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The Sentence

So you think a sentence is just a group of words. Well, my young padawan, you would be mistaken. A
sentence must contain a complete idea, if not it is just an also-ran called a fragment. A fragment is just a
group of words that does not express a complete thought.

Fragment: running down the corridor.

Sentence: The Doctor spends a lot of time running down the


corridor.

Fragment: While flying his ship

Sentence: While flying his ship, Baron Fel set the Empires speed
record.

People use fragments all the time when they talk but they are
not acceptable in formal writing and if you are writing for school,
it is formal writing.

The Subject

The subject is the main focus of the sentence. It is the person, place, thing or idea the sentence is about.
What do we call a person, place, thing or idea? A noun. Good for you, award yourself 10 experience
points.

River Song is actually Amys daughter. (spoilers!)

River Song is the subject of the sentence.

Captain Picard needs a hair transplant.

Captain Picard is the subject of that sentence.

Sometimes the subject is made up of more than just one word. If it is just one word or a name it is called
a simple subject. If it is more than one word we call it a complete subject.

The round and fat slug named Jabba liked to eat Klatooine Paddy Frogs.

The complete subject is round and fat slug named Jabba. The simple subject would just
be Jabba.

Jon Snow, a strapping, handsome young man, always has bad things happen to him.

The simple subject is Jon snow. The complete subject is Jon Snow, a strapping,
handsome young man.
Attention S-Mart customers!

You will never find the simple subject in a prepositional phrase. So if you find yourself unsure of what
the simple subject is, just beam out the prepositional phrases:

Chewbacca was attacked by a group of wild Gundarks!

If you did not know the simple subject remove by a group and of wild Gundarks and the only person,
place, thing or idea left is Chewbacca.

Finding the subjects of questions

To find the subject of a question the best thing you can do is to rephrase the question into a
statement:

Where does a ten-foot Mugato sleep?

Rephrase the question as a statement: A ten-foot Mugato sleeps (where). Now it is easy to
see the subject is Mugato and he can sleep wherever he wants to.

Finding subjects in sentences beginning with here

Here is never a subject. Remember only nouns (and noun phrases which we will get to
shortly) and pronouns can be subjects and here is an adverb. When a sentence begins with here, the
subject comes after the verb.

Here is the TARDIS.

To find the subject just rephrase the sentence: The TARDIS is here. TARDIS is the subject and is is the
verb.

Finding the subject in sentences beginning with there

There, like here, can never be the subject of a sentence because it is also an adverb.
Also like here, rephrase the sentence or just drop the word there.

There are tribbles in my engine room.

Tribbles in my engine room.

We can see that tribbles is the subject and are is the verb.

When there comes before the verb in the place where you would normally expect to find the subject,
its called an expletive (and not the kind you hear from your friends at school). An expletive, in this
sense, is a space filler or sentence starter but does not add to the meaning of the sentence and can
often be exterminated. Exterminate, exterminate!

There are bogarts living in that closet.


Exterminate, exterminate, exterminate and re-phrase a bit.

Bogarts are living in that closet.

Finding the subject of a command

All this yacking about the complexity of sentences but were you aware that a sentence can be only one
word?

Sit. Run. Stay.

The subjects of these sentences are using Harrys invisibility cloak. The subject for each of these short
subjects in an implied you. You sit. You run. You stay. Good boy. Heres your Scooby Snack.

Grab your phaser.

Use the force.

Read your book.

Stop your drooling.

All of these subjects are commands, even use the force, which does not have you or your in it but the
you is implied. Even if a command includes a name, the subject is still you.

Spock, mind-meld with that rock.

Watch out for the Alliance, Mal.

Shockingly neither Spock nor Mal are the subjects of those sentences. The subject is still an implied you.

Compound Subjects

Sometimes a sentence can have two or more subjects. These are compound subjects (not to be
confused with a king whose subjects live in a compound).

The Cardassians and the Dominion have formed an alliance.

The Cardassians (almost as bad as the Kardashians) and the Dominion are the compound subject while
formed is the verb. It is that simple. More than one subject is compound.
The Predicate

To have a real sentence, not a fragment, you not only need a subject, you need a predicate. So what is a
predicate? It is a verb. Whatever the predicate says the subject does. Like subjects there is also a
complete and simple predicate. The complete predicate is the verb and all the words and phrases that
go along with it, essentially the rest of the sentence after (or sometimes before) the subject. The simple
predicate is the verb or verb phrase by itself.

Scotty reads technical manuals late at night.

In this sentence the subject is Scotty. The simple predicate is reads and the complete predicate is reads
technical manuals late at night.

On the IES Protector, Captain Taggart struggles to keep his shirt on for an entire
episode.

For this sentence, Captain Taggart is the subject. The simple predicate is
struggles. The complete predicate is On the IES Protector, Struggles to keep his
shirt on for an entire episode. On the IES Protector is part of the complete
predicate even though it is before the subject.

Compound verbs

A compound verb is a verb that is made up of two or more verbs with the same subject.

James Bond dodged and weaved his way through enemy fire.

James Bond is the subject and dodged and weaved are the compound verbs.

For his Starfleet graduation, Wesley will recite a speech and fly a difficult formation.

Wesley is the subject and will recite and fly are the compound verbs. In this sentence the helping verb,
will, is not repeated before the verb fly, it is understood that he (will fly). In a compound sentence with
a compound verb phrase you do not have to repeat the helping verb if it is the same, in this case, will.

The complement

Every sentence must have a subject and a verb, but it must also be a complete thought and sometimes
just having a subject and a verb does not make a complete thought. In those cases we need to turn on
the tractor beam and bring a word or words into our sentence to complete our thought.

Kirk discovered

Obi-Wan felt

The Horseman lost

The word or words that complete these thoughts are called complements.
Kirk discovered he liked kissing alien women.

Obi-Wan felt he had waited in the desert long enough.

The Horseman lost his head a second time.

The complement will always be a noun, pronoun or adjective and will never be found in a prepositional
phrase.

C-3po soaks his gears.

C-3po sits in an oil bath.

In the first sentence gears is the complement. In the second sentence in an oil bath is a
prepositional phrase. So the second sentence does not contain a complement. There are three types of
complements that we are going to look at: direct objects, indirect objects and subject complements.

Direct objects

A direct object will always be a noun or a pronoun. It will always come after an action verb. A
cheat code for finding the direct object is to ask whom? or what? after the action verb. Dont
forget to exterminate that prepositional phrase because they will never contain a direct object.

Zaphod, you have a second head on your shoulders.

In this sentence you is the subject and have is the verb. Have what? Then you have your direct
object, head. Ignore on your shoulders because it is a prepositional phrase.

Dont be confused by a sentence like this:

At midnight, Professor Lupin howls loudly at the moon.

The subject is Professor Lupin and the verb is howls. The verb in this case is followed by a prepositional
phrase, at the moon. A direct object must be a noun or pronoun after the action verb. So this sentence
does not contain a direct object.

Sometimes you might have a compound direct object:

Jon Snow polishes his sword and shield with a cloth.

The subject in the sentence is Jon Snow. The verb is polishes. The first direct object is sword, the second
direct object is shield. You might also have a case where you have a compound verb with a direct object
after each verb.

They landed the shuttlecraft on the planet and explored the abandoned city.
In this sentence the subject is they, landed is the verb and shuttlecraft is the direct object but then you
have a second verb, explored, with a second direct object, city.

Indirect objects

If a sentence has an indirect object it will be found just before the direct object. First you need to puzzle
out what the direct object is then ask yourself to whom? Or to what? Or for what? To the direct object.

Static electricity gives Chewbaccas body the frizzies.

Electricity is the subject of the sentence, and gives is the verb. Now ask what? (or whom?) after the verb
and you find the direct object, frizzies. Now ask to whom? Or what? About the direct object frizzies and
you get the indirect object, Chewbacca.

You might even get a sentence with a compound indirect object:

For diplomatic functions, Janeway sends her officers and security to special engagements.

In that sentence, Janeway is the subject and sends is the verb the first indirect object is
officers and the second indirect object is security with engagements being the direct
object.

Just to add another layer of confusion, you can even have a compound direct and indirect
object:

Bail taught C-3po and R2-D2 how to sing and dance for the Muppet Show. (love that
episode!)

Lets break it down! Bail is the subject and taught is the verb. C-3po is the first indirect object and R2-D2
is the second indirect object while sing is the first direct object and dance is the second indirect object.

Beware of the Blob!

As with all the others, an indirect object cannot be found in a prepositional phrase. An indirect object
must come before a direct object. Put this under you microscope and look at it:

Bail taught tap-dancing to C-3po.

The subject is Bail. The verb is taught and the direct object is tap-dancing. To C-3po is a prepositional
phrase and therefore this sentence has no indirect object.

Bail taught C-3po tap-dancing.


In this case the subject is still Bail, the verb is still taught but C-3po is before tap-dancing. Tap-dancing is
the direct object so C-3po becomes the indirect object.

Subject complements

I like it when my subjects give me compliments. Oops, wrong kind. The difference between subject
complements and direct or indirect objects is that subject complements only come after linking verbs.
As with every other part of a sentence there is more than one type of subject complement. We have
predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives.

Predicate nominatives

And the nominee for best predicate is..Nope, no nominees here. A predicate nominative is a noun or
pronoun that follows a linking verb. A predicate nominative explains or identifies the subject of a
sentence.

Lone Stars best friend is his Mawg, Barf.

In this sentence Barf is the predicate nominative. It is a noun that follows the
linking verb is and renames the subject friend. In this example, Lone Star is a
possessive adjective (patience, my young friend we will get to those later) and
not the subject of the sentence.

Predicate adjectives

Still with me? Good for you and your attention span. Personally, I would have
taken a break by now. A predicate adjective is just like a predicate nominative except it iswait for
it.an adjective that follows the linking verb. I honestly have no clue why this is called a predicate
adjective but a predicate nominative is not called a predicate noun.

Jar-Jars voice is very annoying.

In this sentence voice is the noun and is is the linking verb. Annoying is the adjective that follows the
linking verb that completes the idea of the sentence, therefore annoying is the predicate adjective. I am
not saying the predicate adjective is annoying (although you might think so) but that the word annoying
is the predicate adjective.

Quicksand ahead

Some linking verbs like to hide. Words like look, seem, taste, feel, appear and smell to name a few can
be linking verbs depending on how they are used in a sentence. Also, a very familiar refrain, predicate
objectives will never be found in a prepositional phrase.
An interesting subject

Take these sentence fragments and add a subject to complete the sentence.

1. Beamed to the planet.


2. Ate tribble stew.
3. While flying the ship.
4. Ran from the cylons.
5. Jumped over the mushrooms.
6. Wanted to stop the Templars.
7. Cursed a lot of people.
8. Cursed at a lot of people.
9. Ate a lot of people.
10. Is made of people.
By your command, question or statement

Underlie the simple subject in the following statements, questions or


commands.

1. Dont eat the Puking Pastel, Fred!


2. Have you seen this boy?
3. The ED-209 couldnt beat Robocop.
4. If Cyclops has two eyes, how do they form one
beam?
5. Who was the idiot that gave Jason his machete
back?
6. The owls are not what they seem.
7. So long and thanks for all the fish.
8. Grammar Slam should be shown in schools.
9. The Nerdist podcast has it all.
10. Voldermort could use a tan.
Arise my subjects

Find the complete subject in the following sentences:

1. Cut, cuddy tribbles should not be used for softball practice.


2. Scary monsters can have feelings too.
3. Mal, a loveable rouge, was the captain of
Serenity.
4. Willie liked to cut school and hang out with his
uncle.
5. After exercising strenuously, Jayne liked to clean
his weapons.
6. Eleven hid from the scientists.
7. Seven of Nine used to be a Borg.
8. It turned out Harry was a horecrux.
9. Alan Rickman was a fantastic Snape.
10. Farscape should have had a fifth season.
Predator: Predicates

Hunt down and underline the simple subject and simple predicate in the following
sentences.

1. A near sighted beholder needs lots of contact lenses.


2. Riff-Raff has a bouncing thumb.
3. Audrey II swallowed Seymour both in the play and the directors cut of the
movie.
4. You should not eat ketchup made from killer tomatoes.
5. Mothra thinks Godzilla gets all the good attention.
6. Howard the Duck is a better movie than people give it credit for.
7. William Shatner does not really want to be in a musical version of Julius
Caesar.
8. Hagrid had a whole ham stuck in his beard once and didnt notice.
9. Avada Kedavra is considered inappropriate language in school.
10. I like muggles better than no-maj.
Directions: For each sentence given below, change the circle of the complete
subject and underline the complete predicate .

Example A: John went to the new Star Wars movie with his friends
Answer: John went to the new Star Wars movie with his friends.

1. The centaur appeared at the starting line.


2. The Andorian student arrived late to class because he woke up late.
3. John looked out of the window to check for aliens.
4. The audience grew very restless waiting for the midnight show to begin.
5. The air in the ship is recycled.
6. I felt exhausted from the anticipation of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.
7. The owners grew flowers that ate people all around their house.
8. The Falcon looks very wet because it has been in
the rain many hours.
9. The horse tastes the hay and oats without
hesitation.
10. Dragons fly often in the blue sky.
11. fairies like to land in green trees.
12. Dragon watchers must always wait with
patience.
13. The Weyland-Yutani Company charges its
workers medical insurance.
14. The bank on Ferenginar will keep a record of your work.
15.Jake wrote in his column twice a week.
16. My team had to climb over the hill to reach the survivors.
17. Everybody at the stadium felt so alive waiting for Disaster Area.
Directions: Add a complete subject to each group of words.

Example A: ____________________ heard a loud noise.


Answer: The tall Vulcan heard a loud noise.
1. ____________________ walked to the assembly.
2. ____________________ spoke to the crowd.
3. ____________________ went to class in the morning.
4. ____________________ was happy to survive.
5. ____________________ were relieved that they won the game.
6. ____________________ won the race.
7. ____________________ made dinner.
8. ____________________ cheered loudly.

Directions: Add a complete predicate to each group of words.

Example A: The man ____________________________________________.

Answer: The man traveled to the future with Doctor Brown.

9. The quidditch player


10. My mother
11. Susan
12. My friend
13. The quidditch team
14. The city
15. We

Now write an 8-10 sentence story. Change the color of the complete
subject and underline the complete predicate.
Thanks for the complememt

Underline the complement in the following sentences.

1. James Kirk captains the Enterprise.


2. Star Wars in the Classroom is a good resource.
3. Peabody owned a time machine.
4. Han Solo was frozen in a block of carbonite.
5. Michonne owns a sword.
6. Wash flew Serenity.
7. The Flash ran to China.
8. Wonder Woman flies an invisible jet.
9. Hermione made the Polyjuice Potion.
10. Bilbo found a magic ring.
Unidentified Flying Direct Objects (UFDOs)

Ride your dewback to the direct object or objects in each sentence and leave your
mark.

1. Kylo Ren has a really nifty lightsaber.


2. Jyn Erso did not have a happily ever after.
3. Mark Hamil reads tweets like the Joker.
4. Mulder spotted the alien but Scully did not see it.
5. Cooper liked a damn fine cup of coffee.
6. Shelob is a big spider.
7. The William Shakespeares Star Wars series is a must read.
8. He beamed down with a tricorder and phaser.
9. The Batmobile has custom rims.
10. Wampas do not make good pets.
Indirect Flying Objects

Identify the indirect objects in the following sentences.

1. Pokemon teaches children how to catch monsters.


2. Obi-wan handed Luke a lightsaber.
3. The Doctor sent me a bill for time travel services.
4. Ron read his daughter the Tales of Beedle the Bard.
5. Adama built Rosslin a cabin.
6. Have you got your tickets for the next Star Trek convention?
7. Kirk told McCoy about Spock.
8. Doc Brown sent Marty a letter from the past.
9. Ford gave Arthur a much needed towel.
10. Sheldon lectured Leonard all about trains.
Predicate nominatives

Underline the predicate nominatives in the sentences below.

1. Godzillas best friend is his son.


2. Wonder woman thought that could be her
jet but she couldnt see it.
3. The Doctor would have used his screwdriver
if he could have found it.
4. Palpatine should not have been the leader of
the galaxy.
5. Worfs favorite toy is a stuffed targ.
6. Man eating fly traps eat people who like to
sing.
7. He thought they were Vulcans but they were
Romulans.
8. Leonardos favorite food must be pizza.
9. Aragon will be king.
10. Transformers are robots in disguise.
Predicate adjectives

Underline the predicate adjectives in the sentences below.

1. A three-headed dog seems weird.


2. Fluffy is a funny name for a three-headed dog.
3. Fluffys hair looks matted.
4. Music makes fluffy feel like a sleepy dog.
5. Fluffy can be a scary dog.
6. Fluffy loves the scruffy giant Hagrid.
7. Hargrid thought fluffy looked lovely.
8. Fluffy has giant fleas.
9. Fluffy would like a juicy bone.
10. Wow, ten sentences were about that mangy mutt.
All together now

See if you can use your VISOR to identify the most important parts of a sentence.
Use the following code subject (s), verb (v), direct object (DO), indirect object (IO),
predicate nominative (PN) and predicate adjective (PA). Not all sentences will
have all of the above.

1. Kira bought Sisko a new baseball program for his birthday.


2. According to the Bat Computer, the Joker goes through a lot of pies.
3. Hobbits are generally small.
4. Professor Xavier gives interesting lectures on mind reading,
mind control and resistance.
5. Most Vulcans are slightly green and they love logic.
6. Every day Data feeds his cat.
7. Luke praised young Ben for an interesting lightsaber design.
8. During the two week space flight, Ender often became very
bored.
9. Neelix showed Naomi a funny film, the Adventures of Flotter
and the Perfect Day.
10. Ron told his mother a creative story about Martin the mad
muggle.
11. Howard invented a new guidance system to make money.
12. Through meditation, Tuvok finds his inner Vulcan.
13. At the replemat, always check your gagh for worms.
14. Wash taught Mal how to play with dinosaurs.
15. At the Appreciation Dinner, Picard introduced Data to the loquacious
Hutch.
16. After getting into the loader, angry Ripley gave the mother alien a huge
smack.
17. To the surprise of the family, Dudley came out of surgery with an even
longer tail.
18. Dig like a Horta.
19. Dont make the Devils Tower out of your mashed potatoes and gravy.
20. Nearsighted gunners sometimes mistake buzzing flies for targets.
An interesting subject

Take these sentence fragments and add a subject to complete the sentence. Answers will vary.

1. Beamed to the planet.


2. Ate tribble stew.
3. While flying the ship.
4. Ran from the cylons.
5. Jumped over the mushrooms.
6. Wanted to stop the Templars.
7. Cursed a lot of people.
8. Cursed at a lot of people.
9. Ate a lot of people.
10. Is made of people.

By your command, question or statement

Underlie the simple subject in the following statements, questions or commands.

1. Dont eat the Puking Pastel, Fred!


2. Have you seen this boy?
3. The ED-209 couldnt beat Robocop.
4. If Cyclops has two eyes, how do they form one beam?
5. Who was the idiot that gave Jason his machete back?
6. The owls are not what they seem.
7. So long and thanks for all the fish.
8. Grammar Slam should be shown in schools.
9. The Nerdist podcast has it all.
10. Voldermort could use a tan.

Arise my subjects

Find the complete subject in the following sentences:

1. Cut, cuddy tribbles should not be used for softball practice.


2. Scary monsters can have feelings too.
3. Mal, a loveable rouge, was the captain of Serenity.
4. Willie liked to cut school and hang out with his uncle.
5. After exercising strenuously, Jayne liked to clean his weapons.
6. Eleven hid from the scientists.
7. Seven of Nine used to be a Borg.
8. It turned out Harry was a horecrux.
9. Alan Rickman was a fantastic Snape.
10. Farscape should have had a fifth season.

Predator: Predicates

Hunt down and underline the simple subject and simple predicate in the following sentences.

1. A near sighted beholder needs lots of contact lenses.


2. Riff-Raff has a bouncing thumb.
3. Audrey II swallowed Seymour both in the play and the directors cut of the movie.
4. You should not eat ketchup made from killer tomatoes.
5. Mothra thinks Godzilla gets all the good attention.
6. Howard the Duck is a better movie than people give it credit for.
7. William Shatner does not really want to be in a musical version of Julius Caesar.
8. Hagrid had a whole ham stuck in his beard once and didnt notice.
9. Avada Kedavra is considered inappropriate language in school.
10. I like muggles better than no-maj.

Directions: For each sentence given below, change the circle of the complete subject and underline the
complete predicate .

Example A: John went to the new Star Wars movie with his friends
Answer: John went to the new Star Wars movie with his friends.

1. The centaur appeared at the starting line.


2. The Andorian student arrived late to class because he woke up late.
3. John looked out of the window to check for aliens.
4. The audience grew very restless waiting for the midnight show to begin.
5. The air in the ship is recycled.
6. I felt exhausted from the anticipation of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.
7. The owners grew flowers that ate people all around their house.
8. The Falcon looks very wet because it has been in the rain many hours.
9. The horse tastes the hay and oats without hesitation.
10. Dragons fly often in the blue sky.
11. fairies like to land in green trees.
12. Dragon watchers must always wait with patience.
13. The Weyland-Yutani Company charges its workers medical insurance.
14. The bank on Ferenginar will keep a record of your work.
15.Jake wrote in his column twice a week.
16. My team had to climb over the hill to reach the survivors.
17. Everybody at the stadium felt so alive waiting for Disaster Area.
Directions: Add a complete subject to each group of words.

Example A: ____________________ heard a loud noise.


Answer: The tall Vulcan heard a loud noise.
1. ____________________ walked to the assembly.
2. ____________________ spoke to the crowd.
3. ____________________ went to class in the morning.
4. ____________________ was happy to survive.
5. ____________________ were relieved that they won the game.
6. ____________________ won the race.
7. ____________________ made dinner.
8. ____________________ cheered loudly.

Directions: Add a complete predicate to each group of words.

Example A: The man ____________________________________________.

Answer: The man traveled to the future with Doctor Brown.

9. The quidditch player


10. My mother
11. Susan
12. My friend
13. The quidditch team
14. The city
15. We

Now write a 8-10 sentence story. Change the color of the complete subject and underline the complete
predicate.

Thanks for the complememt

Underline the complement in the following sentences.

1. James Kirk captains the Enterprise.


2. Star Wars in the Classroom is a good resource.
3. Peabody owned a time machine.
4. Han Solo was frozen in a block of carbonite.
5. Michonne owns a sword.
6. Wash flew Serenity.
7. The Flash ran to China.
8. Wonder Woman flies an invisible jet.
9. Hermione made the Polyjuice Potion.
10. Bilbo found a magic ring.

Unidentified Flying Direct Objects (UFDOs)

Ride your dewback to the direct object or objects in each sentence and leave your mark.

1. Kylo Ren has a really nifty lightsaber.


2. Jyn Erso did not have a happily ever after.
3. Mark Hamil reads tweets like the Joker.
4. Mulder spotted the alien but Scully did not see it.
5. Cooper liked a damn fine cup of coffee.
6. Shelob is a big spider.
7. The William Shakespeares Star Wars series is a must read.
8. He beamed down with a tricorder and phaser.
9. The Batmobile has custom rims.
10. Wampas do not make good pets.

Indirect Flying Objects

Identify the indirect objects in the following sentences.

1. Pokemon teaches children how to catch monsters.


2. Obi-wan handed Luke a lightsaber.
3. The Doctor sent me a bill for time travel services.
4. Ron read his daughter the Tales of Beedle the Bard.
5. Adama built Rosslin a cabin.
6. Have you got your tickets for the next Star Trek convention?
7. Kirk told McCoy about Spock.
8. Doc Brown sent Marty a letter from the past.
9. Ford gave Arthur a much needed towel.
10. Sheldon lectured Leonard all about trains.

Predicate nominatives

Underline the predicate nominatives in the sentences below.

1. Godzillas best friend is his son.


2. Wonder woman thought that could be her jet but she couldnt see it.
3. The Doctor would have used his screwdriver if he could have found it.
4. Palpatine should not have been the leader of the galaxy.
5. Worfs favorite toy is a stuffed targ.
6. Man eating fly traps eat people who like to sing.
7. He thought they were Vulcans but they were Romulans.
8. Leonardos favorite food must be pizza.
9. Aragon will be king.
10. Transformers are robots in disguise.

Predicate adjectives

Underline the predicate adjectives in the sentences below.

1. A three-headed dog seems weird.


2. Fluffy is a funny name for a three-headed dog.
3. Fluffys hair looks matted.
4. Music makes fluffy feel like a sleepy dog.
5. Fluffy can be a scary dog.
6. Fluffy loves the scruffy giant Hagrid.
7. Hargrid thought fluffy looked lovely.
8. Fluffy has giant fleas.
9. Fluffy would like a juicy bone.
10. Wow, ten sentences were about that mangy mutt.

All together now

See if you can use your VISOR to identify the most important parts of a sentence. Use the following
code subject (s), verb (v), direct object (DO), indirect object (IO), predicate nominative (PN) and
predicate adjective (PA). Not all sentences will have all of the above.

1. Kira (S) bought (V) Sisko (IO) a new baseball program (DO) for his birthday.
2. According to the Bat Computer, the Joker (S) goes (V) through a lot of pies (DO).
3. Hobbits (S) are (V) generally small (PA).
4. Professor Xavier (S) gives (V) interesting lectures (DO) on mind reading, mind control and
resistance.
5. Most Vulcans (S) are (V) slightly green (PA) and they (S) love (V) logic.
6. Every day Data (S) feeds (V) his cat (DO).
7. Luke (S) praised (V) young Ben (DO) for an interesting lightsaber design.
8. During the two week space flight, Ender (S) often became (V) very bored (PA).
9. Neelix (S) showed (V) Naomi (IO)a funny film (DO), the Adventures of Flotter and the Perfect
Day.
10. Ron (S) told (V) his mother (IO) a creative story (DO) about Martin the mad muggle.
11. Howard (S) invented (V)a new guidance system (DO) to make (V) money (PN).
12. Through meditation, Tuvok (S) finds (V) his inner Vulcan (DO).
13. At the replemat, always check (V) your (S) gagh for worms (DO).
14. Wash (S) taught (V) Mal (IO) how to play with dinosaurs (DO).
15. At the Appreciation Dinner, Picard (S) introduced (V) Data (IO) to the loquacious Hutch (DO).
16. After getting into the loader, angry Ripley (S) gave (V) the mother alien (IO) a huge smack (DO).
17. To the surprise of the family, Dudley (S) came (V) out of surgery (IO) with an even longer tail
(DO).
18. (You, implied, S)Dig (V) like a Horta.
19. (You implied, S)Dont make (V) the Devils Tower (DO) out of your mashed potatoes and
gravy.
20. Nearsighted gunners (S) sometimes mistake (V) buzzing flies (IO) for targets (DO).