements:
q Panel Mounting
q NEMA 4/4X
q NEMA 7

3.1.1. Panel Mounting


Panel Mounting - Panels A panel with the correct size cut out as dimensioned below is required. Panels
less than 1/8 inch thick can should be a minimum of 1/8 inch thick. Use the two keyed nuts and clamping
be used but will require that
the rear of the computer be
bars provided to mount the flow computer to the panel.
supported.

CAUTION!
These units have an integral
latching mechanism which
first must be disengaged by
lifting the bezel upwards
before withdrawing the unit
from the case.

IMPORTANT!
The maximum length of the
ribbon cable that connects
the keypad to the CPU
module is 18 inches. The
operation of the Central
Processor Module (CPU) will
be significantly affected if
this length is exceeded.

Fig. 3-1. Panel Mounting - Omni 6000 (upper), Omni 3000 (lower)

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Chapter 3 Mounting and Power Options

3.1.2. Nema 4 / 4X Configurations


Both the NEMA 4 and NEMA 4X are weather-proof enclosures. The NEMA 4 is
a standard steel enclosure, whereas the NEMA 4X is a stainless steel
enclosure. Both Omni 6000 and Omni 3000 flow computers can be mounted
inside the NEMAs on a sturdy swing frame. The NEMAs also include a 5 x 3
viewing window with a lexan plate to allow easy viewing. Custom enclosures
are available.

NEMA 4 / 4X FOR OMNI 6000 / 3000


Dimensions Weight Compliance

q NEMA 4, -12 & -13


24 in x 24 in x 12 in 80 lbs q UL 50, Type 4
(610 mm x 610 mm x 305 (36 kg) q CSA Enclosure 4
mm) q IEC 529, IP66

3.1.3. Nema 7 Specification


The NEMA 7 is an explosion-proof enclosure which allows switch or pushbutton
options for manipulating the contained flow computer. The viewing window is
sustained by a 3 circular glass thick. Both the Omni 6000 and Omni 3000
flow computers can be mounted in the NEMA 7 with minimal specification
variances. Custom enclosures are available.

NEMA 7 FOR OMNI 6000

Dimensions Weight Compliance

120 lbs q NEC


(54 kg) Division 1 & 2
12 in x 18 in x 9 in Class I; Groups B, C & D
(305 mm x 457 mm x 203 Class II; Groups E, F & G
mm) Class III
q IEC
Zone 0 & 1
Groups IIC, IIB & IIA

NEMA 7 FOR OMNI 3000

Dimensions Weight Compliance

12 in x 12 in x 8 in 110 lbs q NEC


(305 mm x 305 mm x 203 (50 kg) Division 1 & 2
mm) Class I; Groups B, C & D
Class II; Groups E, F & G
Class III
q IEC
Zone 0 & 1
Groups IIC, IIB & IIA

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

3.2. Input Power


INFO - A recommended The Omni Flow Computer can be AC or DC powered.
maximum of 500mA of
transducer loop power is
available with a fully loaded
system of 6 combo I/O
3.2.1. AC Power
modules, 2 digital I/O
modules and 2 dual serial
When AC powered, 120 VAC, 50 Watts is applied to the AC terminal block.
I/O modules. The computer Approximately 500 mA at 24 VDC is always available from the DC terminal
must be DC powered if this block to drive transducer loops, pre-amplifiers, and digital I/O loads when the
500 mA limit is to be unit is powered by AC.
exceeded.
The flow computer can be special ordered for operation on 220-250 VAC
supplies. This requires a modified power supply unit and a different cord set.
CAUTION!
POTENTIAL FOR DATA 3.2.2. DC Power
LOSS!
RAM Battery Backup - When DC powered, 18 to 30 volts at 24 Watts is applied to the DC terminal
Omni flow computers leave block (this wattage figure does not include power sourced from the digital output
the factory with a fully terminals).
charged Ni-Cd battery as
RAM power backup. RAM
data, including user
configuration and I/O 3.2.3. Safety Considerations
calibration data, may be lost
if the flow computer is To ensure continued protection against fire, the AC fuse must always be
disconnected from external replaced with a 0.5 amp (5x20 mm) slow blow fuse. The DC fuse must be
power for more than 30 days. replaced by a 3 amp, 2 AG fast blow.
Observe caution when
storing the flow computer Power should be connected via a suitable power disconnect switch certified as
without power being applied
for extended periods of time.
being safe for the area (for grounding requirements, see sidebar note on facing
The RAM back-up battery is page).
rechargeable and will be fully
charged after power has
been applied for 24 hours.

ENVIRONMENTAL - The
maximum system
configuration of 24 process
inputs, 12 process outputs,
24 digital I/O points and 4
serial I/O channels dissipates
approximately 24 Watts. This
causes an internal
temperature rise of 15F over
the ambient. The unit should
not be mounted in a cabinet
or panel where the ambient
inside the cabinet will exceed
110F.

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Chapter 3 Mounting and Power Options

3.3. Power Terminals

3.3.1. CE Equipment Power Terminals


In this current version of the Omni 3000 and Omni 6000 back panel the AC
receptacle is a power line filter with a separate AC fuse holder. The AC power is
connected via a separate 4-wire conductor cable which plugs into the power
supply. The DC terminal is on TB 11 (for Omni 6000) and on TB5 (for Omni
3000).
The power supply used with this version is a Model 68-6118; no fuses.

Back Panel Fuses - All DC


fuses are 3 amp, fast-blow
Model 225.003,
manufactured by Littlefuse.
All AC fuses are amp,
slow-blow Model 229.500,
manufactured by Littlefuse

Earth Ground
Requirements -To minimize
the effects of electrical
transients, the outer case of
the flow computer should be
connected to a high quality
earth ground using the
grounding stud located on
the back of the unit (see Fig.
3-2).
Connect the shields of all
wiring to the same grounding
stud. To eliminate earth loop
currents, shields should be
left unconnected and taped
back at the other end.

Fig. 3-2. Input Power Terminals - Omni 3000 (upper), Omni 6000 (lower)

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

3.3.2. Extended Back Panel Power Terminals


Several mounting options are now available with the Omni 6000 flow computer
by requesting the Extended Back Panel Termination option. This panel
incorporates all the terminal blocks of Versions 2 and 3, TB1 through TB10 with
terminals marked 1 through 12. Screw type terminals are provided for AC and
DC power. In addition to TB1 through TB10, extra DC (fused), return and shield
terminals are provided for TB1 through TB8. Extended 64-conductor ribbon
cables and the AC cables are provided with a standard length of 5 feet.

Amp

Extended Back Panel


Fuses - All DC fuses are
amp fast-blow manufactured
by Littlefuse, Model 225.250.
The main DC fuse is 3 amp.
The AC fuse is amp slow-
blow manufactured by
Littlefuse, Model 239.500.
The fuse for the back panels
AC receptacle is a 5x20mm,
amp slow-blow.

amp

3 Amp

Fig. 3-3. Input Power Terminals - Extended Back Panel (Omni 6000 only)

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Chapter 3 Mounting and Power Options

Fig. 3-4. Example of Typical Back Panel Assignments (Omni 6000)

Fig. 3-5. Example of Typical Back Panel Assignments (Omni 3000)

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

3.4. Power Supply Module Switching


Regulator
All analog and digital circuits within the flow computer are powered from a 5-
volt switching regulator located on the power supply module. This is located in
the rear most connector on the computer backplane.
The DC power which supplies the switching regulator either comes directly from
the DC terminals on the back panel of the flow computer (18-30 VDC) or by
rectifying the output of the integral 120 VAC (240 VAC) to 20 VAC transformer.
DC power into or out of the back panel DC power terminals is fused by a 3
Amp, 2 AG fuse located on the back panel next to the DC power terminals.
Regulated 5-volt power is monitored by a 3 to 4 second shutdown circuit located
on the power supply module. When power is applied to the computer there will
be a delay of 3 to 4 seconds before the unit powers up.

CAUTION
The Power Low and +5 v
Adjust on the Power Supply
Module are factory
adjustments that require the
use of special equipment.
DO NOT attempt to adjust

Fig. 3-6. Power Supply Module Model 68-6118

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

4. Connecting to Flowmeters

4.1. Turbine Flowmeter (A or B Combo


Module)
Input Channels 3 and 4 can be independently jumpered to accept pulse signals.
Channel 3 on the A and B Combo Modules and Channel 4 on the A Combo
Module can be used to input turbine or positive displacement flowmeters. The
input threshold is 3.5 volts; hysteresis 1/2 volt.

Fig. 4-1. Connecting to a Turbine Pre-amp (A or B Combo Modules)

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Chapter 4 Connecting to Flowmeters

4.2. Wiring Flowmeter Signals to E Type


Combo Modules
Input Channels 3 and 4 of each E Type Combo Module are used to input
signals from turbine or PD flowmeters. Both channels share a common signal
return at the Omni terminals. Input threshold can be jumpered for +1 or +3.5
volt. Input coupling can be AC or DC (see Chapter 2). Hysteresis is
approximately 0.5 volt.

Fig. 4-2. Wiring to Turbine Pre-Amps (E Type Combo Modules Only)

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

4.3. Faure Herman Turbine Meters (E


Combo Module)
Faure Herman Turbine Meters are used in liquid applications only. For these
flowmeters, high threshold jumpers JP1 and JP8 on the E Type Combo Module
must be installed.

Fig. 4-3. Wiring of Faure Herman Pre-amp Using Omni 24 VDC

Fig. 4-4. Wiring of Faure Herman Pre-amp Using External 24 VDC

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Chapter 4 Connecting to Flowmeters

4.4. Pulse Fidelity and Integrity Checking


with E Type Combo Modules
A flowmeter with dual channel out-of-phase outputs can be connected as
shown. The flow computer can be configured to continuously compare the
signals for frequency and sequence on a pulse-to-pulse basis, and alarm and
log any differences. (See Volume 5, Technical Bulletin TB-970901 for more
information on Pulse Fidelity Checking.)

Fig. 4-5. Connecting Dual Coil Turbines for Pulse Fidelity Checking

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

5. Connecting to Transducers and


Transmitters

5.1. Wiring the Input Transducers


Because of the high density of connections on the back panel terminal, it is
recommended that wiring to the terminals be made with 18-22 gauge wire
wherever possible. Transducers should be wired using twisted pairs of 18 gauge
shielded wire. The shields should be connected together and grounded at the
flow computer end. To prevent ground loops, shields should be taped back and
insulated at the transducer end.
Each of the 4-20 mA process input channels are individually optically isolated.
The transducer may be connected in series with either the power or return line
of the transducer current loop. The figure shown below shows a transducer
wired in the power leg of the loop.

Fig. 5-1. Wiring the 4-20 mA Inputs (Input Channels 1 & 2 shown)

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Chapter 5 Connecting to Transducers and Transmitters

5.2. Wiring of a Dry C Type Contact


Certain types of flowmeter photo-pulsers produce a low frequency contact pulse
output (typical 1 pulse per barrel). To accommodate these low frequencies, they
can be wired to any pulse input on A or E Type Combo Modules, as shown
below.

Fig. 5-2. Wiring for Dry C Type Contact

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

5.3. Wiring RTD Probes


INFO - Each A or B Type Channels 1 and 2 of each combo I/O module can be jumpered to accept a
Combo Module always has 1 signal from a 100 ohm RTD probe. The flow computer can be configured for the
RTD excitation current
source available at Terminal
DIN 43-760 curve (= 0.00385) or the American curve (=0.00392). The probe
9. A second source is always is wired in a 4-wire configuration as shown below.
available on B Types at
Terminal 12.

TIP - The excitation current


source for an RTD need not
come from the same combo
module from which the signal
is input. You will need to
recalibrate the input channel
if you choose to use an
excitation source from
another combo module.

Fig. 5-3. Wiring a 4-Wire RTD Temperature Probe

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Chapter 5 Connecting to Transducers and Transmitters

5.4. Wiring Densitometers

5.4.1. Wiring Densitometer Signals to an E/D Type


Combo Module
INFO - Because the density Two independent densitometers with RTD probes can be wired directly to an
pulse signal can be a small E/D type combo module. For example, Solartron and UGC densitometers
AC signal with a large DC
offset, you must select AC
can be wired to the same E/D Type Module.
coupling and low trigger
threshold for the combo
module channel used; i.e.: on 5.4.2. Solartron Densitometers
the B Type Combo Modules,
JP13 in the AC position and Connecting to a Solartron Digital Densitometer actually involves two devices:
JP11 out; on E/D Combo the densitometer current pulse signal and the densitometer 4-wire RTD probe
Modules, JP2 and JP7 in the
AC positions and JP1 and
attached to the vibrating tube. The pulse signal is connected to Channel 4 of a
JP8 out. B Type Combo Module. The RTD is connected to Channel 1 or Channel 2. The
Input impedance will be device can be connected with or without safety barriers, depending on the
10kohms; 1.5Vpp is required needs of the application.
from the densitometer to
reliably trigger the input.

INFO - When configuring the


flow computer, select the
DIN curve for this RTD
temperature point.

Fig. 5-4. Wiring a Solartron Densitometer with Safety Barriers to a B


Type I/O Combo Module

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

NOTICE!
Diagrams shown are based
on published manufacturers,
data. Omni accepts no
responsibility for wiring or
installation of equipment in a
hazardous area. Equipment
must always be installed in
compliance with local and
national safety standards.

Fig. 5-5. Wiring a Solartron Densitometer without Safety Barriers to a


B Type I/O Combo Module

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Chapter 5 Connecting to Transducers and Transmitters

5.4.3. Sarasota Densitometers


INFO - Because the density The Sarasota Densitometer provides a voltage pulse signal representing
pulse signal can be a small density and also a 4-wire 100 ohm RTD probe monitoring the temperature of
AC signal with a large DC
offset, you must select AC
the device. The pulse signal is connected to Channel 4 of a B Type Combo
coupling and low trigger Module. The RTD is connected to Channel 1 or Channel 2 of any module. The
threshold for the combo device can be connected with or without safety barriers, depending on the
module channel used; i.e.: on needs of the application.
the B Type Combo Modules,
JP13 in the AC position and
JP11 out; on E/D Combo
Modules, JP2 and JP7 in the
AC positions and JP1 and
JP8 out.
Input impedance will be
10kohms; 1.5Vpp is required
from the densitometer to
reliably trigger the input.

INFO - When configuring the


flow computer, select the
DIN curve for this RTD
temperature point.

Fig. 5-6. Wiring a Sarasota Densitometer with Safety Barriers to a B


Type I/O Combo Module

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

NOTICE!
Diagrams shown are based
on published manufacturers,
data. Omni accepts no
responsibility for wiring or
installation of equipment in a
hazardous area. Equipment
must always be installed in
compliance with local and
national safety standards.

Fig. 5-7. Wiring a Sarasota Densitometer without Safety Barriers to a B


Type I/O Combo Module

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Chapter 5 Connecting to Transducers and Transmitters

5.4.4. UGC Densitometers


INFO - Because the density The UGC Densitometer output provides an open collector transistor that
pulse signal is a large DC requires an external pull-up resistor to 24 volts DC. The densitometer provides
pulse signal with little or no
DC offset, you must select
a 24 volt DC pulse output in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The pulse signal is
DC coupling with normal connected to Channel 4 of a B Type Combo Module and can be connected with
trigger threshold for the or without safety barriers, depending on the application requirements.
combo module channel used;
i.e.: on the B Type Combo
Modules, JP13 in the DC
position and JP11 in; on E/D
Combo Modules, JP2 and
JP7 in the DC positions and
JP1 and JP8 in.
Input impedance will be
1Mohms; <3.0Vfor low level
and >4V.0 for high level is
required from the
densitometer to reliably
trigger the input.

Fig. 5-8. Wiring a UGC Densitometer with Safety Barriers to a B Type


I/O Combo Module

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

NOTICE!
Diagrams shown are based
on published manufacturers,
data. Omni accepts no
responsibility for wiring or
installation of equipment in a
hazardous area. Equipment
must always be installed in
compliance with local and
national safety standards.

Fig. 5-9. Wiring a UGC Densitometer without Safety Barriers to a B


Type I/O Combo Module

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Chapter 5 Connecting to Transducers and Transmitters

5.5. Wiring of Honeywell ST3000


Transmitters
Up to four Honeywell Smart Transmitters can be wired to each H Type Combo
I/O Module. Loop power is provided by the combo module. No external power is
required.

Fig. 5-10. Wiring of a Honeywell Smart Transmitter

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

5.6. Wiring Micro Motion Transmitters

5.6.1. Connecting Micro Motion RFT9739 Transmitter


to A Type or E Type Process I/O Combination
Modules
The frequency/pulse output that represents the volume flow from the RFT9739
Transmitter can be wired directly into either Frequency Channel 3 or 4 on A
Type or E Type Combo Modules. (See Technical Bulletin TB-980401.)

Fig. 5-11. Wiring of a Micro Motion RFT9739 Field-Mount (Explosion-Proof) Transmitter

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Chapter 5 Connecting to Transducers and Transmitters

5.6.2. Connecting Micro Motion RFT 9739 via RS-485


Serial Communications
Serial communication via RS-485 can be accomplished using the Peer-to-Peer
Mode via Omni Serial Port #2 of the RS-232-C/485 Serial Module # 68-6205,
with selection jumpers in the RS-485 position. (See Technical Bulletin TB-
980401.)

OMNI BACK PANEL TERMINALS


SERIAL PORT #2 (PEER-TO-PEER)
RS-485 MODE SELECTED

7 (B)

10

11 (A)

Fig. 5-12. Wiring of a Micro Motion RFT9739 Field-Mount (Explosion-Proof)


Transmitter Via Two-wire RS-485 Communications (Serial I/O Module #68-
6205)

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

5.6.3. Connecting Micro Motion RFT9739 via Serial


RS-232-C to 485 Converter
Serial communication via RS-485 can also be accomplished utilizing the Peer-
to-Peer Mode via RS-232-C. (See Technical Bulletin TB-980401.)

Fig. 5-13. Wiring of a Micro Motion RFT9739 Field-Mount (Explosion-Proof)


Transmitter Via Serial RS-485 Converter

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

6. Connecting Analog Outputs and


Miscellaneous I/O Including Provers

6.1. Analog Outputs


Analog outputs are available for remote terminal units, flow controllers, and
recording devices. The analog outputs source 4-20 mA into a load wired to the
DC power return. Maximum load resistance is 1000 ohms at 25 VDC. Digital-to-
Analog conversion is accomplished with a 12-bit binary resolution.
Two outputs are available on each A Type Combo Module. One output is
available on each B Type Combo Module.
To calibrate, each of the outputs is set to 4.00 and 20.00 mA and the software
zero and span adjusted while in the Diagnostic Mode (described later). Any
value between 2.5 and 23.0 mA may be output.
Each output is assigned via the keypad or serial link to one of the many
variables available (see Volume 3).

Fig. 6-1. Wiring Devices to the Flow Computers Analog Outputs

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Chapter 6 Connecting Analog Outputs and Miscellaneous I/O Including Provers

6.2. Digital Inputs/Outputs

6.2.1. Wiring a Digital Point as an Input or an Output


Digital I/O modules handle 12 digital points. Each point can be independently
configured as either an input or output via the keypad or via a serial port.
The power and returns for all digital I/O signals are common with the DC power
terminals. Digital output loads are connected between the I/O terminal and DC
power return. An approximate total load of 500 mA per module (per 12 points) is
allowed although an individual point can handle 200 mA. Voltages applied to
I/O points used as inputs must not exceed the DC supply voltage at the DC
terminal, or the protective fuse for that point on the digital I/O module may
blow.

Fig. 6-2. Wiring of a Digital I/O Point as an Input

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

Fig. 6-3. Wiring of a Digital I/O Point as an Output

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Chapter 6 Connecting Analog Outputs and Miscellaneous I/O Including Provers

6.2.2. Connecting Various Digital I/O Devices


On the Omni 6000, Digital I/O Module #1, handling points 1 through 12, is
plugged into the backplane connector marked I/O Module #1. This in turn is
connected to Terminal Strip TB1-1 through 12. Digital I/O Module #2, handling
points 13 through 24, is plugged into the backplane connector marked I/O
Module #2 which is connected to Terminal Strip TB2-1 through 12. The Omni
3000 has only one digital I/O module which is connected to Terminal TB1-1
through 12 on the back panel.
The diagram below shows the typical wiring required to interface to other
devices, such as: switches, relays, provers, programmable logic controllers,
among other devices.

Fig. 6-4. Connecting Digital I/O Devices to the Flow Computer

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

6.3. Provers

6.3.1. Connecting Pipe Prover Detector Switches


INFO - The prover detector Pipe prover detector switches are the only I/O signal that must be connected to
switch signal activates an a specific I/O point. They must be wired as shown in Fig. 6-4 to Digital I/O
interrupt request into the
computer. Jumpers JP1 and
Point #1, and the point assigned to Boolean 1700 in the software configuration
JP2 on the digital I/O module (see Volume 3). This is because Digital I/O Point #1 is internally jumpered to
(Fig. 1-5) control which edge cause a high priority interrupt of the computer used to start and stop prover
of the signal will cause the counting. Digital I/O Point #1 can still be used as a normal I/O point if pipe
interrupt. Pulse counting
should start when the sphere
proving is not needed.
first activates the detector
switch. Install JP1 in cases
where the detector switchs 6.3.2. Interfacing to a Brooks Compact Prover
normally opened contacts are
used (Fig. 1-9). Install JP2 in The Omni Flow Computer interfaces to the basic Brooks Compact Prover Skid
cases where the detector Electronics (the Brooks Control Box is not used). The control interface involves
switchs normally closed
contacts are used.
one digital output to control the piston launch, a digital input point to monitor the
position of the piston, and a detector switch signal shared between each meter
run to be proved.
Note: When using double
chronometry proving, the Compact provers use the Pulse Interpolation Method of measuring the
detector switch input is on flowmeter counts between the detector switches. The interpolation method
Terminal 7 of an E Type requires that the detector switches activate high speed hardware timers on the
Combo I/O Module. Omnis combo I/O module. The detector switch signals called first and final
pickoff by Brooks are connected to the Detector Switch input of each E Type
Combo Module installed in the flow computer.
The following diagram shows the complete installation, including 4-20 mA
signals representing the temperature and pressure of the prover tube as well as
the nitrogen plenum chamber. The 12-volt DC power supply is user supplied.

Fig. 6-5. Wiring to a Brooks Compact Prover

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Chapter 6 Connecting Analog Outputs and Miscellaneous I/O Including Provers

6.3.3. Controlling the Plenum Pressure of a Brooks


Compact Prover
The plenum chamber pressure is used as a spring to close the poppet valve of
the piston and cause the piston to be moved forward by the flowing liquid. The
pressure required to close the poppet valve varies with pipeline pressure. Too
high a plenum pressure causes the piston to be pushed downstream by this
excess pressure and can lead to inaccurate provings.
The Omni Flow Computer can monitor the plenum pressure and line pressure,
and automatically charge or vent nitrogen from the plenum chamber.
Before commencing a proving run, the Omni Flow Computer checks the
plenum pressure versus the required pressure and activates either the charge
or vent solenoid valve. The pressures will be matched within some user
entered deadband percent. The Omni activates the solenoids via low voltage
relays (not shown).
An additional enhancement shown is a pressure switch signaling low nitrogen
bottle pressure. In this case, the prove attempt would be aborted if it became
impossible to achieve the correct plenum pressure.

Fig. 6-6. Controlling the Plenum Pressure of a Brooks Compact Prover

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

7. Connecting to Serial Devices

7.1. Serial Port Connection Options


INFO - Up to 12 flow The total number of serial communication ports depends on the number of dual
computers and/or other port serial I/O modules installed. The Omni 6000 accepts 2 serial I/O modules;
compatible serial devices can
be multi-dropped using
the Omni 3000 accepts 1. Two optional serial communication I/O modules are
Omnis proprietary RS-232-C available with your flow computer (see Chapter 1): the RS-232-C (compatible)
serial port. Thirty-two Model #68-6005, and the RS-232-C/485 Model #68-6205. The older Model #68-
devices may be connected 6005 is only capable of RS-232 compatible serial communications. The newer
when using the RS-485
Model #68-6205 is capable of either RS-232 or RS-485 communications via a
mode. Typically, one serial
I/O module is used on the selection jumper.
Omni 3000, providing two
ports. A maximum of two When jumpered for RS-232, the characteristics and functionality of this module
serial modules can be is identical to that of the older RS-232-C module, providing 2 optically isolated
installed in the Omni 6000, RS-232-C serial ports which can operate from 0.3 to 38.4 kbps. These ports are
providing four ports. used for printers, personal computers, and SCADA devices. Although the output
voltage levels are compatible with the RS-232 standard, the output is actually
RS-485 Communications
tristated when not sending data. This allows the transmit output from multiple
with an RS-232-C Serial I/O flow computers to be bussed. A terminating resistor is provided at the back
Module #68-6005 - When panel connections to pull down the transmitter signal to a mark (-9V). Hence, a
connecting to RS-485 serial short jumper is required in many cases from TX (Out) to Term.
devices using Serial I/O
Module #68-6005, a RS-232- RS-485 communications allows interconnecting multiple flow computers,
to-485 Converter device must programmable logic controllers, multivariable transmitters, and other serial
be used.
devices in either four-wire multi-drop mode or peer-to-peer two-wire multi-drop
mode.
Multivariable Transmitting
Devices - In addition to the
Serial I/O Module # 68-6205,
the flow computer must also
have an SV Module to
communicate with RS-485
compatible multivariable
transmitters. This serial
module must be jumpered to
IRQ 3 when used in
combination with an SV
Module. Without an SV
Module, the jumper must be
placed at IRQ 2. The SV
Module can only be used with
this serial module (68-6205)
and is not compatible with
the Serial I/O Module # 68-
6005. For more information,
see Technical Bulletin # TB-
980303.

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Chapter 7 Connecting to Serial Devices

7.2. Connecting to Printers

7.2.1. Connecting to a Dedicated Printer (Port 1)


INFO - The speed that data The following diagram shows the Omni Flow Computer connected to a
can be accepted by the dedicated printer. The hardware handshake wire connected to Pin 20 of the
printer depends on the size
of the input buffer (if any)
DB25 connector is optional, as the computer can be made to insert null
and the print mode (draft or characters after each carriage return to match the computer data transmission
near letter quality). Typical rate to the printer speed.
printers provide about 120
printed characters/second.

TIP - Most printers default to


the draft mode. Leave it there
for maximum performance.
Because of impact printer
limitations, no speed
improvement is obtained by
selecting baud rates over
2.4kbps.

Fig. 7-1. Connecting a Printer to Serial Port #1 of the Flow Computer

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

7.2.2. Connecting to a Shared Printer (Port 1)


Up to 12 Omni flow computers can share a printer. They are connected as
shown. One flow computer is assigned as the master and manages all traffic to
the printer. Each computer monitors the data transmitted to the printer by
having its TX terminal jumpered to its RX terminal. Resident firmware ensures
that only one computer will attempt to access the printer at any one time.

INFO - Note that only 1


terminating pull-down resistor
is jumpered in place.

Fig. 7-2. Connecting Several Flow Computers to a Shared Printer

7.2.3. Print Sharing Problems


Note: Refer to Volume 3, Most problems associated with printer sharing show up as garbled reports or
Chapter 2 for Printer locked up printers. This is usually caused by one or more computers sending
Settings.
data to the printer at the same time. Check your wiring to the figure above and
consult the following checklist if you experience problems:
1) Check that all computers are set to the same baud rate, stop bits, and
parity settings as the printer.
2) All computers must have the Transmitter Key Delay set to zero (0).
3) One and only one computer must have its Printer Priority Number set to
1. All computers must have a different priority number.
4) Some printers provide jumpers or switches which set the polarity of the
Printer Ready signal on Pin 20. This signal must be positive when the
printer is ready.
5) When not using the Printer Ready signal (Pin 20), ensure that you have
entered enough NULs to prevent overrunning the printer buffer.

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Chapter 7 Connecting to Serial Devices

7.3. Connecting to a Personal Computer and


Modem
Note: Ports #1 and #2 (Ports #3 and #4* of an Omni 6000) can provide access to the
* Depending upon whether computers database using a Modbus protocol interface. This port is usually
a printer or Allen-Bradley connected to a PC running the OmniCom configuration software. Up to 12
PLC is used.
Omni flow computers can be connected to 1 PC. The Modbus protocol includes
an address field which ensures that only 1 unit will transmit at a time.

INFO - Note that only 1


terminating pull-down resistor
is jumpered in place.

Fig. 7-3. Direct Connect to a Personal Computer - DB25 Female


Connector (Using Port #2 as an example)

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

INFO - Note that only 1


terminating pull-down resistor
is jumpered in place.

Fig. 7-4. Direct Connect to a Personal Computer - DB9 Female


Connector

Fig. 7-5. Connecting Port #2 to a Modem

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Chapter 7 Connecting to Serial Devices

7.4. Peer-to-Peer Communications and Multi-


drop Modes
Peer-to-Peer Serial Port #2 can also be configured by the application software to act as a
Communications - The peer-to-peer Modbus master port. This is a half duplex/simplex link which
peer-to-peer communication
feature allows you to multi-
allows any Omni Flow Computer to communicate with any other flow computer
drop up to 32 flow computers or Modbus slave device. That data link can operate at up to 38.4 kbps and uses
and other devices in RS-485 a proprietary token passing scheme. Interconnecting multiple flow computers
serial communications mode, and or multiple serial devices can be accomplished via RS-232-Compatible or
and up to 12 using RS-232-C RS-485 communications.
communications.

Peer-to-Peer Redundancy 7.4.1. Peer-to-Peer RS-485 Two-wire Multi-drop Mode


Schemes - Redundancy
schemes allows for The diagram below shows the wiring requirements for multi-dropping two or
uninterrupted measurement more flow computers via RS-485 in two-wire mode. This option is available only
and control functionality by with the Omni Serial I/O Module #68-6205. (See Technical Bulletin #TB-
interconnecting two
identically equipped and
980401.)
configured flow computers
(see Technical Bulletin TB-
980402).


OmniCom and Peer-to-
UP TO 32 FLOW COMPUTERS
Peer - The OmniCom
Configuration PC Software
package supplied with your
Omni Flow Computer cannot B
be used on Serial Port #2
when it is being used as a
peer-to-peer link.

GND

RS-485 TWO-WIRE RS-485 TWO-WIRE RS-485 TWO-WIRE RS-485 TWO-WIRE


TERMINATED NON-TERMINATED NON-TERMINATED NON-TERMINATED

Fig. 7-6. Wiring of Several Flow Computers using the Peer-to-Peer


Feature via RS-485 Communications in Two-wire Multi-drop
Mode

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

7.4.2. Peer-to-Peer via RS-232-C Communications


The diagram below shows the wiring requirements for multi-dropping two or
more flow computers in RS-232 C (compatible) mode. When multi-dropping two
or more flow computers with other serial devices via the RS-232-C mode, an
RS-232-to-RS-485 standard converter may be required. (See Technical
Bulletin #TB-980401.)

Fig. 7-7. Wiring of Several Flow Computers in the Peer-to-Peer Mode


using RS-232-C Communications.

7.4.3. Keying the Modem or Radio Transmitter Carrier


in Multi-drop Applications
Note: Refer to Volume 3, Use the RTS signal to key the modem or radio transmitter carrier in a multi-drop
Chapter 2 Flow Computer application. A delay between activating the RTS signal and actually sending
Configuration.
data is provided to allow for carrier acquisition at the remote end. This delay
can be selected as 0.0 msec, 50 msec, 100 msec, or 150 msec.

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Chapter 7 Connecting to Serial Devices

7.4.4. RS-485 Four-wire Multi-drop Mode


The diagram below shows the wiring requirements for multi-dropping two or
more flow computers via RS-485 in four-wire mode to a third party PLC type
device. Note that in the wiring example shown below, the PLC acts as a master
and can communicate with either flow computer. A four-wire wiring system does
not allow communications between slaves; i.e., data can only be transferred
between master and slaves. The RS-485 option is available only with the Omni
Serial I/O Module #68-6205.

UP TO 32 RS-485 DEVICES
SLAVE SLAVE

MASTER
TX-B PLC DEVICE

RX

RX-A

TX

TX-A

RX-B RS-485

RS-485 FOUR-WIRE RS-485 FOUR-WIRE

Fig. 7-8. Wiring of Multiple Flow Computers to a PLC Device Via RS-485
Communications in Four-wire Multi-drop Mode

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

7.5. Connecting to a SCADA Device


When using an Omni 6000 with 2 serial I/O modules installed, a second
Modbus port (Physical Port #3 used as an example) can provide access to the
computers database. This port can also be connected to a PC or any SCADA
device either directly, via modem, or via radio link.

Fig. 7-9. Typical Wiring of Port #3 to a SCADA Device via Modem

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Chapter 7 Connecting to Serial Devices

7.6. Interfacing the Fourth Serial Port to an


Allen-Bradley KE Module
Port #4 is available on Omni flow computers with the second serial module
fitted. This port can be selected to communicate with Allen-Bradley devices
using DF1 full duplex or half duplex protocol, or set up for Modbus devices. The
example below assumes that the Allen-Bradley Protocol has been selected.

Fig. 7-10. Wiring Serial Port #4 to Allen-Bradley KE Communications


Module

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

8. Diagnostic and Calibration Features

8.1. Introduction
In the diagnostic mode you can verify that the I/O modules and transducers are
working and are calibrated to specification.
The actual process transducers used may provide a variety of signal types,
ranging from voltage or current pulses of various levels, to linear analog signals
such as 4-20 mA., 1-5V, 0-1V or RTD elements. In the case of pulse inputs, the
input module provides amplification and/or level shifting, Schmitt triggering and
opto-isolation.
When analog signals are used the input module provides all signal conditioning,
opto-isolation, and converts the analog signal to a high frequency pulse train, in
the range of 0 - 20 kHz. By using a precision voltage to frequency converter,
typical linearity of +/-0.01 % is obtained.
Certain diagnostic displays are always available while in the Display Mode. For
example pressing [Input] then [Display] will display the raw frequency input
from each process input point. The up/down arrow keys can be used to scroll
through all inputs. A typical display shows:
INFO - When viewing an
analog input point, the Input % Freq/Period
frequency displayed #1 2530
approximates 1000Hz/mA.
When viewing a turbine or Input % /Freq/Period
photo pulsar signal, the #2 3021
display is the actual input
frequency.
Pressing [Output] [Status] [Display] shows the current percentage output for
each of the digital to analog 4-20 mA outputs.
INFO - 0.0% corresponds to
4mA. 100.0% corresponds to Analog Output %
20mA. #1 55.79
Analog Output %
#2 34.10

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Chapter 8 Diagnostic and Calibration Features

Important timing information is available by pressing [Time] then [Display] and


then scrolling down using the down arrow. The displays are as follows:

Power Applied
Time: 09:10:30
Date: 01/21/91

Power Last Lost


Time: 10:25:21
Date: 01/20/91

The previous two displays of power lost and power applied allow the user to
estimate the amount of product flow which may be unaccounted for in the event
of a power failure.
Scrolling down further displays:

Main Task Timing-Sec


20 mS Task 00.00
50 mS Task 00.00
100mS Task 00.01
500mS Task 00.04
Background 00.02

This timing information refers to various main application tasks that run within
the computer. The information may be useful to Omni in the event of a
problem.

8.2. Calibrating in the Diagnostic Mode


INFO - The Diagnostic LED In the Diagnostic Mode the user selects a specific process variable to calibrate
glows red after a valid or view. The display shows the input channel and combo module used for the
password has been asked for
and entered.
variable. Calibration override values can be input and the input signals can be
viewed simultaneously as engineering values % span, input voltage and
current. Analog outputs and digital I/O points can also be viewed and
manipulated.

8.2.1. Entering The Diagnostic Mode


To enter the diagnostic mode proceed as follows press the [Alpha Shift] key,
then the [Diag] key.
INFO - The Select The front panel diagnostic LED will glow green and the following will be
Input/Output screen must displayed on the first three lines of the LCD Display:
be displayed when making a
new selection while in the
Diagnostic Mode. Return to Select Input/Output
this screen by pressing the
[Diag] key once.
to Calibrate,
Press "Diag" to Exit

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

The fourth line of the display is used to show the users selection. The user can
choose to calibrate or view any analog input or output, or manipulate any set of
digital I/O points.

8.2.2. Display Groups in the Diagnostic Mode


INFO - Each input channel of To display an input or output variable to calibrate, select from the following
each combo module has had display groups and associated key presses or select the I/O number if known,
its temperature coefficient
trimmed to 10 ppm/F. To
(usually supplied on a separate sheet).
avoid temperature gradient
effects and for best results,
always allow the internal
temperature of the computer
DISPLAY VARIABLES VALID KEY PRESSES
to stabilize before making
your final calibration
All of the following key presses are valid in the Diagnostic Mode. To enter
adjustments. the Diagnostic Mode, these key presses must be preceded by the [Alpha
Shift] [Diag] keys.

Input Channels (n = 1 through 24) [Input] or [Input] [n]

Meter Temperature (n = 1 through 4) [Temp] or [Temp] [Meter] [n]

Meter Pressure (n = 1 through 4) [Press] or [Press] [Meter] [n]

Meter Density (n = 1 through 4) [Density] or [Dens] [Meter] [n]

Meter Density Temp (n = 1 through 4) [Density][Temp] or [Density][Temp][Meter][n]

Meter Dens Pressure (n = 1 through 4) [Density][Press] or [Density][Press][Meter][n]

Prover Temperature (Left, Right) [Prove} [Temp]

Prover Pressure (Left, Right) [Prove} [Temp]

Output Channels (n = 1 through 24) [Output] [n]

Digital I/O (n = 1 or 2) [Status] [n]

8.2.3. Leaving The Diagnostic Mode


Once you are done viewing and/or modifying the calibration settings, press
[Diag] to return to the selection screen below:

Select Input/Output
to Calibrate,
Press "Diag" to Exit

Press the [Diag] key again to return to the Display Mode (Diagnostic LED will
turn off).

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Chapter 8 Diagnostic and Calibration Features

8.3. Calibration Instructions

8.3.1. Calibrating A Voltage or Current Analog Input


Note: You can also calibrate While the above display is shown select the input variable to calibrate. For
the input and output of your example to calibrate Meter Run #1 Temperature, press [Meter] [1] [Temp] (or
choice by entering the
number of that input or
the input # if known). The display shows:
output; e.g.: Press [Input]
[1] [Enter]; press [Output]
[4] [Enter]. With this method
Select Input/Output
you can calibrate the inputs to Calibrate,
and outputs to the computer Press "Diag" to Exit
without having them Meter 1 Temp
assigned to any I/O point
numbers.

Other key press combinations work. [Temp] [Meter] [1] means the same to the
computer as [Meter] [1] [Temp]. Pressing [Temp] without a meter number
allows all of the temperatures to be scrolled through and calibrated.
Now enter the selection by pressing [Display] and the following is displayed:

Temperature #1
Input# & Module 1-a1
Override 60.0
Calibrate Input ? _

INFO - Unless previously The display shows the process variable name, the input channel number and
entered, a request for a valid combo module used. This example shows Temperature Meter Run #1
password is made at this
point.
connected to Channel 1 of Combo Module A1.
The calibrate override value Before calibrating an input the user should enter a Cal Override value to be
entered will be substituted for used in all calculations in place of the live value.
all process variables
assigned to this physical I/O Answer [Y] to the 'Calibrate Input ?' question and the following is displayed:
point when the user answers
[Y] to Calibrate Input ?. It is
automatically removed when Meter 1 27.5
the user presses the [Diag]
key to exit or make a new % Value 50.00
selection. Input Volts 3.000
mA Value 12.00

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

To calibrate the input channel follow these instructions:


INFO - Each input channel of 1) Disconnect the transducer signal and replace it with a stable current or
each combo module has had voltage source capable of inputting 4.000 to 20.000 mA or 1.000 to
its temperature coefficient
trimmed to 10 ppm/F. To
5.000 V signal.
avoid temperature gradient 2) Set the input signal to 4.000 mA or 1.000 V as applicable.
effects and for best results,
always allow the internal 3) Using the Up/Down arrow keys adjust the displayed value so it reads
temperature of the computer
to stabilize before making
4.000 mA / 1.000 V.
your final calibration 4) Set the input signal to 20.000 mA or 5.000 V as applicable.
adjustments.
5) Using the Left/Right arrow keys adjust the displayed value so it reads
20.000 mA / 5.000 V.
INFO - The [ ]/[ ] keys are
used as a software Zero 6) Recheck step 2) No further adjustment is normally needed if the Zero is
potentiometer.
adjusted at exactly 4.0 mA.
Adjustments made when the
Shift LED is on are 7) Disconnect the calibrator signal and reconnect the transducer signal.
approximately ten times more
sensitive. 8) Press the [Diag] key to return to the selection screen.
Holding the arrow keys
longer than two seconds
speeds up the rate of Select Input/Output
adjustment. to Calibrate,
Press "Diag" to Exit
TIP - The Span adjustment
has no effect at 4mA or 1v.
Always adjust the Zero first
at exactly 4mA or 1v.
8.3.2. Calibrating an RTD Input Channel
Leaving the Diagnostic While the above screen is being displayed select a process variable which is
Mode - In the Select
Input/Output screen, press
assigned as an RTD probe input. For example, assuming a pulse type
the [Diag] key to return to the densitometer is installed, pressing [Meter] [1] [Density] [Temp] (or the input #
Display Mode (Diagnostic if known), selects the input channel used to process Meter Run #1's
LED will turn off). Densitometer integral RTD. Other key press combinations will work, and
[Density] [Meter] [1] [Temp] all mean the same. Pressing [Density] [Temp]
allows the user to scroll through all density temperature channels.
Now enter the selection by pressing [Display] and the following is displayed:

Dens #1 Temperature
Input# & Module 2-B1
Cal Overide 60.0
Calibrate Input ? _

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Chapter 8 Diagnostic and Calibration Features

Enter the Calibrate Override value and answer [Y] to the 'Calibrate Input ?'
question and a screen similar to the following is displayed:

Dens#1 Deg.F 65.0


% Value 60.00
Resistance Value
Ohms 100.00

To Calibrate an RTD input channel proceed as follows :


INFO - Each input channel of 1) Disconnect the RTD probe and connect precision decade resistance box.
each combo module has had capable of inputting 25.00 to 150.00 Ohms as shown below.
its temperature coefficient
trimmed to 10 ppm/F. To 2) Set the decade box to 25.00 Ohms.
avoid temperature gradient
effects and for best results, 3) Using the Up/Down arrow keys adjust the displayed value so it reads
always allow the internal 25.00 Ohms.
temperature of the computer
to stabilize before making 4) Set the decade box to 150.00 Ohms.
your final calibration
adjustments. 5) Using the Left/Right arrow keys adjust the displayed value so it reads
150.00 Ohms.
INFO - Installing the decade 6) Recheck step 2). No further adjustment is normally needed if the Zero is
box at the actual RTD probe adjusted at exactly 25 Ohms.
location provides maximum
accuracy, but can be 7) Disconnect the decade box and reconnect the RTD probe.
inconvenient. The errors
introduced by installing the 8) Press the [Diag] key to return to the selection screen.
decade box at the back panel
terminals of the flow
computer are approximately Select Input/Output
0.01% per 100 ohms of field to Calibrate,
wiring resistance.
Press "Diag" to Exit

TIP - The Span adjustment


has no effect at 4mA or 1v.
Always adjust the Zero first
at exactly 4mA or 1v.

Leaving the Diagnostic


Mode - In the Select
Input/Output screen, press
the [Diag] key to return to the
Display Mode (Diagnostic
LED will turn off).

Fig. 8-1. Figure Showing Calibration of RTD Input Channel

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

8.3.3. Calibrating a 4 to 20 mA Digital to Analog Output


Each of the analog outputs can be calibrated by monitoring the loop current with
an accurate milliamp meter and setting the output current to 4.00 mA and 20.00
mA. For example to calibrate Analog Output #1 proceed as follows:
While the 'Select Input/Output' screen is displayed, press [Output] [1]
[Display]. The display shows:

Analog Output #1
0%=4mA, 100%=20mA
Override % 0.00
Calibrate Output ? _

Answer [Y] to the 'Calibrate Output ?' question and the display shows:
CAUTION!
At this point, the analog
output reflects the value of
Analog Output #1
the currently displayed 0%=4mA, 100%=20mA
override, not the assigned Override % 0.00
variable. The user must Override Now Active
ensure that any equipment
using the output signal will
not cause an unsafe
condition to arise or cause To calibrate the output channel follow these steps:
erroneous results to be
generated.
1) Connect an accurate milliamp meter in series with the load.
2) Input 0.00 % (4.00 mA) as the output override.
3) Using the Up/Down arrow keys adjust the output current until the milliamp
meter indicates 4.00 mA.
4) Input 100.00 % (20.00 mA) as the output override.
5) Using the Left/Right arrow key adjust the output current until the milliamp
meter indicates 20.00 mA.
6) Repeat steps 2) through 5) until no further improvement can be obtained.
7) Remove the milliamp meter and reconnect the load.
8) Press the [Diag] key to return to the selection screen.
Leaving the Diagnostic
Mode - In the Select Select Input/Output
Input/Output screen, press to Calibrate,
the [Diag] key to return to the
'Display Mode' (Diagnostic Press "Diag" to Exit
LED will turn off).

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Chapter 8 Diagnostic and Calibration Features

8.3.4. Verifying the Operation of the Digital I/O Points


The digital I/O points can be manipulated as a group by pressing [Status] [1]
for digital points 1 through 12 or [Status] [2] for digital points 13 through 24.
Pressing [Status] will allow the user to scroll to either group. Press [Display]
and a screen similar to the following is displayed:

Digital#1 I/O Points


Input 001011001011
Overide 101010101010
Force To Output ? _

The second line shows the status of the I/O points frozen at the time that the
CAUTION! screen was displayed. The points are numbered left to right (1 to 12) with a '0'
After answering [Y], the indicating that a point is off and a '1' indicating that a point is on. The third line
digital outputs will reflect the shows the override bit values that will be forced to the output port when the user
value of the currently
answers [Y] to the 'Force To Output ?' question. A screen similar to the
displayed override, not the
assigned variable. The user following is displayed:
must ensure that any
equipment using the output
signal will not cause an Digital#1 I/O Points
unsafe condition to arise or Input 101110001101
cause erroneous results to Overide 101010101010
be generated.
Override Now Active

INFO - To avoid a hardware The override '1's and '0's can be changed at any time while the 'Override Now
conflict, only points that have Active' line is displayed. The input status displayed on the second line should
been assigned as outputs will
accept an override of 1; i.e.,
always agree with the green LEDs on the edge of the digital I/O module. Red
entering a 1 at an input LEDs lit indicate blown fuses on the digital I/O module.
position will be ignored and
displayed as a 0. Outputs on this I/O module that are assigned as totalizer outputs will stop
counting while the 'Override Now Active' line is displayed. Pulses to be output
are accumulated and are output at the maximum allowed rate as soon as the
[Diag] key is pressed.
Press [Diag] to return to the selection screen below:
Leaving the Diagnostic
Mode - In the Select Select Input/Output
Input/Output screen, press to Calibrate,
the [Diag] key to return to the
Display Mode (Diagnostic Press "Diag" to Exit
LED will turn off).

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

9. Flow Computer Specifications

9.1. Environmental
Operating Temperature : q -15C to +65C
NOTICE! Storage Temperature : q -20C to +75C
Omni Flow Computers, Inc., Relative Humidity : q 80% non-condensing maximum
pursuant to a policy of
product development and
improvement, may make any
necessary changes to these
specifications without notice.
9.2. Electrical
Supply Voltage : q 120 VAC, 50-500 Hz; or 18-30 VDC, 10-20
Watts (excluding transducer loops)
q Optional: 220-250 VAC, 50-500 Hz; or 18-
30 VDC, 10-20 Watts (excluding transducer
loops)
Transducer Output Power : q 24 VDC at 400 mA+ for most
configurations (when AC powered)
Isolation : q All analog inputs and outputs are optically
isolated from computer logic supply
q Maximum common mode voltage on any
input or output is 250 VDC to chassis
ground.

9.3. Microprocessor CPU


Type : q Motorola MC68HC000FN16
q Clock Speed: 16 MHz, 0 wait state;
Throughput 4,000,000 instructions/sec
Coprocessor : q Motorola MC68HC881/82FN16B
q Clock Speed: 16 MHz; Throughput 50,000
floating point operations/sec
EPROM Memory : q 1 Mbyte. expandable to 2 Mbytes max.
RAM Memory : q 512 bytes standard; Expandable to 1
Mbytes max.
Real Time Clock : q Battery backed-up, time of day;
programmable interval down to 1 msec
q Maintains time during power loss
q Reports downtime on power-up
Logic Voltage : q 5 VDC
Over-voltage Protection : q Crowbar on power supply fires at 6.25 VDC
approx.
Transient Protection : q Transorbs on power supply module
RAM Memory Battery Backup : q 3.6 VDC Ni-Cad; rechargeable
Typical Memory Backup Period : q 30-60 days (with power removed)

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Chapter 9 Flow Computer Specifications

9.4. Backplane
Type : q Passive; configured with plug-in DIN
NOTICE! connectors
Omni Flow Computers, Inc., Number of I/O Module Slots : q Omni 3000: 4 slots
pursuant to a policy of q Omni 6000: 10 slots
product development and
improvement, may make any
necessary changes to these
specifications without notice. 9.5. Process Input/Output Combo Modules

ANALOG ADDITIONAL
TYPE INPUT #1 INPUT #2 INPUT #3 INPUT #4
OUTPUTS FEATURES

Two
A 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD 1-5v; 4-20mA; Flow Pulses Pipe Proving
4-20mA

1-5v; 4-20mA Frequency One


B 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD Pipe Proving
Flow Pulse Density 4-20mA

Two
E/D 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD Frequency Density
4-20mA
Pipe Proving
Two
E 1-5v; 4-20mA; RTD Flow Pulses Double Chron. Proving
4-20mA Level A Pulse Fidelity

Two
H Honeywell DE Protocol
4-20mA

Two
HV Honeywell Multivariable DE Protocol
4-20mA

PORT #1 PORT #2
Six
SV RS-485 Multi-drop to Various Multivariable Transmitters
4-20mA

9.6. Flowmeter Pulse Inputs


Input Frequency : q DC to 15 kHz.
Positive Going Trigger Threshold : q +4.0 Volts
Negative Going Trigger Threshold : q +2.0 Volts
Input impedance : q 1 M Ohm
Configuration : q Differential input (E module inputs are
single ended referenced to DC ret.)
Common Mode Voltage : q 250 VDC to chassis ground
Pulse Fidelity Check : q Channels are continuously compared for
frequency and sequence.
E Module Only : q Complete failure of either A or B channel
will not effect totalizing
q Simultaneous noise pulses are rejected
with 85% certainty

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

9.7. Detector Switch Inputs


(Non-Double Chronometry)
NOTICE! Input Type : q Voltage
Omni Flow Computers, Inc.,
pursuant to a policy of
Gating Transition : q Application of voltage starts and stops
product development and proves.
improvement, may make any Minimum Time Pulse High : q 1 msec
necessary changes to these
specifications without notice. Minimum Time Pulse Low : q 2 seconds
Input Impedance : q 4.7 k Ohms
Input On Voltage : q >10 V On, <4 VDC+ Off (referenced to DC
Power Return)
Debounce : q 2 sec in Software
Common Mode Voltage : q 250 VDC to chassis ground

9.8. Detector Switch Inputs of E Combo


Module
(Double Chronometry)

q Driven by open collector transistor or Normally Open


switch.
q Debounce capacitor may be needed with switch type
detectors.

9.9. Analog Inputs


Input Type : q 4 - 20 mA or 1-5 V
Input Impedance : q 1 MegOhm (250 Ohms) (4-20 mA range
selected by installing shunt resistor)
Resolution : q 14 Binary Bits, w/ 500 msec sample
Linearity : q 0.020% F.S. typical 1 Digit
Temperature Drift : q Less than 15 ppm/OF
Common Mode Voltage : q 250 VDC to chassis ground

9.10. RTD Inputs


RTD Configuration : q 4-wire Bridge
RTD Resistance : q 100 Ohm @ 32F
Excitation Current : q 3.45 mA Nominal
Maximum Field Wiring Resistance : q 1k Ohm per wire
Resolution : q 0.008 Ohms
Temperature Drift : q Less than 15 ppm/F
Linearity : q 0.020% F.S. typical 1 Digit
Common Mode Voltage : q 250 VDC to chassis ground

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Chapter 9 Flow Computer Specifications

9.11. Analog Outputs


Resolution : q 12 Binary Bits
NOTICE! Output : q Current source 4-20 mA (referenced to
Omni Flow Computers, Inc., transducer power return terminal)
pursuant to a policy of Common Mode : q 250 Volts to chassis ground
product development and
improvement, may make any Max./Min. Working Loop Voltage : q 30 VDC to 18 VDC
necessary changes to these Loop Resistance : q 900 Ohm with 24 VDC Power
specifications without notice.
q 1.2 k Ohm with 30 VDC Power
Update Rate : q Each 500 milliseconds

9.12. Control Outputs/Status Inputs


(12 per module)
Configuration : q Open emitter Darlington transistor source
(Referenced to transducer power return
terminal)
Current Capacity : q 100 mA max., 500 mA per module
Output Voltage : q +DC - 1 V Nominal
Common Mode : q 250 Volts to chassis ground
Input Impedance : q 4.7 k Ohms in series with 2 LEDs
Input Voltage : q Input voltages > 8 to < DC voltage at back
panel DC terminal block, typically 24 VDC,
will be recognized as on
q Input voltages < +2 V will be recognized as
off
LEDs : q Operating and Fuse Indicators on each
channel
Scan Rate : q Outputs may be pulsed at 50Hz Maximum

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Volume 1 System Architecture and Installation

9.13. Multi-bus Serial I/O Interface

9.13.1. RS-232 Compatible


(2 per Module)
Serial Data Output Voltage : q 7.5 Volts typical
Recommended Load Impedance : q 1.5 k Ohm
Short Circuit Current : q 10 mA limited
Input Low Threshold : q Vl = -3.0 Volts
Input High Threshold : q Vh = +3.0 Volts
Baud Rate : q Software selectable
q Range 1.2, 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 19.2, 38.4 k bps
Common Mode Voltage : q 250 Volts to chassis ground
LEDs : q Indicator LEDs for each channel input,
output and handshaking signals

9.13.2. RS-485
(2 per Module)
Serial Data Output Voltage : q 5 Volts differential driver
Recommended Load Impedance : q 120 Ohm
Short Circuit Current : q 20 mA
Input Low Threshold : q 0.8 Volts
Baud Rate : q Software selectable
q Range 1.2, 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 19.2, 38.4 k bps
Common Mode Voltage : q 250 Volts to chassis ground
LEDs : q Indicator LEDs for each channel input,
output and handshaking signals

9.14. Operator Keypad


Keypad Characteristics : q 34-key, domed membrane, with tactile and
audio feedback
Material : q Autotex 2 Hard coat Polyester Film
Data Entry Lockout : q Internal switch and software passwords
Key Debounce : q Software controlled

9.15. LCD Display


Display : q 4 lines of 20 Characters
q 5 x 8 Dot Matrix
Character Height : q 4.75 mm
Display Data : q Alphanumeric, 80 characters
Backlight : q Green/Yellow LED
q Viewing angle, contrast and backlight
controlled from keypad

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Chapter 9 Flow Computer Specifications

9.16. Electromechanical Counters


Quantity : q Three, with programmable function
NOTICE! Display : q 6-digit, non-resetable
Omni Flow Computers, Inc., Character Height : q 5 mm
pursuant to a policy of
product development and Maximum Count Rate : q 10 counts per second
improvement, may make any
necessary changes to these
specifications without notice.
9.17. Operating Mode Indicator LEDs
Quantity : q Four
Dual Color : q Red/Green
Indication : q Active Alarm LED
Green: to indicate acknowledged existing
alarm
Red: to indicate new, unacknowledged,
existing alarm
q Diagnostic LED
Green: to indicate Diagnostic or
Calibration Mode is active
Red: to indicate password is active
q Program LED
Green: to indicate Program or
Configuration Mode is active
Red: to indicate password is active
q Alpha Shift LED
Green: to indicate Alpha Shift Lock
Mode is active
Red: to indicate alpha shift next key only

9.18. Security
Hardware : q Optional lock on housing and internal
keyboard program lockout
Software : q Multi-level password control

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Volume 2C
User Manual

Basic Operation
Firmware Revisions 22.71/26.71

Turbine / Positive Displacement


Liquid Flow Metering Systems
with Meter Factor Linearization

Effective May 1999


Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 2

1. Basic Operating Features ...................................................................................... 1-1


1.1. Overview of the Keypad Functions..................................................................... 1-1
1.2. Operating Modes.................................................................................................. 1-2
1.2.1. Display Mode ........................................................................................................1-2
1.2.2. Keypad Program Mode..........................................................................................1-2
1.2.3. Diagnostic and Calibration Mode ...........................................................................1-2
1.2.4. Field Entry Mode ...................................................................................................1-2
1.3. Special Keys......................................................................................................... 1-4
1.3.1. Display/Enter (Help) Key .......................................................................................1-4
1.3.2. Up/Down Arrow Keys []/[] .................................................................................1-4
1.3.3. Left/Right Arrow Keys []/[]................................................................................1-4
1.3.4. Alpha Shift Key and LED .......................................................................................1-4
1.3.5. Program/Diagnostic Key [Prog/Diag] .....................................................................1-5
1.3.6. Space/Clear (Cancel/Ack) Key ..............................................................................1-5
1.4. Adjusting the Display........................................................................................... 1-5
1.5. Clearing and Viewing Alarms .............................................................................. 1-6
1.5.1. Acknowledging (Clearing) Alarms ..........................................................................1-6
1.5.2. Viewing Active and Historical Alarms.....................................................................1-6
1.5.3. Alarm Conditions Caused by Static Discharges .....................................................1-6
1.6. Computer Totalizing............................................................................................. 1-6

2. PID Control Functions............................................................................................ 2-1


2.1. Overview of PID Control Functions..................................................................... 2-1
2.2. PID Control Displays ............................................................................................ 2-2
2.3. Changing the PID Control Operating Mode........................................................ 2-3
2.3.1. Manual Valve Control ............................................................................................2-3
2.3.2. Automatic Valve Control........................................................................................2-3
2.3.3. Local Setpoint Select.............................................................................................2-4
2.3.4. Remote Setpoint Select.........................................................................................2-4
2.3.5. Changing the Secondary Variable Setpoint............................................................2-4
2.4. PID Control Remote Setpoint .............................................................................. 2-4
2.5. Using the PID Startup and Shutdown Ramping Functions ............................... 2-5
2.6. Startup Ramp/Shutdown Ramp/Minimum Output Percent................................ 2-5
2.7. PID Control Tuning .............................................................................................. 2-6
2.7.1. Estimating The Required Controller Gain For Each Process Loop .........................2-6
2.7.2. Estimating The Repeats / Minutes And Fine Tuning The Gain ...............................2-7

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

3. Computer Batching Operations............................................................................. 3-1


3.1. Introduction...........................................................................................................3-1
3.2. Batch Status .........................................................................................................3-1
3.3. Batch Schedule Stack..........................................................................................3-2
3.3.1. Empty Batch Schedule Stacks .............................................................................. 3-2
3.3.2. Manually Editing the Batch Schedule Stack .......................................................... 3-2
3.4. Ending a Batch .....................................................................................................3-3
3.4.1. Using the Product Change Strobes to End a Batch ............................................... 3-3
3.4.2. Manually Ending a Batch from the Keypad............................................................ 3-3
3.5. Recalculate and Reprint a Previous Batch Ticket..............................................3-4
3.6. Batch Preset Counters.........................................................................................3-5
3.6.1. Batch Preset Flags................................................................................................ 3-5
3.6.2. Batch Warning Flags ............................................................................................ 3-5
3.7. Adjusting the Size of a Batch ..............................................................................3-5
3.8. Automatic Batch Changes Based on Product Interface Detection ...................3-6

4. Specific Gravity/Density Rate of Change.............................................................. 4-1


4.1. Specific Gravity/Density Rate of Change Alarm Flag.........................................4-1
4.2. Delayed Specific Gravity/Density Rate of Change Alarm Flag ..........................4-1
4.3. Determining the Gravity Rate of Change Limits .................................................4-2

5. Meter Factors .......................................................................................................... 5-1


5.1. Entering a Base Meter Factor Curve ...................................................................5-1
5.2. Changing Meter Factors.......................................................................................5-2
5.3. Changing Meter Factors for the Running Product .............................................5-3

6. Proving Functions................................................................................................... 6-1


6.1. Full-Sized Provers (Unidirectional and Bi-directional) .......................................6-1
6.2. Brooks Compact Prover.......................................................................................6-2
6.2.1. Proving Reports for Brooks Compact Provers ...................................................... 6-3
6.3. Other Proving Reports .........................................................................................6-3
6.4. Official and Unofficial Prove Results...................................................................6-4

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Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 2

7. Printed Reports....................................................................................................... 7-1


7.1. Fixed Format Reports .......................................................................................... 7-1
7.2. Default Report Templates and Custom Reports ................................................ 7-2
7.3. Printing Reports ................................................................................................... 7-2
7.4. Audit Trail ............................................................................................................. 7-3
7.4.1. Audit Trail Report ..................................................................................................7-3
7.4.2. Modbus Port Passwords and the Audit Trail Report .............................................7-4

8. Index of Display Variables ..................................................................................... 8-1

Figures of Volume 2
Fig. 1-1. Flow Computer Front Panel Keypad....................................................................................1-1
Fig. 1-2. Block Diagram Showing the Keypad and Display Modes .....................................................1-3
Fig. 2-1. Typical PID Control Application - Single Loop .....................................................................2-1

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

1. Basic Operating Features

1.1. Overview of the Keypad Functions


INFO - Within the document Thirty-four keys are available. Eight special function keys and twenty-six
the following convention is dedicated to the alphanumeric characters A through Z, 0 through 9 and various
used to describe various key
press sequences: Individual
punctuation and math symbols.
keys are shown in bold The [Display/Enter] key, located at the bottom right, deserves special mention.
enclosed in brackets and
separated by a space. This key is always used to execute a sequence of key presses. It is not unlike
Although not always that the Enter key of a personal computer. Except when entering numbers in a
indicated, it is assumed for field, the maximum number of keys that can be used in a key press sequence is
the rest of this document that four (not counting the [Display/Enter] key).
the [Display/Enter] key is
used at the end of every key
press sequence to enter a
command.

Fig. 1-1. Flow Computer Front Panel Keypad

22/26.71+ w 05/99 1-1


Chapter 1 Basic Operating Features

Key words such as Density, Mass and Temp appear over each of the
alphanumeric keys. These key words indicate what data will be accessed when
included in a key press sequence. Pressing [Net] [Meter] [1] for instance will
display net flow rates and total accumulations for Meter Run #1. Pressing the
[Net] key causes net flow rates and total accumulations for all active meter runs
to be displayed. In many instances, the computer attempts to recognize similar
key press sequences as meaning the same thing; i.e., [Meter] [1] [Net] and
[Net] [Meter] [1] all cause the net volume data for Meter Run #1 to be
displayed. In most cases, more data is available on a subject than can be
displayed on four lines. The [ ]/[ ] (up/down) arrow keys allow you to scroll
through multiple screens.

1.2. Operating Modes


Keyboard operation and data displayed in the LCD display depends on which of
the 3 major display and entry modes are selected.

1.2.1. Display Mode


This is the normal mode of operation. Live meter run data is displayed and
updated every 200 msec. Data cannot be changed while in this mode.

1.2.2. Keypad Program Mode


Configuration data needed by the flow computer can be viewed and changed
via the keypad while in this mode. When the Program Mode is entered by
pressing the [Prog] key, the Program LED glows green. This changes to red
when a valid password is entered.

1.2.3. Diagnostic and Calibration Mode


The diagnostic and calibration features of the computer are accessed by
pressing the [Alpha Shift] [Diag] keys. This mode allows you to check and
adjust the calibration of each input and output point. The Diagnostic LED
glows green until a valid password is entered.

1.2.4. Field Entry Mode


You are in this mode whenever the data entry cursor is visible, which is anytime
the user is entering a number or password while in the Program Mode or
Diagnostic Mode.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

Fig. 1-2. Block Diagram Showing the Keypad and Display Modes

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Chapter 1 Basic Operating Features

1.3. Special Keys

1.3.1. Display/Enter (Help) Key


This key is located bottom-right on the keypad. Pressing once while in the Field
Entry Mode will store the data entered in the field to memory. Pressing twice
within one second will cause the context-sensitive Help to be displayed. The
Help displays contain useful information regarding available variable
assignments and selections. When in other modes, use it at the end of a
keypress sequence to enter the command.

1.3.2. Up/Down Arrow Keys [ ]/[ ]


These keys are located top-center on the keypad.
When in the Display Mode, the [ ]/[ ] keys are used to scroll through data
relevant to a particular selection.
When in the Program Mode, they are used to scroll through data and position
the cursor on data to be viewed or changed.
In the Diagnostic Mode, The up/down arrow keys are initially used to position
the cursor within the field of data being changed. Once you select an input or
output to calibrate or adjust, the up/down arrow keys are used as a software
zero potentiometer.

1.3.3. Left/Right Arrow Keys [ ]/[ ]


These keys are located top-center on the keypad; to the left and right
respectively of the Up/Down Arrow Keys.
The [ ]/[ ] keys have no effect while in the Display Mode. When in Program
Mode, they are used to position the cursor within a data field.
In the Diagnostic Mode, they are initially used to position the cursor within the
field of data to be changed. Once you select an input or output to calibrate or
adjust, the left/right arrow keys are used as software span potentiometer.

1.3.4. Alpha Shift Key and LED


This key is located top-right on the keypad.
Pressing the [Alpha Shift] key while in the Field Entry Mode causes the Alpha
Shift LED above the key to glow green, indicating that the next valid key press
will be interpreted as its shifted value. The Alpha Shift LED is then turned off
automatically when the next valid key is pressed.
Pressing the [Alpha Shift] key twice causes the Alpha Shift LED to glow red
and the shift lock to be active. All valid keys are interpreted as their shifted
value until the [Alpha Shift] key is pressed or the [Display/Enter] key is
pressed.
When in the Calibrate Mode, zero and span adjustments made via the arrow
keys are approximately ten times more sensitive when the Alpha Shift LED is
on.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

1.3.5. Program/Diagnostic Key [Prog/Diag]


This key is located top-left on the keypad.
While in the Display Mode, pressing this key changes the operating mode to
either the Program or Diagnostic Mode, depending on whether the Alpha Shift
LED is on. When in other modes, it cancels the current entry and goes back
one menu level, eventually returning to the Display Mode.

1.3.6. Space/Clear (Cancel/Ack) Key


This key is located bottom-left on the keypad.
Static Discharges - It has Pressing this key while in the Display Mode acknowledges any new alarms that
been found that applications occur. The Active Alarm LED will also change from red to green indicating an
of electrostatic discharges
may cause the Active Alarm
alarm condition exists but has been acknowledged.
LED to glow red. Pressing
When in the Field Entry Mode, unshifted, it causes the current variable field
the [Space/Clear] key will
acknowledge the alarm and being changed to be cleared, leaving the cursor at the beginning of the field
turn off the red alarm light. awaiting new data to be entered. With the Alpha Shift LED illuminated, it
causes the key to be interpreted as a space or blank.
When in all other modes, it cancels the current key press sequence by flushing
the key input buffer.

1.4. Adjusting the Display


Once the computer is mounted in its panel you may need to adjust the viewing
angle and backlight intensity of the LCD display for optimum performance. You
may need to re-adjust the brightness setting of the display should the computer
be subjected to transient electrical interference.
While in the Display Mode (Program LED and Diagnostic LED off), press
[Setup] [Display] and follow the displayed instructions:

Use Up/Down Arrows


To Adjust Contrast;
Left, Right Arrows
To Adjust Backlight

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Chapter 1 Basic Operating Features

1.5. Clearing and Viewing Alarms


TIP - Alarm flags are latched
while the red LED is on. To
avoid missing intermittent 1.5.1. Acknowledging (Clearing) Alarms
alarms, always press
[Alarms] [Display] to view New alarms cause the Active Alarm LED to glow red. Pressing the
alarms before pressing [Cancel/Ack] key (bottom left), or setting Boolean Point 1712 via a digital I/O
[Cancel/Ack]. point or via a Modbus command, will acknowledge the alarm and cause the
Active Alarm LED to change to green. The LED will go off when the alarm
condition clears.

1.5.2. Viewing Active and Historical Alarms


To view all active alarms, press [Alarms] [Display] and use the [ ]/[ ] arrow
keys to scroll through all active alarms.

Active Alarms
Temperature #1 Hi Hi
Pressure #2 Low
Prove Temp (L) Hi Hi
Prove Temp (R) Hi Hi

The last 500 time-tagged alarms that have occurred are always available for
printing (see Historical Alarm Snapshot Report in this chapter).

1.5.3. Alarm Conditions Caused by Static Discharges


It has been found that applications of electrostatic discharges may cause the
Active Alarm LED to glow red. Pressing the [Space/Clear] key will acknowledge
the alarm and turn off the red alarm light.

1.6. Computer Totalizing


Two types of totalizers are provided: 1) Three front panel electromechanical
and non-resetable; and 2) Software totalizers maintained in computer memory.
The electromechanical totalizers can be programmed to count in any units via
the Miscellaneous Setup Menu (Volume 3). The batch and daily based software
totalizers are automatically printed, saved and reset at the end of each batch or
the beginning of each contract day. Daily flow or time weighted averages are
also printed, saved and reset at the end of each day. Batch flow weighted
averages are also available in liquid application flow computers. Software
cumulative totalizers are also provided and can only be reset via the Password
Maintenance Menu (Volume 3). View the software totalizers by pressing
[Gross], [Net] or [Mass]. Pressing [Meter] [n] [Gross], [Net] or [Mass] will
display the software totalizer(s) for Meter Run n.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

2. PID Control Functions

2.1. Overview of PID Control Functions


Four independent control loops are available. Each loop is capable of
controlling a primary variable (usually flow rate) with a secondary override
variable (usually meter back pressure or delivery pressure).
The primary and secondary set points can be adjusted locally via the keypad
and remotely via a communication link. In addition, the primary set point can be
adjusted via an analog input to the computer.
Contact closures can be used to initiate the startup and shutdown ramp function
which limits the control output slew rate during startup and shutdown conditions.
A high or low 'error select' function causes automatic override control by the
secondary variable in cases where it is necessary either to maintain a minimum
secondary process value or limit the secondary process maximum value.
Local manual control of the control output and bumpless transfer between
automatic and manual control is incorporated.

Fig. 2-1. Typical PID Control Application - Single Loop

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Chapter 2 PID Control Functions

2.2. PID Control Displays


INFO - Select PID Loop 1 While in the Display Mode press [Control] [n] [Display]. Press the Up/Down
through 4 by entering n as arrow keys to display the following screens:
1, 2, 3 or 4.

Screen #1

PID #1 VALVE STATUS


Open 50.00
Indicates which parameter is Auto/Manual Auto
being controlled; primary or Primary Controlling
secondary

Screen #2

PID #1 PRIMARY
Measurement 20.00
Shows actual primary set
point being used in Setpoint 20.00
engineering units

Screen #3

PID #1 SECONDARY
Measurement 20.00
Shows actual secondary set
point being used in Setpoint 20.00
engineering units

Screen #4
INFO - Data such as set
points or operating mode
cannot be changed while in PID #1 SET POINT
the Display Mode. Source is Local
Remote S.P. Input
Value is 20.00

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

2.3. Changing the PID Control Operating


Mode
INFO - Select PID Loop 1 Press [Prog] [Control] [n] to display the following screen:
through 4 by entering n as
1, 2, 3 or 4.
To access the next two
screens you must enter the
PID#1 OPERATING MODE
[Y] to select Manual Valve or Manual Valve(Y/N) N
Local Setpoint even if a Y is Local Set.Pt(Y/N) N
already displayed. Sec Set.Pt 750.0
To cancel the Manual Mode
or Local Setpoint Mode, enter
[N].

2.3.1. Manual Valve Control


To change to manual valve control enter [Y] at the 'Manual Valve (Y/N)' prompt
and the following screen is displayed:

PID #1 MANUAL VALVE


Primary Variable Up/Down Arrow to Adj
(Measurement in engineering Measurement 20.00
units)
Open % 50.00

The switch from Auto to Manual is bumpless. Use the Up/Down arrow keys to
open or close the valve. Press [Prog] once to return to the previous screen.

Notice you are now in Manual


PID#1 OPERATING MODE
Valve Control Manual Valve (Y/N) Y
Local Set.Pt(Y/N) N
Sec Set.Pt 750.0

2.3.2. Automatic Valve Control


To change from manual to automatic valve control, enter [N] at the 'Manual
Valve (Y/N)' prompt. The switch to automatic is bumpless if local setpoint is
selected.

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Chapter 2 PID Control Functions

2.3.3. Local Setpoint Select


Enter [Y] at the 'Local Set. Pt. (Y/N)' prompt and the following screen is
displayed:

PID#1 LOCAL SETPOINT


Primary Variable Up/Down Arrow to Adj
(Measurement in engineering Measurement 20.00
units) Setpoint 20.00

The switch from Remote to Local is bumpless. Use the Up/Down arrow keys to
increase or decrease the setpoint. Press [Prog] once to return to the previous
screen.

Notice you are now in


Automatic with Local Valve PID#1 OPERATING MODE
Control Manual Valve(Y/N) N
Local Set.Pt(Y/N) Y
Change the setpoint of the
Sec Set.Pt 750.0
secondary variable here

2.3.4. Remote Setpoint Select


To change from local setpoint to remote setpoint, enter [N] at the 'Local Set.
Pt.(Y/N)' prompt. The switch to remote setpoint may not be bumpless,
depending upon the remote set point source.

2.3.5. Changing the Secondary Variable Setpoint


Move the cursor to the bottom line of the above display, press [Clear] and then
enter the new setpoint.

2.4. PID Control Remote Setpoint


As described above, the PID control loop can be configured to accept either a
IMPORTANT! local setpoint or a remote setpoint value for the primary variable. The remote
You must assign a remote setpoint is derived from an analog input (usually 4-20 mA). This input is scaled
setpoint input even if one will in engineering units and would usually come from another device such as an
not be used. The 4-20mA RTU. High/Low limits are applied to the remote setpoint signal to eliminate
scaling of this input
determines the scaling of the possible problems of over or under speeding a turbine meter (see Volume 1,
primary controlled variable. Chapter 8 for more details).

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

2.5. Using the PID Startup and Shutdown


Ramping Functions
These functions are enabled when a startup and/or shutdown ramp rate
between 0 and 99 percent is entered (see section PID Setup in Volume 3,
Chapter 2).
Commands are provided to Start the valve ramping open, Shutdown to the
minimum percent open valve or Stop the flow by closing the valve
immediately once it has been ramped to the minimum percent open.
These commands are accessed using the keypad by pressing [Prog] [Batch]
[Meter] [n], which will display the following:

Mtr1 Batch Start Y ?


Shutdown to Min% ?
Batch Stop ?
Print & Reset ?

2.6. Startup Ramp/Shutdown Ramp/Minimum


Output Percent
Inputs are provided for startup/shutdown ramp rates and minimum output %
settings. When these startup/shutdown ramp rates are applied the control
output, movements will be limited to the stated % movement per second (see
Volume 3). On receipt of a shutdown signal, the output will ramp to the
minimum output % for topoff purposes.

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Chapter 2 PID Control Functions

2.7. PID Control Tuning


Individual control of gain and integral action are provided for both the primary
IMPORTANT! and secondary control loops. Tune the primary variable loop first by setting the
PID Control Tuning - The secondary setpoint high or low enough to stop the secondary control loop from
primary variable must be taking control. Adjust the primary gain and integral repeats per minutes for
tuned first. When tuning the stable control. Reset the primary and secondary set points to allow control on
primary variable loop, you
must set the secondary the secondary variable without interference from the primary variable. Adjust
setpoint high or low enough the secondary gain and integral repeats per minute for stable control of the
to the point where it will not secondary variable.
take control. Otherwise, the
PID loop will become very
unstable and virtually
impossible to tune. Adjust the 2.7.1. Estimating The Required Controller Gain For
primary gain and integral Each Process Loop
repeats per minute until you
achieve stable control. Each process loop will exhibit a gain function. A change in control valve output
Likewise, when tuning the
secondary setpoint, the
will produce a corresponding change in each of the process variables. The ratio
primary must be set so it of these changes represents the gain of the loop (For example: If a 10 %
cannot interfere. Once you change in control output causes a 10% change in the process variable, the loop
have achieved stable control gain is 1.0. If a 10 % change in control output causes a 20 % change in process
of both loops, you can then
variable, the loop gain is 2.0). To provide stable control the gain of each loop
enter the setpoints
established for each loop at with the controller included must be less than 1.0. In practice the controller gain
normal operating conditions. is usually adjusted so that the total loop gain is between 0.6 and 0.9.
Unfortunately the gain of each loop can vary with operating conditions. For
example: A butterfly control valve may have a higher gain when almost closed
to when it is almost fully open. This means that in many cases the controller
gain must be set low so that stable control is achieved over the required range
of control.
To estimate the gain of each loop proceed as follows for the required range of
operating conditions:
(1) In manual, adjust the control output for required flowing conditions and
note process variable values.
(2) Make a known percentage step change of output (i.e., from 20% to 22%
equals a 10% change).
(3) Note the percentage change of each process variable (i.e., 100 m3/hr to
110 m3/hr equals a 10% change).
INFO - The primary gain (1) Primary Gain Estimate = 0.75 / (Primary Loop Gain).
interacts with the secondary
gain. The actual secondary (2) Secondary Gain = 0.75 / (Secondary Loop Gain x Primary Gain
gain factor is the product of Estimate).
the primary gain and
secondary gain factors.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

2.7.2. Estimating The Repeats / Minutes And Fine


Tuning The Gain
(1) Set the 'repeats / minute' to 40 for both primary and secondary loops.
(2) Adjust set points so that only the primary (sec) loop is trying to control.
(3) While controlling the primary (sec) variable, increase the primary (sec)
gain until some controlled oscillation is observed.
(4) Set the primary (sec) 'repeats/minute' to equal 0.75 / (Period of the
oscillation in minutes).
(5) Set the primary (sec) gain to 75% of the value needed to make the loop
oscillate.
(6) Repeat (2) through (5) for the secondary variable loop.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

3. Computer Batching Operations

3.1. Introduction
A complete set of software batch totalizers and flow weighted averages are also
provided in addition to the daily and cumulative totalizers. These totalizers and
averages can be printed, saved and reset automatically, based on the number
of barrels or cubic meters delivered, change of product or on demand. The
Omni flow computer can keep track of 4 independent meter runs running any
combination of 8 different products. Flowmeter runs can be combined and
treated as a station. The batch totalizers and batch flow weighted averages are
printed, saved and reset at the end of each batch. The next batch starts
automatically when the pulses from the flowmeter exceed the meter active
threshold frequency. Pulses received up to that point which do not exceed the
threshold frequency are still included in the new batch, but the batch start time
and date are not captured until the threshold is exceeded.

3.2. Batch Status


The batch status appears on the Status Report and is defined as either:
o In Progress ------- Batch is in progress with the meter active.
o Suspended ------- Batch is in progress with the meter not active.
o Batch Ended ----- Batch End has been received, meter not active.

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Chapter 3 Computer Batching Operations

3.3. Batch Schedule Stack


When running independent products on each meter run, each flowmeter run has
a batch schedule stack which stores the setup information for up to 5 future
batches. The setup information is popped off the appropriate stack by the
computer at the beginning of each batch. When all meter runs are running the
same product, the individual meter run batch schedule stacks are combined and
organized to store up to the next 23 future station batches.

3.3.1. Empty Batch Schedule Stacks


TIP - When ending a batch The flow computer will use the batch setup data for the batch last completed if
with flow occurring, the meters batch schedule stack is empty at the beginning of a new next batch.
remember that the next batch
will start immediately after
you end the current one. You
should check that the batch 3.3.2. Manually Editing the Batch Schedule Stack
schedule contains the correct
setup information for that Pressing [Prog] [Batch] [Setup] or [Prog] [Meter] [n] [Batch] [Setup]
batch. displays the screen similar to that shown below. The screen shows information
regarding the current running batch. The 16 character batch ID number appears
on all reports and can be edited at any time during a batch. The starting size of
the batch in net barrels is used to determine the value of the batch preset
counter. It can be changed at any time during a batch and the batch preset
counter will be adjusted accordingly.

MTR #1 CURRENT BATCH


ID: Butane 5010
Running Product 1
Size BBl 100

By using the [ ]/[ ] keys you can scroll through and modify any one of the 6
batch setups (in Independent Batch Stack) and 24 (in Common Batch Stack) in
the Batch Schedule Stack.

M1:1 I=Ins D=Del ?


ID: EP-001-021-BUT
Product to Run? 0
Size BBl 0

The number on the left on Line 1 is the flowmeter run number and stack
position; i.e., M2:1 will be the next batch setup run for Meter #2, M2:2 the next
and so on. Batch setups can be inserted before the displayed position or the
displayed setup and can be deleted by entering I or D on Line 1. Press
[Prog] twice to return to the Display Mode.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

3.4. Ending a Batch


A batch in progress is ended by setting the appropriate End Batch Flag in the
computers database. This can be done manually from the keypad, on a timed
basis, through a digital I/O point or via a Modbus command.

3.4.1. Using the Product Change Strobes to End a


Batch
Batches can be ended and products changed by using the Product Change
Strobes (Boolean 1707 and 1747 through 1750). Setting any of these Boolean
commands, either through a digital input or writing it through a Modbus port,
will cause the flow computer to:
(1) End the batch in progress and print a batch report.
(2) Determine what the next product to run will be by decoding the binary
coded Product Select Input flags (Booleans 1743 through 1746).
(3) Write the number of the selected product into the next batch stack
position.
(4) Pop the batch setup off the stack and start a new batch.

3.4.2. Manually Ending a Batch from the Keypad


Press the [Prog] [Batch] [Meter] [n] or [Prog] [Meter] [n] [Batch] keys and a
screen similar to the following will be displayed:

METER #1 BATCH
Print & Reset ?

Pressing [Prog] [Batch] and [Enter] (i.e., not specifying a meter run) will
display the following:

STATION BATCH
Print & Reset ?

Enter [Y] to the Print & Reset ? question and enter your password when
requested. The batch will be ended immediately and a Batch Report printed out.
The above displays will vary if the PID ramping functions are enabled (see the
following section).

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Chapter 3 Computer Batching Operations

3.5. Recalculate and Reprint a Previous


Batch Ticket
Recalculating a Previous To recalculate and reprint a previous batch, you must do the following:
Batch - For more information
on this topic, see Technical
Bulletin TB-980202 (1) Press [Prog] [Batch] [Meter] [n] [Enter] (n = meter run number).
Recalculating a Previous The Omni LCD screen will display:
Batch within the Flow
Computer included in
Volume 5.
METER #1 BATCH
Print & Reset ?
Select Prev# Batch 1
Enter API60 .0
Enter SG60 .0000
Enter %S&W .00
Recalculate&Print?

(2) Select which previous batch you wish to recalculate. The Omni stores
the last 4 completed batches numbered as:

1 = last batch completed


to
4 = oldest batch completed.

(3) Press [ ] to scroll down to Select Prev # Batch and enter a number
between 1 and 4, depending upon which batch is to be recalculated. The
flow computer moves the selected previous batch data to the previous
batch data points within the database (see explanation in Technical
Bulletin TB-980202)
(4) Enter Password when requested. Scroll to either Enter API60 or
Enter SG60. Type in a valid value and press [Enter].
(5) Scroll to Recalculate & Print?. Press [Y] and then [Enter].

At this time the flow computer will recalculate the batch data and send the
report to the printer and the Historical Batch Report Buffer in RAM memory.
The default batch report shows the batch number as XXXXXX-XX where the
number ahead of the - is the batch number and the number after the - is the
number of times that the batch has been recalculated.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

3.6. Batch Preset Counters


INFO - In order to activate Independent batch preset counters are provided for each meter run when in the
the batch preset counter you Independent Batch Stack Mode. Each batch preset counter is pre-loaded with
must have entered a batch
size other than zero before
the batch size taken from the appropriate batch schedule stack. The counter is
the batch started (i.e., automatically reduced by the meter runs net flow. Press [Batch] [Preset]
starting with a batch size of [Meter] [n] or [Meter] [n] [Batch] [Preset] to see the current value of the
zero disables the preset counter for a particular meter run:
counter feature). Batch
presets can be selected for
gross, net or mass units (see
Configuring the Meter Meter#1 Batch Preset
Station in Volume 3, barrels 49978
Chapter 2).
Mtr#1 Preset Warning
barrels 100

3.6.1. Batch Preset Flags


The batch preset flags are Boolean variables within the database which are
automatically set whenever the appropriate batch preset counter reaches zero.
They are available for use in programmable Boolean equations and digital I/O
functions.

3.6.2. Batch Warning Flags


The batch warning flags are Booleans within the database which are
automatically set whenever the appropriate batch preset counter is equal or less
than the programmed batch warning value. It is available for use in
programmable Boolean equations and digital I/O functions.

3.7. Adjusting the Size of a Batch


INFO - The batch preset The size of a running batch may change several times during the progress of
counter can be selected for the batch. This is usually due to product take-off or injection upstream of the
gross, net or mass units (see
Configuring the Meter
metering station. While in the Display Mode, press [Prog] and then [Batch]
Station in Volume 3, [Preset] [Meter] [n] or [Meter] [n] [Batch] [Preset]. This will show the
Chapter 2). following screen.

ADJUST #1 BATCH SIZE


Enter Amount to
Adjust 0
Size Now 100000

Press [Clear] and enter the number of barrels/cubic meters (lbs or kgs) that you
wish to add to the size of the batch. Enter a minus number to reduce the size of
the batch.

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Chapter 3 Computer Batching Operations

3.8. Automatic Batch Changes Based on


Product Interface Detection
Automatic batch changes can be made by the computer by monitoring the rate
of change of the products specific gravity/density during the final moments of a
batch. For example, a Boolean point can be programmed to be active whenever
the specific gravity rate of change flag is set and the batch warning flag is set.
This Boolean can then be used to cause a batch end command. Specific
gravity disturbances which may occur during the batch will be alarmed but will
not be used to end a batch unless the batch warning flag has been reached.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

4. Specific Gravity/Density Rate of Change

4.1. Specific Gravity/Density Rate of Change


Alarm Flag
SG & Dens - Delta The specific gravity/density rate of change alarm flag is a flag within the
Specific Gravity (SG) refers database which is set whenever the rate of change of the station gravity/density
to U.S. customary units and
is measured per barrel. Delta
with respect to flow (SG or Dens see sidebar) exceeds the preset limit. It is
Density (Dens) refers to used to detect a change in flowing product and is available for use in
metric units and is measured programmable Boolean equations and digital I/O functions.
in kilograms per cubic meter.
The SG (or Dens) function
is the smallest difference in
specific gravity (or density) 4.2. Delayed Specific Gravity/Density Rate of
between two products that
will form the product Change Alarm Flag
interface.
In many cases the densitometer or gravitometer used to detect the product
interface is mounted many Bbls (m3 or liter3) ahead of the valve manifold used
to cut the product and end the batch. A second gravity/density rate of change
flag which is delayed by the amount of line pack Bbls or m3 provides an
accurate indication of when the interface reaches the actual valve manifold.

Next Interface Due


Barrels 156

The 'Next Interface Due' counter shows the number of Bbls or m3 of line pack
remaining before the leading edge of the product interface reaches the valve
manifold. A minus number indicates that the leading edge has passed. Up to
three interfaces can be tracked between the interface detector and the valve
manifold.

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Chapter 4 Specific Gravity Rate of Change

4.3. Determining the Gravity Rate of Change


Limits
SG & Dens - Delta To accurately detect the product interface it is important to set the gravity rate
Specific Gravity (SG) refers of change limits correctly. This limit is expressed as change in Specific Gravity
to U.S. customary units and
is measured per barrel. Delta
per Net Bbl or m3 (SG/Bbl or Dens/m3 see sidebar) and as such is flow rate
Density (Dens) refers to independent. Too small a limit will cause minor disturbances to be detected and
metric units and is measured too large will cause the interface to be missed.
per cubic meter. The SG (or
Dens) function is the For example: A pipeline runs ISO-Butane (0.565), N-Butane (0.585) and
smallest difference in Propane (0.507). The smallest SG in this case is 0.585 minus 0.565, which
specific gravity (or density) equals 0.020 SG units. It was observed that once an interface was detected,
between two products that
will form the product
40 barrels passed before the specific gravity stabilized at the new gravity. The
interface. actual gravity rate of change limit for this example is calculated as:

0.020 / 40 = 0.0005 ( SG/Bbl)

To allow for a longer interface or a smaller SG we selected is


0.0002 (SG/Bbl). To enter this value, press [Prog] [Meter] [Enter]. Scroll down
to 'Grav Change' and enter .0002.

Meter Station
Grav Change .0002
Line Pack 250

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

5. Meter Factors

5.1. Entering a Base Meter Factor Curve


Under the product area enter the necessary data for the basic Meter Factor
Curve for up to 4 meters. Enter the date of the curve and the 12 meter factors
and associated flow rates from the lowest to the highest flow rate. If a curve is
not required use only Meter Factor #1.
To do this you must edit the product file information by pressing [Prog]. Then
press [Product] [Enter] to scroll through all 16 sets of product data. Pressing
[Product] [n] [Enter] (where n = 1 to 8) will allow you to go directly to data for
a specific product number. A display similar to the following can be scrolled
through:

PRODUCT #5
Name CRUDE
Table Select 0
Override API 35
Override SG .8498
Density Factor A/B A
M1 MF Date 09/26/97
M1 MF #1 1.0099
M1 FLW#1 1000.0

Move the cursor to the appropriate meter factor, press [Clear] and re-enter the
required meter factor. Note that only numbers greater than 0.8000 and less than
1.2001 are allowed.
Each product data field can handle 4 meter runs with 12 different meter factors
and associated flow rates.

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Chapter 5 Meter Factors

5.2. Changing Meter Factors


To do this you must edit the product file information by pressing [Prog]. Then
press [Product] [Enter] to scroll through all 8 sets of product data. Pressing
[Product] [n] [Enter], where n is 1 to 8, will allow you to go directly to data for
a specific product number. A display similar to the following can be scrolled
through:

PRODUCT #5
Name PROPANE
Table Select 2
Override API 150.9
Override Dens .5010
M.F. #1 1.0099
M.F. #2 1.0034
M.F. #3 1.0023
M.F. #4 .9995

Move the cursor to the appropriate meter factor, press [Clear] and re-enter the
required meter factor. Note that only numbers greater than 0.8000 and less than
1.2001 are allowed.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

5.3. Changing Meter Factors for the Running


Product
Enter the Program Mode by pressing [Prog]. Then press [Meter] [n] [Factor]
[Enter] to go directly to the meter factor for Flowmeter n (n = 1, 2, 3 or 4).

Meter Run #1
Base MF 1.0000

Press [Clear] and then enter the required meter factor.

Flow Meter #1
Meter Factor 1.0050

Note that only numbers greater than 0.8000 and less then 1.2001 are allowed
as meter factors.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

6. Proving Functions

6.1. Full-Sized Provers (Unidirectional and


Bi-directional)
Proving functions are accessed via the Program Mode. Press [Prog] [Prove]
[Enter] and the following selection menu is displayed:

* Prover Operation *
Trial Report (Y/N)
Trial Prove Mtr"n" _
Prove Meter "n"
Abort Prove ? (Y)

For a single 'Trial Prove', enter the meter number to be proved on the 2nd line.
To disable a trial prove report, enter [Y] on line one. For a prove sequence
enter the number of the meter to be proved on the 3rd line. To abort a prove in
progress enter [Y] on the 4th line. After making your entry the flow computer will
automatically return you to the Display Mode and select the 'Prove Counts
Display':

Counts 0
Prove Run 1
Meter Selected 2
Check Temp Stability

The bottom line of this display shows the current status of the prover. As the
th
prove sequence proceeds the 4 line is updated with the current status:

Ball Launched Fwd.


1st Detector Switch
In Flight Forward
2nd Detector Switch
Over Travel Forward
Ball Launched
Reverse
1st Detector Switch
In Flight Reverse
2nd Detector Switch
Over Travel Reverse

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Chapter 6 Proving Functions

The 'Prove Run' number on line 2 increments as each run is completed.


Assuming a successful prove the 4th line indicates:

Prove Completed

When the required number of consecutive runs within the run deviation limits
are accumulated, the run data are averaged and the prove calculations are
performed. The resultant meter factor is compared against the meter factor at
base flow rate interpolated from the meters base curve and the average of last
n factors, and if it is within acceptable limits, can be automatically
implemented.

6.2. Brooks Compact Prover


Proving functions are accessed the same as with full sized provers; via the
Program Mode. Press [Prog] [Prove] [Enter] and the following selection menu
is displayed:

*PROVER OPERATION*
Invar Rod Deg.F 75.5
Trial Report (Y/N)
Trial Prove Mtr"n"
Prove Meter "n"
Abort Prove ? (Y)

An additional entry is included for a Brooks prover (Invar Rod temperature). The
invar rod is part of the detector switch mechanism of the prover and is usually
close to ambient temperature. Enter the correct temperature to enable the
computer to correct for any thermal expansion.
For a single 'Trial Prove' enter the meter number to be proved on the 3rd line.
For a prove sequence enter the number of the meter to be proved on the 4th
line. To abort a prove in progress press the down arrow and enter [Y] on the 5th
line.
After making your entry the flow computer will automatically return you to the
Display Mode and select the 'Prove Counts Display' :

Counts 0
Prove Run 1
Meter Selected 2
Check Temp Stability

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

As with the full sized prover the bottom line of this display shows the current
status of the prover. Two additional status states will appear.

Check Plenum Press

While the computer is checking for temperature stability it is also checking and
adjusting the plenum chamber pressure. The status line above will only show if
the plenum pressure is still not within the selected dead band by the time the
temperature is stable.

Piston Downstream

This status display occurs while the prover is returning the piston to the
upstream position ready to launch.
Use the arrow keys to scroll down the display. A second screen is relevant to
the pulse interpolation method of accumulating prove pulse counts.

Prove Counts 1034


Tdvol 2.234122
Tdfmp 2.202312
Piston Downstream

The 1st line shows the integer counts. Tdvol is the time between detectors and
Tdfmp is the time between the 1st flowmeter pulse after each of the detectors.
A pass report is printed at the end of each set of passes.

6.2.1. Proving Reports for Brooks Compact Provers


As the compact prove sequence progresses the flow computer will print the
Pass Summary Report. This report is printed for each sequence of passes that
comprise a prove sequence. The number of passes made per run is selectable
from 1 to 25 (see Prover Setup in Volume 3. Note: an entry of 1 will disable
this report).
On completion of a successful prove a Meter Proving Report will be printed.
This report is user configurable via the OmniCom configuration program.

6.3. Other Proving Reports


The following reports are also available with this application:
o Prove Abort Report
o Meter Proving Report For Master Meter Method

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Chapter 6 Proving Functions

6.4. Official and Unofficial Prove Results


Prove reports are generated after a successful prove and can be either official
or unofficial. Official reports result from the implementation of a meter factor.
Unofficial reports do not have a meter factor implemented.
A meter factor can be implemented automatically based on the configuration
settings in the Prover Setup within the flow computer. When the Prove Report
is printed, it is indicated as official.
The operator has the option to implement a meter factor within the time range
also specified in the Prover Setup. An unofficial Prove Report will be printed
and when the operator selects to implement the meter factor, subsequently the
same report will be printed but indicating it as official.

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

7. Printed Reports
-

7.1. Fixed Format Reports


Several reports use a fixed format (i.e., cannot be changed by the user). These
are described below:
q Status Report Shows general information on current active
flowmeters, batch status (In progress /
Suspended / Ended), current running
products, batch ID string, current alarms and
future batch information.
q Historical Alarm Report Date and time tags of the last 500 alarms,
when they occurred and are cleared. Meter
run specific alarms also snapshot the gross
volume and mass totalizers. Meter factor
changes are also recorded here.
Audit Trail Report - Up to q Audit Trail Report Date and time tags of up to the last 150
150 previous data entry changes to the flow computer database made
changes can be printed when
the Audit Trail is
via the local keypad. Changes made via
requested. Modbus port will also be recorded if the
password feature is being used on that port.
q Product File Report Shows information related to the product
setup of the flow computer. For
turbine/positive displacement liquid flow
computers, this data includes product name,
meter factors, override gravities/densities and
the equation or standard to be used for each
product.
q Config Data Report Lists most configuration settings currently in
the flow computer.

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Chapter 7 Printed Reports

7.2. Default Report Templates and Custom


Reports
The following reports are user-configurable via the OmniCom configuration
program.
Snapshot Report
Batch Report
Daily Report
Prove Report

7.3. Printing Reports


INFO - Entering a number A Snapshot Report can be printed by pressing [Print] [Enter] and can also be
between 1 and 500 at the printed automatically on timed intervals (see 9. Print Setup in Chapter 9).
Hist Alarm ? line will
cause many previous Other printed reports are accessed from the Program Mode. Press [Prog]
alarms to be printed. When
requesting reports, such as
[Print] [Enter] and the following selection menu will be displayed:
previous daily, batch or
prover reports, you must
enter a number between 1 *PRINT REPORT MENU*
and 8; 1 refers to the last
Snapshot Report ?
report generated and 8
refers to the oldest report. Previous Snapshot?
Status Report ?(Y)
Prev. Batch (1-8)
Prev. Daily (1-8)
Prev. Prove (1-8)
Hist Alarm ?
Audit Trail ? (Y)
Arch Starts
# of Arc Days
Product File ?(Y)
Config Report ?(Y)

Move the cursor to the report required and enter [Y] or the number of the
historical report you wish to print ([1] refers to the latest, [2] refers to the next to
latest etc. Press [Prog] twice to return to the Display Mode.

7-2 22/26.71+ ! 05/99


Volume 2c Basic Operation

7.4. Audit Trail

7.4.1. Audit Trail Report


A fixed format report provides an audit trail of changes made to the flow
computer database. The number of changes that can be reported depends on
the type of changes made. The last 150 items are recorded. Each record
consists of a unique event number, time & date tag, database index number for
the variable changed and the new and old value of the variable, The starting
index number and the number of points changed is recorded when changes are
made remotely via a Modbus port, using OmniCom for instance.

Index Number Note1: PIPELINE COMPANY NAME


Password entries are
recorded in this field. A three- Audit Trail Report Page: 1
digit code signifies the Date: xx/xx/xx Time: xx:xx:xx Computer ID: REV2271
password source and level of
the password entered. These Event Time Date Index Old Value/ New Value/
password codes are No. Number1 # of Points Serial Port
indicated in the table on the xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
following page. xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx
xxx xx:xx:xx xx/xx/xx xxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx x.xxxxxxxxxxx

22/26.71+ w 05/99 7-3


Chapter 7 Printed Reports

7.4.2. Modbus Port Passwords and the Audit Trail


Report
The Audit Trail Report is stored within the flow computer and is used to
document and time and date stamp changes made to the flow computer
database, either via the local keypad or via password protected serial port
access. The report is formatted in columns as shown above:

PASSWORD CODES
Privileged Level Password entered at the Level A Password entered via Serial Port
100 300
keypad #3
Level 1 Password entered at local keypad Level B Password entered via Serial Port
101 301
#3
Level 2 Password entered at local keypad Level C Password entered via Serial Port
102 302
#3
Serial Port #2 Level A Password entered Level A Password entered via Serial Port
103 400
at local keypad #4
Serial Port #3 Level A Password entered Level B Password entered via Serial Port
104 401
at local keypad #4
Serial Port #4 Level A Password entered Level C Password entered via Serial Port
105 402
at local keypad #4
Level A Password entered via Serial Port
106 Model # Omni 3000 / Omni 6000 500
#1
Level B Password entered via Serial Port
107 Reset All Totals 501
#1
Level 1A Password entered at local Level C Password entered via Serial Port
108 502
keypad #1
Level A Password entered via Serial Port Serial Port #1 Level A Password entered
200 503
#2 at local keypad
Level B Password entered via Serial Port
201
#2
Level C Password entered via Serial Port
202
#2

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Volume 2c Basic Operation

8. Index of Display Variables

Index of Display Variables DISPLAY VARIABLES VALID KEY PRESSES


-These lists contain variable
groups and corresponding
key press sequences needed
Flow Rates and Totalizers
to display them. In most Batch Totalizers are displayed by including the [Batch] key before the key presses
cases, the sequence can be shown below:
reversed (i.e.: [Temp]
[Meter] [n] is the same as Daily & Cumulative Uncorrected Gross (IV) [Gross] or [Gross] [Meter] [n]
[Meter] [n] [Temp]). In all Batch Uncorrected Gross (IV) [Batch] [Gross] or [Batch] [Gross] [Meter] [n]
cases, the [Display/Enter]
key (keypad bottom right) Daily & Cumulative Corrected Net (GSV)
must be pressed to enter the Daily & Cumul. S&W Corrected Net (NSV) [Net] or [Net] [Meter] [n]
command. Some variables
may not be displayed based Batch Corrected Net
on the application or the Batch S&W Corrected Net (NSV) [Batch] [Net] or [Batch] [Net] [Meter] [n]
physical I/O assignments.
Daily & Cumulative Corrected Net (GSV) [Net] or [Net] [Meter] [n]

Daily & Cumul. S&W Corrected Net (NSV) [Net] [Net] or [Net] [Net] [Meter] [n]

Batch Corrected Net [Batch] [Net] or [Batch] [Net] [Meter] [n]

Batch S&W Corrected Net (NSV) [Batch] [Net] [Net]

Daily & Cumulative Mass [Mass] or [Mass] [Meter] [n]

Batch Mass [Batch] [Mass] or [Batch] [Mass] [Meter] [n]

[Net] or [Net] [Meter] [n] or


Total @ Second Reference Temperature
[Batch] [Net] or [Batch] [Net] [Meter] [n]

Current Instantaneous Values


Batch Flow Weighted Averages are displayed by including the [Batch] key before the
key presses shown below:
Meter Temperatures [Temp] or [Temp] [Meter] [n]

Meter Pressures [Press] or [Press] [Meter] [n]

Density [Density] or [Density] [Meter] [n]

Unfactored Density [Density] [Meter] [n]

API Gravity & API @ Reference [SG/API] or [SG/API] [Meter] [n]

Specific Gravity & SG @ Reference [SG/API] or [SG/API] [Meter] [n]

Densitometer Temperatures [Density] [Temp] or [Density] [Temp] [Meter] [n]

Densitometer Pressures [Density] [Press] or [Density] [Press] [Meter] [n]

Prover Temperatures [Prove] [Temp]

Prove Pressures & Plenum Pressure [Prove] [Press]

Prover Density [Prove] [Density]

Prover Density Temperature [Prove] [Density] [Temp]

Prover Density Pressure [Prove] [Density] [Press]

Auxiliary Inputs 1-4 [Analysis] [Input]

22/26.71+ w 05/99 8-1


Chapter 8 Index of Display Variables

DISPLAY VARIABLES VALID KEY PRESSES

Calculation Factors
Batch Flow Weighted Averages are displayed by including the [Batch] key before the
key presses shown below.
[Temp] [Factor] or [Temp] [Factor] [Meter] [n] or
Volume Correction Factors (VCF)
[Batch] [Temp] [Factor] [n]

[Press] [Factor] or [Press] [Factor] [Meter] [n] or


Pressure Correction Factors (CPL)
[Batch] [Press] [Factor] [n]

[Batch] [n] [Meter] [Factor] or


Batch Flow Weighted Avg. Meter Factors
[Meter] [n] [Factor] [Batch] or
[Factor] [Batch] [Meter] [n] or

Other Factors and Intermediate Calculation factors


Meter Factors & K Factors [Factor] or [Meter] [n] [Factor]

[Density] [Factor] or [Density][Factor] [Meter] [n]


Pycnometer Factors
or [Meter] [n] [Density][Factor]

[Density] [Factor] or [Density][Factor] [Meter] [n]


Solartron / Sarasota / UGC Factors
or [Meter] [n] [Density][Factor]

Equilibrium Pressure / A, B & F Factors [Press] [Factor] [Meter] [n]

Alarm Information
Active Alarms [Alarms]

Transducer High/Low Alarm Limits [Meter] or [Meter] [n]

Product Information
Current Running Product [Product]

Product Number and Name [Product] [n]


Override API & SG Gravity
Meter Factors Calculation Mode Note: n = 1 to 8

Prover Sequence Information


Prove Counts & Run Number
Meter Selected to Prove
Current Prover Status
Tdvol & Tdfmp Timers [Counts] or [Prove] [Counts]

Batch Schedule Stack & Presets


Batch ID Character String
Running Product Number [Batch] [Setup] or [Meter] [n] [Batch] [Setup]

Batch Preset Counters &


Interface Due Line Pack Counter [Batch] [Preset] or [Meter] [n] [Batch] [Preset]

8-2 22/26.71+ w 05/99


Volume 2c Basic Operation

DISPLAY VARIABLES VALID KEY PRESSES

Miscellaneous Displays
Current Time & Date
Power Last Applied Time & Date
Power Last Lost Time & Date
Task Timing Display [Time]

Display of Raw Input Signals [Input]

Display of Raw Output Signals [Output] [Status]

Hardware Inventory / Software Version [Status]

Honeywell Module Status [Input] [Status]

PID Control Displays


Primary Setpoint Source Local/Remote
Remote Setpoint Value
Primary Measurement & Setpoint
Secondary Measurement & Setpoint
Valve Open % & Auto/Manual Status [Control] [n]

User-Configurable Displays
Up to eight additional displays can be programmed by the user (See Volume 3 for
more details).

22/26.71+ w 05/99 8-3


Volume 3C
User Manual

Configuration and
Advanced Operation
Firmware Revisions 22.71/26.71

Turbine / Positive Displacement


Liquid Flow Metering Systems
with Meter Factor Linearization

Effective May 1999


Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 3

1. Overview of Firmware Revisions 22.71/26.71....................................................... 1-1


1.1. Number of Meter Runs - Type of Flowmeters..................................................... 1-1
1.2. Product Configuration ......................................................................................... 1-2
1.3. Configurable Sensors per Meter Run ................................................................. 1-2
1.4. Configurable Sensors per Prover ....................................................................... 1-2
1.5. Temperature ......................................................................................................... 1-2
1.6. Densitometers ...................................................................................................... 1-2
1.7. Station Capability ................................................................................................. 1-2
1.8. Auxiliary Inputs .................................................................................................... 1-2
1.9. Number of products - Information Stored/Product ............................................ 1-2
1.10. Type of Products Measured ................................................................................ 1-3
1.11. Batching and Interface Detection ....................................................................... 1-3
1.12. Auto Proving Features......................................................................................... 1-3
1.13. Retroactive Meter Factors and Override Gravity ............................................... 1-3
1.14. Retroactive Density Correction Factor ............................................................... 1-3
1.15. Meter Factor Linearizing Curves......................................................................... 1-4
1.16. PID Control Functions ......................................................................................... 1-4
1.17. Flow Weighted Averages ..................................................................................... 1-4
1.18. User-Programmable Digital I/O............................................................................ 1-4
1.19. User-Programmable Logic Functions................................................................. 1-4
1.20. User-Programmable Alarm Functions ................................................................ 1-4
1.21. User-Programmable Variables ............................................................................ 1-4
1.22. User Display Setups............................................................................................. 1-5
1.23. User Report Templates ........................................................................................ 1-5
1.24. Serial Communication Links ............................................................................... 1-5
1.25. Peer-to-Peer Communications ............................................................................ 1-5
1.26. Archive Data ......................................................................................................... 1-5
1.27. OmniCom Software Communications Package............................................... 1-5
1.28. OmniView Operator Interface Software Package ............................................ 1-5

ii 22/26.71+ w 05/99
Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2. Flow Computer Configuration ............................................................................... 2-1


2.1. Introduction...........................................................................................................2-1
2.2. Configuring with the Keypad in Program Mode .................................................2-1
2.2.1. Entering the Program Mode .................................................................................. 2-1
2.2.2. Changing Data...................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2.3. Menu Selection Method ........................................................................................ 2-2
2.2.4. Random Access Method ....................................................................................... 2-2
2.2.5. Passwords ............................................................................................................ 2-3
2.3. Getting Help ..........................................................................................................2-4
2.4. Program Inhibit Switch.........................................................................................2-4
2.5. Configuring the Physical Inputs / Outputs..........................................................2-5
2.5.1. Miscellaneous Configuration (Misc. Setup Menu) .................................................. 2-5
2.5.2. Physical I/O Points not Available for Configuration ............................................... 2-6
2.5.3. Password Maintenance Settings............................................................................ 2-6
2.5.4. Entries Requiring a Valid Privileged Password ...................................................... 2-7
2.5.5. Module Settings .................................................................................................... 2-7
2.5.6. Meter Station Settings........................................................................................... 2-8
2.5.7. Meter Run Settings ............................................................................................. 2-10
2.5.8. Prover Settings ................................................................................................... 2-12
2.5.9. PID Control Settings ........................................................................................... 2-13
2.5.10. Analog Output Settings ....................................................................................... 2-14
2.5.11. Front Panel Counter Settings .............................................................................. 2-15
2.5.12. Programmable Boolean Statements.................................................................... 2-16
2.5.13. Programmable Variable Statements.................................................................... 2-18
2.5.14. User Display Settings.......................................................................................... 2-20
2.5.15. Digital I/O Point Settings..................................................................................... 2-22
2.5.16. Serial Input / Output Settings ............................................................................. 2-24
2.5.17. Custom Modbus Data Packet Settings .............................................................. 2-26
2.5.18. Programmable Logic Controller Setup ................................................................ 2-27
2.5.19. Archive File Setup .............................................................................................. 2-27
2.5.20. Peer-to-Peer Communications Settings .............................................................. 2-28
2.6. Setting Up the Time and Date ............................................................................2-33
2.6.1. Accessing the Time/Date Setup Submenu .......................................................... 2-33
2.6.2. Time and Date Settings ...................................................................................... 2-33

22/26.71+ w 05/99 iii


Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 3

2.7. Configuring the Meter Station ........................................................................... 2-34


2.7.1. Accessing the Station Setup Submenu ................................................................ 2-34
2.7.2. Meter Station Settings ......................................................................................... 2-34
2.8. Configuring Meter Runs..................................................................................... 2-37
2.8.1. Accessing the Meter Run Setup Submenu........................................................... 2-37
2.8.2. Meter Run Settings.............................................................................................. 2-37
2.9. Configuring Temperature .................................................................................. 2-40
2.9.1. Accessing the Temperature Setup Submenu ....................................................... 2-40
2.9.2. Station and Meter Run Temperature Settings ...................................................... 2-40
2.9.3. Station and Meter Run Density Temperature Settings ......................................... 2-41
2.9.4. Prover Temperature Settings............................................................................... 2-42
2.9.5. Prover Density Temperature Settings .................................................................. 2-43
2.10. Configuring Pressure......................................................................................... 2-44
2.10.1. Accessing the Pressure Setup Submenu ............................................................. 2-44
2.10.2. Station and Meter Run Pressure Settings ............................................................ 2-44
2.10.3. Station and Meter Run Density Pressure Settings................................................ 2-45
2.10.4. Prover Pressure Settings..................................................................................... 2-46
2.10.5. Prover Density Pressure Settings ........................................................................ 2-47
2.11. Configuring Meter Relative Density / API Relative Density ............................. 2-48
2.11.1. Accessing the Gravity/Density Setup Submenu ................................................... 2-48
2.11.2. Meter Relative Density / Density Settings ............................................................ 2-48
2.12. Configuring PID Control Outputs ...................................................................... 2-51
2.12.1. Accessing the PID Control Setup Submenu......................................................... 2-51
2.12.2. PID Control Output Settings ................................................................................ 2-51
2.13. Configuring Provers........................................................................................... 2-53
2.13.1. Accessing the Prover Setup Submenu................................................................. 2-53
2.13.2. Prover Settings.................................................................................................... 2-53
2.14. Configuring Products ........................................................................................ 2-57
2.14.1. Accessing the Product Setup Submenu ............................................................... 2-57
2.14.2. Product Settings .................................................................................................. 2-57
2.15. Configuring Batches .......................................................................................... 2-67
2.16. Configuring Miscellaneous Factors .................................................................. 2-68
2.16.1. Accessing the Factor Setup Submenu ................................................................. 2-68
2.16.2. Factor Settings .................................................................................................... 2-68

iv 22/26.71+ w 05/99
Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.17. Configuring Printers...........................................................................................2-69


2.17.1. Accessing the Printer Setup Submenu ................................................................ 2-69
2.17.2. Printer Settings ................................................................................................... 2-69

3. User-Programmable Functions.............................................................................. 3-1


3.1. Introduction...........................................................................................................3-1
3.2. User-Programmable Boolean Flags and Statements .........................................3-1
3.2.1. What is a Boolean?............................................................................................... 3-1
3.2.2. Sign (+, -) of Analog or Calculated Variables (5001 8999) ................................ 3-3
3.2.3. Boolean Statements and Functions....................................................................... 3-3
3.2.4. How the Digital I/O Assignments are Configured................................................... 3-8
3.3. User Programmable Variables and Statements................................................3-10
3.3.1. Variable Statements and Mathematical Operators Allowed ................................. 3-10
3.3.2. Using Boolean Variables in Variable Statements................................................. 3-12
3.3.3. Entering Values Directly into the User Variables ................................................. 3-13
3.3.4. Using the Variable Expression as a Prompt......................................................... 3-13
3.3.5. Password Level Needed to Change the Value of a User Variable........................ 3-13
3.3.6. Using Variables in Boolean Expressions ............................................................. 3-14
3.4. User Configurable Display Screens ..................................................................3-15

4. Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)..... 4-1
4.1. Liquid Flow Rate for Flowmeters.........................................................................4-1
4.1.1. Volumetric Flow Rate at Flowing Conditions Qv (Bbls/hr)..................................... 4-1
4.1.2. Volumetric Flow Rate at Base Conditions Qb (Bbls/hr)......................................... 4-1
4.1.3. Mass Flow Rate Qm (KLbs/hr).............................................................................. 4-1
4.1.4. Nomenclature ....................................................................................................... 4-2
4.2. Correction Factors for Liquid Flow .....................................................................4-3
4.2.1. Meter Factor in Use MF....................................................................................... 4-3
4.2.2. Volume Correction Factor VCF............................................................................ 4-4
4.2.3. Correction Factor for Pressure on Liquid CPL...................................................... 4-5
4.2.4. Correction Factor for Sediment and Water Content CS&W ................................. 4-5

22/26.71+ w 05/99 v
Omni 6000 / Omni 3000 User Manual Contents of Volume 3

4.3. Densities and Other Properties of Liquids ......................................................... 4-6


4.3.1. Flowing Density f for Crude Oil and Refined Products ........................................4-6
4.3.2. Density of Ethane, Propane and C3+ Mixes ..........................................................4-6
4.3.3. Density and Relative Density (Specific Gravity) Calculated from Live Digital
Densitometer Output Frequency............................................................................4-7
4.4. Recalculation of Batch Ticket ........................................................................... 4-11
4.4.1. Recalculated Gross Standard Volume GSVRecalc (Bbls)................................... 4-11
4.4.2. Recalculated Net Standard Volume ..................................................................... 4-11
4.4.3. Factored Gross Volume FGV (Bbls)................................................................... 4-12
4.4.4. Net Weight Delivered NWD ............................................................................... 4-12
4.5. Liquid Flow Rate for Provers............................................................................. 4-13
4.5.1. Prove Gross Flow Rate at Flowing Conditions (Bbls/hr) ....................................... 4-13
4.5.2. Prove Flow Rate using Pulse Interpolation Method.............................................. 4-13
4.5.3. Nomenclature...................................................................................................... 4-14
4.5.4. Meter Factors for Provers.................................................................................... 4-15
4.6. Calculations for PID Control.............................................................................. 4-18
4.6.1. Primary Variable Error % ep ............................................................................... 4-18
4.6.2. Secondary Variable Error % es........................................................................... 4-18
4.6.3. Control Output % C0 (Before Startup Limit Function).......................................... 4-18
4.6.4. Integral Error e................................................................................................. 4-19

5. Flow Equations and Algorithms for SI (Metric) Units (Revision 26.71+)............ 5-1
5.1. Liquid Flow Rate for Flowmeters ........................................................................ 5-1
3
5.1.1. Volumetric Flow Rate at Flowing Conditions Qv (m /hr) .......................................5-1
3
5.1.2. Volumetric Flow Rate at Base Conditions Qb (m /hr) ...........................................5-1
5.1.3. Mass Flow Rate Qm (Ton/hr) ...............................................................................5-1
5.1.4. Nomenclature........................................................................................................5-2
5.2. Correction Factors for Liquid Flow..................................................................... 5-3
5.2.1. Meter Factor in Use MF .......................................................................................5-3
5.2.2. Volume Correction Factor VCF ............................................................................5-4
5.2.3. Correction Factor for Pressure on Liquid CPL ......................................................5-5

vi 22/26.71+ w 05/99
Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

5.3. Densities and Other Properties of Liquids..........................................................5-6


5.3.1. Flowing Density f for Crude Oil and Refined Products ........................................ 5-6
5.3.2. Density of Ethane, Propane and C3+ Mixes .......................................................... 5-6
5.3.3. Density and Relative Density (Specific Gravity) Calculated from Live Digital
Densitometer Output Frequency ........................................................................... 5-7
5.4. Liquid Flow Rate for Provers .............................................................................5-11
5.4.1. Prove Gross Flow Rate at Flowing Conditions (m3/hr) ......................................... 5-11
5.4.2. Nomenclature ..................................................................................................... 5-11
5.4.3. Meter Factors for Provers ................................................................................... 5-12
5.5. Calculations for PID Control ..............................................................................5-15
5.5.1. Primary Variable Error % ep............................................................................... 5-15
5.5.2. Secondary Variable Error % es .......................................................................... 5-15
5.5.3. Control Output % C0 (Before Startup Limit Function) ......................................... 5-15
5.5.4. Integral Error e ................................................................................................ 5-16

Figures of Volume 3
Fig. 1-1. Typical Configuration Using Helical Turbine, Positive Displacement Flowmeters ................. 1-1
Fig. 2-1. Figure Showing Program Inhibit Switch................................................................................ 2-4
Fig. 3-1. Figure Showing Automatic Four-Meter Flow Zone Thresholds.............................................. 3-6
Fig. 3-2. Figure Showing Four-Meter Run Valve Switching ................................................................ 3-7
Fig. 3-3. Keypad Layout - A through Z Keys..................................................................................... 3-16

22/26.71+ w 05/99 vii


Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

1. Overview of Firmware Revisions 22.71/26.71

Turbine / Positive Displacement


Liquid Flow Metering Systems
(with Meter Factor Linearization)

1.1. Number of Meter Runs - Type of


Flowmeters
Minimum 1 run, Maximum 4 runs - Turbine, Positive Displacement Flowmeters.
'Level A' dual channel 'Pulse Fidelity' checking can be performed on all 4 meter
runs.

Fig. 1-1. Typical Configuration Using Helical Turbine, Positive


Displacement Flowmeters

22/26.71+ w 05/99 1-1


Chapter 1 Overview of Firmware Revision 22.71/26.71

1.2. Product Configuration


Parallel runs measuring the same product or independent runs with different
products.

1.3. Configurable Sensors per Meter Run


Meter Pulses, meter temperature and pressure, meter density, density
temperature and pressure.

1.4. Configurable Sensors per Prover


Prover inlet and outlet temperature and pressure, prover densitometer any type
(analog or digital pulse type such as Solartron, Sarasota or UGC).

1.5. Temperature
Each temperature sensor can be individually selected to be a 4-20mA, 4-wire
DIN curve RTD or 4-wire American curve RTD.

1.6. Densitometers
Can be configured for any combination or mix of individual or shared
densitometers of any type (analog or digital pulse type such as Solartron,
Sarasota or UGC). The maximum number that can be connected is five. Each
analog density can be specified as flowing or reference conditions.

1.7. Station Capability


Meter runs may be combined or subtracted in any mode to provide station flow
rates and totalizers.

1.8. Auxiliary Inputs


Four auxiliary inputs are provided for miscellaneous sensors (for example:
BS&W, Viscosity monitors, etc.) and can be individually selected to be a 4-
20mA, 4-wire DIN curve RTD or 4-wire American curve RTD.

1.9. Number of products - Information


Stored/Product
Data for eight products is stored including: product name, meter factors,
gravity/density overrides and calculation mode to be used by each flowmeter
running the product.

1-2 22/26.71+ w 05/99


Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

1.10. Type of Products Measured


Crude oil, refined products, NGLs using API 2540, LPGs using GPA TP16 and
API Tables 6, 23 and 54 are also provided.

1.11. Batching and Interface Detection


Six batch setups per meter run can be programmed with alphanumeric batch ID
tag, product number to run and expected size of batch.
Individual meter run batch preset down counters provide 'batch end warning'
and 'batch end reached' alarms.
Batches can be ended manually or automatically on size of batch, change of
product, beginning of new day, day of the week or day of the month.
Product interface detection is achieved using a station interface detector
densitometer mounted ahead of the meter runs. Line pack count-down
counters allow up to three product interfaces to be tracked between the
interface detector gravitometer and the valve manifold allowing pre-emptive
product cuts.

1.12. Auto Proving Features


Fully automated proving to API chapter 12. User configured for Uni-, Bi-
directional and compact provers with optional inlet and outlet temperature and
pressure sensors. Both up-stream and downstream water draw volume inputs
are available. Plenum chamber pressure on a Brooks prover is also input as an
analog and controlled by the computer. Master meter proving is also featured.
Provings can be triggered on change of flow rate versus last known prove for
each meter or on the amount of flow which has occurred since the last prove.
Proves can also be triggered by a meter being shut in for more than a specified
amount of time.

1.13. Retroactive Meter Factors and Override


Gravity
Meter factors and override product gravity can be applied retroactively for a
selectable number of barrels at any time during a batch. Meter factors
determined by a prove can be automatically implemented from that point or
retroactively to the beginning of the batch.

1.14. Retroactive Density Correction Factor


Density correction factors can be applied retroactively for a selectable number
of barrels at any time during a batch.

22/26.71+ w 05/99 1-3


Chapter 1 Overview of Firmware Revision 22.71/26.71

1.15. Meter Factor Linearizing Curves


Variations in flowmeter performance due to viscosity and flow rate are corrected
by the use of twelve-point meter factor versus flow rate curves. Curves are
provided for each meter measuring each product.

1.16. PID Control Functions


Four independent control loops are provided for control of a primary variable
with either high or low override control by a secondary variable. Contact closure
inputs are activated to provide a startup and shutdown ramp function for each
control loop if needed. Primary setpoint can be adjusted via an analog input, a
keypad entry or communication link. Control loops are not dedicated and may
be cascaded. Data is processed every 500 msec.

1.17. Flow Weighted Averages


Flow weighted averages are calculated for all input variables and correction
factors based on hourly, daily totals and running batch totals.

1.18. User-Programmable Digital I/O


Each I/O point is individually configurable as either an input or output with
variable 'Delay On' and 'Delay Off'. Pulse widths are adjustable when used as
auxiliary totalizer outputs or sampler outputs.

1.19. User-Programmable Logic Functions


Sixty-four logic statements can be user programmed to control meter run
switching, prover loop and provide user auxiliary control functions.

1.20. User-Programmable Alarm Functions


Sixteen of the programmable logic statements described above can be used to
contain custom text messages which can be displayed, logged and printed.

1.21. User-Programmable Variables


Sixty-four user variables can be programmed to manipulate data for display and
printing or remote access via a communication port. Typical uses include,
special units conversions, customer averaging algorithms for leak detection,
special limit checking and control functions. The programmable variable
statements can also be used to type cast data of one type to another (i.e.,
change a floating point variable to an integer type so that a PLC or DCS system
can make use of it).

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

1.22. User Display Setups


The user may specify eight key press combinations which recall display
screens. Each user display screen can show four variables each with a
descriptive tag defined by the user.

1.23. User Report Templates


Using OmniCom the user can generate custom report templates or edit existing
templates. These are uploaded into the flow computer. Custom templates for
the snapshot, batch end, daily and prove reports can be defined.

1.24. Serial Communication Links


Up to four serial data links are available for communications with other devices
such as printers, SCADA systems, PLCs and other Omni Flow Computers.
Ports communicate using a superset of the Modbus protocol (ASCII or RTU).
Printer data is ASCII data.

1.25. Peer-to-Peer Communications


Omni flow computers can be user configured to communicate with each other
as equal peers. Groups of data variables can be exchanged or broadcast
between other flow computers. Multiple flow computers can share resources
such as a PLC.

1.26. Archive Data


Two types of data archiving are possible in the flow computer. 1) Formatted
ASCII text using custom report templates, 2) Raw Data using archive records
and files.

1.27. OmniCom Software Communications


Package
OmniCom software is provided with each flow computer, and allows the user
to configure the computer on-line or off-line using a personal computer.

1.28. OmniView Operator Interface Software


Package
A Man-Machine Interface package for the Omni Flow Computer is also
available as an option.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2. Flow Computer Configuration

2.1. Introduction
Configuration data is stored in the computer's battery backed-up RAM memory
which will retain its data for at least 1 to 2 months with no power applied.
Configuration data can be entered using one of three methods:

1) Configure off-line using the OmniCom PC configuration program and


then uploading all data at once.
2) Configure on-line using the OmniCom PC configuration program which
uploads each change as it is entered.
3) Enter configuration data via the front panel keypad using the Program
Mode.

Methods 1) and 2) require an IBM compatible PC running the OmniCom


Configuration Software and are described in Volume 5 and in OmniCom Help.
Method 3) is described here.

2.2. Configuring with the Keypad in Program


Mode

2.2.1. Entering the Program Mode


INFO - Key presses are While in the Display Mode press the [Prog] key. The front panel Program LED
denoted in bold face between above the key will glow green and the following selection menu will be
brackets; e.g.: the enter key
appears in this manual as
displayed on the first three lines of the LCD display.
[Enter].
Press Keys to Select
th Group Entry, or
The 4 line of the display is
used to show the user key Press "Prog" to Exit
presses.

2.2.2. Changing Data


Data can be accessed using a sequential list of menu prompts or in a random
access manner by going directly to a specific group of entries.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.2.3. Menu Selection Method


INFO - Characters in [ ]
refer to key presses. *** SETUP MENU ***
Misc Configuration _
TIP - It is best to use the
Time/Date Setup
menu selection method when Station Setup
programming an application Meter Run Setup
for the first time as every Temperature Setup
possible option and variable
will be prompted. Once a Pressure Setup
computer is in operation and Grav/Density Setup
you become familiar with the PID Control Setup
application you can decide to
use the faster Random
Prover Setup
Access Method described on Product Setup
the facing page. Batch Preset Setup
While in the Program Mode Batch Sequence
(program LED on) press Factor Setup
[Setup] [Enter]. A menu
similar to the following will be Printer Setup
displayed.

Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to the appropriate
entry and press [Enter] to access a particular submenu. The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always be completed first as these entries specify the
number and type of input and output devices connected to the flow computer;
i.e., the menus following the 'Misc Configuration' menu do not ask for
configuration data unless a transducer has been defined.

2.2.4. Random Access Method


In addition to the Setup Menu, the data is also presented in related groups such
as Temperature, Pressure, Meter, etc. You press the group key of your choice
to get to a data area. By specifying a meter run before or after a group you go
directly to the data for that group and that group only.
Once a group is selected use the 'Up/Down' arrow keys to step to a specific data
entry within the group. You can view data and, assuming a valid password has
been entered, change its value as required. If an error is made, press [Clear],
re-enter the correct data and press [Enter] to enter the new value. The cursor
will automatically step to the next data item in that group unless that would
cause a total change of screen (i.e., you can always verify your entry). A list of
data groups and associated key presses is listed later in this chapter.

Example:
Pressing [Temp] will allow you access to temperature data for all meter runs.
Pressing [Meter] [1] [Temp] or [Temp] [Meter] [1] will allow access to only
Meter Run #1 temperature data. For example, pressing [Meter] [1] [Temp] will
display the following until the [Enter] key is pressed.

Press Keys to Select


Group Entry, or
Press "Prog" to Exit
th
The 4 line of the display is
used to show the user key
presses.
Meter 1 Temp

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Pressing the [Enter] key will display a screen similar to this:

TEMPERATURE #1 Deg.F
Low Limit 30.0
High Limit 125.0
Override 60.0

2.2.5. Passwords
INFO - Most entry groups Except when changing transducer high/low alarm limits, a password is usually
occupy multiple screens so asked for when changing the configuration data within the computer.
be sure to use the [ ]/[ ] to
scroll and see all data. The flow computer has independent password protection of the following:
o Local Keypad Access / Modbus Port #1 (selectable)
(Physical Serial Port #1)
o Modbus Port #2 - (Physical Serial Port #2)
o Modbus Port #3 - (Physical Serial Port #3)
o Modbus Port #4 - (Physical Serial Port #4)

Local Keypad Access


Three password levels are provided:

q Privileged Level Allows complete access to all entries within the flow
computer including keypad passwords 1, 1A and 2
below. The initial privileged password for each
Modbus port is selected via this password level.
q Level 1 This level allows technician access to most entries
within the flow computer with the exception of I/O
Points assignments, programmable variables and
Boolean statements and passwords other than
Keypad Level 1.
q Level 1A This level allows technician access to the following
entries only:
Meter Factors
K Factors
Densitometer Correction Factors (Pycnometer
Factor)
q Level 2 Allows access to the operator type entries. These
entries include:
Transducer Manual Overrides
Product Gravity Overrides
Prover Operations
Batching Operations

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Changing Passwords at the Keypad


INFO - Characters in [ ] 1) At the keypad press [Prog] [Setup] [Enter].
refer to key presses.
2) With the cursor blinking on 'Misc Configuration', press [Enter].
3) With the cursor blinking on 'Password Main?', press [Enter].
4) Enter the Privileged Level Password (up to 6 Characters) and press
[Enter].
5) The Level 1, 1A and Level 2 passwords can now be viewed and changed
if required.
INFO - See Technical 1) Scroll down to access each of the Modbus serial port 'Level A'
Bulletin TB-960701 in passwords. These are labeled Serial 1 (if Modbus Protocol is selected),
Volume 5 for setting Level B 'Serial 2', Serial 3', and 'Serial 4' corresponding to the physical port
and Level C passwords using numbering for Modbus Ports 1, 2, 3 and 4.
OmniCom.

Note: Level B and Level C


passwords for each Modbus
2.3. Getting Help
port cannot be viewed or Context sensitive help is available for most data entries. Help is summoned by
changed from the keypad.
pressing the [Display/Enter] key twice ([Help] key) with the cursor on the data
field in question. Help screens are frequently more than 1 full screen so always
INFO - The Help System is use the [ ]/[ ] keys to scroll in case there is more. Press [Prog] or [Enter]
not limited to just the once to exit the help system and return to your original screen.
Program Mode. Context
sensitive help is available in
all modes of operation.
2.4. Program Inhibit Switch
A 'Program Inhibit Switch' mounted behind the front panel prevents
unauthorized changing of data when in the 'Inhibit' position. Most data can be
viewed while the switch is in the program inhibit position, but any attempt to
alter data will be ignored and cause 'PROGRAM LOCKOUT' to be displayed on
the bottom line of the LCD display.
The inner enclosure of the flow computer can be locked or sealed within the
outer enclosure blocking access to the 'Program Inhibit Switch'.

CAUTION!
These units have an integral
latching mechanism which
first must be disengaged by
lifting the bezel upwards
before withdrawing the unit
from the case.

Fig. 2-1. Figure Showing Program Inhibit Switch

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.5. Configuring the Physical Inputs /


Outputs
Tip - It is best to use the The Omni Flow Computer can accept many I/O modules and be configured to
Menu Selection Method (see match just about any combination of measurement transmitters. Configuring the
2.2.3) when programming an
application for the first time
physical I/O means setting up the number of meter runs, what types of
as every possible option and transducers are to be used and to which physical I/O points they are connected.
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in
operation and you become 2.5.1. Miscellaneous Configuration (Misc. Setup Menu)
familiar with the application
you can decide to use the The physical I/O configuration of the flow computer is changed by entering the
faster Random Access
Method (see 2.2.4).
Misc. Setup menu while the 'Select Group Entry' screen is displayed (see
2.2.1. Entering the Program Mode).

INFO - Characters in [ ]
refer to key presses. Press Keys to Select
Group Entry, or
Press "Prog" to Exit
INFO - The first menu, 'Misc Setup
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Press [Setup] then [Enter] and the following selection menu will be displayed:
devices connected to the flow
computer. You are advised to
complete all entries under *** SETUP MENU ***
this menu before proceeding. Misc Configuration _
Only transducers that have Time/Date Setup
been assigned to physical
Station Setup
I/O points will be available for
further configuration (i.e., the
menus following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not The cursor automatically appears at the Misc Configuration option. Press
ask for or accept [Enter] and the following selection menu will be displayed:
configuration data unless a
transducer has been
defined). (See 2.5.2.) *** Misc. Setup ***
Password Maint?(Y)
Check Modules ?(Y)
Config Station?(Y)
Config Meter n
Config Prove ? (Y)
Config PID ? n
Config D/A Outn
Front Pnl Counters
Program Booleans ?
Program Variables?
User Display ? n
Config Digitaln
Serial I/O n
Peer/Peer Comm(Y)?
Custom Packet n
Archive File n
PLC Group n

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.2. Physical I/O Points not Available for


Configuration
Configuration parameter groups are only prompted as needed. Meter runs and
transducers which are not assigned to a physical I/O point will not be available
for configuration. In these cases the following message will be displayed:

If this message is displayed Variable Selected is


check the I/O point Not Assigned to a
assignment for the variable.
Physical I/O Point

2.5.3. Password Maintenance Settings


INFO - Characters in { } Password maintenance settings can only be entered via the Omni front panel
refer to password levels. keypad. Enter [Y] at Password Maint ? of the Misc Setup menu to open the
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses.
following entries:

{PL} Privileged _______________


TIP - Use the blank lines
provided next to each Enter the privileged password to allow you to view and change all configuration data including
configuration option to write other passwords.
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {PL} Level 1 _______________
flow computer. Enter the Level 1 password to allow entry of all configuration data except entries which determine
Some of these entries may the physical I/O personality of the computer.
not appear on the display or
in OmniCom. Depending on {PL} Level 1A _______________
the various configuration
settings of your specific Enter the Level 1A password to allow entry of Meter factors, K Factors and Density Correction
metering system, only those Factors only.
configuration options which
are applicable will be {PL} Level 2 _______________
displayed. Enter the Level 2 password which is required for operator type entries such as gravity overrides
and meter factors.

Note: In the privileged


password area all passwords {PL} Serial Port #1 Password _______________
are legible upon entering the Enter the Serial Port password. All data in the Modbus database except passwords can be read
correct privileged password. via the serial ports. These passwords allow writes to the Modbus database. Password protection
In all other cases when can be disabled by entering a blank field as a password.
requested for a password,
upon entering the password, {PL} Lockout Switch Active? (Serial Port #1) _______________
the Omni will display all Enter [N] for the lockout switch to be inactive for this serial port.
entered characters as
asterisk. Enter [Y] for the lockout switch to be active for this serial port.

{PL} Serial Port #2 Password _______________


Enter the Serial Port #2 Password.

{PL} Lockout Switch Active? (Serial Port #2) _______________

{PL} Serial Port #3 Password _______________


{PL} Lockout Switch Active? (Serial Port #3) _______________

{PL} Serial Port #4 Password _______________


{PL} Lockout Switch Active? (Serial Port #4) _______________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.5.4. Entries Requiring a Valid Privileged Password


INFO - Characters in { } The following entries display only when a Valid Privileged Password is entered:
refer to password levels.
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses. {PL} Model Number (0=3000, 1=6000) _______________
This entry is used by the OmniCom configuration software to determine the maximum I/O
TIP - Use the blank lines capability of the computer.
provided next to each
configuration option to write {PL} Re-configure Archive _______________
down the corresponding Enter [Y] to re-configure archive records definition. Enter [N] when finished.
settings you entered in the
flow computer.
{PL} Archive Run (Y/N) _______________
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or Enter [Y] to start the archive running.
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration {PL} Reset All Totalizers ? (Y/N) _______________
settings of your specific Reset All Ram and Reset Totalizers will only display after the privileged password has been
metering system, only those entered. will clear to zero all internal totalizers. You can change totalizer decimal place settings
configuration options which after entering [Y]. The three electromechanical totalizers on the front of the computer cannot be
are applicable will be zeroed.
displayed.
{PL} Reset All RAM ? (Y/N) _______________
Resetting all RAM will clear all configuration data, calibration data and totalizers. This means that
CAUTION! all configuration data will have to be re-entered.

If you change the number or


{PL} Input Calibrate Default ? _______________
type of installed I/O modules,
you must perform the Check Entering a [Y] here will set all the analog input calibration constants used to scale zero and span
Modules Function to inform settings to the default value. This will require you to re calibrate all the inputs. You can also do
the computer that you wish to this on a channel by channel basis by entering the input channel number.
use the new hardware
configuration. {PL} D/A Calibrate Default ? _______________
Entering a [Y] here will set all the analog output calibration constants used to scale zero and span
settings to the default value. This will require you to re-calibrate all the outputs. You can also do
this on a channel by channel basis by entering the output channel number.

2.5.5. Module Settings


Enter [Y] at Check Modules ? of the Misc Setup menu and a screen similar
to the following will display:

MODULE S-WARE H-WARE


A-1 Y Y
B-1 Y Y
E/D-1 Y Y
E-1 Y Y
H-1 Y Y
D-2 Y Y
S-2 Y Y
Update S-Ware ?

{PL} Update S-Ware ? (Y) _______________


A table is displayed showing all of the physically installed I/O modules verses the I/O modules
recognized by the software (see display example above). You must answer the 'Update Software'
question entering [Y] whenever you change the number or type of installed modules. The available
I/O point numbers are allocated to each module at this time according to the type and number of
each module (see Chapter 2 for more information).

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.6. Meter Station Settings


INFO - The number of Enter [Y] at Config Station ? of the Misc Setup menu to open the following
process variable I/O points entries:
available depends on the
number of combo modules
installed (see Chapter 2 in {PL} Station Configured As: _______________
Volume 1 for more
information). Point numbers Station Totals and Flows Defined As: Define which meter runs will be included in the station flow
range from 01 through 24. rates and totalizers. Meter data can be added or subtracted.
Assign [0] to invalidate the Example: Entering [1] [+] [2] [-] [3] [-] [4] defines the station flows and totals as the result of
assigning of a variable. Meter Runs #1 and #2 added together, subtracted by the flows of Meters #3 and #4.
Enter [0] for no station totalizers.
I/O Type Mismatch - The
computer will not let you {PL} Density I/O Point Number _______________
assign the same I/O point # Enter the I/O point number that corresponds to the station density or gravity input used as the
to incompatible transducer product interface detector. Digital densitometers can be corrected for temperature and pressure
types; i.e., an I/O point effects using the station pressure and temperature points. Digital pulse densitometers can only be
th
cannot be assigned as a assigned I/O point numbers corresponding to the 4 input channel of a B Type Combo Module, or
temperature input for Meter Channels 3 or 4 of an E/D Type Combo Module.
Run #1 and a pressure input
for Meter Run #2. If the I/O Densitometer Tag _______________
Type Mismatch message is
Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this density transducer on the LCD display.
displayed, recheck the I/O.
Densitometer Type _______________
Shared Transducers - Enter the densitometer type:
Enter the same I/O point to 0 = No density type selected
share transducers between 1 = 4-20mA output signal linear with API gravity units (many API devices are actually designed
meter runs. to drive non-linear API chart recorders; they are usually linear with relative density units)
2 = 4-20mA output signal linear with relative density (SG) units
Correcting a Mistake - 3 = 4-20mA output signal linear with grs/cc density
Enter an I/O point # of [0] to 4 = Solartron digital pulse
cancel an incorrectly entered 5 = Sarasota digital pulse
I/O point #, then enter the 6 = UGC digital pulse.
correct number.
{PL} Density Temperature I/O Point Number _______________
Assigning I/O Point #99 - Enter the I/O point number to which the temperature sensor used to compensate the station
This indicates that the densitometer is connected.
associated variable will be When a digital densitometer is used as the station transducer, it can be corrected for temperature
available for display and be effects by assigning a temperature I/O point.
used in all calculations, but
will not be obtained via a live For the station product interface densitometer, enter a meter run temperature sensor in cases
input. The variable value is where a separate temperature transmitter is not available.
st
usually downloaded into the RTD probes should be assigned to the 1 channel on any type of combo module. RTD probes can
nd
flow computer database via a also be assigned to the 2 channel of B Type combo modules.
communication port or via a
user variable statement. Density Temperature Tag _______________
Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this density temperature transducer on the LCD
display.

Density Temperature Type _______________


Enter the densitometer temperature transmitter type:
0 = RTD probes that follow the DIN curve and = 0.0385
1 = RTD probes that follow the American curve and = 0. 0392
2 = Honeywell smart transmitter connected to an H combo module or a transducer with a 4-
20mA linear output

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

{PL} Density Pressure I/O Point Number _______________


Enter the I/O point number to which the pressure transmitter used to compensate the station
INFO - Characters in { }
digital densitometers is connected.
refer to password levels.
Characters in [ ] refer to key When a digital densitometer is used as the product interface detector, it can be corrected for
presses. pressure effects by assigning a station pressure point.
If a separate pressure transmitter is not available, enter a meter pressure transmitter I/O point.
TIP - Use the blank lines
Density Pressure Tag _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this density pressure transducer on the LCD
down the corresponding display.
settings you entered in the
flow computer.
Some of these entries may Auxiliary Input Assignment
not appear on the display or
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration
{PL} Auxiliary Input #1 I/O Point Number _______________
settings of your specific Enter the physical I/O point number to which this auxiliary input is connected. Auxiliary Inputs can
metering system, only those be used to enter S&W, viscosity and other miscellaneous variables.
configuration options which
are applicable will be Auxiliary Input #1 Tag _______________
displayed. Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this transducer on the LCD display.

Auxiliary Input #1 Type _______________


INFO - The number of Enter the Auxiliary Input Type:
process variable I/O points 0 = RTD probes that follow the DIN curve and = 0.0385
available depends on the
1 = RTD probes that follow the American curve and = 0. 0392
number of combo modules
installed (see Chapter 2 in 2 = Transducer with a 4-20mA linear output or Honeywell smart transmitter connected to an H
Volume 1 for more combo module
information). Point numbers
range from 01 through 24. {PL} Auxiliary Input #2 I/O Point Number _______________
Assign [0] to invalidate the
assigning of a variable. Auxiliary Input #2 Tag _______________

I/O Type Mismatch - The Auxiliary Input #2 Type _______________


computer will not let you
assign the same I/O point #
to incompatible transducer
{PL} Auxiliary Input #3 I/O Point Number _______________
types; i.e., an I/O point
cannot be assigned as a
Auxiliary Input #3 Tag _______________
temperature input for Meter Auxiliary Input #3 Type _______________
Run #1 and a pressure input
for Meter Run #2. If the I/O
Type Mismatch message is {PL} Auxiliary Input #4 I/O Point Number _______________
displayed, recheck the I/O.
Auxiliary Input #4 Tag _______________
Shared Transducers -
Enter the same I/O point to
Auxiliary Input #4 Type _______________
share transducers between
meter runs.

Correcting a Mistake -
Enter an I/O point # of [0] to
cancel an incorrectly entered
I/O point #, then enter the
correct number.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.7. Meter Run Settings


Config Meter Runs - Enter [1], [2], [3] or [4] at Config Meter "n" of the Misc Setup menu to open
Physical I/O information for the following entries:
up to 4 meter runs can be
entered. Transducers that Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
are not assigned an I/O point
will not be available for {PL} Flow I/O Point Number _______ _______ _______ _______
display or further
Enter the number of the I/O point used to input the flow signal for each meter run. Flowmeter
configuration. rd th
pulse inputs can only be assigned to the 3 input channel of any combo module and 4 input
channel of A Type combo modules. When working with compact provers using pulse interpolation,
rd th
you must assign each of the flowmeter pulse signals to the 3 or 4 channel of an E Type combo
Assigning I/O Point #99 - module.
This indicates that the
associated variable will be Flow Transmitter Tag _______ _______ _______ _______
available for display and be Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this flowmeter on the LCD display.
used in all calculations, but
will not be obtained via a live {PL} Dual Pulse Fidelity Check? _______ _______ _______ _______
input. The variable value is
usually downloaded into the Enter [Y] to enable 'Level A' pulse fidelity and security checking for this meter run (API MPMS
rd
flow computer database via a Chapter 5, Section 5). The 'Flow I/O Point' entered above must correspond to the 3 input channel
communication port or via a of an E Combo Module. The flowmeter pulses are physically wired to Input Channels 3 and 4 of
user variable statement. the E Combo Module. Enter [N] to disable dual pulse fidelity checking.

{PL} Temperature I/O Point # _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the I/O point number used to input the temperature signal for each meter run. Duplicate I/O
assignments are allowed when a sensor is shared by more than one meter run.

{PL} Temperature Transducer Tag _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this temperature transducer on the LCD display.

{PL} Temperature Transducer Type_______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the Temperature Transmitter Type:
0 = RTD probes that follow the DIN curve and = 0.0385
1 = RTD probes that follow the American curve and = 0. 0392
2 = Honeywell smart transmitter connected to an H combo module or a transducer with a 4-
20mA linear output

{PL} Pressure I/O Point # _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the I/O point number used to input the pressure signal for each meter run. Duplicate I/O
assignments are allowed when a sensor is shared by more than one meter run.

Pressure Transducer Tag _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this pressure transducer on the LCD display.

{PL} Density I/O Point # _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the I/O point number used to input the density signal for each meter run. Duplicate I/O
assignments are allowed when a densitometer is shared by more than one meter run. Digital pulse
th
densitometers can only be assigned I/O point numbers corresponding to the 4 input channel of a
rd th
'B' Type Combo Module or the 3 and 4 input channels of an E/D Combo Module.

{PL} Densitometer Tag _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this density transducer on the LCD display.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


INFO - Characters in { } {PL} Densitometer Type _______ _______ _______ _______
refer to password levels.
Enter the Densitometer Type:
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses. 0 = No density type selected
1 = 4-20mA output signal linear with API gravity units (many API devices are actually designed
to drive non-linear API chart recorders; they are usually linear with relative density units)
TIP - Use the blank lines
2 = 4-20mA output signal linear with relative density (SG) units
provided next to each
configuration option to write 3 = 4-20mA output signal linear with grs/cc density
down the corresponding 4 = Solartron digital pulse
settings you entered in the 5 = Sarasota digital pulse
flow computer. 6 = UGC digital pulse.
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or {PL} Flowing/Reference Conditions_______ _______ _______ _______
in OmniCom. Depending on This entry applies only if you selected a 4-20mA type densitometer in the previous entry Specify if
the various configuration the density transducer signal represents density at:
settings of your specific
metering system, only those 0 = Flowing temperature and pressure
configuration options which 1 = Reference temperature and pressure
are applicable will be
displayed. {PL} Density Temp I/O Point # _______ _______ _______ _______
Enter the I/O point number used to input the signal applied to compensate for temperature effects
at the densitometer for each meter run.
If the densitometer has no temperature sensor fitted, enter the same I/O point assignment as the
meter run temperature sensor.

{PL} Density Temperature Tag _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this density temperature transducer on the LCD
display.

{PL} Density Temperature Type _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the Densitometer Temperature Transmitter Type:
0 = RTD probes that follow the DIN curve and = 0.0385
1 = RTD probes that follow the American curve and = 0. 0392
2 = Honeywell smart transmitter connected to an H combo module or a transducer with a 4-
20mA linear output

{PL} Density Pressure I/O Point # _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the I/O point number used to input the signal applied to compensate for pressure effects at
the densitometer for each meter run.
If the densitometer has no pressure sensor fitted, enter the same I/O point assignment as the
meter run pressure sensor.

{PL} Density Pressure Tag _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this density pressure transducer on the LCD
display.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.8. Prover Settings


INFO - Characters in { } Enter [Y] at Config Prove ? of the Misc Setup menu to open the following
refer to password levels. entries:
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses.
Inlet Outlet

TIP - Use the blank lines {PL} Prover Temperature I/O Point Number __________ __________
provided next to each
configuration option to write Enter the I/O point number used to input the prover inlet/outlet temperature signal. Inlet and outlet
down the corresponding temperature sensor readings are averaged to determine the actual prover temperature.
settings you entered in the To use the meter run temperature, enter [0] for both inlet and outlet.
flow computer. If there is only one temperature sensor, enter [0] for outlet or enter the same number for both
Some of these entries may prover inlet and outlet.
not appear on the display or
in OmniCom. Depending on {PL} Prover Temperature Transducer Tag __________ __________
the various configuration Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this temperature transducer on the LCD display.
settings of your specific
metering system, only those {PL} Prover Temperature Transmitter Type __________ __________
configuration options which
are applicable will be Enter the Prover Temperature Transmitter Type:
displayed. 0 = RTD probes that follow the DIN curve and = 0.0385
1 = RTD probes that follow the American curve and = 0. 0392
2 = Honeywell smart transmitter connected to an H combo module or a transducer with a 4-
Configuring the Prover - 20mA linear output
When an input and output
transducer signal is available, {PL} Prover Pressure I/O Point Number __________ __________
the computer uses the
average of both signals. Enter the I/O point number used to input the prover inlet/outlet pressure signal. Inlet and outlet
Otherwise, it uses the signal pressure sensor readings are averaged to determine the actual prover pressure.
from the available transducer. To use the meter run pressure, enter [0] for both inlet and outlet.
The pressure or temperature If there is only one pressure sensor, enter [0] for outlet or enter the same number for both prover
of the meter run being proved inlet and outlet.
will be used to compensate
the prover if neither left or {PL} Prover Pressure Transducer Tag __________ __________
right transducer is assigned
Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this pressure transducer on the LCD display.
to an I/O point #.

{PL} Prover Plenum Pressure I/O Point Number _______________


Applies only when a Brooks compact prover is specified. Enter the I/O point number used to input
the compact prover plenum pressure sensor input.

{PL} Prover Plenum Pressure Tag _______________


Enter the 8-character tag name used to identify this plenum pressure transducer on the LCD
display.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.5.9. PID Control Settings


Proportional Integral Enter [1], [2], [3] or [4] at Config PID ? "n" of the Misc Setup menu to open
Derivative (PID) -- For the following entries:
practical reasons we refer to
PID Control Loops in this Loop #1 Loop #2 Loop #3 Loop #4
manual. However, your flow
computer actually performs {PL} Assign Primary Variable _______ _______ _______ _______
the Proportional Integral (PI) Enter the database index number of the primary variable in the PID loop (see the sidebar).
function and does not apply
the derivative term. The Remarks ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________
addition of the derivative term Enter a remark in this 16-character field to identify the function of each variable assignment.
would greatly complicate
tuning of the control loop and {PL} Primary Action (F/R) _______ _______ _______ _______
besides is not normally
Enter [F] (forward action) if the value of the primary variable increases as the controller output %
applicable to the types of flow
increases. Enter [R] (reverse action) if the value of the primary variable decreases as the controller
and pressure control used in
output % increases.
pipelines.
{PL} Remote Setpoint I/O Point # _______ _______ _______ _______
Enter the I/O point number that the remote set point analog signal is connected to (01-24). Assign
Valid Assignments - Any
this point to 99 in cases where the set point will be downloaded via a communication port. Enter
32-bit integer or floating point
[0] if you will not be using a remote setpoint.
variable within the database
can be assigned to be the
{PL} Assign Secondary Variable _______ _______ _______ _______
primary or secondary
controlled variable (see Enter the database index number of the secondary variable in the PID loop (see the sidebar).
Volume 4 for a complete
listing of database addresses
Remarks ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________
and index numbers). Enter a remark in this 16-character field to identify the function of each variable assignment.

{PL} Secondary Action (F/R) _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter [F] (forward action) if the value of the primary variable increases as the controller output %
increases. Enter [R] (reverse action) if the value of the primary variable decreases as the controller
output % increases.

{PL} Error Select (L/H) _______ _______ _______ _______


This entry determines the circumstances under which the primary or secondary variables are
controlled. Enter [L] for low or [H] for high error select, according to the following modes:
MODE #1 MODE #2
Are both primary and secondary actions Are both primary and secondary actions
forward? forward?
yes no yes no
Enter [L] for Low yes Is secondary Enter [H] for High Is secondary
Error Select action forward? Error Select action forward?
no no
Enter [H] for High Enter [L] for Low
Error Select Error Select
Mode #1: The controller will attempt to control the primary variable but will switch to controlling
the secondary variable, should the controller be trying to drive the secondary variable ABOVE its
setpoint. An example of this mode would be controlling flow rate (primary) while not exceeding a
MAXIMUM delivery pressure (secondary).
Mode #2: The controller will attempt to control primary variable but will switch to controlling the
secondary variable, should the controller be trying to drive the secondary variable BELOW its
setpoint. An example of this mode would be controlling flow rate (primary) while not dropping
below a MINIMUM pressure value (secondary).

{PL} Startup Mode (L/M) _______ _______ _______ _______


This entry determines how the computer handles a system reset such as a momentary loss of
power. Enter [L] (Last) to cause the PID loop to stay in the operating mode it was last in before the
system reset. Enter [M] (Manual) to cause the PID loop to startup with the PID loop in manual
control mode and with the valve open % as it was before the system reset.

{PL} PID Tag _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter an 8-character tag name to identify the PID controller output signal on the LCD display.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.10. Analog Output Settings


INFO - Characters in { } Press [n] [Enter] at Config D/A Out "n" of the Misc Setup menu to open the
refer to password levels. following entries (n = Analog Output #1 through #12):
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses. Assign @ 4mA @ 20mA

TIP - Use the blank lines {L1} Analog Output #1 _________ _________ _________
provided next to each Under Assign, enter the database index number of the variable that will be assigned to the
configuration option to write digital-to-analog output points.
down the corresponding
Under at 4mA and at 20mA, enter the required scaling parameters in engineering units at 4mA
settings you entered in the
and 20mA (e.g.: For Meter #1 Net Flow Rate assign 7102. Typical scaling might be 4mA=0.0
flow computer.
bbls/hr and 20mA=1000.0 bbls/hr).
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or Remark _______________________________
in OmniCom. Depending on
Enter a remark in this 16-character field which identifies and documents the function of each
the various configuration
digital-to-analog output.
settings of your specific
metering system, only those
configuration options which {L1} Analog Output #2 _________ _________ _________
are applicable will be
displayed.
{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #3 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #4 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #5 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #6 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #7 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #8 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #9 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #10 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #11 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

{L1} Analog Output #12 _________ _________ _________


{L1} Remark _______________________________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.5.11. Front Panel Counter Settings


Enter [Y] at Front Pnl Counters of the Misc Setup menu to open the
following entries:
Counter A Counter B Counter C

{L1} Assign Front Panel Counter _________ _________ _________


Enter the database index number of the accumulator variable that will be output to this
electromechanical counter.
3
The unit of measure is the same as that shown on the LCD for the totalizer (i.e., barrels, klbs, m ,
etc.) The maximum count rate is limited to 10 counts per second. Count rates higher than 10
pulses per second will cause the computer to remember how many counts did not get output and
continue to output after the flow stops until all buffered counts are output.

