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HEALTHY KIDS, HEALTHY SCHOOLS GRANT: INFORMATION ON WATER BOTTLE FILLING STATIONS

In 2015 the legislature appropriated $5 million in the capital budget for the Healthy Kids, Healthy Schools
grant. This new grant program was established to help schools remove barriers that hinder their ability
to implement best practices and policies for improved student health and nutrition. The grants were to
be used for improvements or renovations to existing buildings, site improvements, and purchasing new
equipment under the following categories:
Physical Education and Physical Activity indoor and outdoor equipment, covered play
structures, playground equipment
Nutrition kitchen equipment, cafeteria, gardens, greenhouses
Access to and Appeal of Water hydration stations

Overall district grant awards were limited to $200,000 per school district and a maximum of $1 million
statewide was allowed for hydration stations.1 Schools were limited to one water bottle station per school.
Although the smallest portion of actual dollars was awarded for water bottle filling stations, it was
distributed to the largest number of schools and school districts.

CATEGORY NUMBER OF NUMBER OF TOTAL AMOUNT AVERAGE AWARD AWARD RANGE


APPLICATIONS AWARDS APPLIED & PER SCHOOL PER SCHOOL
AWARDED

Physical 185 Schools 36 Schools $904 to


83 Districts 30 Districts $12,106, 476 $198,789
Education $60,977
$1,805,215
and Activity

164 Schools 55 Schools $4,520,222 $1,346 to


Nutrition $32,822
100 Districts 15 Districts $2,195,172 $199,987

Hydration 482 Schools 416 Schools $1,313,359 $100 to


92 Districts 77 Districts $2,403 $10,8501
Stations $999,613

653 Schools 466 Schools


Totals2: $5,000,000
150 Districts 93 Districts

Many organizations including the Institute of Medicine and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention
recommend the use of hydration stations to increase water consumption among school-aged youth.2-5 In
our state, a study conducted by the Center for Public Health Nutrition at the University of Washington
found that high school students preferred to drink water from hydration stations and were less likely to
drink water when only drinking fountains were available. Although many schools received grants for single
bottle stations in 2016, the need for more hydration stations across Washington remains high.

1 Note that the $10,850 was an outlier number as one school installed a multi-spout, outdoor, stand-alone station
which required all new water/sewer/power.
2 Some districts/schools applied for and received grants in more than one category
[1] Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, Healthy Kids-Healthy Schools Grant, http://www.k12.wa.us/SchFacilities/HealthyKids-HealthySchools/
[2] Institute of Medicine. Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention. https://www.nap.edu/catalog/13275/accelerating-progress-in-obesity-prevention-solving-the-weight-of-the
[3] Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Increasing Access to Drinking Water in Schools. https://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/npao/pdf/water_access_in_schools.pdf
[4] Change Lab Solutions. Drinking Water Access in Schools. http://www.changelabsolutions.org/sites/default/files/WaterAccess_FactSht_20141106.pdf
[5] Grummon, A., Hampton, K.E., Oliva, A., Brindis, C.D., Patel A.I. Water Works: A Guide to Improving Access to and Consumption of Water in Schools to Improve Health and Support
Learning. (2014). Retrieved from http://waterinschools.org/pdfs/WaterWorksGuide2014.pdf
[6] Downs, Nora, Johnson, Donna B., and Podrabsky, Mary. Factors Influencing Water Intake at School among Youth in King County, Washington: A Qualitative Study Based on the Social
Ecological Model, 2015, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses.