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Easy Magic Trick:

Tips and hints to help you become a successful magician:

  • 1. Practice in front of a mirror so you can see the trick as your audience will. Practice lots!

  • 2. Practice the "patter" as well as the trick. Figure out before hand what you want to say during the show. Good patter will help distract the audience just enough to keep them from guessing how you've pulled off your magical feats! Here's a start for you:

I have a magic trick for you. It should be lots of fun. Pay very close attention, And guess how it is done!

  • 3. ... guessing and they'll be even more impressed with your show.

Resist the temptation to tell how the trick worked

keep them

  • 4. Never do the same trick more than once for the same audience. It makes it too easy for the audience to guess how it was done.

  • 5. ... that the people be looking straight at you. Have the audience remain seated throughout the show.

Control the seating arrangements

Some of the tricks require

  • 6. Wherever you can, borrow the objects from the audience

Coins, pencils, napkins, etc. Borrowing from the

... audience makes it seem like the magician hasn't had time to do anything sneaky to the item. This makes everything seem more magical!

Magic Envelope Trick

Effect:

Effect: The magician asks for a volunteer to write down four numbers on a piece of

The magician asks for a volunteer to write down four numbers on a piece of paper.

The magician asks the volunteer to TOTAL up the numbers.

The magician opens a sealed envelope and it has the same number as the TOTAL!

(or have the magic puppet pull out an envelope and hand it to the magician. Have the puppet "whisper" to the magician to open up the envelope.)

Supplies:

piece of paper

a pen

an envelope

Secret:
Secret:

number would = 4000. In the year 2001, the number would =

4002

Seal the paper in the envelope.

At the show, ask a helper to write down the year he was born.

Ask him to write down the year of an important event in his life (for example, the year he started school or the year he lost his first tooth)

Ask him to write down his age (How many years old will you be at the end of the current year?)

Ask him to write down the number of years that have passed since the important event (What anniversary will you celebrate in the current year?)

(these numbers HAVE to be right *grin*

If it's been 4 years

... since the event and he writes down 3, the trick won't work)

The years have to be whole numbers (he can't say he's 6 and a

half years old

...

it

has to be 7.)

Have the assistant TOTAL the 4 numbers.

Open the envelope. The TOTAL will be the same as the number you already wrote down!

For example:

The year is 2011. (Times two is 4022 which is the number written on the paper in the envelope.)

Kaitlyn was born in 1997 She will turn 14 this year. Kaitlyn started school in 2002. In 2011 she will celebrate her 9th anniversary since she started school.

1997 + 14 + 2002 + 9 = 4022 the same as the number in the envelope.

Easy Magic Tricks for Kids, Spoon Bend - The Grip

1997 + 14 + 2002 + 9 = 4022 the same as the number in the

Using both of your hands, grasp the spoon and press the bowl of the spoon, open side up, onto a table. Don't let the top if the handle peek out over your thumbs.

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Easy Magic Tricks for Kids, Spoon Bend - The Grip in Detail

This image shows the location of the spoons handle in your hands. We've removed one hand

This image shows the location of the spoons handle in your hands. We've removed one hand to show you the positioning, which is crucial.

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Easy Magic Tricks for Kids, Spoon Bend - The Bend

As you appear to press down on the spoon’s han dle towards the table, the handle

As you appear to press down on the spoon’s handle towards the table, the handle of the spoon slides through your hands until it's at the base of your hands, nearest the table.

This shot shows how the effect looks to spectators, the next image shows what is actually happening.

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Easy Magic Tricks for Kids, Spoon Bend - What's Really Happening

This image shows the position of the spoon's handle when it appears that you have bents tyle effects where spoons are apparently bent by using the "power" of the mind. In these tricks, the spoons are actually bent and in many cases, destroyed. In this spoon bending trick, the spoon isn't harmed in any way. You could present and perform this one as a destruction and restoration effect where you apparently bend and damage the spoon and then bring it back to its original state. The other way to present this effect as a quick gag or bit. You, the trickster, simply grab a spoon from the table and then appear to bend it. And everyone has fun being fooled and looking at others' reactions to your little stunt. " id="pdf-obj-6-2" src="pdf-obj-6-2.jpg">

This image shows the position of the spoon's handle when it appears that you have bent the spoon. The arrow shows the circular path of the handle. Of course, this action is covered by your other hand that is gripping the spoon.

This trick will take some practice to be convincing.

When you're done, simply pick up the spoon off of the table with both hands and then show that the spoon is unbent.

Thoughts:

Many magicians perform

mentalism
mentalism

style effects where spoons are apparently bent by

using the "power" of the mind. In these tricks, the spoons are actually bent and in many cases, destroyed.

In this spoon bending trick, the spoon isn't harmed in any way. You could present and

perform this one as a

effect where you apparently bend and

damage the spoon and then bring it back to its original state.

The other way to present this effect as a quick gag or bit. You, the trickster, simply grab a spoon from the table and then appear to bend it. And everyone has fun being fooled and looking at others' reactions to your little stunt.

This spoon bending effect can be improved, as you can see in the effect here. The use of a coin makes the bending more believable - spectators can actually see the end of the spoon as its bending. If you can work up this effect, you'll find that it's superior and will garner even greater reactions. To learn it, all you need is a shiny coin to stand in for the tip of the spoon;s handle.

Since you're not actually bending the spoon, this one can be particularly fun at a party where you take a host's spoon - the more expensive the better - and apparently bend it.

It's a great piece of

impromptu
impromptu

magic that can be done at any time you have a spoon.

Build and Perform the DIY Magic Box Trick

Here’s a great

This spoon bending effect can be improved, as you can see in the effect here. Theeasy magic trick that allows you to produce stand-up style handkerchiefs or effect that’s ribbons from an apparently empty box. This is a particularly great for a kid who wants to put on a show. And another fun aspect is " id="pdf-obj-7-16" src="pdf-obj-7-16.jpg">

easy magic trick that allows you to

produce stand-up style
produce
stand-up style

handkerchiefs or

effect that’s

ribbons from an apparently empty box. This is a

particularly great for a kid who wants to put on a show. And another fun aspect is

that it’s a

that it’s a <a href=do-it-yourself (DIY) style project/magic trick that you can make and you’re free to customize and decorate it as you wish. If you like, you can make the box suit a particular theme for say, a birthday party. Furthermore, once you make the box Using the scissors, measure out and cut out six squares of cardboard. You can make the box any size that you wish. For this lesson, I cut the cardboard into squares that are four-inches by four-inches. I think this is a good size. You can always make another box in a different size later to better suit your needs. " id="pdf-obj-8-4" src="pdf-obj-8-4.jpg">

you’re free to customize and decorate it as you wish. If you like, you can make the

box suit a particular theme for say, a birthday party.

Furthermore, once you make the box

Using the scissors, measure out and cut out six squares of cardboard. You can make the box any size that you wish. For this lesson, I cut the cardboard into squares that are four-inches by four-inches. I think this is a good size. You can always make another box in a different size later to better suit your needs.

Glue the cardboard squares onto the black paper and let it dry. If you like, you can paint one side of each cardboard square with flat black paint.

Cut out the squares and trim the excess black paper from the sides of the cardboard squares.

One cardboard square has to have two sides painted black or decorated with black paper.

At the end, you’ll have five cardboard squares that have one side black, and one cardboard square that has both sides black.

Using the tape, connect together four of the cardboard squares. Be sure to keep

the black side of each cardboard square on the inside of the “box.” For this step,

be sure to only use the cardboard squares with a single side that is black. We are

saving the double-sided cardboard square for the next step.

Tape an edge of the double-sided - the cardboard square with black on both sides - off center onto the black side of the fifth cardboard square. Notice how the square

is positioned “off center." This is what creates the secret compartment where you

can hide production materials (the ribbon and/or handkerchief).

Magic Toothpick Trick

© Contributed by Leanne Guenther

Effect:

The magician shows a pan full of water with five toothpicks in the shape of a pentagon.

The magician takes his magic toothpick and dips it in the center of the pentagon. The five toothpicks fly apart, breaking the pentagon!

Someone from the audience says

Oh, that's just what happens

... when you do that, it's not magic. The magician arranges the five

toothpicks back into a pentagon and hands the person in the audience the magic toothpick. The person dips it in the center. Nothing happens. It really was magic!

Supplies:

a tinfoil pan (a pie plate or leftover Chinese food plate work

well) water

6 flat wooden toothpicks

the magic ingredient: liquid dishwashing soap

Before the Audience - Preparation:

Dip one of your toothpicks in liquid dishwashing soap. Set it aside for now.

Make sure your pan is clean. Rinse it well with water. Fill it quite full of water (but not so full that you're going to spill it).

In Front of the Audience - Preparation:

Arrange the five SOAPLESS toothpicks in the shape of a

pentagon.

Before the Audience - Preparation: Dip one of your toothpicks in liquid dishwashing soap. Set it

Make sure the tips of the toothpicks

overlap so your pentagon stays together. This can be a bit of a challenge the first time you do it, so practice arranging the toothpicks

at home a few times first and consider arranging them while the audience is seating itself.

Now, when the audience is settled, let them look at the pentagon. They may have to stand to do this or you may want to do the trick on the floor with the audience around you in a U-shape.

Tell the audience that you've arranged the toothpicks into a special five sided shape called a pentagon and that you're going to cast a spell on the sixth toothpick to imbue it with some of your magical force so it will be able to break apart the pentagon. (big words always impress an audience *grin*)

Take out the sixth toothpick (the one that was dipped in dish soap) and wave your hand over it while chanting some magical words. Close your eyes and frown a bit so it looks like you're working on putting your magic into the toothpick.

Words you could chant:

Alaka penta Abraka magic

Now, dip the magical toothpick into the center of the pentagon (Make sure you dip the soapy end in the water and try to get it as close to the center of the shape as possible -- the soap shouldn't be visible anymore). The five toothpicks will fly apart.

If you have a non-believer in the audience, offer to let them try the trick. Arrange the pentagon in the water again and hand them the magic toothpick. Let them dip it in the center. It won't work!

If the audience asks you to do the trick a second time, just tell them that it takes awhile to recharge your magical force. You have to rest before you can put more of it into a toothpick, otherwise you could lose your magic forever!

Secret:

Throughout history, a lot of 'magic' has really been science disguised with a few silly words. This is one of those tricks.

All things (including water) is made up of tiny things called molecules). Water molecules like each other and stick together (that's why when a bit of water falls on a table or window, it blobs together in a little droplet).

The surface of the water has a layer of clingy molecules on it -- this layer is called the water's surface tension. The toothpicks were nice and flat so they were floating on this layer.

The surface of the water has a layer of clingy molecules on it -- this layer

Remember that we dipped the sixth toothpick in dish soap? That's the real trick to this trick. The soap molecules break the surface tension of the water. This effect spreads out in an ever widening ring (like ripples in the water when you throw a rock in a lake). The molecules originally holding the toothpicks break apart. The molecules farther away from where you dipped the toothpick still have their surface tension (for a little longer) so they pull the toothpick toward them. Of course, eventually the "ripples" of soap hit those molecules too.

Once the soap is in the water, the surface tension won't come back. That's why the audience member couldn't recreate the trick. It will only work once and then you have to clean everything up and use new toothpicks to do the trick a second time. That's also why you have to be careful that your pan is well rinsed before you do the trick.

Effect:

The magician tries to fit a loop of paper around his wrist (or around the magic puppet's neck) but it won't fit. The magician says, "Hmmm, I'll have to cut this loop bigger". The magician takes a pair of scissors and cuts the loop in half up the middle. Instead of two loops, the magician ends up with one larger loop that now fits around his wrist!

(Normally, you would expect a loop cut in half up the middle to turn into two loops, instead of one big loop).

OPTIONAL: Have an audience member cut a regular loop (one without a twist) in half up the center before you start your trick -- they will get two loops. Before cutting your loop, you can ask the

audience to guess what you will get if you cut the loop in half up the

center

As long as you don't have anyone in the audience who

... knows about Mobius Strips you should get lots of guesses like "you'll end up with two loops".

Supplies:

Construction paper

Tape

Scissors

Secret:

Secret:

Take a long, fairly wide strip of paper. Twist the paper once and tape it into a loop.

This type of loop is called a "Mobius Strip".

Take a long, fairly wide strip of paper. Twist the paper once and tape it into

Snip the loop up the center.

Don't go too fast (snip, snip, snip) and keep as close to the exact center as you can.

You can babble some "magic words" as you go (Hocus Pocus, Luminous Mobius are the ones I like!)

When you're done cutting, you'll end up with one big loop with a couple of twists in it -- the natural assumption is that you'd end up with two loops.

Take a long, fairly wide strip of paper. Twist the paper once and tape it into

HOW IT WORKS

A loop with a single twist in it is called a mobius strip. The "Mobius Strip" is an actual mathematical phenomenon. You aren't really doing magic, you're doing math!

The Mobius strip has several curious properties. A line drawn starting from the seam down the middle will meet back at the seam but at the "other side". If continued the line will meet the starting point and will be double the length of the original strip. This single continuous curve demonstrates that the Mobius strip has only one

boundary.

The example they always give in university is that if an

ant walks along the edge of the strip, he'll travel twice as long as the loop before he gets back to his starting point.

Cutting a Mobius strip along the center line yields one long strip with two full twists in it, rather than two separate strips. This happens because the original strip only has one edge which is twice as long as the original strip.

If you're confused right now, don't worry -- I am too. Math was never my strong suit -- suffice it to say just like gravity, mobius magic works whether you understand it or not!

When you do the trick, you have to be careful to cut as close to the center as you can, because there's a second magical mathematical ability the Mobius Strip has. If the strip is cut about a third of the way in from the edge, it creates two strips: One is a thinner Mobius strip,

the other is a longer but thin strip with two full twists in it.

So keep

your cut close to the center so you don't accidentally end up with

this.

Grandma asked me

Yes, but now how do we explain this all to a

...

You can just tell

... five year old!? The answer is, you don't have to

them it's magic!

As with all tricks, it's best if you practice this a few times before you do it for an audience!

Pepper Trick

Effect:

Magician has cup with pepper and water.

Volunteer puts fingers in water trying to separate the pepper - nothing happens.

Magician puts fingers in water and the pepper separates.

Supplies:

Water

Soap

Pepper

Cup

(make sure there is a sink nearby so volunteer can wash hand)

Secret:
Secret:

Put water in a cup then regular pepper.

Before show, rub soap on your fingers -- don't let anyone see you do this. (The soap will separate the pepper)

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