{L1} Remarks _________ _________ _________


Enter a remark in this 16-character field which identifies and documents the function of each front
panel counter.

{L1} Pulses/Unit _________ _________ _________


Enter the number of pulses per unit (volume, mass, energy).

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.12. Programmable Boolean Statements


Program Booleans - These Enter [Y] at Program Booleans ? of the Misc Setup menu to open the
64 Boolean statements are following entries:
evaluated every 100 msec
starting at Point 1025 Boolean Point 10xx Equation or Statement Comment or Remark
continuing through 1088.
Each statement can contain {PL} 25: _______________________ _______________________
up to 3 Boolean variables,
optionally preceded by the {PL} 26: _______________________ _______________________
slash (/) denoting the NOT
Function and separated by a {PL} 27: _______________________ _______________________
valid Boolean operator:
Operator Symbol {PL} 28: _______________________ _______________________
NOT /
AND &
{PL} 29: _______________________ _______________________
OR + {PL} 30: _______________________ _______________________
EXOR *
EQUAL = {PL} 31: _______________________ _______________________
IF )
GOTO G {PL} 32: _______________________ _______________________
MOVE :
COMPARE %
{PL} 33: _______________________ _______________________
INDIRECT {PL} 34: _______________________ _______________________
E.g.: 1025 1002&/1003
Boolean 1025 is true when {PL} 35: _______________________ _______________________
point 1002 is true AND point
1003 is NOT true. {PL} 36: _______________________ _______________________
Note: Points 1002 and 1003
in this example reflect the {PL} 37: _______________________ _______________________
status of Physical Digital I/O
Points 2 and 3.
{PL} 38: _______________________ _______________________
There are no limitations as to {PL} 39: _______________________ _______________________
what Boolean points can be
used in a statement. {PL} 40: _______________________ _______________________
Statements can contain the
results from other {PL} 41: _______________________ _______________________
statements.
E.g.: 1026 /1025+1105 {PL} 42: _______________________ _______________________
Boolean 1026 is true when
Boolean 1025 is NOT true
{PL} 43: _______________________ _______________________
OR Point 1105 is true. {PL} 44: _______________________ _______________________
Using the = operator, the
result of a statement can {PL} 45: _______________________ _______________________
initiate a command.
E.g.: 1027 1719=1026 {PL} 46: _______________________ _______________________
Request a Snapshot Report
when Boolean 1026 is true. {PL} 47: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 48: _______________________ _______________________
Note: See Volume 4 for
detailed list of Booleans and {PL} 49: _______________________ _______________________
Status Commands.
{PL} 50: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 51: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 52: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 53: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 54: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 55: _______________________ _______________________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Boolean Point 10xx Equation or Statement Comment or Remark


TIP - Use the blank lines {PL} 56: _______________________ _______________________
provided next to each
configuration option to write {PL} 57: _______________________ _______________________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {PL} 58: _______________________ _______________________
flow computer.
{PL} 59: _______________________ _______________________
Program Booleans - These {PL} 60: _______________________ _______________________
64 Boolean statements are
evaluated every 100 msec {PL} 61: _______________________ _______________________
starting at Point 1025
continuing through 1088. {PL} 62: _______________________ _______________________
Each statement can contain
up to 3 Boolean variables, {PL} 63: _______________________ _______________________
optionally preceded by the
slash (/) denoting the NOT {PL} 64: _______________________ _______________________
Function and separated by a
valid Boolean operator: {PL} 65: _______________________ _______________________
Operator Symbol
NOT / {PL} 66: _______________________ _______________________
AND &
{PL} 67: _______________________ _______________________
OR +
EXOR * {PL} 68: _______________________ _______________________
EQUAL =
IF ) {PL} 69: _______________________ _______________________
GOTO G
MOVE : {PL} 70: _______________________ _______________________
COMPARE %
INDIRECT
{PL} 71: _______________________ _______________________
E.g.: 1025 1002&/1003 {PL} 72: _______________________ _______________________
Boolean 1025 is true when
point 1002 is true AND point {PL} 73: _______________________ _______________________
1003 is NOT true.
Note: Points 1002 and 1003 {PL} 74: _______________________ _______________________
in this example reflect the
status of Physical Digital I/O {PL} 75: _______________________ _______________________
Points 2 and 3.
{PL} 76: _______________________ _______________________
There are no limitations as to
what Boolean points can be {PL} 77: _______________________ _______________________
used in a statement.
Statements can contain the {PL} 78: _______________________ _______________________
results from other
statements. {PL} 79: _______________________ _______________________
E.g.: 1026 /1025+1105
Boolean 1026 is true when
{PL} 80: _______________________ _______________________
Boolean 1025 is NOT true
OR Point 1105 is true.
{PL} 81: _______________________ _______________________
Using the = operator, the {PL} 82: _______________________ _______________________
result of a statement can
initiate a command. {PL} 83: _______________________ _______________________
E.g.: 1027 1719=1026
Request a Snapshot Report {PL} 84: _______________________ _______________________
when Boolean 1026 is true.
{PL} 85: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 86: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 87: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 88: _______________________ _______________________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.13. Programmable Variable Statements


Programmable Variables - Enter [Y] at Program Variables ? of the Misc Setup menu to open the
These 64 variable statements following entries:
are evaluated every 500
msec starting at the
statement that determines Prog Variable 70xx Equation or Statement Comment or Remark
the value of Points 7025
through 7088. Each {PL} 25: _______________________ _______________________
statement can contain up to 3
variables or constants. {PL} 26: _______________________ _______________________
Variables can be optionally
preceded by the $ symbol {PL} 27: _______________________ _______________________
denoting the ABSOLUTE
value of the variable is to be {PL} 28: _______________________ _______________________
used. Constants are
identified by placing a # {PL} 29: _______________________ _______________________
symbol ahead of the number.
These and other operators {PL} 30: _______________________ _______________________
are:
Operator Symbol {PL} 31: _______________________ _______________________
ABSOLUTE $ {PL} 32: _______________________ _______________________
CONSTANT #
POWER & {PL} 33: _______________________ _______________________
MULTIPLY *
{PL} 34: _______________________ _______________________
DIVIDE /
ADD + {PL} 35: _______________________ _______________________
SUBTRACT -
EQUAL = {PL} 36: _______________________ _______________________
IF )
{PL} 37: _______________________ _______________________
GOTO G
MOVE : {PL} 38: _______________________ _______________________
COMPARE %
INDIRECT
{PL} 39: _______________________ _______________________
The order of precedence is: {PL} 40: _______________________ _______________________
1) ABSOLUTE
2) POWER {PL} 41: _______________________ _______________________
3) MULTIPLY/DIVIDE
4) ADD/SUBTRACT {PL} 42: _______________________ _______________________
In cases where operators {PL} 43: _______________________ _______________________
have the same precedence,
statements are evaluated left {PL} 44: _______________________ _______________________
to right.
E.g.: The value of floating {PL} 45: _______________________ _______________________
point variable 7035 is defined
as: {PL} 46: _______________________ _______________________
7035:7027&#0.5*7026
The power operator is {PL} 47: _______________________ _______________________
evaluated first (the value of
Point 7035 is set equal to the
{PL} 48: _______________________ _______________________
square root of the number
contained in Point 7027) and
{PL} 49: _______________________ _______________________
the result is multiplied by the
{PL} 50: _______________________ _______________________
number stored in variable
7026. Note that statements {PL} 51: _______________________ _______________________
can contain the results of
other statements. (See {PL} 52: _______________________ _______________________
OmniCom Help for more
information by pressing [F1] {PL} 53: _______________________ _______________________
on your PC keyboard in the
Configure Variable {PL} 54: _______________________ _______________________
Statement menu.)
{PL} 55: _______________________ _______________________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Prog Variable 70xx Equation or Statement Comment or Remark


TIP - Use the blank lines {PL} 56: _______________________ _______________________
provided next to each
configuration option to write {PL} 57: _______________________ _______________________
down the corresponding
settings you enter in the flow {PL} 58: _______________________ _______________________
computer.
{PL} 59: _______________________ _______________________

Note: See Volume 4 for {PL} 60: _______________________ _______________________


detailed list of Booleans and
Status Commands {PL} 61: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 62: _______________________ _______________________
Valid Numeric Variables - {PL} 63: _______________________ _______________________
These are any long integer or
floating point number within {PL} 64: _______________________ _______________________
the database (Points 5000-
8999), including Boolean {PL} 65: _______________________ _______________________
variables. For the purpose
of evaluation, Boolean {PL} 66: _______________________ _______________________
variables have the value of
1.0 if they are True and 0.0 if {PL} 67: _______________________ _______________________
they are False.
{PL} 68: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 69: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 70: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 71: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 72: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 73: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 74: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 75: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 76: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 77: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 78: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 79: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 80: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 81: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 82: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 83: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 84: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 85: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 86: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 87: _______________________ _______________________
{PL} 88: _______________________ _______________________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.14. User Display Settings


Valid Index Number Enter 1 through 8 for the selected user display at User Display ? n of the
Assignments - Any 32-bit Misc Setup menu to open the following password Level 1 {L1} entries:
integer or floating point
variable within the database
can be assigned to be viewed
via a user display (see User Display #1 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]
Volume 4 for a complete Using the keys marked A through Z, enter the sequence of key presses needed to recall the
listing). selected user display (see the side bar for details). A maximum of 4 keys are allowed. User key
press sequences take priority over any existing resident key press sequences.
Valid Key Press
Sequences - You may select
1st Variable Tag _______________
a sequence of up to 4 key Enter an 8-character tag name used to identify the display variable on the LCD display.
presses to recall each
display. This does not count 1st Variable Index Number _______________
the [Display/Enter] key Enter the database index number of the variable that you want to appear on the LCD display. Each
press which must be used to variable within the flow computer database is assigned an index number or address. Any Boolean
signal the end of the integer or floating point variable within the database can be displayed.
sequence. Each key is
identified by the red A 1st Variable Decimal Point Position _______________
through Z character on each
Enter the number of digits to the right of the decimal point for the variable. Valid entries are 0
valid key.
through 7. The computer will display each variable using the display resolution that you have
Valid keys are listed below selected, except in cases where the number is too large or too small. In either case, the flow
[A] - also labeled [Gross] computer will adjust the decimal position or default to scientific display mode.
[B] - also labeled [Net]
[C] - also labeled [Mass] Tag Index # Decimal Points
[D] - also labeled [Energy] nd
[E] - also labeled [S.G./API]
2 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[F] - also labeled [Control] rd
[G] - also labeled [Temp]
3 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[H] - also labeled [Press]
4th Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[I] - also labeled [Density]
[J] - also labeled [D.P.]
[K] - also labeled [Orifice]
[L] - also labeled [Meter] User Display #2 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]
[M] - also labeled [Time]
[N] - also labeled [Counts] Tag Index # Decimal Points
[O] - also labeled [Factor] st
1 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[P] - also labeled [Preset]
nd
[Q] - also labeled [Batch] 2 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[R] - also labeled [Analysis]
rd
[S] - also labeled [Print] 3 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[T] - also labeled [Prove]
th
[U] - also labeled [Status] 4 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[V] - also labeled [Alarms]
[W] - also labeled [Product]
[X] - also labeled [Setup]
[Y] - also labeled [Input]
User Display #3 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]
[Z] - also labeled [Output] Tag Index # Decimal Points
The [ ]/[ ]/[ ]/[ ] (Up/ st
Down/Left/Right arrow) keys 1 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
and the [Prog], [Alpha nd
Shift] and [Clear] keys 2 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
cannot be used in a key rd
press sequence. 3 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
Note: The A through Z th
4 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
keys are used simply to
identify key presses. The
[Alpha Shift] key does not
need to be used when
recalling user displays.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

User Display #4 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]


Valid Index Number Tag Index # Decimal Points
Assignments - Any 32-bit st
integer or floating point
1 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
variable within the database nd
can be assigned to be viewed
2 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
via a user display (see rd
3 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
Volume 4 for a complete
listing). 4th Variable ____________ ________ ____________
Valid Key Press
Sequences - You may select User Display #5 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]
a sequence of up to 4 key
presses to recall each Tag Index # Decimal Points
display. This does not count st
the [Display/Enter] key 1 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
press which must be used to nd
signal the end of the 2 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
sequence. Each key is
identified by the red A 3rd Variable ____________ ________ ____________
through Z character on each th
valid key. 4 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
Valid keys are listed below
[A] - also labeled [Gross]
[B] - also labeled [Net]
User Display #6 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]
[C] - also labeled [Mass]
Tag Index # Decimal Points
[D] - also labeled [Energy]
[E] - also labeled [S.G./API] 1st Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[F] - also labeled [Control]
[G] - also labeled [Temp] 2nd Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[H] - also labeled [Press]
rd
[I] - also labeled [Density] 3 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[J] - also labeled [D.P.]
[K] - also labeled [Orifice] 4th Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[L] - also labeled [Meter]
[M] - also labeled [Time]
[N] - also labeled [Counts] User Display #7 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]
[O] - also labeled [Factor]
[P] - also labeled [Preset] Tag Index # Decimal Points
[Q] - also labeled [Batch] st
[R] - also labeled [Analysis] 1 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[S] - also labeled [Print] nd
[T] - also labeled [Prove] 2 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[U] - also labeled [Status] rd
[V] - also labeled [Alarms] 3 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[W] - also labeled [Product] th
[X] - also labeled [Setup]
4 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
[Y] - also labeled [Input]
[Z] - also labeled [Output]
The [ ]/[ ]/[ ]/[ ] (Up/ User Display #8 Key Press Sequence [ ][ ][ ][ ]
Down/Left/Right arrow) keys
and the [Prog], [Alpha Tag Index # Decimal Points
Shift] and [Clear] keys st
1 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
cannot be used in a key
nd
press sequence. 2 Variable ____________ ________ ____________
3rd Variable ____________ ________ ____________
th
4 Variable ____________ ________ ____________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.15. Digital I/O Point Settings


TIP - Use the blank lines Enter 1 through 24 for the selected digital I/O Point at Config Digital n of
provided next to each the Misc Setup menu to open the following password Level 1 {L1} entries:
configuration option to write
down the corresponding Assign Pulse Width Pulse/Unit or Delay On Delay Off
settings you entered in the
flow computer.
Some of these entries may Digital I/O #1 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
not appear on the display or
in OmniCom. Depending on Remark _______________
the various configuration
settings of your specific
metering system, only those Digital I/O #2 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
configuration options which
are applicable will be
Remark _______________
displayed.
Digital I/O #3 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Config Digital n - Assign Remark _______________
each physical I/O point to a
Modbus address of a
Boolean variable. There are Digital I/O #4 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
no limitations as to what
Boolean points can be Remark _______________
assigned to physical I/O
points. Enter [0] (zero) for
Modbus control. Digital I/O #5 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Remark _______________
Assigning as Pulse
Outputs - Meter and Station
Accumulators may be output Digital I/O #6 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
in the form of pulses.
Remark _______________
Pulse Width - Pulse width is
measured using 10msec
ticks; i.e., 100 = 1 second. Digital I/O #7 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Remark _______________
Pulse per Unit - Pulse per
unit entry can be used to
provide unit conversion (e.g.: Digital I/O #8 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
entering 4.2 pulses per barrel
will give 1 pulse every 10 Remark _______________
gallons as there are 42
gallons in a barrel). The units
of volume, mass and energy Digital I/O #9 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
flow are the same as is
displayed on the LCD. Remark _______________

Assigning as Control Digital I/O #10 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Output - Any internal alarm
or Boolean can be output. Remark _______________

Digital I/O #11 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

Digital I/O #12 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Assign Pulse Width Pulse/Unit or Delay On Delay Off


Delay On/Off - Used to delay
or stretch a control output. Digital I/O #13 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
The delay is measured using
100msec ticks; i.e., 10 = 1 Remark _______________
second.

Digital I/O #14 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Assigning as Status or
Command Inputs - Remark _______________
Switches, etc., can be used
to trigger events within the
flow computer, such as end a Digital I/O #15 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
batch or start a prove
sequence (see the facing Remark _______________
page for more details).

1700 Dummy Boolean -


Digital I/O #16 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Assign all physical I/O points
which will be used only in
Remark _______________
Boolean statements for
sequencing or control to Digital I/O #17 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
1700. This sets up the points
as an input only. Remark _______________
Note: See Volume 4 for
valid assignments. Digital I/O #18 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Remark _______________

Digital I/O #19 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

Digital I/O #20 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

Digital I/O #21 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

Digital I/O #22 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

Digital I/O #23 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

Digital I/O #24 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Remark _______________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.16. Serial Input / Output Settings


Baud Rates Available - Enter [1], [2], [3] or [4] at Serial I/O n of the Misc Setup menu to open the
300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, following entries:
9600, 19200, 38400.
Port #1 Port #2 Port #3 Port #4
Data Bits - 7 or 8 - 7 for
ASCII Modbus, 8 for RTU {L1} Baud Rate _______ _______ _______ _______
Modbus.
{L1} Number of Stop Bits _______ _______ _______ _______
Stop Bits - 0, 1 or 2.
{L1} Number of Data Bits _______ _______ _______ _______
Parity Bit - Odd, Even,
None. {L1} Parity Bit (Even/Odd/None) _______ _______ _______ _______
Transmitter Carrier Key {L1} Transmit Carrier Key Delay _______ _______ _______ _______
Delay - Delays are
approximate only. 0=msec, Enter one of the following options:
1=50msec, 2=100msec, 0 = 0 msec delay 2 = 100 msec delay
3=150msec. 1 = 50 msec delay 3 = 150 msec delay
You must enter [0] for Transmitter Carrier Key Delay for any port that will be used with a shared
Modbus Type - Select the printer.
protocol type which matches
the Modbus master device. If {L1} Serial Port Type _______
the master can support either This entry corresponds to Serial Port #1 only. Enter one of the following options:
ASCII or RTU, choose RTU
0 = Printer
protocol as it is approximately
twice as efficient as the 1 = Modbus RTU
ASCII protocol. Serial Ports
#3 and #4 have additional {L1} Modbus Protocol Type _______ _______ _______
protocol options. This entry does not apply to Serial Port #1. Enter the type of protocol to be used on this port:
0 = Modbus RTU
Modicon Compatible - 1 = Modbus ASCII
OmniCom will not operate if 2 = Modbus RTU (modem).
downloading configuration
with this entry set to Y. Serial Port #4 has the following additional options:
3 = Allen Bradley Full Duplex
4 = Allen Bradley Half Duplex
Mixed protocols are not allowed on a communication link. All devices must use the same protocol
type. The RTU protocol is preferred as it is twice the speed of the ASCII. Selecting 'Modbus RTU
Modem' provides RTU protocol with relaxed timing which is usually needed when communicating
via smart modems. These modems have been found to insert inter-character delays which cause
a premature end of message to be detected by the flow computer.
IMPORTANT: You must select either 'Modbus RTU' or 'Modbus RTU Modem' protocol for the
port that will be used to communicate with OmniCom PC configuration software.

{L1} Modbus ID _______ _______ _______


This entry does not apply to Serial Port #1 when a printer is selected as the port type. Enter the
Modbus slave ID number that this serial port will respond to (1 through 247 acceptable). This entry
will be disabled for Serial Port #1 if a printer is selected as the port type.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Port #1 Port #2 Port #3 Port #4


INFO - Characters in { } {L1} Modicon Compatible (Y/N) _______ _______ _______ _______
refer to password levels.
Enter [Y] to configure these Modbus ports to be compatible with Modicon PLC equipment (e.g.:
Characters in [ ] refer to key
984 series) and DCS systems (e.g.: Honeywell TDC3000 systems using the Advanced Process
presses.
Manager APM-SI). This entry will be disabled for Serial Port #1 if a printer is selected as the port
type.
TIP - Use the blank lines In this mode the point number indexes requested and transmitted while using the Modbus RTU
provided next to each modes are actually one less than the index number documented in this manual. ASCII mode
configuration option to write transmissions use the address documented in this manual. Data is counted in numbers of 16 bit
down the corresponding registers rather than points. i.e., To request two 4 byte IEEE floating point variables, index
settings you entered in the numbers 7101 and 7102, would require the host to ask for 4 registers starting at index 7100. IEEE
flow computer. Floating Point data bytes are transmitted in swapped format:
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or NORMAL IEEE FLOAT FORMAT ORDER TRANSMITTED
in OmniCom. Depending on
Byte #1 Byte #2 Byte #3 Byte #4 Byte #1 Byte #2 Byte #3 Byte #4
the various configuration
settings of your specific Biased MS LS LS Biased MS
Mantissa Mantissa
metering system, only those Exponent Mantissa Mantissa Mantissa Exponent Mantissa
configuration options which
are applicable will be
displayed. {L1} CRC Enabled _______ _______ _______ _______
Many protocols use either a CRC, LRC or BCC error check to ensure that data received is not
corrupted. The flow computer can be configured to ignore the error checking on incoming
Skip CRC/LCR Check - If messages. This allows software developers an easy means of debugging communications
you have disabled the error software. Error checking should only be disabled temporarily when debugging the master
checking on incoming slave communication link. The computer expects dummy characters in place of the CRC, LRC
messages, you must or BCC.
substitute dummy bytes in Enter [Y] to perform error checking on incoming messages. For maximum data integrity always
the message string. enter [Y] during normal running conditions. Enter [N] to disable error checking on incoming
Outgoing messages will messages. This entry will be disabled for Serial Port #1 if a printer is selected as the port type.
always include the error
checking bytes.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.17. Custom Modbus Data Packet Settings


INFO - Packets defined are Custom Modbus Data Packets are provided to reduce the number of polls
usually read-only and must needed to read multiple variables which may be in different areas of the
always be retrieved as a
packet. When Modicon 984
database. Groups of data points of any type of data can be concatenated into
is selected these packet one packet by entering each data group starting index numbers 001, 201 and
setup entries are used to 401. The number of data bytes in a custom packet in non-Modicon compatible
define a logical array of mode cannot exceed 250 (RTU mode) or 500 (ASCII mode). When Modicon
variables which can be read compatible is selected, the number of data bytes in a custom packet cannot
or written in any grouping.
exceed 400 (RTU mode) or 800 (ASCII mode).
The number of data points is
always input in terms of Enter [1], [2] or [3] to select a data packet at Custom Packet n of the Misc
Omni logical elements; i.e.,
an IEEE floating point Setup menu to open the entries below. Under Index #, enter the database
number comprises two 16-bit address or Modbus index number for each start data point of each group. Under
words but is considered one Points, enter the number of consecutive data points to include in each data
logical element. group.

INFO - Characters in { } Custom Modbus Data Packet #1 (Addressed at 001)


refer to password levels.
Characters in [ ] refer to key {L1} Index # | Points Index # | Points Index # | Points Index # | Points
presses.
#1_______|_____ #2_______|_____ #3_______|_____ #4_______|_____
TIP - Use the blank lines
#5_______|_____ #6_______|_____ #7_______|_____ #8_______|_____
provided next to each
configuration option to write #9_______|_____ #10_______|_____ #11_______|_____ #12_______|_____
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the #13_______|_____ #14_______|_____ #15_______|_____ #16_______|_____
flow computer.
Some of these entries may #17_______|_____ #18_______|_____ #19_______|_____ #20_______|_____
not appear on the display or
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration Custom Modbus Data Packet #2 (Addressed at 201)
settings of your specific
metering system, only those {L1} Index # | Points Index # | Points Index # | Points Index # | Points
configuration options which
are applicable will be #1_______|_____ #2_______|_____ #3_______|_____ #4_______|_____
displayed.
#5_______|_____ #6_______|_____ #7_______|_____ #8_______|_____

Custom Modbus Data Packet #3 (Addressed at 401)


{L1} Index # | Points Index # | Points Index # | Points Index # | Points
#1_______|_____ #2_______|_____ #3_______|_____ #4_______|_____
#5_______|_____ #6_______|_____ #7_______|_____ #8_______|_____
#9_______|_____ #10_______|_____ #11_______|_____ #12_______|_____
#13_______|_____ #14_______|_____ #15_______|_____ #16_______|_____
#17_______|_____ #18_______|_____ #19_______|_____ #20_______|_____

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.5.18. Programmable Logic Controller Setup


INFO - Characters in { } Note: See Technical Bulletin TB-960702 Communicating with Allen-
refer to password levels. Bradley Programmable Logic Controllers in Volume 5 for
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses.
information on the PLC Group n submenu.

TIP - Use the blank lines


provided next to each
configuration option to write 2.5.19. Archive File Setup
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the Note: See Technical Bulletin TB-960703 Storing Archive Data within the
flow computer.
Flow Computer in Volume 5 for information on the Archive File n
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or
submenu.
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration
settings of your specific
metering system, only those
configuration options which
are applicable will be
displayed.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.5.20. Peer-to-Peer Communications Settings


INFO - Characters in { } Serial Port #2 of the flow computer can be configured to act as a simple
refer to password levels. Modbus slave port or as a peer-to-peer communication link. Using the peer-to-
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses.
peer link allows multiple flow computers to be interconnected and share data.
Enter [Y] at Peer / Peer Comm (Y) ? of the Misc Setup menu to open the
TIP - Use the blank lines following submenu:
provided next to each
configuration option to write {L1} Activate Redundancy Mode _______________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the The active redundancy mode feature allows two flow computers to operate as a pair. Each flow
flow computer. computer receives the same process signals and performs the same calculations; i.e., in
Some of these entries may redundancy. This mode is typically used in critical applications where failure of a flow computer
not appear on the display or cannot be tolerated.
in OmniCom. Depending on Enter [Y] to allow both flow computers to manage the peer-to-peer link between them and
the various configuration automatically switch between being the master or slave computer. Important data such as meter
settings of your specific factors and PID control settings can be continually exchanged between flow computers ensuring
metering system, only those that at any time, should a failure occur to one, the other unit would be able to assume control of the
configuration options which PID and ticketing functions.
are applicable will be The redundancy mode requires that four digital I/O ports be cross-connected to sense watchdog
displayed. failure modes using the following points 2714=Input master status, 2864=Output Master status,
2713 Input watchdog status, 2863 = Output of watchdog status. (See Technical Bulletin TB-
980402 in Volume 5.)
TIP - For maximum
efficiency, always start {L1} Next Master in Sequence _______________
Modbus ID numbers from 1.
Enter the slave number of the next flow computer in sequence in the peer-to-peer communication
sequence to pass over control. After the flow computer completes all of it's transactions it will
attempt to pass over master control of the Modbus link to this Modbus ID. For maximum
efficiency, always start Modbus ID definitions from 1.
Enter the Modbus ID of this flow computer if there are no other peers in sequence on the
communication link.
Enter [0] to disable the peer-to-peer feature and use Serial Port #2 as a standard Modbus
slave port.

{L1} Last Master in Sequence ID # _______________


Enter the slave number of the last Omni (the highest Modbus ID number) in the peer-to-peer
communication sequence. This is required for error recovery. Should this flow computer be unable
to hand over control to the 'next master in sequence' (see previous entry), it will attempt to
establish communications with a Modbus slave with a higher Modbus ID. It will keep trying until
the ID number exceeds this entry. At that point the flow computer will start at Modbus ID #1.
Enter the Modbus ID of this flow computer if it is the only master on the link.

{L1} Retry Timer _______________


Should any slave device fail to respond to a communication request, the master device will retry to
establish communications several times. Enter the number of 50 millisecond ticks that the flow
computer should wait for a response from the slave device. To ensure fast recovery from
communication failures, set this entry to as low a number as possible. Enter [3] for peer-to-peer
links involving only Omni flow computers. Other Modbus devices may require more time to
respond.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Transaction #1
{L1} Target Slave ID # _______________
Each transfer of data is called a transaction. Enter the Modbus ID # of the other slave involved in
INFO - Characters in { }
the transaction. Modbus ID 0 can be used to broadcast write to all Modbus slave devices
refer to password levels.
connected to the peer-to-peer link. Other valid IDs range from 1-247.
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses. {L1} Read/Write ? _______________
Enter [R] if data will be read from the slave. Enter [W] if data will be written to the slave.
INFO - The Omni Flow {L1} Source Index # _______________
Computer determines what
Modbus function code and Enter the database index number or address of the Modbus point where the data is to be obtained,
what data type is involved by corresponding to the first data point of the transaction. This is the slaves database index number
the Modbus index number of when the transaction is a read, and the masters database index number when the transaction is
the data within the Omnis a write. Refer to Volume 4 for a list of available database addresses or index numbers.
database. The Source Index {L1} Number of Points _______________
determines the data type for
a write. The Destination Enter the number of contiguous points to transfer. Each transaction can transfer multiple data
Index determines the data points that can be any valid data type recognized by the Omni. The maximum number of points
type for a read. that can be transferred depends on the type of data:
Function codes used are: q IEEE floats (4bytes each) 63 max
01=Read Multiple Booleans q 32-bit Integers (4 bytes each) 63 max
15=Write Multiple Booleans q 16-bit integers (2 bytes each) 127 max
03=Read Multiple Variables q Packed coils or status (8 to a byte) 2040 max.
16=Write Multiple Variables
The Omni automatically knows what Modbus function to use and what data types are involved by
the Modbus index number of the data within the flow computer database. The destination index
number determines the data type when the transaction is a read. The source index number
determines the data type when the transaction is a write.

{L1} Destination Index # _______________


Enter the database index number or address of where the data is to be stored (destination index or
address). If the transaction is a read, this will be the index number within the master Omnis
database. If the transaction is a write, this will be the register number within the remote slaves
database.

Transaction #2
Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

Transaction #3
Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Transaction #4
TIP - Use the blank lines Target Slave ID # _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write Read/Write ? _______________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the Source Index # _______________
flow computer.
Some of these entries may Number of Points _______________
not appear on the display or
Destination Index # _______________
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration
settings of your specific
metering system, only those
Transaction #5
configuration options which
are applicable will be Target Slave ID # _______________
displayed.
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

Transaction #6
Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

Transaction #7
Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

Transaction #8
Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Transaction #9
INFO - Characters in { } Target Slave ID # _______________
refer to password levels.
Characters in [ ] refer to key Read/Write ? _______________
presses.
Source Index # _______________
TIP - Use the blank lines Number of Points _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write Destination Index # _______________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the
flow computer. Transaction #10
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or Target Slave ID # _______________
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration Read/Write ? _______________
settings of your specific
metering system, only those Source Index # _______________
configuration options which
are applicable will be Number of Points _______________
displayed.
Destination Index # _______________

INFO - The Omni Flow Transaction #11


Computer determines what
Modbus function code and
what data type is involved by Target Slave ID # _______________
the Modbus index number of
the data within the Omnis
Read/Write ? _______________
database. The Source Index Source Index # _______________
determines the data type for
a write. The Destination Number of Points _______________
Index determines the data
type for a read. Destination Index # _______________
Function codes used are:
01=Read Multiple Booleans
15=Write Multiple Booleans Transaction #12
03=Read Multiple Variables
16=Write Multiple Variables Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

Transaction #13
Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Transaction #14
TIP - Use the blank lines Target Slave ID # _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write Read/Write ? _______________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the Source Index # _______________
flow computer.
Some of these entries may Number of Points _______________
not appear on the display or
Destination Index # _______________
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration
settings of your specific
metering system, only those
Transaction #15
configuration options which
are applicable will be Target Slave ID # _______________
displayed.
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

Transaction #16
Target Slave ID # _______________
Read/Write ? _______________
Source Index # _______________
Number of Points _______________
Destination Index # _______________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.6. Setting Up the Time and Date


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.6.1. Accessing the Time/Date Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
Misc Configuration
Time/Date Setup _
Flow Computer
Station Setup
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Time/Date Setup
when programming an and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.6.2. Time and Date Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application {L1} Omni Time ____:____:____
you can decide to use the
Enter Current Time using the correct method 'hh:mm:ss'. To change only the hour, minutes or
faster Random Access
seconds, move cursor to the respective position and enter the new setting.
Method described below.
Once you have finished {L1} Omni Date ____/____/____
entering data in a setup
submenu, press the [Prog] Enter Current Date using the correct method 'mm/dd/yy' or dd/mm/yy. To change only the month,
key to return to the Select day or year, move cursor to the respective position and enter the new setting.
Group Entry screen.
Proceed as described in this {L1} Select Date Format Type _____________
manual for each setup Select date format required by entering [Y] or [N]:
option.
Y = month/day/year
N = day/month/year
Time and Date Setup via
the Random Access
Method - Setup entries
require that you be in the
Program Mode. In the
Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen
will appear. Then press
[Time] [Enter] and use [ ] /
[ ] keys to scroll.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.7. Configuring the Meter Station


Meter Station Setup via
the Random Access
Method - Setup entries 2.7.1. Accessing the Station Setup Submenu
require that you be in the
Program Mode. In the Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
Display Mode press the screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
[Prog] key. The Program following will be displayed:
LED will glow green and
Select Group Entry screen
will appear. Then press *** SETUP MENU ***
[Meter] [Enter] and use [ ]
Misc Configuration
/ [ ] keys to scroll.
Time/Date Setup
Meter Station Run
Station Setup _
Switching Flow Rate
Thresholds - The Omni
flow computer has 3 Boolean Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Station Setup
flags which are set or reset and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
depending on the station flow
rate:
q Run Switching Flag #1 at
Modbus database point
2.7.2. Meter Station Settings
1824.
q Run Switching Flag #2 at {L1} Station ID _______________
Modbus database point Enter 8 alphanumeric characters maximum. This string variable usually appears in user custom
1825. reports (Modbus database point 4815).
q Run Switching Flag #3 at
Modbus database point Flow Low Alarm Limit _______________
1826.
Enter the flow rate below which the Station Low Flow Alarm activates (Modbus database point
Each of these flags has a low 1810). Flow rates 5% below this value activate the Low Low Alarm (Modbus database point 1809).
threshold and high threshold
flow rate. Each flag is set
when the station flow rate
Flow High Alarm Limit _______________
exceeds the corresponding Enter the flow rate above which the Station High Flow Alarm activates (Modbus database point
high threshold value. These 1811). Flow rates 5% above this value activate the High High Alarm (Modbus database point
flags reset when the station 1812).
flow rate falls below the
respective low threshold limit. {L1} Gross Flow Rate at Full Scale _______________
See Chapter 3 for more Enter the gross flow rate at full scale for the meter station. Sixteen-bit integer variables
information on how to include representing station gross and net flow rate are included in the database at 3802 and 3804. These
these flags in Boolean variables are scaled using this entry and stored as percentage of full scale with a resolution of
statements to automatically 0.1% (i.e., 0 to 999 = 0% to 99.9%)
switch meter runs depending
on flow rates.
{L1} Mass Flow Rate at Full Scale _______________
Enter the mass flow rate at full scale for the meter station. A 16-bit integer variable representing
station mass flow rate is included in the database at 3806. This variable is scaled using this entry
and stored as percentage of full scale with a resolution of 0.1% (i.e., 0 to 1000 = 0% to 100.0%)

Flag #1 Flag #2 Flag #3


{L1} Run Switching Threshold Low _________ _________ _________
Enter the flow rate Low Threshold value which resets each Station Run Switching Flag when the
station gross flow rate falls below this limit (see sidebar).

{L1} Run Switching Threshold High _________ _________ _________


Enter the flow rate High Threshold value which sets each Station Run Switching Flag when the
station gross flow rate exceeds this limit (see sidebar).

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

{L1} Use Common Batch Stack? _______________


Enter [Y] to set up the flow computer to use a common product on all four meter runs; i.e., to run
INFO - Characters in { }
the same product at the same time on all 4 meter runs. Enter [N] to run different products at the
refer to password levels.
same time on each meter run. (See Volume 2b on Batching Operations.)
Characters in [ ] refer to key
presses.
{L1} Batch Preset Warning _______________
TIP - Use the blank lines Enter the quantity of barrels for the Batch Preset Warning. This entry displays only when Common
provided next to each Batch Stack is selected. The Batch preset counters are activated when a non-zero number is
configuration option to write entered for batch size on the batch sequence stack (see Volume 2b on Batching Operations).
down the corresponding The batch preset reached flag (database point 1819) will be activated whenever the batch preset
settings you entered in the counter counts down to zero. The batch warning flag (database point 1818) will be activated when
flow computer. the batch preset counter is equal or less than this entry.
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or {L1} Relative Density (Gravity) / Density Rate of Change_______________
in OmniCom. Depending on This entry displays only when a Station Density I/O Point has been assigned. It is used to detect
the various configuration product changes in the pipeline (product interface).
settings of your specific Enter the Gravity or Density Rate of Change in relative density units per barrel (US units) or in
metering system, only those 3
Kgs/m per cubic meter (metric units) for this limit. The Relative Density/Density Rate of Change
configuration options which Flag (database point 1813) is activated if the flowing gravity/density measured by the station
are applicable will be densitometer exceeds this preset rate of change.
displayed.
{L1} Line Pack Delay _______________
INFO - See the previous This entry displays only when a Station Density I/O Point has been assigned. In many cases, the
chapter for a description of station densitometer that detects the product interfaces is installed many net barrels in advance of
batching features of the the metering skid to provide prior warning of a product change.
3
Omni flow computer. Enter the Line Pack Delay as the quantity of net barrels or net m between the product interface
detector densitometer or gravitometer and the valve manifold used to end the batch. A Delayed
3
Gravity Rate of Change Flag (database point 1814) is set when this number of barrels or m has
been measured after the Product Interface Flag (database point 1813) is activated; i.e., a line pack
delay is counted down to zero when a product interface is detected.

{L1} Relative Density (Specific Gravity) Sample Time _______________


This entry displays only when a Station Density I/O Point has been assigned. It is used with the
previous entry to determine the relative density rate of change.
Estimate the minimum amount of time in seconds it takes for a product change to be complete and
set this timer by entering approximately 1/4 to 1/3 of that time. False triggering of the product
interface detection flag can be eliminated by ensuring that any density change must exist for at
least this many seconds.

{L1} Gross Batch Preset Counter Units? _______________


Enter [Y] to select gross (actual) volume units (IV). Enter [N] to select net volume units (GSV).

{PL} Select Volume Units _______________


This entry corresponds to metric units only and applies globally to all volumes within the flow
computer. Enter the volume units:
3
0 = Cubic meters (m )
1 = Liters (lts)
Prove Report Batch Report
{PL} Number of Decimal Places for Factors __________ __________
Enter the number of decimal places to use for correction factors appearing on prove and batch
reports (4, 5 or 6 decimal places). These settings correspond to the following factors: CTLM,
CTLP, CPLM, CPLP, CTSP, CPSP, CCF.
The density pycnometer factor remains fixed at four decimal places. For strict adherence to API
MPMS 12.2 (default) select 4 decimal places. This is the recommend selection. Selecting 5
decimal places causes the flow computer to perform the normal API internal rounding and
truncating rules with the exception of the last round which is to 5 places. Selecting 6 decimal
places causes the flow computer to perform no internal rounding and truncating and rounds the
final result to 6 decimal places.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Auxiliary Inputs
Auxiliary Input Setup via Input #1 Input #2 Input #3 Input#4
the Random Access
Method - Setup entries Low Alarm Limits _______ _______ _______ _______
require that you be in the
Program Mode. In the Enter the auxiliary input signal value below which the Low Alarm activates. The low low alarm
Display Mode press the activates when the auxiliary Input signal falls 5% below this value.
[Prog] key. The Program
LED will glow green and High Alarm Limits _______ _______ _______ _______
Select Group Entry screen Enter the auxiliary input signal value above which the High Alarm activates. The high high alarm
will appear. Then press will activate when the auxiliary Input signal rises 5% above this value.
[Analysis] [Input] [Enter] or
[Analysis] [Input] [n] {L2} Override Values _______ _______ _______ _______
[Enter] (n = Auxiliary Input #
1, 2, 3 or 4). Use [ ] / [ ] Enter the value (in engineering units) which will be substituted for the transducer value, depending
keys to scroll. on the override code selected. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override
value is substituted.

Note: {L2} Override Codes _______ _______ _______ _______


* Not Valid when a RTD Enter the Override Code which represents the strategy used regarding each auxiliary input
Probe is specified. override value:
0 = Never use override value
1 = Always use override value
2 = On transmitter failure, use override value
3 = On transmitter failure, use last hour's average

{L1} at 4mA* _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the value in engineering units that produces a transducer output of 4mA or 1volt, or the
lower range limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} at 20mA* _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the value in engineering units that produces a transducer output of 20mA or 5 Volts, or
upper range limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Damping Code _______ _______ _______ _______


This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., temperature/pressure) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to
the flow computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Pressure Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 2 seconds
1 = 0.16 seconds 6 = 4 seconds
2 = 0.32 seconds 7 = 8 seconds
3 = 0.48 seconds 8 = 16 seconds
4 = 1 seconds 9 = 32 seconds
For Temperature Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 6.3 seconds
1 = 0.3 seconds 6 = 12.7 seconds
2 = 0.7 seconds 7 = 25.5 seconds
3 = 1.5 seconds 8 = 51.5 seconds
4 = 3.1 seconds 9 = 102.5 seconds

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.8. Configuring Meter Runs


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.8.1. Accessing the Meter Run Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
Time/Date Setup
Station Setup
Flow Computer
Meter Run Setup _
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Meter Run Setup
when programming an and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.8.2. Meter Run Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
you can decide to use the
faster Random Access {L1} Meter ID ________ ________ ________ ________
Method described below.
Enter the ID of the flowmeter (up to 8 alphanumeric characters) for each meter run. This ID
Once you have finished usually appears on reports.
entering data in a setup
submenu, press the [Prog]
key to return to the Select
Flow Low Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________
Group Entry screen. Enter the flow rate for each meter run below which the Flow Low Alarm (database point 1n21)
Proceed as described in this activates. The Low Low Alarm (database point 1n20) activates when the flow rate falls 5% below
manual for each setup this limit.
option.
Flow High Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________
Meter Run Setup via the Enter the flow rate for each meter run above which the Flow High Alarm (database point 1n22)
Random Access Method - activates. The High High Alarm (database point 1n23) activates when the flow rate rises 5% above
Setup entries require that you this limit.
be in the Program Mode. In
the Display Mode press the {L1} Gross Flow Rate at Full Scale________ ________ ________ ________
[Prog] key. The Program
Enter the gross flow rate at full-scale for each meter run. Sixteen-bit integer variables representing
LED will glow green and the
meter run gross and net flow rate are included in the database at 3n42 and 3n40 respectively.
Select Group Entry screen
These variables are scaled using this entry and stored as percentage of full scale with a resolution
will appear. Then press
of 0.1% (i.e., 0 to 1000 = 0% to 100.0%)
[Meter] [n] [Enter] (n =
Meter Run # 1, 2, 3 or 4).
Use [ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.
{L1} Mass Flow Rate at Full Scale ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the mass flow rate at full-scale for each meter run. A 16-bit integer variable representing
meter run mass flow rate is included in the database at 3n44. This variable is scaled using this
Alternate Access to Meter
entry and stored as percentage of full scale with a resolution of 0.1% (i.e., 0 to 1000 = 0% to
Run Settings from Meter
100.0%)
Station Setup - After
entering the Meter Station
Settings, without exiting, {L1} Active Frequency Threshold ________ ________ ________ ________
press the [ ] key and you Enter the Active Frequency Threshold for each meter run. Flow meter pulse frequencies equal or
will scroll down through each greater than this threshold will cause the Meter Active Flag (1n05) to be set.
Meter Run setup entry. By using any Boolean statement you can use this flag bit to enable and disable totalizing by
controlling the Disable Meter Run Totalizer Flags (Modbus database points 1736, 1737, 1738 &
1739).
Example: 1030 1736=/1105 Turn off Meter #1 flow if not greater than Active Frequency.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


INFO - Characters in { } {L1} Error Check Threshold ________ ________ ________ ________
refer to password levels.
Characters in [ ] refer to key This entry will display only when Dual Pulse is selected under Config Meter Runs (Misc Setup).
presses. It applies only when a 'E' combo module is fitted and 'Pulse Fidelity Checking' is enabled.
Enter the Pulse Fidelity Error Check Threshold (in Hz) for each meter run. To eliminate bogus
TIP - Use the blank lines alarms and error count accumulations, the dual pulse error checking functions are disabled until
provided next to each the sum of both pulse trains exceeds the pulses per seconds entered for this setting.
configuration option to write Example: Entering 50 for this threshold means that the dual pulse error checking will be disabled
down the corresponding until both A and B channels of the flowmeter pick-offs are providing 25 pulses per second each.
settings you entered in the
flow computer. {L1} Max Error Counts per Batch ________ ________ ________ ________
Some of these entries may This entry will display only when Dual Pulse is selected under Config Meter Runs (Misc Setup).
not appear on the display or It applies only when a 'E' combo module is fitted and 'Pulse Fidelity Checking' is enabled.
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration Enter the maximum number of error pulses allowed in one transaction for each meter run. The
settings of your specific alarm points are:
metering system, only those q 1n48 A/B Comparitor Error Detected
configuration options which q 1n49 A Channel Failed
are applicable will be q 1n50 B Channel Failed
displayed. q 1n51 A and B Channels not equal
The dual pulse A/B Comparitor Error Alarm (1n48) is activated when the accumulated error
counts between the flowmeter channels exceeds this count threshold. Accumulated error counts
are cleared for every batch.

{L1A} Meter K-Factor ________ ________ ________ ________


Enter the number of pulses per unit volume that the flowmeter produces; i.e., pulses/barrel (US
3
units), or pulses/m or pulses/liter (metric units). The K factor is used to calculate the gross flow
rate.

{L1} Prove Base Flow Rate ________ ________ ________ ________


Enter the base prove flow rate. This should be the normal flow rate of the flowmeter. For
comparison and historical averaging purposes, the flow computer will normalize all meter factors to
this flow rate using the base meter factor curve entered in the Product Setup submenu (see
Configuring Products this chapter).

{L1} Upstream Prover Volume? ________ ________ ________ ________


This entry displays only when the prover type selected is a Uni-Compact (see Configuring
Provers in this chapter). Enter [Y] to select upstream volume as the prove volume. Enter [N] to
select downstream volume as the prove volume.
Certain models of compact provers (such as the Brooks compact prover) have different water
draw volumes depending on whether the flowmeter is upstream or downstream of the prover. This
entry has no meaning when you are using a normal full-sized prover with one water draw volume.

{L1} Use Meter Factor in Net? (Y) ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter [Y] to apply the meter factor in the net and mass flow equations. Enter [N] to ignore the
meter factor in flow calculations; nonetheless, it will still appear on all reports.

{L1} Temperature Compensated? ________ ________ ________ ________


In some cases, the flowmeter may be fitted with a mechanical or electronic temperature
compensator. Enter [Y] for the Omni Flow Computer to set the temperature correction (VCF) to
1.0000 in all equations. Enter [N] if the meter provides gross uncompensated pulses.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


INFO - Characters in { } {L1} BS&W as Aux n ________ ________ ________ ________
refer to password levels.
Characters in [ ] refer to key Select the auxiliary input or other source to be used to input the S&W % for each meter run:
presses. 0 = None 3 = Use Auxiliary Input #3
1 = Use Auxiliary Input #1 4 = Use Auxiliary Input #1
TIP - Use the blank lines 2 = Use Auxiliary Input #2 5 = Modbus Direct
provided next to each The flow computer will use this input to determine Net Standard Volume (S&W corrected volume).
configuration option to write
down the corresponding {L1} Meter Model ________ ________ ________ ________
settings you entered in the
flow computer. Enter the model number of the flowmeter (up to 8 alphanumeric characters). This entry usually
appears on the prove report.
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or
in OmniCom. Depending on {L1} Meter Size ________ ________ ________ ________
the various configuration Enter the size of the flowmeter (up to 8 alphanumeric characters). This entry usually appears on
settings of your specific the prove report.
metering system, only those
configuration options which {L1} Meter Serial Number ________ ________ ________ ________
are applicable will be
displayed. Enter the serial number of the flowmeter (up to 8 alphanumeric characters). This entry usually
appears on the prove report.

Meter Run Setup via the


Random Access Method -
Setup entries require that you
be in the Program Mode. In
the Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen
will appear. Then press
[Meter] [n] [Enter] (n =
Meter Run # 1, 2, 3 or 4).
Use [ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.9. Configuring Temperature


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.9.1. Accessing the Temperature Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
Station Setup
Meter Run Setup
Flow Computer
Temperature Setup _
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Temperature
when programming an Setup and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.9.2. Station and Meter Run Temperature Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
you can decide to use the
faster Random Access Low Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Method described below.
Enter the temperature below which the flowmeter low alarm activates. Transducer values
Once you have finished approximately 5% below this entry fail to low.
entering data in a setup
submenu, press the [Prog]
key to return to the Select
High Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Group Entry screen. Enter the temperature above which the flowmeter high alarm activates. Transducer values
Proceed as described in this approximately 5% above this entry fail to high.
manual for each setup
option. {L2} Override ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the temperature value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the
Meter Temperature Setup override code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is
via the Random Access substituted.
Method - Setup entries
require that you be in the {L2} Override Code ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Program Mode. In the
Enter the Override Code strategy:
Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program 0 = Never use override code
LED will glow green and the 1 = Always use override code
Select Group Entry screen 2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
will appear. Then press 3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average
[Temp] [Enter], or [Temp]
[Meter] [n] [Enter] or {L1} at 4mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Meter] [n] [Temp] [Enter]
(n = Meter Run # 1, 2, 3 or Enter the temperature engineering units that the transmitter outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower
4). Use [ ] / [ ] keys to range limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.
scroll.
{L1} at 20mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the temperature engineering units that the transmitter outputs at 20mA or 5 Volts, or upper
Note: range limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.
* Not Valid when a RTD
Probe is specified.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


INFO - Characters in { } {L1} Damping Code________ ________ ________ ________ ________
refer to password levels.
Characters in [ ] refer to key This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
presses. The process variable (i.e., temperature) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.

TIP - Use the blank lines For Temperature Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
provided next to each 0 = 0 seconds 5 = 6.3 seconds
configuration option to write 1 = 0.3 seconds 6 = 12.7 seconds
down the corresponding 2 = 0.7 seconds 7 = 25.5 seconds
settings you entered in the 3 = 1.5 seconds 8 = 51.5 seconds
flow computer. 4 = 3.1 seconds 9 = 102.5 seconds
Some of these entries may
not appear on the display or
in OmniCom. Depending on
the various configuration
2.9.3. Station and Meter Run Density Temperature
settings of your specific Settings
metering system, only those
configuration options which Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
are applicable will be
displayed.
Low Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the temperature below which the densitometer low alarm activates. Transducer values
Meter Density approximately 5% below this entry activate the transducer fail low alarm.
Temperature Setup via the
Random Access Method - High Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
To access these settings, in Enter the temperature above which the densitometer high alarm activates. Transducer values
the Program Mode press approximately 10% above this entry activate the transducer fail high alarm.
[Density] [Temp] [Enter].
{L2} Override ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
INFO - The Density
Enter the temperature value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the
Temperature sensor is used
override code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is
to compensate for
substituted.
temperature expansion
effects which effect the
periodic time of oscillation of {L2} Override Code ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
the densitometer. It is also Enter the Override Code strategy:
used when desired to 0 = Never use override code
calculate the density of the
1 = Always use override code
liquid to reference
temperature using API 2540; 2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
Table 23, 23A or 23B. 3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average

{L1} at 4mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Note: Enter the temperature engineering units that the transducer outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower
* Not Valid when a RTD range limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.
Probe is specified.
{L1} at 20mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the temperature engineering units that the transducer outputs at 20mA or 5volts, or upper
range limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Damping Code________ ________ ________ ________ ________


This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., temperature) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Temperature Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 6.3 seconds
1 = 0.3 seconds 6 = 12.7 seconds
2 = 0.7 seconds 7 = 25.5 seconds
3 = 1.5 seconds 8 = 51.5 seconds
4 = 3.1 seconds 9 = 102.5 seconds

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.9.4. Prover Temperature Settings


Prover Temperature Setup Inlet Outlet
via the Random Access
Method - Setup entries
require that you be in the
Low Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
Program Mode. In the Enter the temperature below which the prover low alarm activates. Transducer values
Display Mode press the approximately 5% below this entry activate the transducer fail low alarm.
[Prog] key. The Program
LED will glow green and the High Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
Select Group Entry screen
Enter the temperature above which the prover high alarm activates Transducer values
will appear. Then press
approximately 10% above this entry activate the transducer fail high alarm.
[Prove] [Temp] [Enter] or
[Temp] [Prove] [Enter].
Use [ ] / [ ] keys to scroll. {L2} Override ___________ ___________
Enter the temperature value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the
override code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is
substituted.

{L2} Override Code ___________ ___________


Enter the Override Code strategy:
0 = Never use override code
1 = Always use override code
2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average

{L1} @ 4mA* ___________ ___________


Enter the temperature engineering units that the transducer outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower
range limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} @ 20mA* ___________ ___________


Enter the temperature engineering units that the transducer outputs at 20mA or 5volts, or upper
range limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Damping Code ___________ ___________


This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., temperature) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Temperature Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 6.3 seconds
1 = 0.3 seconds 6 = 12.7 seconds
2 = 0.7 seconds 7 = 25.5 seconds
3 = 1.5 seconds 8 = 51.5 seconds
4 = 3.1 seconds 9 = 102.5 seconds

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.9.5. Prover Density Temperature Settings


INFO - Characters in { } Inlet Outlet
refer to password levels.
Low Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
TIP - Use the blank lines
Enter the temperature below which the prover low alarm activates. Transducer values
provided next to each
approximately 5% below this entry activate the transducer fail low alarm.
configuration option to write
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the High Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
flow computer. Enter the temperature above which the prover high alarm activates. Transducer values
approximately 10% above this entry activate the transducer fail high alarm.

{L2} Override ___________ ___________


Enter the temperature value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the
override code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is
substituted.

{L2} Override Code ___________ ___________


Enter the Override Code strategy:
0 = Never use override code
1 = Always use override code
2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average

{L1} at 4mA* ___________ ___________


Enter the temperature engineering units that the transducer outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower
range limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} at 20mA* ___________ ___________


Enter the temperature engineering units that the transducer outputs at 20mA or 5volts, or upper
range limit) URV of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Damping Code ___________ ___________


This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., temperature) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Temperature Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 6.3 seconds
1 = 0.3 seconds 6 = 12.7 seconds
2 = 0.7 seconds 7 = 25.5 seconds
3 = 1.5 seconds 8 = 51.5 seconds
4 = 3.1 seconds 9 = 102.5 seconds

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.10. Configuring Pressure


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.10.1. Accessing the Pressure Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
Meter Run Setup
Temperature Setup
Flow Computer
Pressure Setup _
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Pressure Setup
when programming an and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.10.2. Station and Meter Run Pressure Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
you can decide to use the
faster Random Access Low Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Method described below.
Enter the pressure below which the flowmeter low alarm activates. Transducer values
Once you have finished approximately 5% below this entry fail to low.
entering data in a setup
submenu, press the [Prog]
key to return to the Select
High Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Group Entry screen. Enter the pressure above which the flowmeter high alarm activates. Transducer values
Proceed as described in this approximately 10% above this entry fail to high.
manual for each setup
option. {L2} Override ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the pressure value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the override
Meter Pressure Setup via code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is substituted.
the Random Access
Method - Setup entries {L2} Override Code ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
require that you be in the
Enter the Override Code strategy:
Program Mode. In the
Display Mode press the 0 = Never use override code
[Prog] key. The Program 1 = Always use override code
LED will glow green and the 2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
Select Group Entry screen 3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average
will appear. Then press
[Press] [Enter], or [Press] {L1} at 4mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Meter] [n] [Enter] or
[Meter] [n] [Press] [Enter] Enter the pressure engineering units that the transmitter outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower range
(n = Meter Run # 1, 2, 3 or limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.
4). Use [ ] / [ ] keys to
scroll. {L1} at 20mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the pressure engineering units that the transmitter outputs at 20mA or 5volts, or upper range
limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


INFO - Characters in { } {L1} Damping Code________ ________ ________ ________ ________
refer to password levels.
This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., pressure) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
TIP - Use the blank lines computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
provided next to each
configuration option to write For Pressure Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
down the corresponding 0 = 0 seconds 5 = 2 seconds
settings you entered in the 1 = 0.16 seconds 6 = 4 seconds
flow computer. 2 = 0.32 seconds 7 = 8 seconds
3 = 0.48 seconds 8 = 16 seconds
4 = 1 seconds 9 = 32 seconds
Meter Density Pressure
Setup via the Random
Access Method - To access
these settings, in the 2.10.3. Station and Meter Run Density Pressure Settings
Program Mode press
[Density] [Press] [Enter]. Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4

INFO - The Density Pressure Low Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
sensor is used to Enter the pressure below which the densitometer low alarm activates. Transducer values
compensate for pressure approximately 5% below this entry activate the transducer fail low alarm.
effects which effect the
periodic time of oscillation of High Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
the densitometer. It is also
used when desired to Enter the pressure above which the densitometer high alarm activates. Transducer values
calculate the density of the approximately 10% above this entry activate the transducer fail high alarm.
liquid at the densitometer to
equilibrium pressure using {L2} Override ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
API 2540 MPMS 11.2.1 or Enter the pressure value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the override
11.2.2. code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is substituted.

{L2} Override Code ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Note:
Enter the Override Code strategy:
* Not Valid when a RTD
0 = Never use override code
Probe is specified.
1 = Always use override code
2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average

{L1} at 4mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Enter the pressure engineering units that the transducer outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower range
limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} at 20mA* ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Enter the pressure engineering units that the transducer outputs at 20mA or 5volts, or upper range
limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Damping Code________ ________ ________ ________ ________


This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., pressure) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Pressure Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 2 seconds
1 = 0.16 seconds 6 = 4 seconds
2 = 0.32 seconds 7 = 8 seconds
3 = 0.48 seconds 8 = 16 seconds
4 = 1 seconds 9 = 32 seconds

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.10.4. Prover Pressure Settings


Prover Pressure Setup via Inlet Outlet
the Random Access
Method - Setup entries
Low Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
require that you be in the Enter the pressure below which the prover low alarm activates. Transducer values approximately
Program Mode. In the 5% below this entry activate the transducer fail low alarm.
Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program High Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
LED will glow green and the Enter the pressure above which the prover high alarm activates Transducer values approximately
Select Group Entry screen 10% above this entry activate the transducer fail high alarm.
will appear. Then press
[Prove] [Press] [Enter] or {L2} Override ___________ ___________
[Press] [Prove] [Enter].
Enter the pressure value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the override
code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is substituted.

{L2} Override Code ___________ ___________


Enter the Override Code strategy:
0 = Never use override code
1 = Always use override code
2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average
{L1} at 4mA ___________ ___________
Enter the pressure engineering units that the transducer outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower range
limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} at 20mA* ___________ ___________


Enter the pressure engineering units that the transducer outputs at 20mA or 5volts, or upper range
limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Damping Code ___________ ___________


This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., pressure) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Pressure Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 2 seconds
1 = 0.16 seconds 6 = 4 seconds
2 = 0.32 seconds 7 = 8 seconds
3 = 0.48 seconds 8 = 16 seconds
4 = 1 seconds 9 = 32 seconds

{L1} Plenum Pressure at 4mA ___________


The plenum pressure applies only to Brooks compact provers. Enter the engineering units that the
transmitter outputs at 4mA or 1volt or lower range limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Plenum Pressure at 20mA ___________


The plenum pressure applies only to Brooks compact provers. Enter the engineering units that the
transmitter outputs at 20mA or 5volts or upper range limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart
Transmitters..

{L1} Plenum Pressure Damping Code ___________


This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
The process variable (i.e., pressure) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Pressure Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 2 seconds
1 = 0.16 seconds 6 = 4 seconds
2 = 0.32 seconds 7 = 8 seconds
3 = 0.48 seconds 8 = 16 seconds
4 = 1 seconds 9 = 32 seconds

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.10.5. Prover Density Pressure Settings


INFO - Characters in { } Inlet Outlet
refer to password levels.
Low Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
TIP - Use the blank lines
Enter the pressure below which the prover densitometer low alarm activates. Transducer values
provided next to each
approximately 5% below this entry activate the transducer fail low alarm.
configuration option to write
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the High Alarm Limit ___________ ___________
flow computer. Enter the pressure above which the prover densitometer high alarm activates. Transducer values
approximately 10% above this entry activate the transducer fail high alarm.

Prover Density Pressure {L2} Override ___________ ___________


Setup via the Random
Enter the pressure value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the override
Access Method - To access
code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is substituted.
these settings, in the
Program Mode press
[Prove] [Density] [Press] {L2} Override Code ___________ ___________
[Enter]. Enter the Override Code strategy:
0 = Never use override code
INFO - The Density Pressure 1 = Always use override code
sensor is used to 2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
compensate for pressure 3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average
effects which effect the
periodic time of oscillation of {L1} at 4mA ___________ ___________
the densitometer. It is also
Enter the pressure engineering units that the transducer outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or lower range
used when desired to
limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.
calculate the density of the
liquid at the densitometer to
equilibrium pressure using {L1} at 20mA* ___________ ___________
API 2540 MPMS 11.2.1 or Enter the pressure engineering units that the transducer outputs at 20mA or 5volts, or upper range
11.2.2. limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

{L1} Damping Code ___________ ___________


Note:
This entry only applies to Honeywell digital transmitters connected to an H Type combo module.
* Not Valid when a RTD The process variable (i.e., pressure) is filtered by the transmitter before being sent to the flow
Probe is specified. computer. The time constant used depends on this entry.
For Pressure Transmitters, enter the selected Damping Code:
0 = 0 seconds 5 = 2 seconds
1 = 0.16 seconds 6 = 4 seconds
2 = 0.32 seconds 7 = 8 seconds
3 = 0.48 seconds 8 = 16 seconds
4 = 1 seconds 9 = 32 seconds

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.11. Configuring Meter Relative Density / API


Relative Density
INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.11.1. Accessing the Gravity/Density Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
Temperature Setup
Pressure Setup
Flow Computer
Grav/Density Setup _
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Grav/Density
when programming an Setup and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.11.2. Meter Relative Density / Density Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application
you can decide to use the Relative Density, API Gravity or Density
faster Random Access
Method described below. Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
Once you have finished
entering data in a setup {L1A} Corr Factor ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
submenu, press the [Prog] These entries apply if an analog gravitometer or densitometer is specified during the 'Config
key to return to the Select Meter Run' in 'Misc. Setup'. They are not available when using API or Specific Gravity
Group Entry screen. gravitometers. Enter the Pycnometer Density Correction Factor (Limit: 0.8 to 1.2). (Usually very
Proceed as described in this close to 1.0000).
manual for each setup
option. Low Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the gravity/density below which the prover densitometer low alarm activates. Transducer
values approximately 5% below this entry activate the transducer fail low alarm.

High Alarm Limit ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Enter the gravity/density above which the prover densitometer high alarm activates. Transducer
values approximately 10% above this entry activate the transducer fail high alarm.

{L2} Override ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Enter the gravity/density value that is substituted for the live transducer value, depending on the
override code. An * displayed along side of the value indicates that the override value is
substituted.

{L2} Override Code ________ ________ ________ ________ ________


Enter the Override Code strategy:
0 = Never use override code
1 = Always use override code
2 = Use override code on transmitter failure
3 = On transmitter failures use last hour's average
4 = On transmitter failure use station transducer value
5 = On transmitter failure use absolute value of override SG/API of the running product.
{L1} at 4 mA ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
These entries apply if an analog gravitometer or densitometer is specified during the 'Config
Meter Run' in 'Misc. Setup'. Engineering units that the transmitter outputs at 4mA or 1volt, or
lower range limit (LRV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


Meter Specific {L1} at 20 mA ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Gravity/Density Setup via
the Random Access These entries apply if an analog gravitometer or densitometer is specified during the 'Config
Method - Setup entries Meter Run' in 'Misc. Setup'. Engineering units that the transmitter outputs at 20mA or 5 Volts, or
require that you be in the upper range limit (URV) of Honeywell Smart Transmitters.
Program Mode. In the
Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program Digital Densitometers
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen The following entries are required if a digital densitometer is specified during
will appear. Then enter the the 'Config Meter Run' in the 'Misc. Setup' menu. There are three selections
key press sequence that which refer to digital densitometers: 4 = Solartron, 5 = Sarasota, 6 = UGC. ({L1}
corresponds to the options Password Level required, except for the Correction Factor.)
you want to configure:
Specific Gravity/API:
To access these settings, Solartron Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
press [S.G./API] [Enter] or
[S.G./API] [Meter] [n] {L1A} Corr Factor A________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Enter] or [Meter] [n]
Pycnometer Density correction factor (usually very close to 1.0000). An A and B factor are
[S.G./API] [Enter].
provided to cover differing products (limit: 0.8 to 1.2). Meter Station only applies Factor A.
Density:
To access these settings, {L1A} Corr Factor B________ ________ ________ ________ ________
press [Density] [Enter] or
[Density] [Meter] [n]
[Enter] or [Meter] [n]
{L1} K0 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Density] [Enter]. {L1} K1 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Digital Densitometers:
To access these settings, {L1} K2 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
press [Factor] [Density]
[Meter] [n] [Enter] or {L1} K18 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Density] [Factor] [Meter] {L1} K19 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[n] [Enter].
(n represents the meter run {L1} K20A ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
# 1, 2, 3 or 4).
Note: Digital densitometers {L1} K20B ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
can only be configured via {L1} K21A ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
the Random Access Method.
{L1} K21B ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
INFO - Densitometer
constants are usually on a
{L1} KR ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
calibration certificate {L1} KJ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
supplied by the densitometer
manufacturer. Usually they
are based on SI or metric Sarasota Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
units. For US customary
applications you must ensure
that the constants entered
{L1B} Corr Factor A________ ________ ________ ________ ________
are based on gr/cc, F and Pycnometer Density correction factor (usually very close to 1.0000). An A and B factor are
PSIG. Constants are always provided to cover differing products (limit: 0.8 to 1.2).
displayed using scientific
notation; e.g.: {L1B} Corr Factor B________ ________ ________ ________ ________
K0=-1.490205E+00 (gr/cc)
To enter K0, press [Clear] {L1} D0 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
and press [-1.490205]
[Alpha Shift] [E] [+00] {L1} T0 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Enter].
{L1} Tcoef ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1} Tcal ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1} Pcoef ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1} Pcal ________ ________ ________ ________ ________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

UGC Station Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


INFO - Characters in { } {L1A} Corr Factor A________ ________ ________ ________ ________
refer to password levels.
Pycnometer Density correction factor (usually very close to 1.0000). An A and B factor are
provided to cover differing products (limit: 0.8 to 1.2).
TIP - Use the blank lines
provided next to each
configuration option to write
{L1A} Corr Factor B________ ________ ________ ________ ________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {L1} K0 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
flow computer.
{L1} K1 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Digital Densitometer Setup {L1} K2 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
via the Random Access
Method - To access these {L1} TC ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
settings, in the Program
Mode press [Factor]
{L1} Kt1 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Density] [Meter] [n] {L1} Kt2 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
[Enter] or [Density]
[Factor] [Meter] [n] [Enter] {L1} Kt3 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
(n = Meter Run # 1, 2, 3 or
4). {L1} Pc ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1} Kp1 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1} Kp2 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1} Kp3 ________ ________ ________ ________ ________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.12. Configuring PID Control Outputs


INFO - Characters in { }
refer to password levels.
2.12.1. Accessing the PID Control Setup Submenu
TIP - Use the blank lines Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
provided next to each
configuration option to write
screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
down the corresponding following will be displayed:
settings you entered in the
flow computer.
Some of these entries may
*** SETUP MENU ***
not appear on the display or Pressure Setup
in OmniCom. Depending on Grav/Density Setup
the various configuration PID Control Setup _
settings of your specific
metering system, only those
configuration options which
are applicable will be Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to PID Control
displayed. Setup and press [Enter] to access the submenu.

Flow Computer
Configuration via the
2.12.2. PID Control Output Settings
Menu Selection Method - It Loop #1 Loop #2 Loop #3 Loop #4
is best to use this method
when programming an
application for the first time Operating Mode
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Manual Valve Open (Y/N) _______ _______ _______ _______
Once a computer is in Enter [Y] to adjust the valve open % and adjust using the [ ]/[ ] keys. Enter [N] to change to
operation and you become AUTO mode.
familiar with the application
you can decide to use the Local Setpoint (Y/N) _______ _______ _______ _______
faster Random Access Enter [Y] to use a local set point and adjust using the [ ]/[ ] keys. Enter [N] for Remote set
Method described below. point mode.
Once you have finished
entering data in a setup Secondary Setpoint Value _______ _______ _______ _______
submenu, press the [Prog] Enter the value in engineering units for the set point of the secondary variable. The primary
key to return to the Select variable will be the controlled variable until the secondary variable reaches this set point. The
Group Entry screen. secondary variable will not be allowed to drop below or rise above this set point, depending on the
Proceed as described in this "Error Select" entry in the Config PID menu.
manual for each setup
option.
Tuning Adjustments
PID Control Output Setup
via the Random Access
{L1} Primary Gain Factor _______ _______ _______ _______
Method - Setup entries Enter a value between 0.01 to 99.99 for the Primary Gain Factor (Gain=1/Proportional Band).
require that you be in the
Program Mode. In the {L1} Primary Integral Factor _______ _______ _______ _______
Display Mode press the Enter a value between 0.0 and 40.00 for the Primary Integral Factor (Repeats/Min=1/Integral
[Prog] key. The Program Factor the reciprocal of the reset period).
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen {L1} Secondary Gain Factor _______ _______ _______ _______
will appear. Then press
Enter a value between 0.01 to 99.99 for the Secondary Gain Factor (Gain=1/Proportional Band).
[Control] [n] [Enter] (n =
PID Control Loop # 1, 2, 3 or The actual controller gain factor used when controlling the secondary variable is the product of
4). Use [ ] / [ ] keys to this entry and the 'Primary Gain Factor'. Tune the primary control variable first and then use this
scroll. entry to adjust for stable control of the secondary variable.

{L1} Secondary Integral Factor _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter a value between 0 and 40.00 for the Secondary Integral Factor (Repeats/Min=1/Integral
Factor the reciprocal of the reset period).

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Loop #1 Loop #2 Loop #3 Loop #4


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc {L1} Deadband % _______ _______ _______ _______
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these Enter the dead band percent range. PID Control will only compensate for setpoint deviations out of
entries specify the number this range. The control output will not change as long as the process input and the setpoint error
and type of input and output (deviation) is within this dead band percentage limit range.
devices connected to the flow
computer; i.e., the menus {L1} Startup Ramp % _______ _______ _______ _______
following the 'Misc Enter the maximum percentage to which the valve movement is limited per 500 msec at start-up.
Configuration' menu do not st
The control output is clamped at 0% until the 1 PID Permissive (PID #1-#4 database points
ask for configuration data 1722-1725) is set true. The control output % is then allowed to increase at the start-up ramp rate.
unless a transducer has
been defined.
{L1} Shutdown Ramp % _______ _______ _______ _______
Enter the maximum percentage to which the valve movement is limited per 500 msec at shutdown.
st
PID Startup, Stop and When the 1 PID Permissive is lost, the control output will ramp-down towards 0% at the
Shutdown Ramp shutdown ramp rate.
nd
Command Points - These During the ramp-down phase, a 2 PID Permissive (PID #1-#4 database points 1752-1755) is
nd
have been added to eliminate used to provide a ramp hold function. If this 2 permissive is true, 100 msec before entering the
the need to manipulate the ramp-down phase, the control output % will ramp-down and be held at the minimum ramp-down
PID permissives directly. limit % (see the following entry) until it goes false. The control output will then immediately go to
Using these command points 0% (see sidebar).
greatly simplifies operation of
the PID ramping functions. {L1} Minimum Ramp to % _______ _______ _______ _______
(See database points 1727-
1730, 1788-1791, 1792-1795 Enter the minimum percentage that the control output will be allowed to ramp down to. In many
respectively.) cases, it is important to deliver a precise amount of product. This requires that the control output
be ramped to some minimum % and held there until the required delivery is complete. The control
output is then immediately set to 0%.

Primary Controlled (Remote Setpoint) Variable


{L1} Low Limit _______ _______ _______ _______
Enter the engineering unit value below which the primary setpoint variable is not allowed to drop
while in the remote setpoint mode.

{L1} High Limit _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the engineering unit value above which the primary setpoint variable is not allowed to rise
while in the remote setpoint mode.

Secondary Controlled (Setpoint) Variable


{L1} Zero Value _______ _______ _______ _______
If a secondary controlled variable is used, enter the value in engineering units of the variable which
will represent zero.

{L1} Full Scale Value _______ _______ _______ _______


Enter the value in engineering units of the secondary variable at controller full scale, which is
usually 2 times the normal operating setpoint setting.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.13. Configuring Provers


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.13.1. Accessing the Prover Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
Grav/Density Setup
PID Cont`rol Setup
Flow Computer
Prover Setup _
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Prover Setup and
when programming an press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.13.2. Prover Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application {L2} Number of Runs to Average _______________
you can decide to use the
Enter the number of consecutive runs required to be considered a complete prove sequence This
faster Random Access
number must be between 2 and 10.
Method described below.
Once you have finished {L2} Maximum Number of Runs _______________
entering data in a setup
submenu, press the [Prog] Enter the maximum number of runs that will be attempted to achieve a complete prove sequence.
key to return to the Select This number must be between 2 and 99.
Group Entry screen.
Proceed as described in this {L1} Prover Type _______________
manual for each setup Enter the type of prover in use:
option.
0 = Unidirectional Pipe Prover
1 = Bi-directional Pipe Prover
Prover Setup via the 2 = Unidirectional Compact Prover
Random Access Method - 3 = Bi-directional Small Volume Prover
Setup entries require that you
4 = Master Meter
be in the Program Mode. In
5 = Two-Series Bi-directional Pipe Prover.
the Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program Select the Unidirectional Compact [2] if you are using a Brooks Compact Prover.
LED will glow green and the Select the Master Meter Method to compare meter 1, 2 or 3 against the master meter. Meter #4 is
Select Group Entry screen always the master meter.
will appear. Then press
For Double Chronometry Proving use type 2 or 3.
[Prove] [Setup] [Enter] and
use [ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.
{L1} Prover Volume _______________
This entry does not apply when the prover type selected is a Uni-Compact. Enter the water draw
volume of the prover at base temperature and pressure.
Certain models of compact provers have different water draws, depending on whether the meters
are upstream or downstream. This entry represents the round-trip volume for bi-directional
provers and the downstream volume for compact provers. When using the Master Meter Method,
enter the minimum volume that must flow through the master meter (Meter #4) for each prove run.

{L2} Number of Passes per Run to Average _______________


This entry applies to Unidirectional and Bi-directional compact provers only. Enter the number of
single passes that will be averaged to make each run when using the pulse interpolation method.
Valid entries are 1 through 25. A pass is round trip when using a bi-directional prover.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

{L1} Linear Thermal Expansion Coeff of Switch Rod _______________


This entry applies to unidirectional compact provers only (except Brooks SVP see following
INFO - Characters in { }
setting). Enter the squared coefficient of thermal expansion for any switch rod components which
refer to password levels.
may affect the water draw volume of the compact prover. This Thermal Expansion Coefficient is
used to calculate the CTSP factor for the compact prover:
TIP - Use the blank lines q For US Units: Carbon Steel = 0.0000124; Stainless Steel = 0.0000177.
provided next to each
q For Metric Units: Carbon Steel = 0.0000223; Stainless Steel = 0.0000319.
configuration option to write
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {L1} Coefficient of Invar Rod _______________
flow computer. This entry applies to Brooks Compact Provers only. This prover uses an invar rod to separate the
optical detector switches. The rod has a coefficient of 0.0000008 per F (US units) or 0.0000014
per C (metric units).

{L1} Plenum Pressure Constant _______________


This entry applies to Brooks Compact Provers only. Enter the Nitrogen Spring Plenum Pressure
Constant used to calculate the plenum pressure needed to operate the Brooks Compact Prover.
This pressure is related to the prover line pressure at the time of proving:
Plenum Pressure = (Line Pressure / Plenum Constant) + 60 Psig
The plenum constant depends on the size of the Brooks Compact Prover. Valid values are:

SIZE PLENUM CONSTANT SIZE PLENUM CONSTANT


8-inch 3.50 18-inch 5.00
12-inch Mini 3.20 24-inch 5.88
12-inch Standard 3.20 Larger Refer to Brooks

{L2} Plenum Pressure Deadband % _______________


This entry applies to Brooks Compact Provers only. Enter the Plenum Pressure Deadband %. The
Brooks Compact Prover requires that the plenum pressure be maintained within certain limits. The
flow computer calculates the correct plenum pressure at the beginning of each prove sequence
and will charge or vent nitrogen until the measured plenum pressure is within the specified
deadband %.

{L1} Prover Upstream Volume _______________


This entry applies to uni-compact provers only. Enter the upstream water draw volume at base
temperature and pressure, if applicable.

{L1} Prover Downstream Volume _______________


This entry applies to uni-compact provers only. Enter the downstream water draw volume at base
temperature and pressure, if applicable.

{L1} Over-travel _______________


This entry does not apply to Master Meter proving. Enter the estimated amount of flow that the
sphere or piston displaces after activating the first detector switch, multiplied by 1.25.

{L2} Inactivity Timer _______________


Enter the time in seconds before the prove is aborted due to prover inactivity. Make sure you allow
enough time for the sphere or piston to travel between detector switches at the lowest flow rate
expected. When using the Master Meter Method, allow enough time for the amount of flow to pass
through the master meter at the lowest expected flow rate.

{L1} Prover Diameter _______________


This entry is not applicable to Master Meter proving. Enter the internal diameter of the prover tube
in inches or mm.

{L1} Prover Wall Thickness _______________


This entry is not applicable to Master Meter proving. Enter the wall thickness of the prover tube in
inches or mm, which is used to calculate the CPSP factor

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

{L1} Modulus of Elasticity _______________


This entry is not applicable to Master Meter proving. Enter the Prover Tube Modulus of Elasticity
Prover Setup via the
used to calculate the CPSP factor.
Random Access Method -
Setup entries require that you q For US Units: Mild Steel = 3.0E7; Stainless Steel = 2.8E7 to 2.9E7.
be in the Program Mode. In q For Metric Units: 2.07E8 or 1.93E8 to 2.0E8.
the Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program {L1} Cubical Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Tube _______________
LED will glow green and the
This entry is not applicable to Compact Provers and Master Meter proving. Enter the Prover Tube
Select Group Entry screen
Cubical Coefficient of Thermal Expansion for full sized pipe provers, used to calculate the CTSP
will appear. Then press
factor.
Prove] [Setup] [Enter] and
use [ ] / [ ] keys to scroll. q For US Units: Mild Steel = 0.0000186; Stainless Steel = 0.0000265.
q For Metric Units: Mild Steel = 0.0000335; Stainless Steel = 0.00000477.

{L1} Base Pressure _______________


This entry is not applicable to Master Meter proving. Enter the atmospheric pressure in PSIg or
kPag, at which the prover was water drawn.

{L1} Base Temperature _______________


This entry is not applicable to Master Meter proving. Enter the Base Temperature in F or C at
which the prover was water drawn. This entry is used to calculate CTSP.

{L2} Stability Check Sample Time _______________


Enter the Stability Check Sample Time in seconds, used to calculate the rate of change of
temperature and flow rate at the prover or master meter. The prove sequence will not start until the
temperature and flow rate are stable.

{L2} Sample Time Temperature Change ( Temp) _______________


Enter the temperature change allowed during the stability sample time (see previous entry). The
change in temperature per sample period must be less than this value for the temperature to be
considered stable enough to start a prove.

{L2} Sample Time Flow Rate Change ( Flow) _______________


Enter the change in flow rate allowed during the stability sample time (see previous two entries).
The change in flow rate per sample period must be less than this value before the flow rate is
considered to be stable enough to start a prove.

{L2} Prover-to-Meter Temperature Deviation Range _______________


Enter the prover-to-meter temperature range (C or F) allowable after the temperature and flow
rate have stabilized. The temperature at the meter and the prover must be within this limit or the
prove sequence attempt will be aborted.

{L2} Prove Run Meter Factor / Counts Repeatability _______________


Enter for the run repeatability calculation based on:
0 = Run Counts
1 = Run Calculated Meter Factor
Run counts repeatability is a more stringent test but may be difficult to achieve due to changing
temperature and pressure during the prove sequence. Calculating repeatability based upon the
calculated meter factor takes into account variations in temperature and pressure, and may be
easier to achieve.

{L2} Run Repeatability Maximum Deviation % _______________


Enter the maximum allowable percentage deviation between run counts or run meter factors
(depending on selection of previous entry). The deviation is calculated by comparing the high/low
meter counts or meter factors based on their low point, as follows:
Deviation = 100 (High - Low) / Low Point
This deviation is always calculated using the meter factor when the Master Meter Method of
proving is selected.

22/26.71+ w 05/99 2-55


Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

{L2} Meter Factor Deviation % from Meter Factor Curve _______________


The maximum % deviation allowed between the new calculated meter factor and the interpolated
INFO - Characters in { }
meter factor obtained from the 'meter factor curve' for the current product (see Product Setup
refer to password levels.
this chapter).

TIP - Use the blank lines {L2} Number of Meter Factors in Historical Average _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write A maximum of 10 previous meter factors (normalized to base prove flow rate) can be stored and
down the corresponding averaged for comparison with the new (normalized) meter factor just calculated.
settings you entered in the
flow computer. {L2} Meter Factor Deviation % from Historical Average _______________
The maximum % deviation allowed between the average of all stored historical meter factors for
the current product and the new calculated meter factor (normalized to the base prove flow rate).

{L2} Automatic Meter Factor Implementation? _______________


Enter [Y] to automatically implement the new meter factor and store in the appropriate product file.
Enter [N] to select not to automatically implement the meter factor determined from the prove.

{L2} Apply Meter Factor Retroactively? _______________


If you selected to auto-implement the meter factor for the previous entry, enter [Y] to retroactively
apply the Meter Factor from the beginning of the batch. The old meter factor will be back
calculated out of the current batch and daily totals. The batch and daily totals will be recalculated
using the new meter factor. Enter [N] to have the Meter Factor applied from this point on.

{L2} Manual Implementation Time Limit _______________


In cases where 'Automatic Meter Factor Implementation' is not selected, the meter factor just
calculated can be implemented manually by activating Modbus point 1787 within this number of
minutes after the prove is completed. Activating point 1787 after the time limit will have no effect.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.14. Configuring Products


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.14.1. Accessing the Product Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
PID Control Setup
Prover Setup
Flow Computer
Product Setup _
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Product Setup
when programming an and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.14.2. Product Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application
you can decide to use the Product #1
faster Random Access
Method described below. {L1} Name _______________
Once you have finished Enter the name of the product (up to 8 alphanumeric characters), right justified.
entering data in a setup
submenu, press the [Prog]
key to return to the Select
{L1} Table Select _______________
Group Entry screen. Enter the number that corresponds to the API or GPA table to use for the product:
Proceed as described in this 0= API 2540 Table 24A (US units) / Table 54A (metric units).
manual for each setup 1= API 2540 Table 24B (US units) / Table 54B (metric units).
option. 2= Table 24C (US units) / Table 54C (metric units).
3= GPA TP16 (US units) / TP16M (metric units).
Product Setup via the 4= Table 24 - 1952 Edition (US units) / Table 54 - 1952 Edition (metric units)
Random Access Method - 5= E/P Mixture
Setup entries require that you
be in the Program Mode. In {L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
the Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program This entry applies only to US units (Revision 22). It will appear depending on which table is
LED will glow green and the selected above. Enter the API Gravity at reference conditions. It is used to calculate the Volume
Select Group Entry screen Correction Factor (VCF) and the Pressure Correction Factor (CPL). The flow computer will accept
will appear. Then press any positive override value and use it as the API in calculations. The override gravity can also be
[Product] [Enter] or entered as specific gravity (see next entry).
[Product] [n] [Enter] (n = To use the live measured density or gravity value (obtained from a densitometer/gravitometer) in
Product # 1 through 8). Use the equations, enter any minus number. The flow computer will then correct the signal from the
[ ] / [ ] keys to scroll. densitometer or gravitometer to 60F, if required (this may be flowing at flowing or reference
conditions - see Meter Run I/O Point Configuration).
Should the gravitometer fail, the flow computer can be made to use the absolute value of the API
Gravity Override. If the override code in Grav/Density Setup is set to 5 = On transmitter failure,
use absolute value of override SG/API for this product.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

{L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________


This entry applies only to US units (Revision 22). It will appear depending on which table is
INFO - Characters in { }
selected above. You may enter an override gravity as either API or SG units when measuring
refer to password levels.
crude oil or generalized refined products. The Computer will accept any positive override value and
use it in the calculations.
TIP - Use the blank lines To use the live measured density or gravity value (obtained from a densitometer/gravitometer) in
provided next to each the equations, enter any minus number. The flow computer will then correct the signal from the
configuration option to write densitometer or gravitometer to 60F, if required (this may be flowing at flowing or reference
down the corresponding conditions - see Meter Run I/O Point Configuration).
settings you entered in the
flow computer. Should the gravitometer fail, the flow computer can be made to use the absolute value of the API
Gravity Override. If the override code in Grav/Density Setup is set to 5=On transmitter failure, use
absolute value of override SG/API for this product.
INFO - The following data,
rounded to 4 digits, is from {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
GPA 2145-92 and TP16:
Product S.G. kg/m
3 This entry applies only to metric units (Revision 26) depending on which table is selected above.
3
Ethane .3562 355.85
This is the density at reference conditions (kg/m at reference temperature). It is used to calculate
Propane .5070 506.90
the volume correction factor VCF and the pressure correction factor CPL.
HD5 .5010 500.50 Using a Live Densitometer Signal - Entering a value with a minus sign ahead of it causes the
.5050 504.50 flow computer to use the live density signal to calculate the density at reference temperature.
.5100 509.50 Using the Product Override if the Densitometer Fails - Selecting 'fail code 5' at the
Propylene .5228* 522.28*
densitometer setup menu will cause the flow computer to stop using the live density signal should
Iso Butane .5629 562.34
it fail, and substitute the absolute value of the density override entry as the reference density. E.g.:
.5650 564.44
Entering -750 causes the computer to ignore the override and use the live densitometer signal as
n-Butane .5840 583.42 3
long as the transducer is OK. A reference density of 750 kg/m will be used if the densitometer
.5850 584.42
should fail.
Iso Pentane .6247 624.08
n-Pentane .6311 630.48
n-Hexane .6638 663.14 {L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Natural Gasolines This entry applies only to metric units (Revision 26). Enter the base or reference temperature in C
.6650 664.34 at which net corrected volumes represent equivalent volumes of liquid.
n-Heptane .6882 687.52
n-Octane .7070 706.30
n-Nonane .7219 721.19
{L2} Alpha Coefficient
n-Decane .7342 733.48 This entry applies depending on which table is selected above. API 2540, Tables 24C/54C
* Propylene figures are equations require you to enter a value for 'alpha'. This alpha value is used to calculate the volume
derived from API 11.3.3.2. correction factor 'VCF'. Enter the thermal expansion coefficient at reference temperature as
0.000xxxx.

INFO - API 2540; Tables {L2} F Factor Override _______________


23A or 23B (US), or 53A or
53B (metric); are also This entry applies depending on which table is selected above. Enter 0.0 if you wish the flow
automatically used when computer to use API 11.2.1 or 11.2.2 to calculate the compressibility factor 'F' used in the Cpl
applicable. equation. Enter the compressibility factor 'F' if you wish to override the API calculated value.
Tables 24A and 53A apply to
Generalized Crude Oils (SG {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
range: 1.076-.6110; Dens This entry applies only when GPA TP16 (or TP16M) is entered for table select. The GPA TP16
range: 1075-610.4). standard specifies that the equilibrium pressure of the flowing fluid be calculated according to
Tables 24B and 53B apply to GPA TP15. Two equations are specified. The first designed for mainly pure products such as
Generalized Products (SG propanes, butanes and natural gasolines requires no input data other than the temperature at
range: 1.076-.6535; Dens flowing conditions and the specific gravity at reference conditions. The second improved
range: 1075-652.8). correlation is suitable for use with more varied NGL mixes where different product mixes could
GPA TP16 and TP16M apply have the same specific gravity but different equilibrium pressures. If you wish to use the improved
to LPG/NGL Products (SG second method enter the vapor pressure at 100F or 37.8C. Enter a minus number to use the
range: .637-.495 on Version normal TP15 method for propanes, butanes and natural gasolines.
20, and 636.4-494.5 on
Version 24 of the Omni. {L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
These calculation methods Density correction factor. Enter [0] to select Density Factor A to correct the densitometer. Enter
use API Chapter 11.2.1 or [1] to select Density Factor B to correct the densitometer.
11.2.2, and 11.2.1M or
11.2.2M to calculate the
pressure correction factor
CPL.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4


INFO - Characters in { } {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
refer to password levels.
Use this entry to record the date which helps identify when the meter factor curve was determined.

TIP - Use the blank lines


provided next to each
{L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
configuration option to write Up to twelve meter factors per product / per meter can be entered. The flow computer dynamically
down the corresponding interpolates the curve to determine the correct factor to apply at any flow rate.
settings you entered in the
flow computer. {L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
Enter the flow rate that existed when the meter factor was determined. Up to twelve meter
Product Setup via the factor/flow rates can be entered per meter per product. Data sets must be entered lowest flow rate
Random Access Method - first working up to maximum flow rate last.
Setup entries require that you
be in the Program Mode. In {L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
the Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program {L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen {L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
will appear. Then press
[Product] [Enter] or {L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
[Product] [n] [Enter] (n =
Product # 1 through 8). Use {L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
[ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.
{L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________

{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________


{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Product #2
INFO - The following data, {L1} Name _______________
rounded to 4 digits, is from
GPA 2145-92 and TP16: {L1} Table Select _______________
3
Product S.G. kg/m
Ethane .3562 355.85
{L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
Propane .5070 506.90 {L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________
HD5 .5010 500.50
.5050 504.50 {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
.5100 509.50
Propylene .5228* 522.28* {L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Iso Butane .5629 562.34
.5650 564.44 {L2} Alpha Coefficient _______________
n-Butane .5840 583.42
.5850 584.42 {L2} F Factor Override _______________
Iso Pentane .6247 624.08
n-Pentane .6311 630.48 {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
n-Hexane .6638 663.14
Natural Gasolines
{L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
.6650 664.34 Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
n-Heptane .6882 687.52
n-Octane .7070 706.30 {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
n-Nonane .7219 721.19
n-Decane .7342 733.48 {L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
* Propylene figures are
{L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
derived from API 11.3.3.2.
{L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
INFO - API 2540; Tables
23A or 23B (US), or 53A or
{L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
53B (metric); are also {L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
automatically used when
applicable. {L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24A and 53A apply to
Generalized Crude Oils (SG {L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1.076-.6110; Dens
range: 1075-610.4). {L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24B and 53B apply to {L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
Generalized Products (SG
range: 1.076-.6535; Dens {L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1075-652.8).
GPA TP16 and TP16M apply {L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
to LPG/NGL Products (SG
range: .637-.495 on Version
{L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
20, and 636.4-494.5 on {L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
Version 24 of the Omni.
These calculation methods {L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
use API Chapter 11.2.1 or
11.2.2, and 11.2.1M or {L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
11.2.2M to calculate the
pressure correction factor {L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
CPL.
{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Product #3
INFO - Characters in { } {L1} Name _______________
refer to password levels.
{L1} Table Select _______________
TIP - Use the blank lines {L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write {L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
flow computer.
{L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Product Setup via the {L2} Alpha Coefficient _______________
Random Access Method -
Setup entries require that you {L2} F Factor Override _______________
be in the Program Mode. In
the Display Mode press the {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
[Prog] key. The Program
{L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
will appear. Then press
[Product] [Enter] or {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
[Product] [n] [Enter] (n =
Product # 1 through 8). Use {L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
[ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.
{L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Product #4
INFO - The following data, {L1} Name _______________
rounded to 4 digits, is from
GPA 2145-92 and TP16: {L1} Table Select _______________
3
Product S.G. kg/m
Ethane .3562 355.85
{L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
Propane .5070 506.90 {L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________
HD5 .5010 500.50
.5050 504.50 {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
.5100 509.50
Propylene .5228* 522.28* {L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Iso Butane .5629 562.34
.5650 564.44 {L2} Alpha Coefficient _______________
n-Butane .5840 583.42
.5850 584.42 {L2} F Factor Override _______________
Iso Pentane .6247 624.08
n-Pentane .6311 630.48 {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
n-Hexane .6638 663.14
Natural Gasolines
{L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
.6650 664.34 Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
n-Heptane .6882 687.52
n-Octane .7070 706.30 {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
n-Nonane .7219 721.19
n-Decane .7342 733.48 {L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
* Propylene figures are
derived from API 11.3.3.2. {L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
INFO - API 2540; Tables
23A or 23B (US), or 53A or {L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
53B (metric); are also
automatically used when {L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
applicable.
{L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24A and 53A apply to
Generalized Crude Oils (SG {L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1.076-.6110; Dens
range: 1075-610.4). {L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24B and 53B apply to
Generalized Products (SG
{L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1.076-.6535; Dens {L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1075-652.8).
GPA TP16 and TP16M apply {L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
to LPG/NGL Products (SG
range: .637-.495 on Version {L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
20, and 636.4-494.5 on
Version 24 of the Omni. {L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
These calculation methods {L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
use API Chapter 11.2.1 or
11.2.2, and 11.2.1M or {L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
11.2.2M to calculate the
pressure correction factor {L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
CPL.
{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Product #5
INFO - Characters in { } {L1} Name _______________
refer to password levels.
{L1} Table Select _______________
TIP - Use the blank lines {L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write {L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
flow computer.
{L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Product Setup via the {L2} Alpha Coefficient _______________
Random Access Method -
Setup entries require that you {L2} F Factor Override _______________
be in the Program Mode. In
the Display Mode press the {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
[Prog] key. The Program
{L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
will appear. Then press
[Product] [Enter] or {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
[Product] [n] [Enter] (n =
Product # 1 through 8). Use {L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
[ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.
{L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Product #6
INFO - The following data, {L1} Name _______________
rounded to 4 digits, is from
GPA 2145-92 and TP16: {L1} Table Select _______________
3
Product S.G. kg/m
Ethane .3562 355.85
{L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
Propane .5070 506.90 {L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________
HD5 .5010 500.50
.5050 504.50 {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
.5100 509.50
Propylene .5228* 522.28* {L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Iso Butane .5629 562.34
.5650 564.44 {L2} Alpha Coefficient _______________
n-Butane .5840 583.42
.5850 584.42 {L2} F Factor Override _______________
Iso Pentane .6247 624.08
n-Pentane .6311 630.48 {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
n-Hexane .6638 663.14
Natural Gasolines
{L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
.6650 664.34 Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
n-Heptane .6882 687.52
n-Octane .7070 706.30 {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
n-Nonane .7219 721.19
n-Decane .7342 733.48 {L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
* Propylene figures are
derived from API 11.3.3.2. {L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
INFO - API 2540; Tables
23A or 23B (US), or 53A or {L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
53B (metric); are also
automatically used when {L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
applicable.
{L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24A and 53A apply to
Generalized Crude Oils (SG {L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1.076-.6110; Dens
range: 1075-610.4). {L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24B and 53B apply to
Generalized Products (SG
{L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1.076-.6535; Dens {L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1075-652.8).
GPA TP16 and TP16M apply {L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
to LPG/NGL Products (SG
range: .637-.495 on Version {L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
20, and 636.4-494.5 on
Version 24 of the Omni. {L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
These calculation methods {L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
use API Chapter 11.2.1 or
11.2.2, and 11.2.1M or {L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
11.2.2M to calculate the
pressure correction factor {L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
CPL.
{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Product #7
INFO - Characters in { } {L1} Name _______________
refer to password levels.
{L1} Table Select _______________
TIP - Use the blank lines {L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
provided next to each
configuration option to write {L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
flow computer.
{L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Product Setup via the {L2} Alpha Coefficient _______________
Random Access Method -
Setup entries require that you {L2} F Factor Override _______________
be in the Program Mode. In
the Display Mode press the {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
[Prog] key. The Program
{L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
will appear. Then press
[Product] [Enter] or {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
[Product] [n] [Enter] (n =
Product # 1 through 8). Use {L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
[ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.
{L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

Product #8
INFO - The following data, {L1} Name _______________
rounded to 4 digits, is from
GPA 2145-92 and TP16: {L1} Table Select _______________
3
Product S.G. kg/m
Ethane .3562 355.85
{L2} API Relative Density (Gravity) Override _______________
Propane .5070 506.90 {L2} Relative Density (SG) Override _______________
HD5 .5010 500.50
.5050 504.50 {L2} Reference Density Override _______________
.5100 509.50
Propylene .5228* 522.28* {L2} Reference Temperature _______________
Iso Butane .5629 562.34
.5650 564.44 {L2} Alpha Coefficient _______________
n-Butane .5840 583.42
.5850 584.42 {L2} F Factor Override _______________
Iso Pentane .6247 624.08
n-Pentane .6311 630.48 {L2} Vapor Pressure at 100 F (37.8 C) _______________
n-Hexane .6638 663.14
Natural Gasolines
{L1A} Density Factor A/B _______________
.6650 664.34 Meter #1 Meter #2 Meter #3 Meter #4
n-Heptane .6882 687.52
n-Octane .7070 706.30 {L1A} Date of Meter Factor Curve ________ ________ ________ ________
n-Nonane .7219 721.19
n-Decane .7342 733.48 {L1A} Meter Factor #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
* Propylene figures are
derived from API 11.3.3.2. {L1A} Flow Rate #1 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
INFO - API 2540; Tables
23A or 23B (US), or 53A or {L1A} Flow Rate #2 ________ ________ ________ ________
53B (metric); are also
automatically used when {L1A} Meter Factor #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
applicable.
{L1A} Flow Rate #3 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24A and 53A apply to
Generalized Crude Oils (SG {L1A} Meter Factor #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1.076-.6110; Dens
range: 1075-610.4). {L1A} Flow Rate #4 ________ ________ ________ ________
Tables 24B and 53B apply to
Generalized Products (SG
{L1A} Meter Factor #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1.076-.6535; Dens {L1A} Flow Rate #5 ________ ________ ________ ________
range: 1075-652.8).
GPA TP16 and TP16M apply {L1A} Meter Factor #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
to LPG/NGL Products (SG
range: .637-.495 on Version {L1A} Flow Rate #6 ________ ________ ________ ________
20, and 636.4-494.5 on
Version 24 of the Omni. {L1A} Meter Factor #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
These calculation methods {L1A} Flow Rate #7 ________ ________ ________ ________
use API Chapter 11.2.1 or
11.2.2, and 11.2.1M or {L1A} Meter Factor #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
11.2.2M to calculate the
pressure correction factor {L1A} Flow Rate #8 ________ ________ ________ ________
CPL.
{L1A} Meter Factor #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #9 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #10 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #11 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Meter Factor #12 ________ ________ ________ ________
{L1A} Flow Rate #12 ________ ________ ________ ________

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.15. Configuring Batches


INFO - Characters in { } Note: See Chapter 3 Computer Batching Operations in Volume 2 for
refer to password levels. information on configuring your flow computer for batches.

TIP - Use the blank lines


provided next to each
configuration option to write
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the
flow computer.

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

2.16. Configuring Miscellaneous Factors


INFO - The first menu, 'Misc
Configuration', should always
be completed first as these 2.16.1. Accessing the Factor Setup Submenu
entries specify the number
and type of input and output Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
devices connected to the flow screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
computer; i.e., the menus following will be displayed:
following the 'Misc
Configuration' menu do not
ask for configuration data *** SETUP MENU ***
unless a transducer has
been defined.
Batch Preset Setup
Batch Sequence
Flow Computer
Factor Setup _
Configuration via the
Menu Selection Method - It
is best to use this method Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Factor Setup and
when programming an press [Enter] to access the submenu.
application for the first time
as every possible option and
variable will be prompted.
Once a computer is in 2.16.2. Factor Settings
operation and you become
familiar with the application {L1} Weight of Water _______________
you can decide to use the
Also known as absolute density of water. Weight of a barrel of water at 60F or 15C, and 14.696
faster Random Access
PSIa or 101.325 kPa(a). Used to convert from specific gravity units to mass. (From GPA 2145-92
Method described below.
= 8.3372 Lbm/Gal = 350.162 Lbs/Bbl).
Once you have finished
Note: This is the true weight of water, NOT the conversion factor used to convert grs/cc to
entering data in a setup
Lbs/Bbl sometimes given as 350.507. For metric versions (Revision 26), the default value
submenu, press the [Prog] 3
is 999.012 kg/m .
key to return to the Select
Group Entry screen.
Proceed as described in this
{L1} Flow Average Factor _______________
manual for each setup The flow averaging factor is the number of calculation cycles used to smooth the displayed flow
option. rate. A number 1-99 will be accepted. (A calculation cycle is 500msec).

Factor Setup via the {L1A} Alarm Deadband % _______________


Random Access Method - Nuisance alarms can occur when input variables spend any amount of time near the high or low
Setup entries require that you alarm set points. These nuisance alarms can swamp the alarm log with useless alarms leaving no
be in the Program Mode. In room for real alarms. This entry sets a percentage limit based on the 'high alarm' entry. A variable
the Display Mode press the must return within the high/low alarm limits by more than this amount before the alarm is cleared.
[Prog] key. The Program E.g.: High limit is 100F, Low limit is 20F, Alarm deadband is set to 2 percent. A transducer input
LED will glow green and the which exceeded 100F will set the 'high alarm'. The transducer signal must drop 2 percent below
Select Group Entry screen the high alarm setpoint (98F) before the alarm will clear.
will appear. Then press
[[Factor] [Enter], or {L1} Atmospheric Pressure (ABS) _______________
[Factor] [Meter] [n] [Enter],
or [Meter] [n] [Factor](n = This setting is used to convert flowing pressure readings in Psig to absolute pressure units PSIa
Meter Run # 1, 2, 3, or 4). for US Units, and for the metric version in absolute units in conformance to pressure (metric) units
selected.
Use [ ] / [ ] keys to scroll.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

2.17. Configuring Printers


INFO - Characters in { }
refer to password levels.
2.17.1. Accessing the Printer Setup Submenu
TIP - Use the blank lines Applying the Menu Selection Method (see sidebar), in the Select Group Entry
provided next to each
configuration option to write
screen (Program Mode) press [Setup] [Enter] and a menu similar to the
down the corresponding following will be displayed:
settings you entered in the
flow computer.
*** SETUP MENU ***
Printer Setup via the
Batch Sequence
Random Access Method - Factor Setup
Setup entries require that you Printer Setup _
be in the Program Mode. In
the Display Mode press the
[Prog] key. The Program Use the [ ]/[ ] (up/down arrow) keys to move the cursor to Printer Setup
LED will glow green and the
Select Group Entry screen and press [Enter] to access the submenu.
will appear. Then press
[Print] [Setup] [Enter] and
use [ ] / [ ] keys to scroll. 2.17.2. Printer Settings
{L1} Computer ID _______________
Appears on all reports. Enter up to 8 alphanumeric characters to identify the flow computer.

{L1} Print Interval in Minutes _______________


Enter the number of minutes between each interval report. Entering [0] will disable interval reports.
The maximum allowed is 1440 minutes which will provide one interval report per 24-hour period.

{L1} Print Interval Start Time _____:_____


Enter the start time from which the interval report timer is based (e.g.: Entering 01:00 with a Print
Interval of 120 minutes will provide an interval report every odd hour only).

{L1} Daily Report Time _____:_____


Enter the hour at which the daily report will print at the beginning of the contract day (e.g.: 07:00).

{L1} Disable Daily Report? _______________


Enter [Y] to disable the Daily Report (default is 'N'). This simply blocks the report from printing.
Data will still be sent to the historical buffers (last 8) and archive if archive is setup.

{L1} Daylight Savings Time Start _____/_____/_____


Enter the Day/Month/Year that daylight savings time begins.

{L1} Daylight Savings Time End _____/_____/_____


Enter the Day/Month/Year that daylight savings time ends.

{L1} Clear Daily Totals at Batch End? _______________


Enter [N] to provide 24 hour totals of all flow through the flowmeter regardless of what product is
run. Select [Y] to clear the totalizers at the end of each batch. This would mean that the daily
totalizers would not necessarily represent 24 hours of flow but the amount of flow since the last
batch end or the daily report

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Chapter 2 Flow Computer Configuration

{L1} Automatic Hourly Batch Select? _______________


Enter [Y] to automatically cause a batch end every hour on the hour. If customized reports are
TIP - Use the blank lines
selected a batch end report will be printed. If default reports are selected no batch end report will
provided next to each
be printed.
configuration option to write
down the corresponding
settings you entered in the {L1} Automatic Weekly Batch Select? _______________
flow computer. Enter a number 1 through 7 to automatically print a batch end report in addition to a daily report on
a specific day of the week (0=No batch end, 1=Monday, 2=Tuesday, etc.).

{L1} Automatic Monthly Batch Select? _______________


Enter a number 1 through 31 to automatically print a batch end report in place of a daily report on a
specific day of the month (0=No batch end).

{L1} Print Priority _______________


Enter [0] when the computer is connected to a dedicated printer. If several computers are sharing
a common printer, one computer must be designated as the master and must be assigned the
number 1. The remaining computers must each be assigned a different Print Priority number
between 2 and 12.

{L1} Number of Nulls _______________


For slow printers without an input buffer, a number of null characterss can be sent after each
carriage return or line feed. A number between 0-255 will be accepted. Set this to 0 if your printer
supports hardware handshaking and you have connected pin 20 of the printer connector to
terminal 6 of the flow computer (see Chapter 3).

{L1} Use Default Report Templates? _______________


Entering [Y] instructs the flow computer to use the default report formats for Daily Batch End,
Snapshot and Prover Reports. Enter [N] if you have downloaded your own custom report
templates using the OmniCom program.

Common Printer Control {L1} Condensed Print Mode Control String _______________
Codes -
Certain default report templates exceed 80 columns when the computer is configured for 4 meter
Epson, IBM & Compatible:
runs and a station. Enter the hexadecimal character string which will put the printer into the
Condensed Mode= 0F condensed print mode. Data must be in sets of 2 characters (i.e., 05 not 5). A maximum of 5
Cancel Condensed= 12 control characters are allowed.
OKI Data Models:
Condensed Mode= 1D {L1} Cancel Condensed Print Mode Control String _______________
Cancel Condensed= 1E Uncondensed Print Mode. Enter the hexadecimal character string which when sent to the printer
HP Laser Jet II & will cancel the condensed print mode. Data must be in sets of 2 characters (i.e., 05 not 5). A
Compatible: maximum of 5 control characters are allowed.
Condensed= 1B266B3253
Cancel Cond= 1B266B3053 {L1} Company Name _____________________________________________

___________________________________________________________
Two lines of the display allow entry of the Company Name. On each line enter a maximum of 19
characters and press [Enter]. Both lines are concatenated and appear on all reports.

{L1} Location ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________
Two lines of the display allow entry of the station location Name. On each line enter a maximum of
19 characters and press [Enter]. Both lines are concatenated and appear on all reports.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

3. User-Programmable Functions

3.1. Introduction
The computer performs many functions, displays and prints large amounts of
data, but there are always some application-specific control functions,
calculations or displays that cannot be anticipated.
The Omni Flow Computer incorporates several programmable features that
enable the user to easily customize the computer to fit a specific application.
o User-programmable Boolean Flags and Statements
o User-programmable Variables and Statements
o User-configurable Display Screens
o User-customized Report Templates
The first three Items are explained here. The last item requires the use of the
OmniCom PC configuration software that comes with the flow computer.

3.2. User-Programmable Boolean Flags and


Statements

3.2.1. What is a Boolean?


A Boolean point is simply a single bit register within the computer (sometimes
called a flag) which has only two states, On or Off (True or False, 1 or 0). These
Boolean flags or points are controlled and/or monitored by the flow computer
and represent alarms, commands and status points. Each Boolean point is
given an identifying number within the data base of the computer allowing the
state (On or Off) to be monitored or modified by assigning that Boolean point to
a physical digital I/O point or accessing it via a communication port. A
maximum of 24 physical digital I/O points are available for monitoring limit
switches, status signals or controlling relays or lamps.

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

Boolean points are numbered as follows:


INFO - The 4-digit point 1001 through 1024 Physical Digital I/O Points 1 through 24
numbers referred to in this 1025 through 1088 Programmable Boolean Points (64 total)
chapter are Modbus index
numbers used to identify 1089 through 1099 Programmable Pulse outputs (11 total)
each variable (Boolean or 1100 through 1199 Meter Run #1 Boolean Points (Alarms, Status etc.)
other) within the Modbus
database. A complete listing 1200 through 1299 Meter Run #2 Boolean Points (Alarms, Status etc.)
and descriptions of database 1300 through 1399 Meter Run #3 Boolean Points (Alarms, Status etc.)
points is included in Volume
4. 1400 through 1499 Meter Run #4 Boolean Points (Alarms, Status etc.)
1500 through 1699 Scratchpad Storage for Results of Boolean Statements
1700 through 1799 Command or Status Inputs
1800 through 1899 Station Boolean Flags (Alarms, Status etc.)
2100 through 2199 Meter Run #1 Totalizer Roll-over Flags
2200 through 2299 Meter Run #2 Totalizer Roll-over Flags
2300 through 2399 Meter Run #3 Totalizer Roll-over Flags
2400 through 2499 Meter Run #4 Totalizer Roll-over Flags
2600 through 2623 Miscellaneous Station Boolean Points (Alarms, Status etc.)
2700 through 2759 Miscellaneous Boolean Command and Status Points
2800 through 2876 Station Totalizer Roll-over Flags
2877 through 2899 More Miscellaneous Boolean Command and Status Points

Physical Digital I/O Points (1001 1024)


Each of the physical digital I/O points is assigned to a valid Boolean point
number as detailed above. Points 1700 through 1799 are command inputs
which are described later, all other point assignments indicate that the I/O point
is to be set up as an output point. Output points which are dedicated as flow
accumulator outputs can be set up for pulse widths ranging from 10 msec to
100 sec in 10 msec increments. All other output point assignments have
associated 'time ON delay' and 'time OFF delay' timers which are adjustable
from 0.0 to 1000 sec in 100 msec increments.

Programmable Boolean Points (1025 1088)


There are 64 user flags or Boolean points are available and are controlled by 64
Boolean statements or equations. These are provided to perform sequencing
and control functions. Each statement or equation is evaluated every 100 msec.
starting at point 1025 and ending at point 1088. The results of these Boolean
statements can then assigned to physical digital I/O points. There are no
restrictions as to what Boolean points can be used in a Boolean statement
including the results of other Boolean statements or the status of physical I/O
points.

Programmable Accumulator Points (1089 1099)


There are 11 Programmable points that are used with Variable Points 7089
through 7099 for programming pulse outputs for Digital I/O or Front Panel
Counters.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

One-Shot Boolean Points (1501 1649)


The 149 Boolean flags located between 1501 and 1650 are used to store
temporary data that has been received via the Modbus link or put there by a
Boolean statement. These Boolean variables can be sent to a digital output or
used in the Boolean statements described above.

Scratch Pad Boolean Points (1650 1699)


The 50 Boolean flags located between 1650 and 1699 can be use as
momentary commands. When set true they remain on for two seconds.

3.2.2. Sign (+, -) of Analog or Calculated Variables


(5001 8999)
The sign of analog or calculated variables can also be used in a Boolean
statements by simply specifying the point number. The Boolean value of the
variable is 'true ' if it is positive and 'false' if it has a negative value.

3.2.3. Boolean Statements and Functions


Each Boolean statement consists of up to 3 variables optionally preceded by
the Boolean 'NOT' function and separated by one of the Boolean functions
'AND', 'OR', 'Exclusive OR' or 'EQUAL' . The following symbols are used to
represent the functions:
Function Symbol
NOT /
AND &
OR +
EX OR *
EQUAL =
IF )
GOTO 'G'
MOVE :
COMPARE %
The '=' function allows a statement to be used to change the state of the
Boolean point on the left of the equal sign (usually a command point).
Evaluation precedence is left to right.

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

To program the Boolean points proceed as follows:


From the Display Mode press [Prog] [Setup] [Enter] [Enter] and the following
menu will be displayed:

*** Misc. Setup ***


Password Maint?(Y)
Check Modules ?(Y)
Config Station?(Y)
Config Meter "n"
Config PID ? "n"
Config D/A Out "n"
Front Pnl Counters
Program Booleans ? _
Program Variables ?
User Display ? "n"

Scroll down to 'Set Boolean ? (Y)' and enter [Y]. Assuming that no Booleans
are as yet programmed, the display shows:

Boolean Point #10xx


25: _
Rmk
26:

Note that the cursor is on the line labeled 25: At this point enter the Boolean
equation that will cause Boolean point 1025 to be ON (True) / OFF (False).
INFO - Points 1005 and 1006 For example, to turn Boolean 1025 ON whenever Boolean 1005 is OFF, OR
reflect the current status of whenever 1006 is ON, enter [/1005+1006] (note the use of the '/' to indicate the
physical I/O Points 05 and 06
which could be inputs 'NOT' function).
connected to the outside
world or outputs controlling
relays, etc. Boolean Point #10XX
25: /1005+1006
Rmk
26: _

Boolean 1025 could then be used in the statement following which defines
Boolean 1026. For example, by including Boolean 1205 which indicates that
Meter #2 is active and flowing (see following page), Boolean 1026 will be ON
whenever 'Meter 2 is active and flowing' AND (1005 is NOT ON OR 1006 is
ON).
TIP - Leave plenty of empty
statements between Boolean Point #10xx
programmed ones. This will 25: /1005+1006
allow you to modify the
execution order of your Rmk
program if you need to later. 26: 1205&1025

Use the 'Up/Down' arrow keys to scroll though all 64 programmable Boolean
points.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Remember that the Boolean statements are evaluated in order starting from
1025 proceeding to 1088 . For maximum speed always ensure that statements
used in other statements are evaluated ahead of time by placing them in the
correct order.

Example 1: Meter Failure Alarm for Two-Meter Run Application


INFO - Use the Exclusive OR Object: Using signals from 'flow sensing switches' inserted into the pipeline,
function * to compare 2 provide an alarm output which activates whenever the signals from the flow
points. The result of an
Exclusive OR of 2 points is
switches and flow meter signals differ, also provide a snapshot report by setting
true only if both points are command point 1719.
different states.
How the hardware is configured:
INFO - Booleans 1025, 1026
and 1027 are only used as an Physical I/O points 02 and 03 are setup as inputs by assigning them to 1700
example here. Any unused (see the Command and Status Booleans on a later page). They are connected
programmable Booleans can
be used for this function.
to flow sensing switches on meter runs 1 and 2 respectively. The switches
activate with flow.
Physical I/O point 04 is connected to a 'meter fail alarm bell'. The output is
assigned to Programmable Boolean 1027. A 'delay ON' of 5 seconds is selected
to eliminate spurious alarms which would occur during startup and shutdown. A
'delay OFF' of 5 seconds is selected to ensures that the alarm bell remains on
for at least 5 seconds.
The Booleans are programmed as follows:

True if Meter #1 fails.


BOOLEAN POINT #10xx
True if Meter #2 fails.
25: 1105*1002
26: 1205*1003
Request snapshot if either 27: 1719=1025+1026
meter fails. 28:

Notes:
q Boolean Point 1025 is true
(Meter 1 failed) whenever
'Meter 1 Active' (Point
1105) differs from 'Flow
Detected' Flow Switch 1
(Point 02).
q Boolean Point 1026 is true
(Meter 2 failed) whenever
'Meter 2 Active' (Point
1205) differs from 'Flow
Detected' Flow Switch 2
(Point 03).
q Boolean Point 1027 is true
(Meter 1 OR 2 failed)
whenever point 1025 OR
0126 are true. The
Boolean Command Bit
1719 is set when Boolean
Point 1027 is true.

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

Example 2: Automatic Run Switching for 4-Meter Run Application


Object: To improve metering accuracy by automatically selecting the correct
flow meter run to be active in a multi run application. Small turbines need to be
protected from over-speeding while for best accuracy larger turbines should be
valved off when the flow drops below their minimum rate. In the example
shown, except when switching from one flow meter to the other, only one flow
meter run is active at one time. This is one example only. The number of runs
open for a given application at any flow rate obviously depends on the size of
the flow meters used.

Fig. 3-1. Figure Showing Automatic Four-Meter Flow Zone Thresholds

Switching is based on the station flow gross flow rate which is compared to
preset switching thresholds entered by the user (See 'Meter Station Settings'
in Chapter 2). Threshold Flags 1, 2 and 3 are set and reset according to the
actual station flow rate.
The first task is identify the 4 zones and assign programmable Boolean points
to them. This allows us to include them in further Boolean statements.
Zone 1 = NOT Flag 1 AND NOT Flag 2 AND NOT Flag 3
Zone 2 = Flag 1 AND NOT Flag 2 AND NOT Flag 3
Zone 3 = Flag 1 AND Flag 2 AND NOT Flag3
Zone 4 = Flag 1 AND Flag 2 AND Flag 3

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

As each statement can have only 3 terms in it we must pre-process some part
of the equations. The term 'NOT Flag 2 AND NOT Flag 3' appears in Zone 1
and 2 equations.
Now we assign valid point numbers to our statements and rewrite them the way
they will be input.
First one term needs to be pre-processed to simplify:
1025 = NOT Flag 2 AND NOT Flag 3 25: /1825&/1826
Next the flow Zones are defined:
Zone 1 = NOT Flag 1 AND NOT Flag 2 AND NOT Flag 3 26: /1824&1025
Zone 2 = Flag 1 AND NOT Flag 2 AND NOT Flag 3 27: 1824&1025
Zone 3 = Flag 1 AND Flag 2 AND NOT Flag 3 28: 1824&1825&/1826
Zone 4 = Flag 1 AND Flag 2 AND Flag 3 29: 1824&1825&1826
The program thus far looks like:

/ Flag 2 & / Flag 3


BOOLEAN POINT #10xx
Zone 1 25: 1105*1002
26: 1205*1003
Zone 2 27: 1719=1025+1026
28: 1824&1825&/1826
Zone 3 29: 1824&1825&1826
Zone 4

In our example each meter run valve (V1, V2, V3 and V4) fails closed,
energizes to open. A limit switch mounted on each valve indicates the fully
open position (SW1, SW2, SW3 and SW4).

Fig. 3-2. Figure Showing Four-Meter Run Valve Switching

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

3.2.4. How the Digital I/O Assignments are Configured


We will use Physical I/O Points 11, 12, 13 and 14 to connect to valve limit
switches SW1, SW2, SW3 and SW4 respectively. The switches activate when
the appropriate valve is fully open. The points are designated as inputs by
assigning them to the dummy input Boolean Point 1700 (see the Command and
Status Booleans on a later page). Their data base point numbers are simply
their I/O point number preceded by 10 (e.g.: I/O Point 11 = 1011).
Physical I/O points 15, 16, 17 and 18 are wired so as to open the meter run
valves V1, V2, V3 and V4. They will be assigned to the Boolean Flags 32 (Point
1032) through 35 (Point 1035) which represent the required state of V1 through
V4 as explained below.
The Boolean equations are as follows:
V1 = (NOT SW2 AND NOT SW3 AND NOT SW4) OR Zone 1
Valve #1 is opened when the flow is in Zone 1 and will remain open until at least
1 of the other 3 valves is fully open.
Valves V2, V3 and V4 are programmed in a similar fashion.
V2 = (NOT SW1 AND NOT SW3 AND NOT SW4) OR Zone 2
V3 = (NOT SW1 AND NOT SW2 AND NOT SW4) OR Zone 3
V4 = (NOT SW1 AND NOT SW2 AND NOT SW3) OR Zone 4
To simplify we pre-process the common terms. The term 'NOT SW3 AND NOT
SW4' is used to determine V1 and V2. The term 'NOT SW1 AND NOT SW2' is
used to determine V3 and V4.
Assigning the next valid point numbers to our statements and re-write them the
way they will be input.
1030 = NOT SW3 AND NOT SW4 30: /1013&/1014
1031 = NOT SW1 AND NOT SW2 31: /1011&/1012
The final Equations to determined the state of V1, V2, V3 and V4 are as follows:
V1= NOT SW2 AND (NOT SW3 AND NOT SW4) OR Zone 1 32: /1012&1030+1026
V2 =NOT SW1 AND (NOT SW3 AND NOT SW4) OR Zone 2 33: /1011&1030+1027
V3= (NOT SW1 AND NOT SW2) AND NOT SW4 OR Zone 3 34: 1031&/1014+1028
V4 =(NOT SW1 AND NOT SW2) AND NOT SW3 OR Zone 4 35: 1031&/1013+1029
The computer evaluates each expression from left to right, so the order of the
variables in the above statements is critical. The logic requires that the OR
variable comes last.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

The final program consists of 11 statements:

Zone 1

BOOLEAN POINT #10xx


Zone 2
25: /1825&/1826
Zone 3 26: /1824&1025
27: 1824&1025
Zone 4 28: 1824&1825&/1826
29: 1824&1825&1826
30: /1013&/1014
31: /1011&/1012
32: /1012&1030+1026
V1 33: /1011&1030+1027
34: 1031&/1014+1028
V2
35: 1031&/1013+1029
V3

V4

The only thing left to do now is assign Booleans 1032, 1033, 1034 and 1035 to
the appropriate digital I/O points which control V1, V2, V3 and V4. Here is a
summary of all of the digital I/O as assigned:

PHYSICAL I/O ASSIGNED TO


WIRED T O SYMBOL
POINT BOOLEAN
11 1700 Valve 1 Fully Open Switch SW1
12 1700 Valve 2 Fully Open Switch SW2
13 1700 Valve 3 Fully Open Switch SW3
14 1700 Valve 4 Fully Open Switch SW4
15 1032 Valve 1 Actuator V1
16 1033 Valve 2 Actuator V2
17 1034 Valve 3 Actuator V3
18 1035 Valve 4 Actuator V4
INFO - A list of Modbus
database addresses and
index numbers is included in
Volume 4 of the Omni User
Any pulse signal can be latched by using a small program similar to the
Manual. following:

BOOLEAN POINT #10xx


1026 is set by 1834 and 25: /1834&/1026
cleared by 1835. 26: /1835&/1025
27:

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

3.3. User Programmable Variables and


Statements
There are 64 user-programmable floating point variables within the flow
computer numbered 7025 through 7088. The value stored in each of these
variables depends on an associated equation or statement. These statements
are evaluated every 500 msec and the resultant variable values can be
displayed on the LCD display, printed on a report, output to a D-A output, or
accessed via one of the communication ports. Typical uses for the variables
and statements include providing measurement units conversions, special
averaging functions, limit checking and comparisons.

3.3.1. Variable Statements and Mathematical Operators


Allowed
Each statement can contain up to 3 variables or constants. The following
symbols are used to represent the functions:

Operator Symbol Description


TIP - The order of ADD + Add the two variables or constants
precedence is: ABSOLUTE, SUBTRACT - Subtract the RH variable or constant from LH
POWER, MULTIPLY &
DIVIDE, ADD & MULTIPLY * Multiply the two variables or constants
SUBTRACT. Where DIVIDE / Divide the two variables or constants
operators have the same
precedence the order is left CONSTANT # The number following is interpreted as a
to right. constant
POWER & Raise the LH variable to the power of the RH
ABSOLUTE $ Use the abs. unsigned value of variable following
EQUAL = Make the variable on left equal to the expression
IF STATEMENT ) Compares the variable to another (What if?)
GOTO STATEMENT G Go to a different variable
MOVE : Move statement or result to another variable.
COMPARE % Compare a value with or equal to

To program the user variables proceed as follows: From the Display Mode
press [Prog] [Setup] [Enter] [Enter] and the following menu will be displayed:

*** Misc. Setup ***


Password Maint?(Y)
Check Modules ?(Y)
Config Station?(Y)
Config Meter "n"
Config PID ? "n"
Config D/A Out"n"
Front Pnl Counters
Program Booleans ?
Program Variables? _

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Scroll down to 'Program Variables ? (Y)' and enter [Y]. Assuming that no
variables are as yet programmed, the display shows:

PROG. VARIABLE #70xx


25: _
26:
27:

Note that the cursor is on the line labeled 25:. At this point enter the variable
equation that will calculate the value of variable 7025.

Example 1:
To provide a variable (7025) which represents Meter Run #1 gross flow rate in
MCF per day' in place of the usual MCF per hour, multiply the 'MCF per hour'
variable (7101) by the constant 24.

PROG. VARIABLE #70xx


bbls/hr x 24 = bbls/day 25: 7101*#24
26:
27:

Example 2:
To provide a variable that represents 'gallons per minute' (7026) we can convert
the 'barrels per hour' variable (7101) to gallons by multiplying by 0.7 (0.7 =
42/60 which is the number of gallons in a barrel / divided by the number of
minutes in an hour).

PROG. VARIABLE #70xx


bbls/hr x 24 = bbls/day
25: 7101*#24
bbls/hr x 0.7 = gal/min 26: 7101*#.7_
27:

Example 3:
To provide a variable (7028) that represents meter run #1 temperature in
'degrees Celsius' we subtract 32 from the 'degrees Fahrenheit' variable (7105)
and divide the result (7027) by 1.8.

bbls/hr x 24 = bbls/day PROG. VARIABLE #70xx


25: 7101*#24
bbls/hr x 0.7 = gal/min
26: 7101*#.7_
F - 32.0 27: 7105-#32
28: 7027/#1.8
(F - 32.0) / 1.8 = C

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

Example 4:
Gross barrels within the flow computer are simply flow meter counts divided by
the flow meter 'K-Factor' (pulses per barrel); i.e., gross barrels are not meter
factored. To provide a variable (7029) which represents Meter Run #1 gross
meter factored barrels, multiply the batch gross barrel totalizer (5101) by the
batch flow weighted average meter factor (5114).

bbls/hr x 24 = bbls/day
PROG. VARIABLE #70xx
bbls/hr x 0.7 = gal/min 25: 7101*#24
26: 7101*#.7_
F - 32.0 27: 7105-#32
28: 7027/#1.8
(F - 32.0) / 1.8 = C 29: 5101*5114
Gross bbls x Mtr Factor

3.3.2. Using Boolean Variables in Variable Statements


Boolean points used in a programmable variable statement are assigned the
value 1.0 when the Boolean value is TRUE and 0.0 when the Boolean value is
FALSE. By multiplying by a Boolean the user can set a variable to 0.0 when the
Boolean point has a value FALSE.

Example:
Provide a variable (7025) which functions as a 'Report Number'. The report
number which will appear on each 'batch end report' must increment
automatically after each batch and reset to zero at the contract day start hour
on January 1 of each year.

Add 1.0 at Batch End PROG. VARIABLE #70xx


25: 7025+1835
Clear batch report number
on Jan 1 Contract Hour 26: 1834)7025=#0
27:

Boolean 1835 is true one calculation cycle at the end of a batch. Boolean point
1834 is equal to 1.0 for one calculation cycle on the contract day start hour on
January 1. If statement 1834 is true we reset counter 7025.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

3.3.3. Entering Values Directly into the User Variables


In some cases it may be necessary to enter data directly into a user variable
(not the expression, just the variable). For example, to preset the 'Report
Number' Variable 7025 in the example above we proceed as follows. While in
the Display Mode press [Prog] [Input] [Enter], the following will display:

Current value (can be USER VARIABLE #7025


changed by the user). Value 1234
7025+1835
Expression for this
variable (cannot be
changed from this entry).

3.3.4. Using the Variable Expression as a Prompt


Entering plain text into the expression associated with the variable causes the
computer no problems. It ignores the text and leaves the variable unchanged.
For example:

USER VARIABLE 7025


Value ? .00018
Enter Lbs to SCF ?

3.3.5. Password Level Needed to Change the Value of a


User Variable
The first four variables, 7025, 7026, 7027 and 7028 require Level 2 password.
the remaining variables require Level 1.

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

3.3.6. Using Variables in Boolean Expressions


Note: See the beginning of In some cases it is also necessary to trigger some type of an event based on
this chapter on how to the value of a calculated variable. Boolean variables used in the Boolean
program a Boolean
expression if necessary:
expressions and described in the previous text can have only one of two values,
ON or OFF (TRUE or FALSE). How can the floating point numbers described in
this chapter be used in a Boolean expression? Simply using the fact that a
variable can be either positive (TRUE) or negative (FALSE). Any variable or
floating point can be used in a Boolean expression.

Example:
Provide an alarm and snapshot report which will occur when the absolute
difference in net flow rate between Meter Runs #1 and #2 exceeds 10 bbls/hr,
but only when Meter Run #1 flow rate is greater than 1000 bbls/hr.

Result can be positive or


negative.
PROG. VARIABLE #70xx
30: 7102-7202
Absolute flow difference
minus 10. 31: $7030-#10
32: 7102-#1000
Positive if flow rate is
greater than 1000.

Variable 7031 will be positive (TRUE) if Meter Runs #1 and #2 flow rates differ
by more than 10 bbls/hr. Variable 7032 will be positive (TRUE) when Meter Run
#1 flow rate exceeds 1000 bbls/hr .
User variables 7031 and 7032 shown above must both be positive for the alarm
to be set. In addition, we will require that the condition must exist for 5 minutes
to minimize spurious alarms. The alarm will be activated by Physical I/O Point
#02 and we will use Boolean statements 1025 and 1026.

Enter the following Boolean statements (1025 and 1026 used as example only):

True when both are


positive. BOOLEAN POINT #10xx
25: 7031&7032
26: 1719=1002
Snapshot report when 27:
alarm active.

To complete the example we assign Digital I/O Point #02 (Point # 1002) to 1025
and select a 'delay on' of 3000 to provide a 5 minute delay on activate (3000
ticks = 3000 x 100 msec = 300 seconds). Set the delay off to 0.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

3.4. User Configurable Display Screens


The user can specify up to eight display screen setups. Each display screen can
be programmed to show four variables, each with a descriptive tag. Any
variable within the data base can be selected for display.
Steps needed to configure a display screen are:
INFO - The computer checks 1) Specify a sequence of up to four key presses that will be used to recall
for the user display key the display. Key presses are identified by the A through Z character on
presses first so you may
override an existing display
each key. For each variable (four maximum):
screen by selecting the same 2) Specify the eight character string to be used to identify the variable. Any
key press sequence.
valid characters on the keypad can be used.
3) Specify the database index or point number.
4) Specify the display resolution of the variable (i.e., how many digits to the
right of the decimal point).
Should the number exceed the display capacity, the decimal will be
automatically shifted right to counter the overflow. The computer will shift to
scientific display mode if the integer part of the number exceeds +/- 9,999,999.
To configure the user display screens proceed as follows:
From the Display Mode press [Prog] [Setup] [Enter] [Enter] and the following
menu will be displayed:

*** Misc. Setup ***


Password Maint?(Y)
Check Modules ?(Y)
Config Station?(Y)
Config Meter "n"
Config PID ? "n"
Config D/A Out"n"
Front Pnl Counters
Program Booleans ?
Program Variables?
User Display ? "n" _

Scroll down to 'User Display ? "n" and enter 1 through 8 to specify which
screen you wish to configure.

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

The screen for Display #1 shows:

USER DISPLAY #1
Key Press _
Var #1 Tag
Var #1 Index
Var #1 Dec.
Var #2 Tag
Var #2 Index
Var #2 Dec.
Var #3 Tag
Var #3 Index
Var #3 Dec.
Var #4 Tag
Var #4 Index
Var #4 Dec.

Use the 'UP/DOWN' arrows to scroll through the screen. For 'Key Press' enter
the key press sequence (up to 4 keys) that will be used to recall this display.
The keys are identified by the letters A through Z.

Fig. 3-3. Keypad Layout - A through Z Keys

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Example:
You wish to recall 'User Display #1' by pressing [Gross] [Meter] [1], select the
key sequence [A] [L] [O] as shown below.

USER DISPLAY #1
Key Press A L O
Var #1 Tag
Var #1 Index
Var #1 Dec.

Continue configuring User Display #1 by entering the description tag, index


number and decimal position required for each variable.

Press [Gross] [Meter]


[1]

Description Tag

Index # for Meter #1 Flow


Rate

Display XXXX.XX USER DISPLAY #1


Key Press A L O
Description Tag
Var #1 Tag M1 MSCF
Var #1 Index 7101
Index # for Meter #1 Batch
Barrels Var #1 Dec. 2
Var #2 Tag M1 MMSCF
Display XXXX.XX Var #2 Index 5101
Var #2 Dec. 0
Description Tag Var #3 Tag M1 PRSET
Var #3 Index 5116
Index # for Meter #1
Preset Count
Var #3 Dec. 0
Var #4 Tag M1 MFACT
Var #4 Index 5114
Display XXXX.XX
Var #4 Dec. 4
Description Tag Var #4 Tag _

Index # for Meter #1 Batch


F.W.A. M/F

Display XXXX.XX

Description Tag

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Chapter 3 User-Programmable Functions

In the preceding example, User Display #1 is used to display Meter Run #1:
Variable #1 Flow rate in MSCF per Hour
Variable #2 Accumulated Batch MSCF
Variable #3 Meter Factor for the Batch
Variable #4 Not Used
The screen is recalled by pressing [Gross] [Meter] [1] [Enter] and displays:

USER DISPLAY # 1
M1 MSCF 1234.56
M1 MMSCF 123456789
M1 MFACT 1.0000

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

4. Flow Equations and Algorithms for US


Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

4.1. Liquid Flow Rate for Flowmeters


The calculations performed for liquid helical turbine, positive displacement and
mass flowmeters are as follows:

4.1.1. Volumetric Flow Rate at Flowing Conditions Qv


(Bbls/hr)

f Hz
Qv = 3600
(IV) K F nom

4.1.2. Volumetric Flow Rate at Base Conditions Qb


(Bbls/hr)

Q b(GSV) = Q v (IV) VCF CPL MF

Qb = Q b(GSV) C S&W
(NSV)

4.1.3. Mass Flow Rate Qm (KLbs/hr)

Q v(IV) f MF
Qm =
1000

Q v(GSV) b
Qm =
1000

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Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

4.1.4. Nomenclature
Qv(IV) = gross indicated volumetric flow rate at flowing conditions, in
barrels per hour (Bbls/hr)
Qb(GSV) = gross standard volumetric flow rate at base conditions, in barrels
per hour (Bbls/hr)
Qb(NSV) = net standard volumetric flow rate at base conditions, in barrels
per hour (Bbls/hr)
Qm = mass flow rate at flowing conditions for gas turbine flowmeters,
in thousands of pounds mass per hour (Klbm/hr)
fHz = total number of pulses emitted from the flowmeter pulse train
per second.
KFnom = nominal K factor, in pulses per barrel (fHz/Bbl) supplied by the
flow transmitter manufacturer
MF = meter factor in use (dimensionless)
VCF = volume correction factor (dimensionless see 5.2.2 this
chapter)
CPL = correction factor for pressure on liquid (dimensionless see
5.2.3 this chapter)
CS&W = correction factor for percent of sediment and water (%S&W)
content in fluid (dimensionless see 5.2.4 this chapter)
f = fluid (live) density at flowing conditions (actual temperature and
pressure), in gm/cc (see 5.3 this chapter)
b = calculated reference density at base conditions (standard or
reference temperature and pressure), in gm/cc
= relative density at 60F and equilibrium pressure multiplied by
the weight in pounds of one cubic foot water at 60F and 14,696
pounds per square inch absolute (PSIa)

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

4.2. Correction Factors for Liquid Flow


Dimensionless Values - The flow rate equations for flowmeters require calculating the following
The calculated correction correction factors:
factors for liquid flow
equations are dimensionless;
however, consistent units
q Meter Factor in Use MF
must be used when q Volume Correction Factor VCF
applicable.
q Correction Factor for Pressure on Liquid CPL
q Correction Factor for Sediment and Water Content CS&W

4.2.1. Meter Factor in Use MF

MF = MFBC +
MFPO

Where:
MF = meter factor in use (dimensionless)

MFBC = meter factor interpolated from base meter factor curve

MFPO = meter factor offset from base meter factor curve obtained from
proving

22.71+ w 05/99 4-3


Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

4.2.2. Volume Correction Factor VCF



VCF = e 1+ 0.8 r

Where:
VCF = volume correction factor

e = Napierian constant
= 2.71828

r = correction for expansion at reference temperature


K 0 + ( K 1 RHO r )
=
2
(RHO r )
Where:
K0 & K1 = physical constants derived from mathematical data
published in the API MPMS, as follows:

Product Type Crude Oil Fuel Oil Jet Group Gasoline


API Tables 6A, 23A 6B, 23B 6B, 23B 6B, 23B
API Gravity
0 to 100 0 to 37 37.1 to 47.9 52.1 to 85
Range
0.6110 0.8400 0.7890 0.6535
Relative
to to to to
Density Range
1.0760 1.0760 0.8395 0.7705
K0 341.0957 103.8720 330.3010 192.4571
K1 0 0.2701 0 0.2438

RHOTr = product density at reference temperature


141.5 H2 0
=
API60 + 131.5
Where:
H20 = density of water

API60 = API gravity, in degrees

When Product is between Jet Group and Gasoline:


B
r = A+
(RHO Tr )2
Where:
A & B are numerical constants obtained from API Standards as
follows:
Between Jet & Gasoline
API Tables 6B, 24B, 5B, 23B
API Gravity Range 48.0 to 52.0
Relative Density Range 0.7710 to 0.7885
A -0.0018684
B 1489.067

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

T = differential temperature
= Ta -Tr
Where:
Ta = actual temperature, in F
Tr = reference temperature, in F

4.2.3. Correction Factor for Pressure on Liquid CPL

1
C PL =
1 - ( P - Pe ) F

Where:
CPL = correction factor for pressure on liquid (dimensionless)

P = flowing pressure in pounds per square inch gauge (PSIg)

Pe = equilibrium vapor pressure calculated from the correlations


developed by Dr. R. W. Hankinson, et al., of Phillips Petroleum
Company for members of the GPA, and published as GPA
Technical Publication NO 15.

F = Compressibility factor for hydrocarbons; using API MPMS 11.2.1


for liquids 0 to 90 API relative density; and using API MPMS
11.2.2 for hydrocarbons ranging 0.35 to 0.637 relative density
and -50F to 140F.

4.2.4. Correction Factor for Sediment and Water


Content CS&W

%S& W
C S&W = 1 -
100

Where:
CS&W = correction factor for percent of sediment and water (%S&W)
content in fluid (dimensionless)
%S&W = percent of sediment and water content in fluid

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Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

4.3. Densities and Other Properties of


Liquids
The flow rate equations for flowmeters require determining the following
densities and other properties:
q Flowing Density f for Crude Oil and Refined Products
q Density of Ethane, Propane and Methane Mixes
q Density of Water
q Density and Relative Density (Specific Gravity) Calculated from Live
Digital Densitometer Output Frequency

4.3.1. Flowing Density f for Crude Oil and Refined


Products

f = b VCF C PL

Where:
f = fluid density at flowing conditions (actual temperature and
pressure), in gm/cc

b = fluid density at base conditions (standard/reference temperature


and pressure), in gm/cc
= relative density at 60F and equilibrium pressure multiplied by
the weight in pounds of one cubic foot water at 60F and 14,696
pounds per square inch absolute (PSIa)

VCF = volume correction factor (ASTM D1250)

CPL = correction factor for pressure on liquid

4.3.2. Density of Ethane, Propane and C3+ Mixes


The density of these mixes at flowing temperature and pressure is calculated
from a computer algorithm developed by Phillips Petroleum (August 1992). The
algorithm was based on data published in GPA TP1, TP2 and TP5.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

4.3.3. Density and Relative Density (Specific Gravity)


Calculated from Live Digital Densitometer Output
Frequency
Density and Relative The calculations expressed in this section are performed by the Omni to
Density Values Determined determine the density from frequency signals received from the following third
from Densitometer and
Gravitometer Frequency
party densitometers and gravitometers:
Signals - The equations q Sarasota / Peek
used to determine the density
and relative density via q UGC
density transducers are q Solartron
provided by the respective
manufacturers.

Densitometer Calibration Sarasota Density (gm/cc)


Constants - In many cases
the densitometer constants
Sarasota density is calculated using the frequency signal produced by a
supplied by the Sarasota densitometer, and applying temperature and pressure corrections as
manufacturers are based on shown below:
SI or metric units. You must
ensure that the constants
entered are based on
D c = D CF
[ D0 ' (t - t 0 ' ) ] [ 2 + K (t - t 0 ' ) ]
grams/cc, F and PSIg.
Contact the densitometer t0' t0'
manufacturer or Omni if you
require assistance. Where:
Dc = corrected density

DCF = Density correction factor


Note:
D0 = calibration constant, in mass/volume*
* D0 must be expressed in
pounds per cubic foot
(gm/cc). t = densitometer oscillation period in microseconds (sec)

t0 = calibration constant, in microseconds

t0' = Tcoef x (Tf - Tcal) + Pcoef x (Pf - Pcal) + t0


where:
Tf = flowing temperature, in F
Tcoef = temperature coefficient, in sec/F
Pf = flowing pressure, in PSIg
Pcoef = pressure coefficient, in sec/PSIg
Pcal = calibration pressure, in PSIg

K = spool calibration constant

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Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

UGC Density (grams/cc)


Density and Relative UGC density is calculated using the frequency signal produced by a UGC
Density Values Determined densitometer, and applying temperature and pressure corrections as shown
from Densitometer and
Gravitometer Frequency
below:
Signals - The equations
used to determine the density
and relative density via UNCORRECTED DENSITY:
density transducers are
provided by the respective
manufacturers. (
D = K 0 + (K 1 t) + K 2 t 2 )
Where:
D = uncorrected density, in grams/cc
K0

K 1 = calibration constants of density probe, entered via the keypad
K 2
t = densitometer oscillation time period, in microseconds (sec)

CORRECTED DENSITY:


( 2
K 3 D + )
K 2 D + K 1 ( f - c )



Dc = D CF
+ K
(
t 3
D2 )
+ K t 2 D + K t1 ( Tf - Tc ) + D



Where:
Dc = corrected density, in grams/cc

DCF = density correction factor


D = uncorrected density, in grams/cc

K 1

K 2 = pressure constants
K 3

f = flowing pressure, in PSIg


c = calibration pressure, in PSIg

K t1

K t2 = temperature constants
K t 3

Tf = flowing temperature, in F
Tc = calibration temperature, in F

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Solartron Density (grams/cc)


Densitometer Calibration Solartron density is calculated using the frequency signal produced by a
Constants - In many cases Solartron frequency densitometer, and applying temperature and pressure
the densitometer constants
supplied by the
corrections as detailed below.
manufacturers are based on
SI or metric units. You must UNCORRECTED DENSITY:
ensure that the constants
entered are based on
grams/cc, F and PSIg.
Contact the densitometer
D = K 0 + (K 1 t) + K 2 t 2 ( )
manufacture or Omni if you
require assistance. Where:
D = uncorrected density, in grams/cc
K0

K 1 = calibration constants supplied by Solartron, in grams/cc and F
K 2
t = densitometer oscillation time period, in microseconds (sec)

T EMPERATURE COMPENSATED DENSITY:

DT = D [1 + K 18 ( Tf - 68) ] + [ K 19 ( Tf - 68) ]
Where:
DT = temperature corrected density, in grams/cc

D = uncompensated density, in grams/cc


K 18
= calibration constants supplied by Solartron
K 19

Tf = Temperature in F

T EMPERATURE AND PRESSURE COMPENSATED DENSITY:

D PT = D T [ 1 + (K 20 Pf ) + (K 21 Pf ) ]

Where:
DPT = temperature and pressure compensated density, in grams/cc
DT = temperature compensated density, in grams/cc

K20 = K 20A + (K 20B Pf )

K21 = K 21A + (K 21B Pf )


K 20A
K 20B
= calibration constants supplied by Solartron
K 21A
K 21B

Pf = flowing pressure in PSIg

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Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

Additional Density Equation for Velocity of Sound Effects:


For LPG Products in the range of 0.350 - 0.550 grams/cc, the following term
can be applied to the temperature and pressure compensated density Dtp:

D VOS = D tp + K r (D tp - K j )
3

Where:
DVOS = density for velocity of sound effects, in grams/cc
Dtp = temperature and pressure compensated density, in grams/cc

Kr
= calibration constants supplied by Solartron
K j

Users wishing to implement the above term are advised to contact Solartron to
obtain a reworked calibration sheet containing the coefficients 'Kr' and 'Kj'.
(Typically, Kr = 1.1 and Kj = 0.5). If you do not want to implement the above
term, enter 0.0 for Kr.

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

4.4. Recalculation of Batch Ticket


The actual values of API60 and %S&W that correspond to a batch are obtained
after the batch has ended. The option to recalculate the batch ticket adjusts the
batch quantities to actual results when the new, actual values of API60 and
%S&W are entered. The calculations performed are:
q Recalculated Gross Standard Volume
q Recalculated Net Standard Volume
q Factored Gross Volume
q Net Weight Delivered

4.4.1. Recalculated Gross Standard Volume GSVRecalc


(Bbls)

GSVRecalc = BGF VCFa C PL a MF


Where:
GSVRecalc = recalculated gross standard volume, in barrels (Bbls)
BGF = batch gross volume

VCFa = recalculated volume correction factor (correction for temperature


on liquid; ASTM D1250) using batch average temperature and
entered (actual) API60a (see 5.2.2 this chapter)

CPLa = recalculated correction factor for pressure on liquid using batch


average pressure and entered (actual) API60a (see 5.2.3 this
chapter)

MF = average meter factor (see 5.2.1 this chapter)

4.4.2. Recalculated Net Standard Volume

Recalculated Net Standard Volume in US Customary Units NSV


(Bbls)

NSVRecalc = GSVRecalc C S&Wa


Where:
NSVRecalc = recalculated net standard volume at 60F and 0 PSIg, in barrels
(Bbls)

GSVRecalc = recalculated gross standard volume, in barrels (Bbls)

CS&Wa = actual correction factor for percent of sediment and water


(%S&W) content in fluid (dimensionless)

22.71+ w 05/99 4-11


Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

Recalculated Net Standard Volume in Metric Units Nm3 (m3)

Nm 3 Recalc = NSVRecalc C API60

Where:
3
Nm Recalc = recalculated net standard volume at 15C and 101.325 kPa, in
3
cubic meters (m )

CAPI60 = correction factor for API60 (see table below)

API60 CAPI
60

0.0 - 12.0 0.15893


12.1 - 31.4 0.15892
31.5 - 44.2 0.15891
44.3 - 52.4 0.15890
52.5 - 59.9 0.15889
60.0 - 68.7 0.15888

4.4.3. Factored Gross Volume FGV (Bbls)

FGV = BGF MF

Where:
FGV = factored gross volume, in barrels (Bbls)
BGF = batch gross flow rate, in barrels per hour (Bbls/hr)

MF = average meter factor (see 5.2.1 this chapter)

4.4.4. Net Weight Delivered NWD

589.9483
NWD (l-ton) = NSVRecalc 0.0375 - 0.0050789
API60 + 131.5

NWD (m-ton) = NWD (l-ton) 1.01605

Where:
NWD(l-ton) = net weight delivered, in US customary units (long tons)
NWD(m-ton) = net weight delivered, in metric units (metric tons)
NSVRecalc = recalculated net standard volume at 60F and 0 PSIg, in barrels
(Bbls)

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

4.5. Liquid Flow Rate for Provers


The calculations performed for unidirectional, bi-directional and small volume
(compact) provers are as follows:

4.5.1. Prove Gross Flow Rate at Flowing Conditions


(Bbls/hr)

Gross Flow Rate for Uni- and Bi-directional Provers PQv(U/B)

Pf Hz
PQ v = 3600
(U/B) K F nom

Gross Flow Rate for Small Volume (Compact) Provers PQv(SVP)

PVb
PQ v = 3600
(SVP) Td vol

4.5.2. Prove Flow Rate using Pulse Interpolation


Method

Td vol
Prove Interpoated Counts = Integer Counts

Td fmp

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Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

4.5.3. Nomenclature
PQv(U/B) = prove gross flow rate at flowing conditions for uni- and bi-
directional provers, in barrels per hour (Bbls/hr)

PQv(SVP) = prove gross flow rate at flowing conditions for small volume
(compact) provers, in barrels per hour (Bbls/hr)

PVb = base prover volume at 60F and 0 PSIg, in barrels (Bbls)

PfHz = total number of flow pulses per second during the prove

KFnom = nominal K factor, in pulses per barrel (fHz/Bbl) supplied by the


flow transmitter manufacturer

Tdvol = timer pulses accumulated between detectors switches (each


pulse is 200 nanoseconds)

Tdfmp = timer pulses accumulated between first flow pulse after each
detector switches (each pulse is 200 nanoseconds)

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

4.5.4. Meter Factors for Provers

Prove Meter Factor PMF

PVb C TSP CPSP C TLP C PLP


PMF =
Pf
C TLM C PLM
KF

Where:

PMF = prove meter factor (dimensionless)

PVb = base prover volume at 60F and 0 PSIg, in barrels (Bbls)

Pf = number of flow pulses during the prove

CTSP = correction factor for effects of temperature on steel at the prover

For Uni- and Bi-directional Provers:

C TSP = 1 + [( T - T b ) t coef ]
Where:

T = average prover temperature, in F

T b = average base prover temperature, in F

t coef = coefficient of cubical expansion per F of the prover tube

For Small Volume (Compact) Provers:



C TSP = 1+ ( T - T b ) t coef 1+ ( T i - T b ) t coef

P i

Where:

T = average prover temperature, in F

T i = average prover switch rod temperature, in F

T b = average base prover temperature, in F

t coef = square coefficient of expansion per F of the prover tube


P

t coef = linear coefficient of cubical expansion per F of the


i
prover switch rod

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Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

CPSP = correction factor for effects of pressure on steel at the prover


(P - Pb ) D
= 1 +
E t
Where:
P = internal prover pressure, in PSIg
Pb = base prover pressure, in PSIg
D = internal prover tube diameter, in inches
E = modulus of elasticity for prover tube
t = wall thickness of prover tube, in inches

CTLP = correction factor for effects of temperature on liquid (volume


correction factor) at the prover
= volume correction factor VCF, where the actual temperature
Ta is replaced by the average temperature during the prove, at
the prover (see 5.2.2 this chapter)

CPLP = correction factor for effects of pressure on liquid at the prover


= correction factor for pressure on liquid CPL, where the flowing
pressure P is replaced by average pressure during the prove, at
the prover (see 5.2.3 this chapter)

CTLM = correction factor for effects of temperature on liquid (volume


correction factor) at the flowmeter
= volume correction factor VCF, where the actual temperature
Ta is replaced by the average temperature during the prove, at
the flowmeter (see 5.2.2 this chapter)

CPLM = correction factor for effects of pressure on liquid at the


flowmeter
= correction factor for pressure on liquid CPL, where the flowing
pressure P is replaced by average pressure during the prove, at
the flowmeter (see 5.2.3 this chapter)

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

Prove Meter Factor at Base Prove Flow Rate PMFPQ


b


PMFPQ = PMF + MFBCPQ - MFBCPQ
b b v

Where:
MFPQ = meter factor at base prove flow rate
b

PMF = prove meter factor

MFBCPQ = meter factor interpolated from base flowmeter factor curve,


b
using base prove flow rate

MFBCPQ = meter factor interpolated from base flowmeter factor curve,


v
using actual prove flow rate

Meter Factor Offset from Base Curve Obtained from Proving MFPO

MFPO = MFPQ MFBCPQ


b b

Where:

MFPO = meter factor offset from base meter factor curve obtained from
proving

MFPQ = meter factor at base prove flow rate


b

MFBCPQ = meter factor interpolated from base flowmeter factor curve,


b
using base prove flow rate

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Chapter 4 Flow Equations and Algorithms for US Customary Units (Revision 22.71+)

4.6. Calculations for PID Control

4.6.1. Primary Variable Error % ep

Forward Action

eP = Primary Setpoint % Span - Primary Variable %


Span

Reverse Action

eP = Primary Variable % Span - Primary Setpoint %

4.6.2. Secondary Variable Error % es

Forward Action

es = Secondary Gain (Sec. Setpoint % Span - Sec. Variable %


Span)

Reverse Action

es = Secondary Gain (Sec. Variable % Span - Sec. Setpoint %


Span)

4.6.3. Control Output % C0 (Before Startup Limit


Function)

Controlling on Primary Variable

C0 = Primary Gain (ep +


e)

Controlling on Secondary Variable

C0 = Primary Gain (es + e)

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

4.6.4. Integral Error e

Controlling on Primary Variable

e = (Repeats per Minute of Primary Variable Sample Period ep) + e n-1

Controlling on Secondary Variable

e = (Repeats per Minute of Sec Variable Sample period es) + e n-1

22.71+ w 05/99 4-19


Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

5. Flow Equations and Algorithms for SI


(Metric) Units (Revision 26.71+)

5.1. Liquid Flow Rate for Flowmeters


The calculations performed for liquid helical turbine, positive displacement and
mass flowmeters are as follows:

5.1.1. Volumetric Flow Rate at Flowing Conditions Qv


(m3/hr)

f Hz
Qv = 3600
(IV) K F nom

5.1.2. Volumetric Flow Rate at Base Conditions Qb


(m3/hr)

Q b(GSV) = Q v (IV) VCF CPL MF

5.1.3. Mass Flow Rate Qm (Ton/hr)

v (IV) f MF
Qm =

Q v (GSV) b
m =
1000

26.71+ w 05/99 5-1


Chapter 5 Flow Equations and Algorithms for SI (Metric) Units (Revision 26.71+)

5.1.4. Nomenclature
Qv(IV) = gross indicated volumetric flow rate at flowing conditions, in
cubic meters per hour (m3/hr)
Qb(GSV) = gross standard volumetric flow rate at base conditions, in cubic
meters per hour (m3/hr)
Qm = mass flow rate at flowing conditions for gas turbine flowmeters,
in ton per hour (ton/hr)
fHz = total number of pulses emitted from the flowmeter pulse train
per second.
KFnom = nominal K factor, in pulses per cubic meter (fHz/m3) supplied
by the flow transmitter manufacturer
MF = meter factor in use (dimensionless)
VCF = volume correction factor (dimensionless see 6.2.2 this
chapter)
CPL = correction factor for pressure on liquid (dimensionless see
6.2.3 this chapter)
f = fluid (live) density at flowing conditions (actual temperature and
pressure), in kilograms per cubic meter (Kgs/m3 see 6.3 this
chapter)
b = calculated reference density at base conditions (standard or
reference temperature and pressure), kilograms per cubic meter
(Kgs/m3 at 15F and equilibrium pressure)

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Volume 3c Configuration and Advanced Operation

5.2. Correction Factors for Liquid Flow


Dimensionless Values - The flow rate equations for flowmeters require calculating the following
The calculated correction correction factors:
factors for liquid flow
equations are dimensionless;
however, consistent units
q Meter Factor in Use MF
must be used when q Volume Correction Factor VCF
applicable.
q Correction Factor for Pressure on Liquid CPL
q Correction Factor for Sediment and Water Content CS&W

5.2.1. Meter Factor in Use MF

MF = MFBC + MFPO

Where: