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Copyright 1941 by Horowitz and Harkness.

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Published in the United Kingdom by Constable
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we 2.

This Dover edition, first published in 1960, is an


unabridged and unaltered republication of the work
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New York, N.Y. 10014
Biography of
AKIBA RUBINSTEIN
An Eventful and Tragic Life
Deep out of the shadows, out of the Middle-Ages, came Akiba Rubin
stein. A dark squalid Ghetto of Russian-Poland was the Bethlehem in which
his spark of life was kindled. Rubinstein was born on December 12, 1882,
1D Stawiski, of the Province of Lomza. For generations his ancestors had
been rabbis and scholars of the Hebrew class1cs, equally inured to physical
privation and the intensive cultivation of the mind.

In the home of Rubinstein's parents both were to be found-keenness


of intellect and stark poverty. A few weeks before his birth, his father had
died, leaving behind a wife and twelve children. Akiba went to the house
of his grandparents, who forthwith undertook his up-bringing. The lines
of this "up-bringing'' were marked out to a nicety. The youngster would
become a teacher of the Talmud, a student of Hebrew, even as his father
and his grandfather before him.

His education was indeed received i n the "Cheder,'' the school of the
Jewish community, and the "Yeshiva,'' a higher academy of religious
instruction. The prescribed language was Hebrew and Yiddish : Rubinstein
understood no other, and had no desire for any other. He would become
an ornament of the Ghetto-nothing more.

Then chess came into his life. He chanced to see two children playing
the game in the "Yeshiva." He was fascinated and from that moment
chess became the ruling passion of his life. He was sixteen years of age
at the time, and immediately obtained the only chess book available i n
Hebrew, "Chess, Checkmate," b y Sossnitz. He absorbed its contents entire.
Study of the T()rah, the lore of the Talmud, became an evanescent dream;
only chess remained.

His grandparents noted, and mourned. They cursed the devilish alchemy
in whose toils the boy had become enmeshed. His mother prayed dally
that the Lord bring her erring son back to the well trodden paths. But
Rubinstein was lost to God; he had succumbed to a demon, that was to
embody his tragic fate, and from which his life could never more be sun
dered. From the petty glory of the Ghetto and a humdrum existence, his
way was to lead to world-wide renown and a soul racking ambition.

ill
At 19 Rubinstein learned that in the nearby town of Lodz there lived
a real chess master, one George Salwe-a champion, who, indeed, had
crossed swords with the great Tschigorin. Forthwith Rubinstein betook
himself to Lodz ; there he found in some way the means of subsistence, and
thereafter was nowhere else to be found except in the sphere of chess. He
played with those to whom Salwe gave the odds of a rook ; but even against
these yokels the young man of Stawiski did not shine. Clearly the lad of the
Ghetto was not cut out to be a chess player.

No one had any confidence In his ability except Rubinstein. He re


turned to his native village and for several months disappeared from view.
Suddenly he was in Lodz once more. He entered the chess club, then direct
to the table of master Sal we, and challenged him to battle.

Salwe smiled indulgently ; those about the master mocked In derision.


But Rubinstein seated himself, and played and won. The whole club went
into a huddle. Without delay a match between Salwe and Rubinstein was
arranged. The result was a deadlock at 5 : 6. A second match was played
and victory rested with Rubinstein 5 : 3. The old champion was dethroned,
and the dreamy Y,Outh from the Polish village reigned in his stead.

A year later he was sent to the Russian National Tourney at Kiev,


where he obtained the 5th Prize. In 1905 he entered the international arena,
and at Barmen won his spurs 1n the Hauptturnier A of the German Chess
Association, tying with Duras for third prize. He became a recognized
master. From the odds of a rook, after less than four years, he bestrode
the realm of chess like a Colossus.

Now began a breath-taking march from triumph to triumph. At Ostend


(1 905) he was third among 36 entrants. Schlechter and Maroczy alone out
ranked him, with such prime figures as Bernstein, Teichmann, Marshall,
Janowski and the whole array of Russian talent trailing behind.

Shortly after the new year was ushered in he scaled the pinnacle in
competition among the great. At Ostend he shared first prize with Bern
stein far in advance of 28 contenders. At Karlsbad he won undisputed first
honors, and with this victory broke the supremacy of the so-called Lasker
Pleiades, that is, the generation of grandmasters who were contemporaries
ot Lasker, and who had set the standard In the world of chess since 1890.
With this victory the standard was hauled down, and Rubinstein in turn
became the standard bearer of his generation, which was to include Capa
blanca, Niemzowitch, Spielmann, Tartakower, Vidmar and all others of the
new epoch of chess.

At St. Petersburg in 1909 the Polish master demonstrated his full


equality with world champion Lasker, whom he defeated in their individual
encounter. In fact it was not until the last round that Lasker's score matched
his own, so that both shared the first prize.

iv
His great year of triumph, however, came three years later, in 1912.
In a period of twelve months, he scored no less than ftve ftrst prizes in in
ternational competition, a record that in the whole gamut of chess history
has never been duplicated, either before or after. San Sebastian, Pistyan,
Breslau, Warsaw, and Vilna.

But In this year also the shadows for the ftrst time flitted across the
spirit of Rubinstein. None the less his record blazoned forth, and it was
clear to the whole world that Rubinstein was to be the next champion. Nor
was this conviction shaken by his astounding failure at St. Petersburg in
1914, the first signal rebu.tr in his career. A great match for the world title
was scheduled to take place in the spring of 1914 between Lasker and
Rubinstein. The chess world waited expectantly. Then came the War.

Among the millions who fell victims to the ravages of the Great War
is to be numbered Rubinstein, chess genius. The post-war Rubinstein Is a
far different master than the triumphant hero of 1914 who was to contest
with Lasker for the Championship of the World. The soul of the sensitive
Rubinstein had been most delicately poised even at the height of his career,
and was most sorely tried by the ravages and hardships of the war years.
Gone was that Inner harmony so essential for the complete fulfillment of
the powers of a chess artist.

It is true that even in the last fifteen years he has garnered a long list
of tournament successes, and not a few first prizes, and has played games
that take their place among the gems of chess literature. But Rubinstein
has lost the supreme confidence in himself that is the necessary equipment
of a champion. He suffers in fact from an Inferiority complex, deeming
himself superfluous, no longer a necessary adjunct to every great tourney,
nor Indeed welcome.

Ever modest and retiring, his shyness has become an obsession to the
point of a real mental aberration. Yet we can be sure that were he to
overcome this fixation, and to find some degree of contentment, attaining
that calm and clear vision that most distinguished his play in his earlier
period, he would once more find his place in the fore-front of the masters
in spite of his fifty years.

There can be little doubt that Rubinstein has added more to the present
status of chess theory and technique than any master since Steinltz. More
innovations in the openings and more of the lines that are today recognized
as the ultimate in correctness and strength can be traced to his genius and
originality than can be ascribed to any other master. The standard defense
of the Ruy Lopez-B-K2, P-Q3, P-QKt4, P-QB4, etc.-owes most to him.
In the Four Knights both Kt-Q6 (leading to a draw) and Q-K2 (followed by
Kt-Q), were formulated by him, and so potently aided Black, that they have
all but banished this opening from serious play. In the Queen's Gambit
Declined, it was Rubinstein who perfected the Fianchetto of the King's
Bishop against Tarrasch's defense of P-QB4, and sent that variation into

v
semi-retirement for many years. Indeed he most signally celebrated the
triumph of th.ls variation by resounding victories over Lasker (1909) and
Capablanca (1911).

In recent years he has introduced new attacks and defenses 1n the most
hyper-modern positions. Against Black's 3 . . . B-Kt5 In the Queen's Pawn
Opening, his simple P-K3 followed by Kt-K2 Is especlally noteworthy. Less
well known is his novel sacrificial line against the Blumenfeld Counter At
tack, while his crushing treatment of the Queen's Fianchetto Defense by !

a solid phalanx of pawns that aimed at QB5, was classically 1llustrated in


his game against Thomas. His 2 . . Kt-KB3 is in my judgment one of
.

the best of Black's resources in the Sicilian.

He is a pioneer and originator who hews out new paths In the domain
of chess. He is not content merely to win games, to take advantage of
some lapse on the part of his adversary, to entrap his opponent Into pitfalls
that have been dug by others. He views himself as an artist and at each
session he endeavors to add something worth while to the literature of
chess and some new thought to its technique.

As a result the record of his victories constitutes the most valuable


compilation of games that has been brought together by any master. As
we go over these one by one we are amazed at their superiority In depth
and strategy over the masterpieces of those we have long honored with
the label of champion. In the opinion of the writer only the games o f
Capablanca reach a higher standard of perfection. B u t Capa built largely
on the labors of others, adding merely the final mark of his own great
talent. His is a great gift of selection. Rubinstein is the creator and h.1s
moves bear the imprint of his own personality.

Of Lasker It was indeed said that he played P-K4 with a view to the
end game. But Lasker's chief forte was the complex struggle of the mid
game, and he added little to our knowledge of the openings, being content
to trod the best paths, and to leave the blazing of new trails to some more
adventurous spirits.

And be it said for Rubinstein that he stands as the greatest end-game


player of all time, if not indeed, the most finished master we have known.
In fact so profound an impression did his games make with the writer, that
in a brief colloquy with Reuben Fine he ventured the thought that the
Polish master ranked with Capablanca in the sheer artistry of his victories.
Mr. Fine not only agreed with this appraisal, but indicated his belief that
Rubinstein should be placed at the very head of the list.

WhY then such disparity between his talent and his recent perform
ances ? Dr. Hannak writes :

Rubi nstein's character is too noble for the rough and tumble
of l i fe. H is col leagues know best the spl e ndor of his personal ity,

vi
his consideration for others. So solicitous is he that his opponent
bo not d isturbed in his reflection, that as a matter of principle, he
l eaves the board after each move, and only retu rns after his ad
versary has completed his play. Naturally much time ia lost there
by, and his own thinking suffers, and many a surprising loss of
R u b i n stei n c:an no doubt be attributed to this factor."

He is indeed the Spinoza of chess. More geometriw, with crystal


clt.ar, mathematical detachment, he builds up his position-grace, ease and
restraint most markedly apparent in the process. Yet his game throbs
with the zeal of the artist, revealing the throes and pains of the creator,
all of which are held in check by a judicial appraisal, a calm logic. His
games remind us of a great symphony that flows evenly and majestically, yet
contains within itself deep tones of approaching storms. From time to time
the wild spirit breaks forth from the confines of its Olympian repose, giving
us games like his imperishable contest with RoUewi. Yet even in his most
dashing attacks there is the supreme mastery of the elements-the sacrl1lce
of a queen (against Duras in 1908), not to overwhelm his adversary, but
to win a pawn, and some twenty-five moves later, by the most refined tech
nique, to translate the pawn advantage into victory.

This is the great feature of his play-its great strategic depth. He 1s


never superficial, never cheap or tawdry. He is never seeking merely to win,
but always to create a "Work of Art." He never plays to the score or to the
weakness of his opponent, but ever to the board and to give us his best.

B. F. WINKELMAN
Philadelphia, 1941
With acknowledgment to
Dr. Hannak'I introduaion
to "RubinJtein Gewinnt"

vii
CONTENTS
BIOGRAPHY OF AKIBA RUBINSTEIN - -- ---- - -- --- ---- - ---------- 111
No. of
Game Page
CHAPTER I. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENT AT KARLSBAD,
1907 ----------------------------------------------- 13
1. Janowski-Rubinstein ----- ----- --- --- -- - --- ----- - --------- 13
2. Duras-Rubinstein -- - -
- --- ---- -- --------- -- --- -- --- ------- 16
3. Salwe-Rubinstein - ---- - ---- - - - --- -- -- - -- -- - ------ - ---- ---- 17
4. P. Johner-Rubinstein --- - -------- - ------- -- ---- ------- - -- - 19
5. Rubinstein-Teichmann - ------- - ------ - ------- - ------- - ---- 21

CHAPTER II. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENT AT LODZ,____ 1907 23


6. Rotleur-Rubinstein -- - - -- --- -- ------ - - -- - -- ----- ------- - - - 23
7. DosChotimirski-Rubinstein - --- - ----- ---- - ---- ----- -- -- - - 24
8. Rubinstein-Salwe ----------------------------------------- 26
9. Rubinstein-Salwe 27
10. Salwe-Rubinstein 30
11. Salwe-Rubinste!n 32

CHAPTER III. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT VIENNA,


PRAGUE AND LODZ, 1908. MATCH AT VIENNA,
1908 --------------------- ---- - -- - ----- ---- ----- ---- 35
12 Rubinstein-Duras ---- - - --- ----- -- ---- - ---- - ---------- ---- - 35
13. Rubinstein-Teichmann --- -- -- --- -- - -- - -------- -- --- -- -- -- - 36
14. Alapin-Rubinstein - -- --- - --- ---- - -
- -- - ----- -- --------- - -- - 37
15. Dr. Vidmar-Rubinstein --- -- -
- -- - ------ - --- - -- - -- ----- ----- 38
16. Rubinstein-Spielman - -- - --- --- --- -- - ------ ---- - ------- - - - - 40
17. Marshall-Rubinstein - ---- --- -- - ---- - -- -- -- -- - - - -
- - - ------- 41
18. Rubinstein-Marshall ---- ------ ----- -------- --- --- - ---- ---- 43
19. Rubinstein-Salwe - ----------- -- - - -- - -- -- ----- --- ------ - --- 45

CHAPTER IV. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENT AT ST. PETERS-


BURG, 1909 ---------------------------------------- 47
20. Rubinstein-Schlechter -- ---- -- ---- - -- - - --- - --- -
- - -------- - 47
21. E. Cohn-Rub!nstein - - ----- -- --- ------------ - - -- -- --- ---- - 48
22. Rubinste!n-M!eses -- -- - ------------- - - -
- - - -- -- -- - - - - --- - - 50
23. Rubinstein-Dr. Lasker - ---- -- ---- ----- -- -------- ---- - -- - - - 62
24. Speyer-Rubinstein -- -- --- -------- -- -- - -- - - ---- -- --- ---- --- 64
25. Dr. Vidmar-Rubinstein -- -- ----- - -- - - ----- - ---
- -- - ---- - --- 56
26. Forgacs-Rub!nste!n ------- -- - --- - ------ - ---- - --- - - --
- ----- 67
27. Duras-Rubinstein - -- ------ - ----- - -- --- - ---- -------- - -- - --- 69
28. Spielmann-Rubinstein - -- - -
- -- - --- -------------- -- -- - - -- - 60
29. Rubinstein-Snosko-Borowski --- - - - - -- ----- - --- - -- - - ----- - 63
No. of
Game Page
CHAPTER V. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT SAN SEBAS-
TIAN AND KARLSBAD, 1911 ------------------------ 65
30. Rubinstein--Capablanca - - - ------ -- - -- - -- ---- - - ------ - -- -
- - 65
31. Rubinstein-Duras ----------------------- --- -------- ----- -- 67
32. AJapin-Rubinstein ---------------------------------------- 69
33. Rubinstein-Lowenfisch - - ----
--- - --
- - --- - - - -- - - -- -- --- -- --- 70
34. Rubinstein-Alekhine - - -- --- - --
-- - -- -- --- --
-- -- - ---- - -- - --- 72

CHAPTER VI. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT SAN SEBAS-


TIAN, PISTYAN AND BR ESLAU, 1912 -------------- 75
35. Rubinstein-schlechter ------ --------- - -- ----- ---------- - -- 75
36. Schlechter-Rubinstein - - - --- -- --- - - - -
-- - ---- ------ -- --- - - - 76
37. Spiehnann-Rubinsteln ------------------------------------ 78
38. Dr. Tarrasch-Rubinstein - -- - -
- - --- --- - ------ - ----- - -- ----- 79
39. Rubinstein-Duras -
- ------- - - - - --
---- - - -- - - -- -- --- - - - --- - -- 81
40. Rubinstein-Marshall - -- - - - --
--- --- -- -
---- -- - --- - - -- - ----- - 82

CHAPTER VII. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT LODZ, 191 6 ;


WARSAW AND LODZ, 1917. MATCH AND QUAD
RANGULAR TOURNEY AT BERLIN, 1918 ---------- 85
41. Factor-Rubinstein ----
------------- -- --- -- - ---- - - -- ----- -- 85
42. Belltzmann-Rubinstein ------------------------------------ 87
43. Gottesduner-Rubinstein -
----- -- - - - - -
---- ------- - - ---- -- - -- 87
44. llegedzinsky-Rubinsteln ---------------------------------- 89
45. Rubinstein-schlechter ---------------------------------- 90
46. Rubinstein-Schlechter ------------------------------------ 92

CHAPTER VIII. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT GOTE-


BUIW, 1920, AND THE HAGUE, 1921 -------------- 94
47. Rubinstein-Dr. Tarrasch ---------------------------------- 94
48. Reti-Rubinstein - ----
-- --- - - ------- - - -- -
- -- 95 - ----- --- - - ----

49. Rubinstein-Maroczy -------------------------------------- 97


50. Dr. Euwe-Rubinstein - ---
----- - ---- -- - -
--- 98 -- - ----- --- - -- --

61. Rubinstein-Marco - - - - -
-------- ----- -- - - 99- - - -- - - --------- -

52. Rubinstein-Maroczy -- - -
---- - - --- - ------ ---- -101 ---- -- - - -- ---

CHAPTER IX. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT TEPLITZ


SCHONAU AND VIENNA, 1922. SIX-MASTER TOUR
NEY AT HASTINGS, 1922 --------------------------- 103
53. Rubinstein-Dr. Tarrasch -- - - -
-- --------- -------- - -- -- -- --- 103
64. Rubinstein-Teichmann --- -- - - -
- - -
---- -- - - -- ----- ---- - --- -- 104
56. H. Wolf-Rubinsteln -------------------------------------- 106
56. Rubinstein-Dr. Tarrasch ------- -- --
-------- -- - - -- -- ------ - 109
67. Yates-Rubinstein ----------------------------------------- 109
58. Thomas-Rubinstein -
-- -- - -- - - ---
------ --
- -- -- -- ------- ---- 112
59. Rubinstein-Dr. AJekhine -- - -- - - - - -- --- - -- -- -- - ------ ---- 113
][
No. of
Game Page
60. RublDstein-Spielmann ---- ---- - - ----------------------- - -- 115
61. Reti-Rubinstein -------- - ----------------------- - ----- 116
62. Rubinstein-Bogoljubow -------------- - - - - -- - ----------- - -- 117

CHAPTER X. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT KARLSBAD


AND MAHRISCH-OSTRAU, 1923; MERAN AND BER-
LIN, 1924 ----------------------- -- --- -------- ---- -- 120
63. Rubinstein-Dr. Tarrasch ----- ------ - ---- -------- - --- --
-- -- 120
64. Rubinstein-Hromadka --- - ----------------- - --- - --- ------ 122
65. Dr. Tarrasch-Rubinstein -- -- -- - -- ------- - ---- ----- ---- --- 124
66. Grunfeld-RublDstein - --------- ---- - - --------- ----------- 126
67. Mieses-Rubinstein ---- ------ --- ------- --- -- - --- - --------- 126

CHAPTER XI. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT BADEN-


BADEN AND MARIENBAD, 1925 ----------------- 129
68. Spielmann-Rubinstein - - --- - ----------- ------- ---- --- - - - - 129
69. Rubinstein-Carls - --- --- ----------- ------------- ------ ---- 130
70. Yates-Rubinstein ----- - ---- ------ -- -- -- - ---- - - - --- - - ------ 131
71. Mieses-Rubinstein ------- --- ------------ - ---- -------- ---- - 133
72. Rubinstein-Samisch ------- ------------ - - ----- ------ -- - - 134
73. Michell-Rubinstein ------ --- ----- - ----- -- -- -- - ------ -- --- 135
74. Rubinstein-Dr. Tartakower -- - ------ - -- --- -- -- ------- - -- 137
75. Rubinstein-Janowski ----------- - -- ------ -- ------------- - 139
76. Yates-Rubinstein -- ----------- ---- ------ - ------- -- - ----- 139

CHAPTER XII. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENT AT SEMMER-


ING, 1926 --------------------------------------- 142
77. Kmoch-Rubinstein --------------------- ---- -- -- -
-- ------ 142
78. Dr. Michel-RubinstelD - --- -------------- - --- -- -------- - - -- 143
79. Rubinstein-Spielmann ------ -------------- - --- -- ---- - ---- 145
80. Rubinstein-Reti - ----- -- - -- - -------- ---- --- - --- ----------- 147
81. Yates-Rubinstein - --- ---- - -- ---- ---- - -- - ---- ------- -- -- - 148
82. Rubinstein--Grunfeld -------- ------ - -------- ---- ---------- - 151

CHAPTER XIII. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT DRESDEN,


BUDAPEST AND HANOVER, 1926 ---------------- 153
83. Yates-Rubinstein ----------------------------- -- ---- - -- -- 153
84. P. Jahner-Rubinstein - -- --------- -- -- ------------ --------- 154
85. Rubinstein-Takacs ----------- ----------------- - ------ - -- 156
86. Rublnstein-Frh. v. Holzhausen -------------- - - - ------- - -- 158
87. Rubinstein-Mieses --------------------------- ----- --- - -- 159

CHAPTER XIV. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENT AT KISSINGEN,


AND TAGEBLATT TOURNEY AT BERLIN, 1928 ___ 161
88. Rubinstein-Mieses ------ - ------ - --- ------ -- --- ----- ----- - 161
89. Rubinstein-Dr. Tartakower - - -------- --- - --- -- -
---- --- --- - 162

xi
No. of
Game Page
90. Rubinstein-Dr. Tarrasch ---------------------------------- 163
91. Rubinstein-Nimzowitch ----------------------------------- 165
92. Rubinstein-Reti ------------------------------------------ 166
93. Rubinstein-Dr. Tartakower ------------------------------- 168

CHAPTER XV. INTERNATIONAL TOURNAMENTS AT KARLSBAD


AND ROHITSCH-SAUERBRUNN, 1929; SAN REMO,
1930; PRAGUE OLYMPICS, 1931 ------------------- 171
94. Mattison-Rubinstein -------------------------------------- 171
95. Canal-Rubinstein ----------------------------------------- 173
96. Rubinstein-Flohr ----------------------------------------- 175
97. Rubinstein-Canal ----------------------------------------- 177
98. Rubinstein-Dr. Vidmar ----------------------------------- 179
99. Rubinstein-Bogoljubow ----------------------------------- 180
100. Kashdan-Rubinsteln -------------------------------------- 182

INDEX OF OPENINGS --------------------------------------------- 185

INDEX OF OPPONENTS ---------------------------------------- 188

RUBINSTEIN'S TOURNAMENT AND MATCH RECORD ---------- 190

xii
Chapter I
Intemational Townament at Xarlsbad. 1907
Game No. 1 no satisfactory reply. Obviously,
White obtains the superior game
FOU R K N I G H TS GAM E if his own Knight occupies KB5.
But 1f 15 . . PxKt; 16 QxKt,
Karlsbad, 1907
would follow thus: 16 .. . PxP; 17
Rubi nstein P-Q4, etc. If 16 . . . P-KKt4; 17
Janowski
BxP, PxB; 18 QxPch, K-R1; 19
1 P-K4 P-K4 PxP, KR-K1; 20 R-R5, with su
2 Kt-KB3 Kt-Q B3 perior prospects for White.
3 Kt-B3 Kt-B3
1 5 B-Kt3 ?
4 B-Kt5 B-Kt5
15 P-Q4 should have been played.
Rubinstein had not as yet dis
After 15 . . Kt-B5 (QRQ1; 16 P
covered 4 . Kt-Q5! a well-known
Q5!) 16 PxP, PxP; 17 Kt-Q4, KR
variation named after him.
Q1; 18 Q-K3, PxKt; 19 QxKt, P
KKt4; 20 BxP, etc. White attains
5 0-0 0-0
an advantageous attack. But if
6 P-Q3 BxKt
15 . . . P-KKt4; 16 B-Kt3, Kt-B5;
7 Px B P-Q3
then White continues 17 BxKt,
8 B-Kt5 Q-K2
KtPxB (KPxB; 18 P-K5!) 18 P
9 Q-Q2
Kt3, Kt-R4; 19 Q-K2 with advan
For 9 R-K1 compare the follow- tage.
ing game. 15 Kt-R4
1 6 P-Q4
9 Kt-Q1
1 0 B-QB4 B-K3 Now this move is inconsequent.
1 1 B-Kt3 BxB
16 Kt(K3)-B5
12 R Px B Kt-K3

1 7 BxKt KtxB
The mobility of this Knight, 18 P-Kt3 Kt-Kt3
which in all variations aims to Black has indeed been compelled
occup y KB5, is one of the greatest to vacate the excellent square of
obstacles which White must over the Knight; but the "Moor has
come in this opening. performed his duty:" The posi
tion of the White King has been
13 B-R4 P-KR3 weakened (by P-Kt3) and attack
by P-KB4 is threatened.
If 13 . . Kt-B5 White might sac
rifice a Pawn for a strong attack 19 Q-Q3 Q.K3
thus: 14 Kt-Q4, PxKt; 15 QxKt, 20 Kt-Q2 P-KB4
PxP; 16 QR-K1, threatening 17 Q 21 P-Q5 Q-Q2
K3, to be followed by 18 P-KB4! 22 PxP RxP
Black could maintain the Pawn at 23 Kt-K4
a grave disadvantage in position.
The position of the Knight offers
14 K R- K 1 P-R3 some compensation for the op
ponent's possession of the KB file.
Kt-B5 would still have been bad, In spite of this Black obtains the
for after Kt-Q4, Black would have initiative, for the weakening

13
14 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

P-KKt3 cramps Whi te's style ap fend himself against 25 . . . R-R4,


preciably. etc. by 26 P-KB3 or Q-B1, as the
Black Kt cannot gain access to
23 QR-K 81 Q5.
24 R-K3
26 P-Q84 Kt-Kt1 !
Preparing for P-KB3 in order to If 26 . . . R-R4 White can pre
guard against the incidental at vent the entrance of the K n ight
tack R-R4 followed by Q-R6. Into Q5, thus: 27 Q-B1!, Kt-B4 ; 28
R-KB3, followed by 29 P-QB3.
24 Kt- K 2 !
27 P-K83
R u b l ntei n P-QB4 would only add to the
force of Black's next move.

27 Kt-83
28 R-K81

KtxKt
29 QxKt
Apparently White has overcome
the perils of the m id-game. What
can now happen to him in a posi
tion as simple as this? To this
question the next two moves of
Rubinstein offer a menacing ans-
wer.

29 . Q-Q1 ! !

Janowski A very strong and subtle m ove.


Rubinstein recognizes that the Q
can force entry only from the other
Now the Knight threatens to
wi ng.
enter decisively into the attack by
Kt-B4 as circumstances may re
30 Q-K Kt4
quire: his task is also to render
innocuous the coun ter-thrust P Comprehensibly he does not de
QB4-B5, as well as to dislodge sire to permit Q-Kt4. A better
his colleague on K4, - the best defense w as offered by 30 R-Q3 in
posted White piece. order to answer Q-Kt4 by 31 Q-K3,
which also threatens Q-R7 in some
25 R-Q1
variations.
The Pawn at Q5 m ust be pro
30 Q-Q Kt1!
tected in order to increase the

mobility of the White Queen; but Quite overwhelm ing! The Queen
25 P-QB4 would have been a de now takes up a strong position on
cisive m istake for: 25 .. . R-R4; the Queen's wing.
26 Q-B1, (or 26 P-B3, Kt-B4; 27
KR-K1, Kt-Q5; followed by Q-R6 31 K-Kt2 Q-R2
and wins) Kt-B4; 27 R-QB3, Kt 32 R(81 ) -K1 Q-84
Q5; 28 P-B3, KR-B4; 29 K t-Q2, 33 Q-K4 Q-Q Kt:J
K txPch; 30 RxKt, RxR; 31 KtxR, 34 R(K)-K2
P-K5; etc.should win.
Better to retain this Rook on the
25 K-R1 fi rst rank.

Now White could adequately de- 34 . . R(84)-83


K.ARLSBAD, 1907 16

35 Q-Q3 K-Kt1 (41 P-B5, R- Q8! ) R- Q8 an d K-Bl


36 Q-Q83 P-Q R4! (42 P-B5, K-K2 ; 43 PxP, KxP.)
with advantage for Black.
Ex ploiting the cramped position
of the White Rooks: for after the 40 P-QKt3
exchange of Queens, R-QRl can
. . .

not be readily played. Now P-QB5 would require longer


preparation.
37 QxQ PxQ
Black gains t ime to strengthen
38 P-Q 83 PxP
his position decisively.
39 RxP
41 K-Kt4
Actually 39 R-R2, P- B7 ; 40 RxP,
R-Rl would have led to the same The quiet retreat K-Kt2 would
position. be relatively better.

39 R-R1 41 R-RB
42 R-QKt2
Rubinstein
Now he i s on the right t rack,
but it is much too late.

42 K-R2
43 P-Kt4 K-Kt3
44 R ( Kt2)-Kt3
If P-B5, R-Q8 ; 45 PxKtP, PxP;
4 6 R-B6, P-Kt 4 ; followed by RxQP.

44. . . R-84

With the idea of R-KR8 followed


by R-Kt 4ch and R- R4ch or R- Q8
follow e d by R-Q5ch and R- R4ch,
then R-Q7ch.
Janowski
45 R ( 83)-82 R-KRB
46 P-84
40 K-R3 7
There was no adequate defense:
The sole counter-play lay i n: 40 the King gets into a mating net,
P-QB5 e. g. and at least a Pawn must be lost.
a) 40 . . . R-R4 ; 41 P-QKt4, R 46 PxP
R5; (R-Kt 4 ; 4 2 R-B4, ) 42 P-Kt5!
.

47 PxP P-R4ch
with the t hreat 43 P-Kt6, BPxP ; 44 48 K-Kt3 R-Kt8c h
P-B6! 49 K-82 R-Kt5
b) 40 . . . R-R6; 41 PxP, PxP ; 50 R-K83 R(Kt5 ) x P
42 P-KB4, PxP ; 43 PxP, RxP ; 44 51 RxR RxRch
R-K7, R- R7ch; [44 . . . R- B2 ?] 45 52 K-K3 K-84
R- B8ch, R-BI ; 46 R( B8 )-B7) ,-46 53 K-Q3 R-86ch
K-Kt3, R ( B 5 ) -B7 ; 46 R ( B3 ) - B7, R 54 K-Q4 R-QKt6
Kt7ch ; 47 K-B3, R(R7 ) -B7ch ; 48 55 R-82ch K-Kt3
K-K3, R-K7ch ; 49 K-Q3, RxR; 50 56 R-Kt2ch K-R3
RxR, RxP ; 51 RxQKtP, with the 57 P-Kt5 R-K 86
threat of R- Q7, etc.
After 57 P-Kt5 the Pawn posi
Weaker than 40 P-B5 would have tion on the Queen's side has lost
been the preparatory move of 40 all aggressive possibilities, and
P-QKt4 because of R-R8 ; 41 R-Kt2 Black can now devote himself
16 RU BINSTEIN' S CHESS MASTERPIECES

quietly to the exploitation of his 4 B-Kt5 B-Kt5


Pawn plus. 5 0-0 0-0
6 P-Q3 BxKt
58 K-K4 R-83
7 PxB P-Q3
59 R-R2 P-Kt4
8 B-Kt5 Q-K2
60 R-R7 R-B5ch
9 R-K1
61 K-Q3 R-82
62 P-85 In the previous game White
Desperation! playe d 9 Q-Q2, attaining an ex
cellent position.
62 QPxP
63 P-Q6 R -Q2 1 9 Kt-Q1
1 0 P-Q4 Kt-K3
Now it become s apparent how 1 1 B-QB1 P-Q B3
important it was to force the 1 2 B-81
White King on t he Queen file by 60
. . . R-B5ch. The Bishop's moves lead to an
attacking continuation that origi
64 RxP RxPch nated with Teichmann. From the
65 K-K4 R -Q5ch viewpoint of development, not
much is lost as Black, too, must
Much st ronger than the worri
regroup his pie ces.
some defense of t he Knight Pawn
by R-KKt3, etc. 12 . Q-82
1 3 Kt-R4 R-K1
66 K-85 P-R5
67 R- 88 Four years later against Spiel
mann in Karlsbad, Rubinstein
Or 67 R-B6ch, K-R4). 68 RxP,
played 13 . .. R- Q1 with disastrous
R-B5ch followed by R-B7 with an
results.
e asy win.

67 R-B5ch 14 Q-Q3
68 K-K5 P-85 This square should be le ft open
69 R-R8ch K-Kt2 for the Bishop. The proper con
70 R-QB8 K-Kt3 tinuation was P-Kt3 followe d by
71 R-Kt8ch K-R4 P-KB4 and Q-B3.
72 P-R3 P-BS
73 R-R8ch K-Kt3 14 B-Q2
74 R- Kt8ch K-R3 1 5 P-Kt3 Q R-Q1
75 R-R8ch K-Kt2 1 6 B-Kt2
76 R-QB8 R-86
Here the Bishop has no offensive
77 R-86 RxP
power.
78 RxP R-K B6
Resigns. 16 B-81
17 P-KB4
Now that Black i s fully deve l op
ed, t his attack is less effective.
Game No. 2
17 Px B P
FOU R K N I GHTS G A M E 1 8 PxP Kt-81
1 9 P-85
Karlsbad, 1907
A more aggressive continuation
Duras Rub i n stein
would be 19 P-QB4, for in that
1 P-K4 P-K4 event, if 19 . . . Kt-Kt3 (not 20
2 Kt- K B3 Kt-QB3 Q-KKt 3, for KtxKt; 21 QxKt, P
3 Kt-83 Kt.. B3 Q4; 2 2 P-K5, Kt-K5 ! ; 23 BxKt,
KARLS BAD, 1907 17

PxB ; 24 RxP, B-B4; etc. or 1f 23 Indeed anything to brag about, but


RxKt, PxR; 24 BxP, P-KB4!) 20 a ft er 26 P-Q5, he could still put
KtxKt, RPxKt; 21 P-Q5 ! ( 21 B up a fight. If 26 . . . P-QB5 27
Kt2, P-Q4! followed by B- B4 gain Q-Q4 should be play ed. F or 27
ing the important square K5 ) fol Q-K2 would lead to a loss, a fter 27
lowed a fter adequate preparation . . . Q-B4, with the double threat
by posting the Queen's Bishop on 28 . . . KtxKP and KtxQP. Duras
the long diagonal. was always notoriously weak ln
games which r equire positional
19 P-KR3
manoeuvring against Rubinstein.

20 B-Q2
Such situations between masters
B-B4 is not possible because of of nearly equal strength are not
Kt-R4. But i f the White queen uncommon in the records of chess.
were on B3 and the Bishop on Q3, Medical psychology terms them
20 B-B4 could be played with an "complexes. " Bogoljubow, In fact,
excellent game. This Is exemplified included a whole country In his
by the Spielmann-Rubinstein game weak ness. He once said: "I can't
above referred to. play well in England:" and the
facts so demonstrate!
20 . Kt(B)-R2
21 Kt-KB3 R-K2 26 P-Q85
22 P-KR4 P-QB4
Clinching the game.
Threat ening P-QB5, which would
27 Q-K2 8xKP
be decisive as the Pawn at K4
2 8 Q-Kt2 P-Q4
would fall.
Not 28 . . . BxP ; 29 RxR, RxR;
23 Kt-R2 R (Q)-K1 30 RxR, QxR; 31 BxRP, Q-K8ch ;
24 R-K3 32 Kt-Bl.
P- QB5 was still threat ened .
29 8-81 8x8
24 P-QKt3 30 Ktx 8 RxR
25 B-83 8-Kt2 31 8xR
Again t hreatening P-QB5. White ls lost: but RxR would
have afforded a longer defense.
Rubi nstein 31 R-K5
32 Q-R3 R-Kt5ch
33 K-R1 R-Kt6
34 Q-R2 Kt-Kt5
35 8-Kt1 KtxQ
36 8xKt Q-85
37 Kt-Kt1 Qx P
Resigns

Game N o. 3

GiUOCO PIANO

Karlsbad, 1907
Dur-aa Saiwe Rubi nstein

1 P-K4 P-K4
26 Q R-K1 ?
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83
An error, which leads to speedy 3 8-84 8-84
collapse. White's position was not 4 Kt-Q83 Kt-83
18 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

5 P-Q3 P-Q3 In order after PxP not t o permit


6 8-K3 Kt-K4. If White now wishes to
occupy K4 with PxP and P-QB4,
At Karlsbad in 1929 Canal has
he suffers decisive weaknesses on
re-introduced the old variation 6
the Queen's file.
B-Kt5, P-KR3 ; 7 BxKt, QxB; 8
Kt-Q5 , Q-Q1 ; 9 P-B3 etc.: however, 17 Kt-83 8-K Kt3
It enjoyed but a brief vogue as it 18 P-QR4 K-Kt1
is of little merit. 19 P-R5 P-R3
20 Kt-R4
6 . 8-Kt3
7 Q-Q2 B-KKt5 Salwe has artfully created a
slight weakness at Kt6, but it does
More enterprising than the usual
not suffice to give him effective
7 .. . B-K3 et c.
counter-play.
8 Kt-KKt5 B-KR4
20 . . Q-82
Castling is dangerous because 21 Q-Kt4 Q.Q3
of 9 P-KB3, B-R4 ; 10 P-KKt4, B 22 QxQch RxQ
Kt 3 ; 11 PKR4 etc.
The exchange o f Queens has not
9 P-K83 P-K R 3 ! changed the essence of the posi
1 0 Kt-R3 Q-Q2 tion. Black retains the advantage.
1 1 Kt-82
23 P-QB3
P-KKt4 would now merely weak
en White's position. Thereby the retreat of the
Knight at R4 I s barred, compelling
11 Kt-Q5 the further weakness of P-QKt4.
However there was no satisfactory
Threatening KtxBPch etc. The
move.
weakness of Q4 now becomes un
pleasantly evident. 8-R2
23 .

1 2 8xKt 24 8-82 Kt-Q2


25 Q R-K1 P-KR4
If 1 2 0-0-0, B-QR4 is quite dis 26 Kt.Q1 P-83
concerting. 27 Kt-K3 R-Q1
28 P-QKt4?
12 8x8
13 Q Kt-Q1 After 28 Kt-KB5, BxKt ; (Black
cannot permit the Knight to re
An awkward move! White
main at B5) 29 PxB, PQB4. Black
should forthwith have prevented
has the superior game, but far less
the advance which follows. With
so than after the move actually
1 3 Kt( B2)-Q1 and 1 4 Kt-K2, or i n
made.
case 13 . . . B-Kt3 is played, 14
Kt-K3 would have maintained the 28 8xKt!
position.
. .

29 Rx8 P-Q5
13 P-Q4 30 R-K 1 PxP
1 4 B-Kt3 0-0-0 31 KtxP

With his two Bishops and the The White Pawn structure is
attack in the center, Black has the now decisively weakened.
superior game. Rubinstein now
translates hi s advantage into vic 31 P-R5
tory in exemplary style.
To prevent a counter attack by
1 5 0-0 P-KKt4 P-R4 if Black replles (PxP; P
16 K-R1 P-Q 83 KB4 ) .
KARLSBAD, 1907 19

32 K-Kt1 Kt-81 wins.


33 K-82 Kt-K3 A nd if 46 R-QZ, Ktx KtPch; 47
34 Kt-K2 8-K1 KQ3, Kt-K8ch; 48 K-B3, RxR; 49
KxR, Ktx BPch; followed b:y Ktx
34 . . . P-QB4 looks strong: but
RP
after 35 PxP, KtxP; 36 Kt-Bl, B
K1; 37 R-Q1 , B-Kt4 ; 38 K-K3, 43 K-82
44 P-85

White would hold the Pawn at Q3, K-Q2


and the exchange of the healthy 45 P-Kt3
BP for the weakling at Kt4, would
Foreshadows the end. The break
prove pointless. Now, on the con
through by P-Kt5 was always in
trary, 35 . . . P-QB4 is threatened,
the offing.
with the win of a Pawn.
45 PxPch
35 8-Kt3 Kt-82
46 PxP P-Kt5 !
36 8-84 8-Q2
37 R-Q 8 1 B-K3 If now 47 PxP, Kt-Kt4! ; or lC
38 R-82 8x8 47 PB4, PxP ; 48 PxP, KtxP ; etc.
39 Px8 Kt-K3
47 Kt-Kt1 Kt-Kt4!
Black now controls the only open 48 K-K2 R-R6
file, his Knight gains the formid 49 P-84 KtxP
able outpost of B5, or Q5, the end 50 PxP PxP
of the battle Impends. 51 K-81 KtxPch
52 K-Kt2 Kt-R4
40 R-Q Kt1 R-Q7
53 R-K82 Kt-85ch
41 K R-Kt2 Rx R
54 K-R1 R-R8
By the exchange of one of his 55 R-Q2ch K-K2
Rooks, the survivor secures great
White resigned. The exchange
er chances of entry into the White
of Rook and Knight cannot be
position.
avoided. For if 56 K-R2, P-Kt6ch!
42 R x R R-Q6 and Kt-R6 etc.

Played by Rubinstein in out


R u b i nste i n standing fashion.

Game No.4
R UY LOPEZ
Karlsbad, 1907

P. Johnel' R u b i nstein
1 P-K4 P-K4
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q 83
3 8-Kt5 P-Q R3
4 8-R4 Kt-83
Sal we 5 0-0 8-K2
6 R-K1 P-Q Kt4
43 R-Kt2 7 8-Kt3 P-Q3
8 P-83 8-Kt5
R-Kt6 was threatened. If 4 3 R
9 P-Q4
B3, R-Q7; and in the event of 44
K-K3, R- Kt7 ; 45 R-Q3, Kt-B5 ; and For 9 P-KR3 etc., compare the
20 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

game against Spielmann, St. Pe Not 2 1 Kt-Kt6 because Black


tersburg, 1909. would attain a clear advantage for
the end-game by 21 . . . RrKt4 ; 22
9 0-0

KtxQ, RxQ ; 23 KtxP, B-K3 ; etc.
10 P-QR4 R-K1
11 8-Q5 Q-Q2 21 QxKt
22 Q-Kt8ch

12 PxP Ktx8 Q-Q1


13 PxKt KtxP 23 QxQch RxQ
14 KtxKt PxKt Black has indeed a Pawn ad
15 Q-Kt3 vantage, but because of the separa
tion of the Pawns, as well as the
It would be a serious mistake
Bishops of opposite colors, White
to play 15 P-B3, B-B4 ; 16 RxP??,
should have no difficulty in assur
because of B-B4ch etc. It is there
ing the draw. But Johner now
fore apparent that the plan of
plays weakly, and Rubinstein on
development initiated by 11 B-Q5,
the contrary, with am a z i n g
was at fault. Black is now better
strength.
developed, has his two Bishops
and a mobile majority of Pawns 24 P-83?
on the King's side. 24 P-B4, would have brought
15 - . 8-Q3 either welcome simplification by
1 6 PxP PxP
. . . PxP; or the exchange of
Rooks.
Played without due considera a) 24 . . . P-K5 ? ; 25 RxP or
tion. The Knight Pawn now be b) 24 . .. P-KB3 ; 25 PxP, PxP;
comes weak, and Black thereby 2 6 B-Kt5, R-K1 ; 27 B-B4, or 26 . . .
nearly loses all his advantage. R-Q4 ; 27 RrQB1, P-B4 ; or 27 . . .
Proper was 16 . . . QxP ! ; for after P-B 4 ; . . . B-K 2 ; . . . R-Q2 ; then
17 QxQ, PxQ ; 18 RxR, RxR; 19 28 R-K1, etc.
Kt-R3, Black can continue effec Black would have to play R-Q8
tively with 19 B-Q 2 ; ( 20 P to avoid loss of his Pawn advan
QB4, P-Kt5). tage, but after the exchange of
Rooks, winning prospects would
17 R x R RxR disappear.
1 8 Kt-R3 R-R4
24 . . . . B-K3
Now the difference is apparent : 25 K-82 R-Q4
Black's Queen Bishop cannot de 26 P-Q Kt4
vote itself to the protection of the
Taking from the Bishop the ex
Queen's wing; and Black is driven
cellent post QB3. To be preferred
-in the effort to preserve a modi
was 26 R-K2 ( . . . R-Q8 ; 27 R-Q2.)
cum of his advantage-to the un
natural text-move. After 18 . . . 26 . P-R3
R-Ktl there would follow 19 P 27 P-Kt3 8-Q2
QB4, P-Kt5 ; 20 Kt-Kt5, a move 28 8-K3 P-K84
impossible with the Bishop on Q2. 29 R-Q 81 P-83
30 R-82 K-82
19 P-Q84 31 K-K2

This loses a Pawn, but the re Or 31 P-KB4 was playable. The


sultant position is so favorable reply 31 . . . P-K5 was less to be
that we can hardly refer to the dreaded than the following move.
move as a mistake. P-Kt4
31
19 PxP 32 8-85 P-K85
20 KtxP
.

RxP! Now Black has attained the ideal


21 Ktx8 Pawn formation.
KARLSBAD, 1907 21

49 BxP R- Kt7 ch
33 R-R2 B-84
White resigns: An instructive
34 PxP B-Q6ch
game.
35 K-K1 KtPxP
36 R-R7ch K-Kt3
37 R-K7 B-Kt4
38 R-K6ch K-Kt2
39 B-Q6?

Ru b i nstei n Game No.5

QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED

Karlsbad, 1907

Rubinstein Teichmann

1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 Kt-KB3 P-K3
3 P-QB4 Kt-KB3
4 B-Kt5 B-K2
5 Kt-Q B3 Q Kt-Q2
6 P-K3 0-0
7 Q-82 P-Q Kt3

7 . . . P-B4 forthwith is here


P. Johner recognized as the proper move.

8 PxP PxP
Giving the opportunity for a
9 B-Q3 B-Kt2
problem-like final thrust. 39 R-Q6
10 0-0-0 P-84
was in order, not because of the
11 P-KR4 R-81
exchange, but because-as Wag
ner the Hamburg master expressed In reference to these opening
it-Black could do nothing at all moves we can compare his games
thereafter. This threat was ac against Dus-Chotimirski, Lodz,
tually so strong that in all human 1907, and against Teichmann in
probabllity the well-nigh helpless their match at Vienna in 1908.
game of White would have been 12 K-Kt1 R-K1
saved thereby.
Teichmann
39
K-82

Now the White Rook is thrust to


the wing, and the Black Rook en
ters decisively into the thick of
the fight.

40 R x R P R-Q6
41 K-82 R-K6
42 B-85 R-K7ch
43 K-Kt1 B-85 !
44 RxP B-Q4
45 R-Q6 BxP
46 P-R4 P-K5
47 B-Q4 R-Q71
48 B-K5 P-K6 1 R ub i nstei n
22 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

1 3 PxP RxP KR-K4. If 20 Q-Q4?, B-B3 ; might


It 13 . . . PxP there are some follow, and 20 Q-QKt4 would be
troublesome rejoinders: 14 B-Kt5 followed by 20 . . . B-K2 ; 21 KtxR,
or 14 BB5, the most pointed. In R-B8ch; and BxQ.
reply to 14 BxKt, KtxB ; 15 BB5, 19 . . R-K2
threatening 16 KtxP and 17 P-K4. 20 R-Q4 Q-R1
And not 13 . . . Ktx P ; 14 B-B5 21 P-QKt4 R-B1
followed by BxKt(B3) and BxPch.
If 21 . . . RxP; the game would
14 Kt-Q4 Kt-K51 be decided by 22 Kt-B7, Q-B1 ; 23
This opens the Queen file, where KR-Q1, QxKt ; 24 RxKt, RxR; 25
upon White repulses the attack 1n RxR, Q-B1; 26 Q-Q1.
the center, and quickly secures a
22 Kt.Q6 P-Q Kt4
decisive advantage. P-QR3 fol
lowed by P-QKt4 merited a trial.
22 . . . R-B2 would also lose
1 5 BxKt PxB quickly: e. g. 23 Kt-B5, R-K4 ; 24
1 6 K Kt-Kt5 RxKt, P-QKt4 ; 25 Q-Q1, etc. But
Threatening Kt-Q6. 22 . . . R-Q1 would have offered
some resistance, as after 23 Kt-B5,
16 B-R3 R-K4 ; 24 RxKt, RxKt might fol
17 Q-R4 BxKt low. The text-move loses immedi
1 8 KtxB BxB ately.
19 PxB
23 KtxRI
According to Marco, 19 Kt-Q6
with the continuation 19 . . . KR After 23 . . . PxQ ; 24 KtxRch,
K 4 ; 20 Kt-Kt7, P-Kt4 ; 21 Q-Q4 was K-B1 ; 25 RxKt mate in a few
even stronger. The situation, how moves or loss of the Queen follows.
ever, is not clear if Black replies
19 . . . P-Kt4 instead of 19 . . . Resigns
Chapter U
International Tournament at Lodz. 1907

Game N o . 6 16 KtxKt Bx Kt
17 P-KB4
Q U E E N'S GAM B I T DECLI N E D
KR-Q1 was better. If then 17
Lodz, 1907 o r 1908*
. . Q-B2; then 18 P-KB4, BxKt;
Rotlewi Rubi nstein 19 QR-Bl.

17 . . . B-82
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
1 8 P-K4
2 Kt-K B3 P-K3
3 P-K3 P-QB4 Entirely wrong. The rooks should
4 P-84 Kt-QB3 be brought to bear upon the open
5 Kt-83 Kt-83 lines. It is, however, quite doubt
6 Q Px P ful If equality could still be
6 B-Q3 is best. achieved.

6 .. . . BxP 18 QR-81
7 P-QR3 P-Q R3 1 9 P-K5
8 P-QKt4 B-Q3
9 B-Kt2 0-0 Thereupon an elemental storm
10 Q-Q2? follows.

An ugly and bad move. PxP, 19 B-Kt3ch


20 K-R1
. . .

PxP; 11 B-K2 was playable, or Kt-Kt5!


also 11 B-Q3, whereupon in any 21 B-K4
event White would realize that
his 6th move was weak . After 21 QxKt, RxB ; and Black
wins easily. If 21 Kt-K4, would
10 - -
. Q-K2! follow 21 . . . RxB ; 22 QxR, BxKt ;
1 1 B-Q3 23 QxB, Q-R5 ; 24 P-R3, Q-Kt 6 ; 25
As long as the Black Queen re PxKt, Q-R5 mate.
mained on Q square, the Pawn on
21 Q-R5
Q4 clearly could not be taken. For

22 P-Kt3
eventually B-Kt5ch would win the
Queen. But even now the Pawn If 22 P-R3, RxKt might follow.
is inviolate. 11 PxP, PxP; 1 2 e.g. a) 23 QxKt, RxRPch ! ; 24
KtxP, KtxKt; 13 QxKt, B-K3 ; 1 4 QxR, QxQch ; 25 PxQ, BxBch ; 26
Q-Q1, ( 1 4 Q-Kt5, BxPch ! ) KtxP ! K-R2, R-Q7ch ; 27 K-Kt3, R-Kt7ch ;
and mate in two moves.
11 . . . PxP
1 2 BxP P-QKt4 b) 23 BxB, RxRPch; etc.
1 3 B-Q3 R-Q1
c) 23 BxR, BxB ; 24 QxKt, ( 24
14 Q-K2
QxB, Q-Kt6 ! etc.) QxQ; 25 PxQ,
Naturally the Queen must not R-Q6 ; followed by 26 . . . RxB for
remain on Q2. White must parry the threat 26
. . . RxRP mate.
14 B-Kt2
1 5 0-0 Kt-K4

White has wasted no less than several sources give the date as
three moves in the opening. 1907, others as 1908.
23
24 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Rubi nstein Resigns


This is Rubinstein's "Im mortal
Game."

Game No. 7
Q U E EN'S PAWN

Lodz, 1907
Dus-Chot l m i rskl Rubinstein

1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 Kt-K83 P-Q84
3 P-K3 Kt.Q83
4 8-Q3 8-Kt5
Rotlewl
5 8-K2

22 RxKt! l l Recognizing that the opening


moves have not been well chosen.
A wonderful combination ! 3 P-B4 would have been stronger.
23 PxQ If 5 P-B3 there might follow :-
5 . P-K4 ; 6 PxP, BxKt; 7 QxB,
Every other reply leads to speedy
. .

PB5 ; 8 B-B2, Ktx:P ; 9 B-R4ch,


loss. KK2 ! ; (Araiza vs. Dr. Alekhlne,
a) 23 BxB, BxBch ; 24 QxB, QxP Mexico City, 1932 ) .
mate.
b) 23 BxB, RxP ; 24 R-B3, (B-B3, 5 P-K3
6 0-0

KtxRP) RxR; 25 BxR, Kt-B7ch ; Kt-K83


26 K-Ktl, (26 K-Kt2, Q-R6ch; 25 7 Q Kt-Q2 Q-82
K-Ktl, Kt-K5ch ; 28 K-R1, Kt-Kt6 8 P-QKt3
mate.) Kt-K5ch ; 27 K-Bl, Kt-Q7ch ;
Since White has lost a tempo,
28 K-Kt2, KtxB ; 29 QxKt, R-Q7ch;
we now have a normal Queen's
etc. ( 29 KtxKt, Q-R5ch ; etc.)
gambit declined in which Black
23 R-Q7 ! I I has the move. According to the
principles of the orthodox defense
The enchanting beautiful point
8 P-B4 was in order.
of the sacrifice of the Queen !
8 . . . . PxP
24 QxR
9 KPxP B-Q3
Again there was no possibility 1 0 8-Kt2 0-0-0
of longer resistance.
With colors reversed,-a well
a) 24 QxKt, BxBch; 25 R-B3,
known position, which we shall en
RxR.
counter frequently in this volume.
b) 24 BxR, RxQ ; and the double
threat of mate by RxP mate and 11 P-84 P-KR4
BxB mate is decisive. 12 R-81
c) 24 BxB, RxQ ; 25 B-Kt2, R
Also after 12 P-B5, B-B5 ; 13
R6! ! etc.
PQR3, BxKt ; 14 KtxB, P-KKt4 ;
24 8x8ch Black's attack has more prospects
25 Q-Kt2 R-R61! than White's-which is just get
ting started.
Now mate follows in three moves
at most. If 26 R-B3, (26 R-B2, 12 K-Kt1
BxR) BxR; 27 B-Q4, BxB ; and 1 3 P-QR3 P-KKt4!
RxP mate. 14 P-QKt4
LODZ, 1907 26

White dare not play P-KR3 or 35 8-Kt2 R-83


KKt3, as these would simply fur 36 R-Kt4 P-Kt4
nish additional targets for the hos 37 R-Q4 R-84
tile attack. 38 P-84 R-KR4
39 P-Kt4 R-R1
14 8xKt
15 Ktx8 P-Kt5
R ubi nstein
16 Kt-K5
If 16 P-B5, 16 . . . B-B5 is de
cisive.
16 KtxKt
1 7 PxKt 8xKP
18 PxP
Naturally BxRPch would be a
mistake. White has figured all
this out to a nicety, - but the
safety of his King costs a Pawn.
18 Q-Q3
19 8x8 Qx8
20 R-K1 Ktx P I
2 1 Q-Kt3 Dus-Chotimi rskl
21 BxP is not playable because
of Kt-K6 ! 40 P-857
21 Q-Kt4 This leads quickly and penitently
22 B-81 QR-81 to destruction. Correct was 40
23 R-85 P-R5 BxKt, R-Ql ; 41 P-Kt5, PxB ; 42
24 P-Kt3 K-B2, K-Kt3 ; 43 R-Ql, and White
can obviously hold his own in the
Apparently bold, but quite sound. Rook ending.
B-Kt2 will protect everything. If Black plays 41 RxB, ( Instead
24 . . . . PxP of PxB) then would follow 42
25 R Px P Q-83 RxR ! , PxR; 43 P-B5, K-Q3 ; 44
26 Q-84 RxR K-B2, K-K4 ; 45 P-Kt6, PxP ; 46
27 QxR Q-Q86 PxP, K-B 3 ; 47 K-K3, KxP ; 48 K
28 Q-Q6ch Q-82 Q4, K-B4 ; 49 KxP, K-B 5 ; 50 K-B5,
29 Q-K5 QxQ K-K5 ; 51 KxP, K-Q5 ; 52 K-R6, K
30 RxQ B5 ; 53 P-Kt5, K-Kt5 ; Drawn.
Having no prospects of winning 40 . R-KKt1
by an attack, Black has forced the 41 K-82
exchange of Queens. But the end Now BxKt is too late, for evi
ing is not easily won, for the dently PxB would follow. If in
Bishop is strong. stead 42 K-B2, K-Q3 ; 43 K-B3, K
30 R-Q81 K4 ; 44 R-Ql, then R-QBl, and
31 R-K4 R-86 Black has a won game. Compare
32 RxP RxP the ending arrived at in the previ
33 R-Kt8ch K-82 ous note!
34 R-Kt7 R-K86 41 . Kt-83
If 34 . . . KtxP, 35 RxPch and the 42 K-83
free Knight Pawn is very strong. White cannot avoid the loss of
Thanks to the strength of his Bish a second Pawn : 42 PxP, KtxPch ;
op, White would then have good 43 K-B3, Kt-K5ch ; 44 K-K4, RxP ;
prospects of maintaining equality. etc.
26 RUBINSTEIN'S CHE S S MASTERPIECES

42 . . P-K4 bad tourney of 1907 Rubinstein,


With this move the game Is ter- playing Black against Marshall,
minated. moved 8 . . PxQP, and after 9
KtxP, 0-0 ; 10 B-K2, Q-Kt3 ; 11 Kt
.

43 R-Q2 RxP Kt3, ( better Q-Q2) P-Q5 ! ; 12 PxP,


44 R-B2ch R-B5 R-Q 1 ; etc. attained a good game.
45 RxRch PxR
46 B-B1 P-B6 9 PxP Q-R4
47 K-K3 10 B-K2 QxP
11 0-0 B-B4
If 47 B-Q3, P-K5ch!
12 R-B1 QR-Q1
47 . . . . P-K5 13 Kt-Q Kt5 Q-Kt3
48 B-84 K-Q3 14 Q-Q2 B-K5
15 Q K t-Q4 R-Q3
The Bishop Pawn might be de
fended by Kt-Kt5ch ; 49 K-K2, P 16 R-B3 R-KKt3
B 3 ; (50 B-Q5, Kt-B7 ! ) , but this The development of the King
Is quite superfluous. Rook was indicated.
49 BxP K-K4 17 P-K Kt3 BxKt
50 B-Kt3 Here also KR-Q1 was more na
Or 50 B-K6, Kt-Q4ch. tural.
50 . . . Kt-Kt5ch 18 Bx B !
51 K-K2 KxP
After 1 8 KtxB, KR-Ql, White will
52 K-Q1 K-K4 eventually have to play Kt-Q4
53 K-B1 K-Q5 again to prevent the threatened
54 B-Q1 Kt-B7
advance of the Queen's Pawn.
55 P-Kt5 KtxB Rubinstein does not want to lose
Resigns any time.

18 KtxKt
Apparently securing an advan
tage, for White also is now left
Game No. 8 with an isolated Queen's Pawn.
Actually one of those positions has
Q U E E N'S GA M BI T D E C LI N E D arisen, in which the Bishop la
Lodz, 1907 presently stronger than the K n i g ht.
Such subtle, but surprising, rever
Rubi nste i n Sal we sals frequently occur in Rubin
1 P-Q4 P-Q4 stein's games, and indicate the
2 P-QB4 PK3 great master.
3 Kt-Q B3 P-QB4 1 9 PxKt R-QB3
4 PxQP K Px P
More natural was R-Ql.
5 Kt-B3 Kt-Q B3
6 B-Kt5 20 R-K1 Q-Kt5

At a later period Rubinstein 20 . . . Q-Q1 is not satisfactory


played P-KKt3 exclusively in this either. There might follow : 21
position. QR-K3, Kt-Kt3 ; ( R-QB2 ; 22 R-K5,)
22 B-Kt2 ! , (not 2 2 P-KR4 ? because
6 B-K2 of P-KB4 ! and P-B5 with a strong
7 BxB K KtxB counter-attack), and Black has no
8 P-K3 0-0 good moves. Equally favorable for
The whole game is well known White are the continuations 20 . . .
from the match between Dr. Las RxR; 21 PxR, or 20 . . . R-K3 ; 21
ker and Marshall. In the Karls- R-K5, etc.
LODZ, 1907 27

21 R-K5 R-K3 If 33 . . . P-B 3 ; the continuation


Black now loses a Pawn, but might be : 34 Q-K4, P-Kt6 ; 35 Rr
his game was already inferior. KB7, R-KKtl ; 36 P-K7, P-Kt7 ; 37
Ir 21 . . . R-Q1 ; 22 QK2 is very RxKtP ! and wins.
strong ; and after 21 . Q-Q3, a 34 Q x K B P Q-R1ch
Pawn is lost thus : 22 R-K3, R 35 K-R2 R-KKt1
QB2 ; 23 Q-K2, etc.
RxQ would only postpone the
22 BxP RxR end.
23 PxR KtxB
24 QxKt QxP 36 R-Kt7 Q-K1
25 R-87 37 Q-85
Naturally 37 RxP would suffice.
Winning a Pawn.
37 Q-R5
25 P-QKt4
. . .

38 Q-83 R-K1

26 RxR P
39 P-K7 K-R2
White has a clear win, with a 40 Q-88 Q-83
Pawn plus and an overwhelming 41 R-Kt8 RxR
position. 42 QxR P-Kt7

26 P-R3 A bold attempt to continue the


27 P-KR4 P-Kt5 fight.
28 K-Kt2 K-R1 43 QxP Q-K5
29 R-Kt7 Q-86 44 Q-R3 Q-K7
To prevent 30 Q-QB5. 45 Q-85 P-Kt3
46 Q-K31 QxRPch
30 P-R5 Q.K8
47 K-Kt2 Q-Q4ch
31 R-K7 Q-Kt1
48 Q-83
31 Q-B5 would have been weaker, 49 Q-QB6 Resig n s
for the Pawn at KR5 is unpro
tected.
31 . Q-K7 Game No. 9
32 Q-83
K I NG'S GAM B I T D EC L I N E D
Now an impressive finale ensues.
Lodz, 1907
32 QxRP
33 P-K6 P-Kt6 Rubinstei n Sal we
1 P-K4 P-K4
Sal we 2 P-KB4 8-84
3 Kt-KB3 P-Q3
4 P-83 Kt-QB3
Here 4 . . . P-KB4 has o ften
been recommended and tried, but
the analysis of this move has not
yet been exhausted. In a match
game - Stoltz-Spielmann, played
late in 1932, - White after 4 . . .
P-KB4, obtained the decisive ad
vantage thu s : 5 BPxP, QPxP; 6
P-Q4, PxQP; 7 B-QB4, PxKP; 8
Kt-K5, Kt-KB3 ; 9 Kt-B7, Q-K2 ; 10
KtxR, P-Q 6 ; 11 B-KKt5, B-B7ch;
12 KxB, Q-B4ch ; 13 B-K3, QxB ; 14
Rubi nstein P-KR3, B-K3 ; 15 Kt-Q2, Q-Q4 ;
28 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

16 P-KKt4 ! The onrushing Pawn In this and the following moves


threatens to free the imprisoned Black lacks decision. It was ne
Knight, and Black has no means cessary to forestall the hostile plan,
of thwarting this. and for this purpose P-R4 might
Simple and good, however, is 4 have been tried. The advance of
. . . B-KKt5, for if 5 P-Q4, BxKt ; 6 this Pawn to R5 could not have
PxB, QR5ch ; 7 K-K2, B-Kt3 ! ; 8 been prevented ( 19 P-R4?, Kt-Q2
Kt-R3, P-KB4 ! ; 9 Kt-B4, BPxP; 10 etc.) and the threat Kt-B3-R4-B5
BPxP(K5), QPxP; 11 KtxP, Kt would have required the utmost
QB3 ; 12 KtxKt, PxK t ; and Black's care. In any event Black could not
position is splendid (Dr. Lasker play Kt-R4 at a point where P-KB4
Janowsk.i Match 1910). was possible in reply. But he
After the last move White ob could by P-QB3, even at the sac
tains a favorable game in a simple rifice of a Pawn, strive to open up
manner. the game,-which would be un
favorable for White just at this
5 8-Q Kt 5 ! 8-Q2
moment because of his somewhat
6 P-Q4 8-Kt3
undeveloped King side.
7 P-Q5 Kt-Kt1
8 8-Q3 PxP 19 Q R-K1 R-R6
He alms to gain K4 for his 20 B-QB4 QR-R1
pieces, but in the ensuing play he 21 R-K2 Kt-R4?
has too little combinative scope 22 P-84
to profit thereby. After Black has four times
9 8xP Kt-K83
passed up the opportunity of P-R4-
10 Q Kt-Q2
R5 etc., White advances against
8-Kt5
11 Kt-B4 Q Kt-Q2
the ensuing weaknesses of the
12 Ktx8 R Px Kt
Black squares (K4, KB5) and soon
0-0 attains the initiative. The ex
13 0-0
14 P-QKt4
change which follows is much
more favorable for White than that
In order to be able to play Q-B2 on move 15.
with no molestation by Kt-B4.
22 . Ktx8
14 Q-K2 23 PxKt Kt-81
15 Q-82 BxKt 24 K R-K1 Q-83
Here 15 . . . P-KR3, followed by 25 K-Kt2 R-K2
Kt-K4 was to be considered. Not,
Evidently the Black game be
however, Kt-K4 immediately be
comes entirely hopeless if White
cause 16 KtxKt followed by B
proceeds with P-K5 without oppo
KKt5 would have been downright
sition. Inasmuch as this advance
unpleasant. The importance of P
cannot be prevented directly,
QKt4 becomes apparent in this
Black's sole and slim hope lies
variation ; als o : The Black Queen
in bringing about complications by
cannot depart with check. Salwe,
25 . . . P-KKt4. After 26 P-K5,
however, does not wish to sur
Q-KR3 ! ; 27 RKR1, Q-Kt2 ; or 26
render the opportunity of utilizing
Q-Q2, Kt-Kt3 ! ; (27 PxP? Q-Kt2)
K4, and therefore gives up the
the White King would have no
second Bishop, The strengthening
reason to believe himself secure.
of the White center is frequently
not of moment, as PB4 and P-K5 26 Q-Q2 Q R.K1
are difficult to accomplish.
Even now P-KKt4 was to be
16 Px8 Kt-K4 considered, though White could
17 B-K2 Kt-Kt3 now force the exchange of Queens
18 B-Kt3 K R-K1 by 27 Q-Q4. For 27 . Q-KR3?
.
LODZ, 1907 29

falls because of 28 R-KR1, Q-Kt3 ? ; RxP ? 33 RxRch and 34 P-Q7,


2 9 P-KB5, followed by P-B6 win winning ) , 33 PxP, RxRch; 35 BxR,
ning the Rook ; and 27 . . . Q-Kt3 ? and White has a winning position.
is tactically circumvented by 28 31 . QxQ !
P-B5, Q-R4 ; 29 R-KR1, Q-Kt5 ; 30
Obviously not RxP ? ? 3 2 QxQ and
R-K3, with the threat of K-Ktl and
wins.
B-K2.
The ending arising after 27 . . . 32 PxQ P-Kt3?
QxQ ; 28 PxQ, PxP; 29 PxP, R-R5 ; It is amazing that a keen tac
30 R-QKtl, P-B3 ; would have been tician like Salwe should overlook
incomparably more favorable for the favorable opportunity of 32 . . .
Black than that which eventually P-Kt4 ! White would have been in
arises in the actual game. Black, a most difficult situation in any
in the former case, would have event, e.g.
obtained excellent mobility for his I 33 PxP? RxP; 34 RxR, RxR;
pieces, and thereby d r a w i n g and gains the Pawn at Kt5 (35
chance s ; whereas in the variation R-R5 ? P-B3) .
chosen, he is entirely hemmed in. I I 3 3 KR-K1, Kt-Kt3 ; 3 4 P-Q6,
It is also to be noted that the PxP ; 35 PxP, KtxPc h ; 36 K-B2,
acceptance of the Pawn sacrifice RxRch ; 37 BxR, K-Kt2, and Black
by 27 PxP would have been poor threatens the double exchange of
business, for thereby K5, the key Rooks, to be followed by K-B3, the
square of the position would have march of the King to Q2, and then
passed Into the control of Black. the decisive advance of the 3
( 27 . . . Q-Kt2 threatening R-K4 united Pawns.
etc. ) . III 33 B-Q3, PxP ; 34 KR-Kl, Kt
27 Q-Q4 ! K-R1 Q2 ; 35 P-K6, PxP ; 36 PxP, Kt-B l ;
and releases the Pawn majority,
The ending ansmg after 27 .
since White must take time to pro
QxQ differs markedly from that
tect the Pawn at K6.
mentioned in the previous note
IV 33 B-Kt5, R-Q1 ; and wins a
(P-KKt4) ; by reason of the liquid
Pawn.
ation through PxP and the dis
From these examples, it is evi
placement of the Rook at R5. Nor
dent that after 33 . . . P-Kt4 White
does 27 . . . Q-KR3 relieve the
would have had a hard battle, a
situation, for P-KKt4 is no longer
draw, at best.
playable.
33 K-83
28 P-K5
Now all is well once more. If 33
The Rubicon is crossed. Natu
. . . P-Kt4, clearly 34 P-Q6 follows,
rally 28 QxQ would be against the
as the Rook at K2 is adequately
logic of the position, and would
defended.
surrender the laboriously won con
trol of the point K5. 33 . K-Kt2
34 P-QR4

P-KB3
28 . . . Q-KR3
29 R-K R 1 Px P S alwe hopes to attain a favor
30 PxP Q-Kt4 able control of the Black squares.
31 Q-KB4? This dream is shattered by Rubin
stein in masterly manner.
A thoughtless move, by which
White suddenly falls into danger 35 P-K6 R-Q1
of loss. The proper line was 31 36 R-Q 1 !
R-K1 to be followed by Q-KB4. Important, as P-QB3 could be
Should Black play 31 . . . Kt-Kt3 answered by P-Q4. The Pawn at
in order to prevent 32 Q-B4, there K6 cannot be captured by the
would follow 32 P-Q6, PxP ; (32 Knight because of 37 R-K1, not by
30 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

the Rook on account of 37 PxP, Game No. 1 0


RxR ; 38 P-K7 !
Q U E E N ' S GAM B I T ACC E P T E D
36 . P-KR4
Lodz, 1907

D K KK
38 P-BS ! Sal we Rubi nstein
Without the help of the pieces,
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
Black's united passed Pawns are
2 P-Q B4 P-K3
not to be feared.
3 Kt-QB3 Px P
38 R-Q3
Rubinstein is an outstanding ex

39 P-B4 P-B4
40 P- RS ! pert at this method of play, which
was also greatly favored by Steln
An instructive example of the itz.
weakness of the doubled Pawns.
W hite threatens by PxP etc., to 4 Kt-KB3 Kt-KB3
drive the hostile Rook from the 5 P-K3 P-QB4
blockading square, Q3, after which 6 BxP Kt-B3
P-Q6 would win forthwith ! If 7 0-0 PxP
Black did not have the doubled 8 PxP
Pawns,-if these stood at QR2 and Playing White, Rubinstein In
QKt3 - this method of winning such positions usually captured
would not be possible. with the Knight. If Black there
40 P-KtSch upon captures the Knight, he gives
41 K-B4 Kt-Q2 up one of the pieces needed to
42 R-K3 BPxP block the White center Pawn.
White will thereupon soon be able
A sacrifice dictated by despair.
If 42 . . . Kt-K4, there would fol to play P-Q5, and attain good play
low, 43 RxKt, PxRch ; 44 KxP, and for his pieces. ( Compare the game
Rubinstein vs. Dr. Tartakower,
Black now loses one of his Rooks.
Marlenbad, 1925 ! )
However, if Black plays 42 . . .
Kt-Ktl, in order to answer 43 PxP 8 . . . . B-K2
with Kt-R3, the decisive thrust 9 B-B4
occurs on the King's wing. 43 R
The Bishop is better placed at
KRI, K-R3 (44 RxP, followed by
K3 or Kt5. Nothing can now be
R-Kt3 with a m ating attack was
threatened. ) , 44 B-Ql ! ! , and against accomplished by the break-through
9 P-Q5, for the presence of the
the threat 45 RxPch (KxR, 46 R
Knights at KB3 and QB3 creates
R3 mate) , there Is no defense.
an unfavorable situation for Black :
43 PxKt RxR after 9 . . . PxP ; 10 KtxP, KtxKt ;
44 KxR Px P 11 BxKt, the threat of BxQKtP is
lacking, so that Black can continue
O therwise 45 PxP and P-B5.
his development undisturbed.
4S B-R4
9 . . . . 0
45 P-B5, followed by P-B6 etc. 1 0 Q-Q2 P-QKt3
was at least equally good. 1 1 K R-Q1

4S P-Kt3 With 1 1 PQ5 White can attain


46 K-Q4 K-R3 complete equality.
47 P-BS PxPch
11 Kt-Q Kt5
48 KxP RxP

49 BxR P-K R 5 Now P-Q5 is unfavorable as


50 P-Q6 P-K Kt6 Black would secure the two Bish
51 B-B6 Resi g ns ops.
LODZ, 1907 31

12 Q-K2 8-Kt2 Now Black has an overwhelming


1 3 Kt-K5 Kt( Kt5)-Q4 position : in addition to the Bish
ops, and the attack upon the weak
See the note to 9 B-B4.
and blockaded Pawns, there is also
14 8-KKt3 the control of the White squares.
Such advantages must be sufficient
B-KKt5 or B-K3 would be some
to win in the hands of a master.
what better.
14 . . . - R-81 19 8-K1
1 5 Q R-81 KtxKt If only P-QB4 was possible ! But
Now begins a splendid counter this unfortunately is refuted by
play, based on the unfavorable . . . PxP and . . . B-R3.
post if White's Queen Bishop.
19 . . R-82
16 PxKt 20 P-QR4

White does not grasp his op Not wishing to be throttled


ponent's plan, else he would have slowly, with one forceful stroke, he
played 16 RxKt. It is true that seeks to be rid of the pitiful con
Black could then have secured the figuration of the blockaded, hang
two Bishops by 16 . . . Kt-K5 and ing Pawns.
17 . . . KtxB. But relatively,
White could have suffered the loss 20 . . P-8 3 !
21 Kt-83 PxP
of the wayward son at Kt3 with
22 P-84 Q-K5
few qualms.
23 QxQ
16 - . Kt-Q4 !
1 7 P-K847
There was no chance of avoid
ing the exchange of Queens, be
White was in difficulties. On the cause after 23 Q-Q2 (KB4 must be
one hand, . . . P-B4-B5 was threat protected) 23 . . . B-R3 would be
ened, on the other . . . P-QKt4 etc. decisive, since 24 P-B5 is refuted
If he play 17 P-B3, after . . . B-Kt4 by B-K7.
or . . . P-QKt4, he is committed
to the exchange on Q5, although 23 . . . . 8xQ
under somewhat more favorable 24 P-Q 85 R-Kt2
circumstances, as the Bishop at 25 Kt-Q2 8.Q4
Kt3 is not obstructed, and the 26 Kt-84 P-Kt3 !
Pawn at B3 is more effective and 27 P-B5 was threatened, after
safer. Relatively best was how which White would gain two united
ever: 17 Q-Q3 ; if then 17 . . . P passed Pawns.
B4, then 18 P-B3 ( B-Kt4, 19 R-B2 ! )
and if 17 . . . B-Kt4 then 18 R-B2, 27 R-83 K R-QKt1
Kt-B5 ; 19 BxKt, BxB ; 20 R-K1, 28 K R-Q81 8-Q1
and the hanging Pawns at B3 and 29 K-82 B-82
Q4, as well as the two Bishops, 30 P-Kt3 R-Kt6
justify Black in a favorable ap 31 R-K3 K-82
praisal of his position. Yet White 32 RxR PxR
would have had prospects of over 33 Kt-Kt2 P-Q R4
coming all dangers. After 20 . . . 34 R-Q R 1 K-K2
Q-Kt4 ; 2 1 Q-KR3 might follow, and 35 K-K3
after 20 . . . Q-R5 ; 21 P-KR3, Q
Kt4 ; 22 Q-KB1 would suffice. O bviously not 3 5 BxP, because
of . . . R-R1 etc.
17 P..QKt4!
1 8 8xKt Qx8 35 . . K-Q2
32 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIE CES

36 8-83 K-83 3 8-84 8-84


37 K-Q3 K-Kt4 4 Kt-83 Kt-83
38 Kt-R4 P-Kt4 5 P-Q3 P-Q3
6 8-K3 8-Kt3
The ending has indeed been won
7 0-0
for Black for a long time. How
ever, Rubinstein's well considered After this move Black obtains
winning procedure is instructive. the freer game by the pin which
Precisely at the moment when the follows. Castling was premature.
White Rook is taken up with the Better was 7 Q-Q2 or even 7 p.
protection of the Knight, Black KR3.
opens the file on the King's wing,
and penetrates with his own Rook. 7 8-KKt5
8 Kt-Q5 KtxKt
39 PxP PxP
40 8-Kt2 R-K 8 1 To prevent 9 BxB and 10 Kt-K3.
41 Kt-83ch K-83
9 8xKt 0-0
42 R-K1 R-86ch
1 0 P-KR3 8-KR4
43 R-K3 R-88
11 P-K Kt4
44 Ktx8 KxKt
45 K-K2 R-KRB 11 QKZ was the proper line,
46 R x Kt P RxPch in order to continue, 12 P-B3, and
47 K-83 P-KR4 if necessary BxB and Q-K3.
48 8-83 P-Kt5ch
49 K-K3 R-KKt7 11 8-Kt3
50 8-K1 8xP 1 2 K-Kt2
51 8xP 8-87ch More exact was K-Rl.
52 K-84 8xP
12 . Q-K2
Worthy of note : the hanging 13 Q-K2
Pawns, notoriously weak, fall at
last. We are reminded of the Neglecting the opportunity of
prophecy, "The last shall be first." initiating an advance on the King's
wing by 13 B-Kt5, Q-Q 2 ; 14 Kt-R4
K K
etc.
54 8-Kt6 P-K4
55 P-86 KxP 13 K-R1
56 B x 8 Px8 1 4 P-QR4
57 KxP K-Q4
58 K-Kt4 K-K5 White has a difficult game. The
59 R-Kt8 R-K87 position demands P-KB4, and the
60 KxP R-82 posting of a Knight on B5. But
Resigns none of these objects is to be at
tained without greater disadvan
tages. Hence the nervous advance
on the Queen's side. Preferable
was however 14 P-B3.
14 Kt-Q1
1 5 P-R5 8x8
Game No. 1 1
If White believed that it was
G I U OC O PIANO
favorable for him to force this
Lodz, 1907 exchange, he was grievously mis
taken. There are indeed many
Salwe Rubi nstei n
cases in which the capture of the
1 P-K4 P-K4 Bishop on K3 (or K6 ) is disad
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83 vantageous (to the player making
LODZ, 19(}7 33

the capture ) , because the open 25 P-84 P-85


Bishop file proves useful to his 26 PxQ P
opponent. In the game before us
the situation is quite different. 26 PxBP? fails because of .
Clearly White can put the open P-K6, etc.
file to no practical use. Above all 26 P-86ch
he is confined to defense measures,

27 K-R1 Q-R5
and because of the restricted po 28 8-84 QxRP
sition of his King, he can hope for 29 8xKt Px8
no advantage from the opening of 30 R-82 8-K5
the game in the center. 31 R-Q 8 1 R-83
16 Px8 P-QB3 32 Q-Kt4
17 B-Kt3

17 B-R2, Kt-K3 ; 18 P-Kt4, QR R u b i nstein


Q1 ; 19 P-B4 would have served
only for the moment, but on the
contrary would have availed little
against the permanent weakness.

17 Kt-K3

1 8 P-QB3?

18 BxKt would have afforded


better resistance.

18 . . Kt-84
1 9 B-82 P-Q4

Forcing the exchange which fol


lows, as 20 . . . PxP as well as Sal we
20 . . KtxQP etc. is threatened.
20 PxP PxP Among other things 32 . . . R
KR3 and . . QxKtch, and .
21 Kt-R2? .

P-B7 mate was threatened. White


Neither 21 P-K4 nor 21 P-Q4 prevents this by the counter-threat
was a satisfactory continuation, 33 Q-K7.
but either was far better than the
text-move. Now the White King 32 . . . . P-Q7 !
is con fronted by several mating Gaining a move ! If now 33 QxQP,
attacks. R-KR3 ; 34 K-Ktl, Q-Kt6c h ; 35 K
21 P-K5 B1, QxP (35 Q-Kt4 ? B-Q6ch) etc.
22 P-Q4 33 R-Q1
22 PxP would not have materi
Not wishing to abandon the
ally altered the situation.
threat of Q-K7. But the Queen
22 . . . . Kt-Q6 is needed for the defense, and ln
23 8-Kt3 its absence an even more br1lllant
finale takes place.
Still worse would be 23 BxKt?
PxB ; 24 Q-Q2, QR-K1 ; 25 QR-Kl , 33 Q-Kt6
34 Q-K7

B-K5ch ; 26 Kt-B3, P-KB4 and R-Q 81


resignation is in order. 35 K RxQP

23 . . . . Q R-Q1 Now the Pawn ha d to be cap.


24 Q-Q2 P-K84 tured, because after 35 QR-KB1
34 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

clearly QxR or . . . Q-Kt7ch Or 36 Kt-Bl, R-R3ch ; 37 R-R2,


would follow. And if 35 QRxP, Q-B7 ! ! or 37 K-Ktl, P-B7ch ; 38
R-B8ch ; leads to a speedy mate ; RxP, R-RS mate. It is remarkable
e. g. 36 R-Bl, P-B7ch ; 37 QxB, Q how it all clicks.
Kt8ch ; 38 RxQ, RxR mate.
36 P-B7ch
35 Q.KSch PxR ( Q ) c h
37 Qx B

Very pretty. 38 K-Kt2 QxRch

36 RxQ Resigns
Chapter m
International Tournaments at Vienna, Prague and Lodz, 1 908.
Match at Vienna. 1908.

Game No. 1 2 12 KtxKt !


Q U E EN'S PAW N Very pretty, even though quite
obvious. It is surprising that the
Vienna, 1908
genial Duras failed to perceive this
R ubinstein Duraa combination in time. By the sac
rifice of the Queen White captures
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
a Pawn, and, in fact, quite prop
2 Kt-K83 P-Q84
erly the unfortunate Pawn at QKt4.
3 P-K3 Kt-K83
4 PxP Q-R4c h ? 12 . . .
8xQ

4 . . . P-K3 was i n order ( 5 P To decline the sacrifice would


QKt4 ? P-QR4 ; 6 P-B3, PxP ; 7 PxP, be worse.
P-QKt3 etc.).
13 8xPch Kt-Q2
5 Q Kt-Q2 Qx 8 P
6 P-Q R3 Q-82 Or 13 . . . K-Q 1 ? 14 RxBch and
7 P-84 PxP White wins in a walk, most ele
gantly as follows : 14 . . . K-B1 ;
7 . . P-K3 was to be preferred. 15 B-R6ch, K-Ktl ; 16 Kt-B6ch,
8 KtxP 8-Kt5 QxKt ; 17 B-K5ch, Q-Q3 ; 18 R
9 P-Kt4 Kt-83 QB1 ! ! and R-B8 mate.
10 8-Kt2 P-Q Kt4 ? ? 14 8xKtch
It was high time t o develop the 14 RxB would have had the same
King's wing by 10 . . . P-K3 ; or result. After 14 . . . R-Q1 ; 15
. . R-Q1 followed by . . . P-K3. KtxKt, RxKt (P-K3 ? 16 Kt-K5 dis.
Possibly the game might still have ch., Kt-B6ch etc.) ; 16 BxRch, Black
been saved. With the text-move must not play K-Q1 ?, because of
Black commits harakiri. 17 B-Kt5ch and B-R6ch, followed
by QR-B1, but instead 16 . . . QxB,
Duraa
though this too gives White a
Pawn.

14 Qx8

Not K-Q1 ; 15 RxB and White


wins immediately.
15 KtxQ B-R4
16 Kt-K5 R-Q 8 1
17 P-Kt4 8-Kt3
18 Ktx8 R PxKt

The slight weakening of the


White King's side is of little mo
ment. The superiority on the
Queen's wing decides the issue.
R u b i nstein
19 B-Q4 P-QR 3
1 1 K t ( 84)-K5 KtxKt 2 0 K-Q2 P-83

35
36 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

21 Q R-QB1 ! RxR 9 B-Q3 B-Kt2


22 RxR P-K4 10 0-0-0
Also played successfully at
Or 22 . . . RxP ; 23 R-B8ch, K-B 2 ; Karsbad (1907) against the same
2 4 K-K2 etc. opponent.

23 B-85 RxRP 10 P-84


24 BxB KxB 1 1 P-KR4 P-85
25 K-K2 P-K5
26 R-86 11 . . . PxP, followed by . . . R-BI,
. . . P-QR3 and . . . P-QKt4 appears
White now obtains united passed to hold out better prospects.
Pawns and wins easily.
12 B-85 R-K1
26 R-Kt7
27 RxRP RxKtP Here also . . . P-QR3 and .
28 R-R7 R-Kt8 P-QKt4 was better.
29 P-Kt5 R-Kt8
30 P-R4 P-Kt4 13 Bx K Kt KtxB
31 R-QKt7 R-Q R8 14 P-K Kt4 B-Q3
32 P-Kt6! RxP 15 P-Kt5 Kt-K5
33 R-R7 R-Kt5 16 P-R5
34 P-Kt7 P-Kt5
White's attack is now irresist
35 R-R8ch K-82
ible.
36 P-Kt8 (Q) RxQ
37 RxR K-K3 16 Q-K2
38 R-K8ch K-84
39 K-81 Resigns Or 16 . . . KtxKtP; 17 KtxKt,
QxKt; 18 BxPch, KBl ; 19 P-R6,
PxP; 20 QR-Ktl etc.

1 7 Q R-Kt1 P-Q R3

Much too late !


G a m e No. 1 3

Q U E E N 'S GAM B I T DEC L I N E D Teichma n n

Match at Vienna, 1908


Rubinstein Teichmann
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 P-QB4 P-K3
3 Kt-Q B3 Kt-KB3
4 B-Kt5 Q Kt-Q2
5 P-K3 B-K2
6 Kt-83 0-0
7 Q-82 P-QKt3

As is well known P-QB4 ! is


here correct. After the text-move,
which, among other things, blocks
the path of the Queen to R4, White R u b i n stein
can castle on the Queen's side with
impunity and initiate a strong 1 8 BxPc h ! !
attack.
Now the Black position is ripped
8 PxP PxP open with a Morphy-like assault.
VIENNA, 1908 37

18 KxB 26 RxQ
1 9 P-Kt6ch K-Kt1
If now 26 . . . BxR; 27 Q-K6ch,
After 19 . . . PxP; 20 KtxKt, etc. Or if 26 . . . RxR; 27 QxP ( B 6 ) ,
PxKt ; 21 Kt-Kt5ch, K-R3 ( K-Ktl ; R- Q 1 ( o r . . . B-Kt5) 28 R-R1 and
22 QxPch) ; 22 PxPch, KxP; 23 mates in a few moves.
KtxP dis. ch. K-B2 ; 24 QxPch, Resigns
and wins.
A dashing victory in the grand
20 KtxKt PxKt manner.

. . . QxKt i s refuted by 21 PxP


ch, KxP ; 22 Kt-Kt5ch.

21 P-R 6 ! ! P-837

The Knight could not be cap Game No. 14


ture d : 21 . . . PxKt; 22 PxPch,
QxP; 23 PxP with the double K I N G'S G A M B I T DECLI N E D
threat of mate on R7 and R8, Prague, 1908
which is decisive. Much weaker
was 23 RxPch. But Black has in Alapin Rubinstein
deed a better defense, to wit, 21 1 P-K4 P-K4
. . . BPxP. Then 22 RxP was not 2 P-KB4 B-84
sufficient on account of 22 . . . 3 Kt.. K B3 P-Q3
PxKt ! ; 23 RxPch, QxR; 24 PxQ, 4 Kt-83 Kt..Q B3
B-K5 ! ; 25 QxPch, KxP; 26 R 5 B-Kt5 B-KKt5
Ktlch, K-B3 ; etc. Nor was 23 QxP
ch (instead of RxPch), K-R2 ! ; 24 In conjunction with the next
RxPch, K-Rl ! ; 25 RxQ, RxR ! any move, a noteworthy setup, distinct
better. Black in this variation, ly superior to Kt-B3 etc.
with Rook and two Bishops against 6 P-Q3 Kt-K2 1
the Queen, has in fact winning 7 P-KR3 BxKt
prospects, as the co-operation of 8 QxB 0-0
the two White pieces has been dis
turbed. Hence White would have Black now has a favorable posi
had to play 22 Kt-R4. After 22 tion because of his control of Q6.
. . . PxP, Black's game collapses Perhaps White should have played
because of 23 KtxP or RxPch. Or 5 BxKtch. But one does not readily
if 22 . . . P-KKt4, there follows decide on such moves.
23 Kt-Kt6, Q-B3 ; 24 P-R7ch, K-B2 ; 9 P-85
25 P-R8 ( Q ) , RxQ ; 26 KtxRch, and
White wins, but by no means as Inferior. But 9 B-K3 was not
easily as in the actual game. quite satisfactory either.

9 Kt-Q5
22 PxP I PxKt

1 0 Q-Kt3 KtxB
All moves lead to the same con 1 1 KtxKt
clusion.
Or 1 1 P-B6, Kt-Kt3 ; 1 2 PxP,
23 R-R8ch KxP KxP ; 13 KtxKt, P-QB3 ; 14 Kt-B3,
24 R-R7ch K-Kt1 P-B4 with the better development
25 Q-85 1 for Black, and in fact an incipient
attack.
Threatening P-Kt7 as well as Q
R5, to say nothing of RxQ. 11 P-K B3
1 2 B-K3 BxB
25 P-86 13 QxB P-Q4!
38 RUBINSTEIN'S CHl!IBS MASTERPIECES

Tbls Important move could not Now the Black King enters
be prevented. mightily into the tray. Would 1t
have been better to permit 27 P:xP
14 0-0 P-Q B3
supporting the Pawn at B5 by P
1 5 Kt-R3 Q-Kt3 !
KKt4 ? No: In such event there
Simple and yet powerful ! The was great danger that Black would
two fold threat (KG and Kt7) open a file on the King's wing,
forces the exchange. Black ob and there gain decisive entrance
tains thereby a superior ending. into the position.
16 QxQ PxQ 35 Px P PxP
17 P-83 36 R-Kt2 R-Q8
37 R-Kt6ch
Weakens Q3, so that Black
gradually secures a decisive ad 37 R-QBZ, R-K8ch ; 38 Kt-K2, Kt
vantage upon the Queen's file. The QG followed by P-B4 etc. was hope
attempt to develop by 17 Kt-Ktl less also.
and 18 Kt-B3 or Kt-QZ w ould be
37 K.Q2!
met by 17 . . . P-Q5, preparing

38 Kt-K2 K-821
for . . . P-B4 and the break-through
by P-B5. For 39 RxBP Is refuted by 39
. R-Q6ch; 40 K-B2, KtxPch.
17 K R-Q1
1 8 R-82 R-Q2 39 R-Kt4 R-Q6ch
19 Kt-82 QR-Q1 40 K-82 KtxPch
20 QR-K1 PxP 41 K-K1 Kt.Q3
42 R-R4 K-83
Counter-play by P-Q4 was threat 43 R-RS K-Q4
ened. 44 P-K R4 Kt-84
21 PxP Kt-81 1 45 R-KBS Kt.K6 1
22 R ( B2)-K2 P-QKt4 I t 4 6 RxP??, RQ8ch; 4 7 K-BZ,
23 Kt-R1 Kt-Kt3 Kt-Kt5ch etc.
24 Kt-Kt3 Kt- R 5 !
25 K-82 P-84 46 R-KKt87
26 R-82 P-KKt3 In any event the game was lost.
27 PxP PxP
28 Kt-81 P-85 46 KtxPch
47 K-82 KtxP
While Black strengthens his po. 48 R-Q8ch K-K5
sltlon at every step, White Is con 49 Kt-Kt3ch K-85
demned to Inactivity. Tbe con 50 Kt-K2ch K-Kt5
trol of the Queen's file Is decisive ; 51 R-QB8 R-B6ch
its effects are noticeable over the Resigns
entire board.
29 K-K3 K-82
30 R-81 R-Q8

By the exchange of a pair of


Rooks, the superiority of the Black
position Is increased, inasmuch as
White now haa to guard three Game No. 15
critical points-Q3, Q2 and Ql. Q U E E N'S GA M B I T D EC L I N E D

31 RxR RxR Prague, 1908


32 K-K2 R-Q2
Dr. Vidmar Rubinstein
33 K-K3 Kt-84
34 P-QKt3 K-K3 1 P-Q4 P.Q4
PRAGUE, 1908 39

2 P-K3 Kt-K83 19 R-Q4 ?


3 Kt-K83 P-QB4
19 Kt-Q4 should be played. With
4 P-QB4 P-K3
the text move White has an in
5 Kt-83 P-Q R3
ferior game.
6 Px8P 8xP
7 P-Q R3 PxP 19 . R-Q 8 1 l
8 QxQch KxQ
Threatening to attack on the
9 8xP P-QKt4
llishop file, e.g. . . . BxKt, followed
10 8-K2 8-Kt2
by . . . B-K4. Hence White takes
11 P-QKt4 8.Q3
back his last move.
12 0-0 Q Kt-Q2
20 R ( Q4)-Q2
The game appears very drawish,
but contains certain fine points. 20 Kt-Q2, though a daring move,
Carefully considered, It becomes afforded better chances. After the
apparent that Black's minor pieces text-move White gets into per
are better posted, for the Queen's manent difficulties.
Knight does not obstruct the ftan
20 8xKt
chettoed Bishop, and the King's
. .

21 Px8
Bishop is more effectively placed
than his White colleague. The Forced. After 21 BxB, KtB5 !
King In the middle of the board winning the exchange.
is advantageously mobilized, pro
21 8-K41
tecting the Bishop, while the White
.

King must be brought to the scene 22 Kt-R4?


of action at the expense of several Preferable was 22 RxRch, Kt
tempi. Nevertheless the game (B3)xR; 23 R-BI, Kt-B5 ; 24 BxKt,
should have ended In a draw, but RxB ; 25 Kt-Ql etc.
Vidmar does not seem to have
22 . . . RxR
had the remotest idea of the dan
.

23 R x R
ger lurking, and plays too care
lessly. If 23 KtxKt, there would follow:
RxRch; 24 BxR, BxB ; 25 KtxRch,
13 B-Kt2 K-K2 K-Q2 and Black wins.
14 K R-Q1 K R-Q1
15 R-Q2 23 . 8x8
24 KtxB R-88ch
Had Black's manoeuvre Kt-Kt3- 25 R-Q1
B5, occurred to Vidmar, he would
no d oubt have played 15 QR-Bl, Or 25 K-Kt2, R-QRS ; 26 R-Q3,
with safety. W,i th this move he R-R7 ; 27 R-Kt3, Kt-R6 ! and wins.
would not only have obviated the White is lost.
posting of the hostile Knight at 25 . . R-87
B5 with the threat of his Rook, 26 Kt.Q3 R-R7
but,-what is of greater Impor 27 Kt-K5 Kt( 83).Q4!
tance, he would have reserved to
himself the opportunity of counter In order not to have to retreat
play by KtQ2, Kt-Kt3 and Kt-B5 to KBl, after Kt-B6ch. White can
or R5. only protect the Pawn at QR3 for
a single move.
15 Kt-Kt3
R-R8ch

1 6 QR-Q1 R-Q2 28 R-Q3


29 K-Kt2 Kt-85!
Kt-B5 would be premature.
A little combination : if 30 KtxKt,
1 7 K-81 Q R.Q1 PxKt ; 31 R-Ql, Black should not
1 8 P-KR3 P-KR3 play 31 . . . RxP; 32 BxP, KtxP;
40 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

nor even 31 . . . RxR ; 32 BxR, Now P-Q5 is threatened, shatter


Kt-B 6 ; 33 B-B2, Kt-Kt4 ; 34 K-B1, ing the Black formation in the
Ktx P ; 35 B-K4, inasmuch as in center.
either case White could offer
13 R-82
further resistance. But with 31
. . .

. . . R-R7 ! ! Black wins quickly as The only resistance. Now if 14


32 BxP is refuted by KtxPch. P-Q5, P-K4 ! ; and if 15 QxP, KtxP;
Hence White must protect the and the Queen can no longer
Bishop, whereupon 32 . . . P-B6 check. 13 . . . K-R1, with the
wins quickly. same idea was not feasible be
cause of 14 Kt-B4.
30 Kt-86ch K-83
31 Kt-Kt8 Ktx R P 14 P-84!
32 KtxP Kt-87 Again P-Q5 is threatened; and
Threatening not only KtxKtP, now there is no reply.
but Kt-K8ch also.
14 . . Q-Kt2
33 R-Q2 Kt-K8ch 15 P-Q5 PxP
34 K-81 Kt-86 1 16 PxP
35 8-Q1 KtxP
White now has a winning po-
36 R-Q3 Ktx8
sition.
After 37 K-K2, Kt-Kt8c h ; 38 K P-Kt3
16 . . .
Q2 (on any other move 39 . . . 17 P-K4! PxP
Kt-Kt7ch) , KtxBP; 39 R-Q6, Kt 1 8 KtxP KtxP
K5ch.
Resigns Spielmann

Game No. 1 6

DUTCH D E F E N S E

Prague, 1908
R u b i nstein Spielmann
1 P-Q4 P-K3
2 Kt- K 83 P-K84
3 P-Q 84 Kt-K83
4 Kt-83 P-QKt3 R u b i nstein
5 P-K Kta 8-Kt2
6 8-Kt2 8-K27 1 9 Kt-83 !

In this variation this is weak, This is the po i nt of the Pawn


the Bishop merely hampering sacrifice.
Black's game. Correct was B-Kt5 ! 19 . . . KtxKt
R-Kt2
7 0-0 0-0 20 Q x Pc h
P-K R3 21 Q-K6ch K-R2
8 8-84
P3 22 PxKt Kt-84
9 Q-82
23 Q-85ch K-Kt1
10 Q R-Q1 Q Kt-Q2
11 Kt- K 1 8x8 24 Q-R5
12 Ktx8 Q-81 The principal threat is now 25
13 8-81 ! P-B5 ! Hence the reply.
PRAGUE, 1908

24 Kt-K5 15 KPxB, with advantage : or 1Z


25 P-85 Kt-83 . . . KtxKt?, BxPch; etc. Hence
26 QxP R-R2 Black would have to play 1Z .
27 Q-K3 P-Q4 Kt-KB3, losing two tempi
28 Q-K6ch K-R1
11 K R-Q1
29 8-Kt5 R-K81
12 Kt-K5 KtxKt
30 Kt-R4 8-84ch
13 PxKt Kt-K1
31 R-Q41 K R-82
1 4 Q-R5 P-K84
32 Kt-Kt6ch K-Kt2
33 KtxR RxKt Not 14 . . . P-Kt3 because of 16
34 R-841 P-83 Q-R6, B-Kt4 ; 16 BxB, QxB ; 17 Kt
35 8xKtch B3, and White has a strong attack.
In order to follow 35 . . . RxB 1 5 R-K 1 7
w.lth 36 R-Kt4ch.
This method of avoiding the
Resigns threatened exchange of Bishops
The above game should be com (by B-QKt4) is entirely erroneous.
pared with Rubinstein vs. Samisch, The correct procedure was : 16
M arienbad, 1926! PxP, e.p. KtxP ; 16 Q-K2, followed
by P-K4, with about an even game.
15 . . . . 8-QKt4
16 8-82 Q-R3 !
17 R-R1 8-Q6
Game No. 17 18 8-Q1 7

Q U E E N 'S PAW N GAM E By the effort to retain his King's


Bishop, White falls into a woeful
Lodz, 1908 position. 18 BxB, QxB; 19 Kt-B3
Marshall Rubi nstei n was essential, with only the slight
est positional inferiority.
1 P..Q4 P-Q4
Kt-K83 18 Q-Kt31
2 8-84
3 Kt- K 83 P-K3 19 Kt-Kt3
4 P-K3 P-QB4 If 19 P-QKt3, Q-R4 ! follows.
5 P-83 Kt-83
6 8-Q3 Q-Kt3 19 . P..QR41
7 Q-81 Stronger than 19 . . . P-B5 ; 20
Forced, for 7 Q-K2 as well as 7 Kt-Q4, QxKtP; 21 B-B3 and White
Q-Kt3 would be disadvantageous. has some play for the Pawn.
20 8-83
7 - B-Q2
8 0-0 R-81 In order to answer 20 . . . P-R6,
9 QKt-Q2 B-K2 with 21 Kt-Bl.
10 R-Kt1
20 . 8-K5
10 P-KR3, to be followed by Q 21 R-K2
Ktl, aiming at PxP, and P-K4,
All his elforts to avoid the ex
seems to be better.
change were fruitless,-the Bishop
10 0-0 cannot escape its fate. But Rubin
1 1 Q-Q1 stein waits for the right moment.

Stopping 11 KKt-R4 ; be- 21 Kt-82


cause thereafter 12 Kt-K5 would 22 R-Q2 P-R 5
be very strong, e. g. 12 . . . KtxB ? 23 Kt-81 P-Kt3
13 KtxB, Q-B2; 14 KtxP, BxKt; 24 Q-R3 K-R 1 1
42 RUBINSTEIN'S CHD38 MASTERPIECES

Threatening destruction by 25 e.g. 38 P-B4, Q-K5ch ; 39 K-Ktl,


. . . P-Kt4 ! ( 26 BxB, QPxB ; 27 R-QB2 ; 40 Q-R6, Kt-K6 ! etc .
RxRch, RxR ; 28 BKt3, QxKtP ; ) .
White is now gravely beset in the R u b i nste i n
center as well as on both wings,
the collapse is inevitable.
25 Q..R6 8x8
26 Px8 P-Kt41
27 8-Kt3 P-Q5
Threatening 28 . . . PxKP; 29
RxRch, RxR; 30 PxP, QxKtP ; etc.,
with decisive result on the Queen's
side.
28 KPxP

Relatively the best. With two


Paw ns for the piece, White can
still put up a battle for some time.
Marshall
28 . . . . P-K85
29 Kt.Q2
37 RxK 8P I !
29 BxP, PxB ; 30 QxP?, would be A bold and beautiful combina
very bad because of B-Kt4 ! (if tion ! By the preparatory move
31 QxB, R-KKt) . 37 . . . P-R6 ! it would have been
29 . . . . PxB aWl more forcible : R-QKtl follow
30 R PxP Q-83 ed by PxP would have been threat
31 Q-R5 ened, and inasmuch as 38 P-Kt3,
R-QKtl followed by PxP would
If 31 K-Kt2, P-Kt5 ! have given Black a passed Pawn,
31 R-K81 White had to choose between 38
Q.K1 P-Kt4 or PxP, whereupon 38 . . .
32 K-Kt2
Q-Kt3 RxKBP ! ! etc. would follow with
33 Q-Kt4
34 R-KR1 P-851 a vengeance. The difference be
tween this and the actual move
Making Q4 secure for his Kt. made will soon be apparent.
35 Q-K4! K-Kt2! I
38 Qx R 7
Marshall's move was very good ;
Rubinstein's answer still better. 38 KxR would have offered much
After 35 . . QxQ; 36 PxQ, with more resistance. It is true that
PB4 etc. as soon as possible, the after 38 . . . R-B1ch ; 39 KKt3
White Pawns could still have would lose quickly ( . . . Q-K5 ; 40
proven very formidable. R-KB1, P-R4 ! ! ; 41 P-B3, P-R5ch ;
42 K-R2, RxP ! ; or 40 . . . R-B6ch ;
36 QxKtP Kt..Q4 41 K-R2, QxKt P ; 42 Kt-Kt3, PR4 ! ;
etc . ) . But 39 K-Kt2 would still
Now White has three Pawns for put up a battle. Q-K5ch ; 40 K-Ktl,
the piece, but his Queen is cut oft, QxKtPch ; 41 Kt-Kt3 ! R-B 6 ; 42
and Black has the attack. In such P-R3 ! , P-R4 ; 43 RxP, RxKtch; 44
cases the extra piece is always PxR, QxR; 45 Q-Q7 ! , Q-Kt5 ; 46
decisive. R-Kt2, and Black will have diffi
culty winning. Hence instead of
37 P-KKM
41 . . . R-B6, 41 . P-R6 should
37 have been played, in order to give
.

. . P-KKt5 was threatened :


LODZ, 1908 43

the Rook at B6 new attacking pos so 7 . . B-R4 or 7 . Kt-K2.


sibilities by weakening the Pawn Marshall, however, prefers ener-
at QB3. The attack would have getic variations, though they be
proceeded with more precision and double-edged.
simplicity If the sapping move P
8 8-K3
R6 had been made before the sac
rifice of the previous note. 8 P-B3 Is preferable, e.g. 8 .
B-R4 ; 9 Kt-Kt3, (bold would be
38 . . . . Q-KS 9 BxKt, followed by QR4, etc.)
Now the combination succeeds Kt-R4 ; 10 KtxKt, BxKt; 11 P-KR3 1
without difficulty, since the White and White has a good game.
Queen can offer no assistance, tied 8
Kt-R4?
down by the two minor pieces.
Weak ! Black could obtain a
39 K-Kt1 Kt-K61 good game by 8 . . . BxKt; 9 PxB,
Threatening R-Kt6ch etc. If 40 P-Q4 ! The advance in the center
R-R2, Q-Kt8ch; follows. There is disrupts White's plans on tbe
no salvation. King's side.

40 Kt-Kt3 R x Ktch 9 8xKt PxB


41 PxR Q-KtBch 1 0 Kt-K1 I
42 K-82 Here again 10 P-B3, B-R4 ; 11
If 42 K-R2, KtxPch ; 43 K-R3, Q-R4, B-Kt3 ; 12 QxBP, (or flrst
(43 K-Kt2, Q-K5ch, etc.) QxRch ; 12 BxB) would be of little value,
44 KxKt, P-R4 ; mate. and In fact dangerous, for by BxKt
and P-KB4, Black would obtain
42 . KtxPch the attack.
43 K-K2 Q-KSch
Resigns 10 P-Q4
White Is now wen prepared for
this : his attack on the flank gets
into full play.
1 1 P-K83 8-K3
Game N o. 1 8 12 P-KKt4! Kt-83
13 Kt-Kt3 !
F O U R K N I G H TS G A M E
Not 13 P-KR3 (in order to an
Lodz, 1908
swer PxKP by 14 BPxP) because
R ubi nstein M a rshall P-KR4 might follow. Nor is Kt
Kt2 in order because of QPxP! 14
1 P-K4 P-K4
QPxP, B-B5 ! ; 15 QxQ, KRxQ; 16
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q 83
K-B2, R-Q2 ; and White has the
3 Kt-83 Kt-83
Queen's file to worry over.
4 B-Kt5
13 P-Q S ?
Rarely played by Rubinstein

later in his career. On the in A grave error ! After the need


frequent occasions he did essay 1 less removal of the pressure In
P-K4, he usually continued after the center, White can comfortably
1 . . . P-K4 ; 2 P-KB4. give attention to the attack on the
King's wing. It Is true that 13
4 B-Kt5
. . . PxP; 14 QPxP, B-B5 ; (or QxQ

5 0-0 0-0
followed by B-B5) would be weak,
6 P-Q3 P-Q3
for evidently there would follow:
7 Kt-K2 B-Kt5
15 Kt-Q3. But 13 . . . Kt-Q3, in
Recognized continuations are al order to play B-B4 would have
44 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

been good. If White plays 14 P the principal threat 31 Q-Q7 a.nd


KB4, KPxP; and if 15 BxP, Q-R5 ! P-K6 ! (which is even stronger
And if 15 RxP, B-Q3 ! In addition than QxKt ) . Upon 30 . . . Q-R5,
13 . . . B-Q3 was also far superior 31 P-K6, KtxP; 32 PxPch, K-R1 ;
to the move actually made. 33 Q-R4 ! is decisive.

14 8-Q2 8-K2 30 P-K 6 ! Rx8P


15 Kt-Kt2 R-Kt1
16 P-Kt3 P-84 If 30 . . . PxKP; 31 QxKPch,
17 Kt-85 8xKt and Q-B7 wins. And if 30 . . .
18 KtPx8 R-Kt3 QxBP, evidently 31 PxBPch, K-Rl ;
32 Kt-B4, KtxP; 33 KtxKtPch, etc.
19 R-82 Q-Q2
K R-QKt1 is overwhelming.
20 Q-K2
21 P-K 84 PxP
31 Kt-K1 ! RxQ R P
22 8xP P-85
32 PxPch KxP
A spirited effort to obtain a 33 Kt-83 !
counter-attack.
It Is now evident that 31 Kt-Kl
23 KtPxP won an important tempo.

In the correct appraisal that the 33 KtxP


counter-attack on the Queen's side
must come too late. 23 QPxP, B The double threat of Kt-K5ch
B4 ; 24 Q-Q3, would also have suf and Kt-Kt5ch could not be parried.
ficed, but Rubinstein did not wish
34 Kt-Kt5ch K-Kt2
to disturb his position In the cen
ter without absolute necessity.
Marshall
23 R-Kt8eh
24 RxR RxRch
25 R-81 R-Kt7

After 25 . RxRch ; 26 QxR,


White would win the ending with
out d.lffi.culty.

26 P-K5

Beginning a.n attack that carries


through.

26 Kt-K1
27 B-Kt3 Q-R5

Possibly B-Kt4 was somewhat R u b instein


better.

28 P-86! B-81 35 RxKtl KxR


36 Q-84ch K-K2
After 28 . . . PxP ; 29 B-R4, was
very strong. If 28 . . RxBP; 29 If . . . K-Kt2 ; 37 Kt-K6ch, mat
Q-B3, PxP; 30 B-R4, or 29 Q-K4, ing the following move.
B-B1 ; 30 P-K6, etc. 37 Q-87ch K-Q1
38 Kt-K6ch Resigns
29 Q-Kt4 P-KKt3
Mate on the following move
If 29 . . QxBP; 30 Kt-B4, with could not be avoided.
LODZ, 1908 45

Game No. 1 9 13 R-B1, Kt-Q2 ; 14 Q-B2, R-B1 ; (15


BxRP ?, R-R1 ) .
Q U E E N'S GAM B I T D EC L I N E D
1 3 R-Q B1 B-KKt5
Lodz, 1908
B-K3 immediately was now no
R u b i nste i n Salwe better. 14 B-B5 would follow, and
the blockade begins.
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 P-QB4 P-K3 14 P-KB3
3 Kt-QB3 P-QB4
The "weakening" proves of value
4 PxQP KPxP
later.
5 Kt-KB3 Kt-KB3
6 P-KKt3 Kt-83 14 B-K3
7 B-Kt2 PxP 15 B-85 KR-K1
16 R-KB2! Kt-Q2
Not good. B-K2 and 0-0 are
17 BxB RxB
necessary.
18 Q-Q4 1 KR-K1
8 KtxP Q-Kt3 If 18 . . . R-QB1, not 19 QxRP
As to 8 . . . B-QB4, compare the because Black could obtain some
game against Marshall at Breslau, play by 19 . . P-QB4, but more
1912. brutally 20 Kt-B5.
1 9 B-81 K R-QB1
9 Ktx Kt !
20 P-K3 Q-Kt2
I t was diffi cult t o control the If 20 . . . P-B4 ; 21 RxP!
square Q4. Hence Rubinstein
gracefully revamps his plan of ac 21 Kt-85 KtxKt
tion. His principal aim is now, 22 RxKt R-82
not to direct an attack against Q5, 23 K R-QB2 Q-Kt3
but to blockade the square Q4 and P-QR4 was another type of move.
principally B5. Now Black becomes completely
tied up.
9 PxKt
1 0 0-0
. .

B-K2? 24 P-QKt4!

Thereafter it is no longer pos Sal we


sible to avert the entry into B5.
The Pawn at Q4 should have been
"over-protected" by B-K3 at once,
Jn order to threaten P-B4. There
after if 11 Kt-R4, Q-Kt4 ; 12 B-K3,
P-B4 ; 13 B-Kt5, B-K2 ; ( R-Q1 is
also to be considered) 14 BxKt,
BxB ; 15 BxP, R-Q1 ; 16 P-K4, 0-0 ;
Black would have some counter
play and prospects of winning back
the Pawn. Of course White would
not have to proceed so obviously
and could obtain an excellent game.
But he could not force the kind of
tle-up that occurred in the actual Rubinstein
game.
24 . P-Q R3
1 1 Kt-R4 Q-Kt4
P-Kt5 was threatened. Apart
12 B-K3 0-0
from this, P-QR4 ? was refuted by
Even here B-K3 was better: e.g. RxP!
46 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

25 R-QR5 Q R-Kt1 32 Q-Q6 Q-81


33 R-85 Q.Kt2
QxQ would also be hopeless : e.g.
34 P-KR4 P-R4
26 PxQ, B-QBl ; 27 RxQP.
35 R-87 Q.Kt1
26 P-QR3 R ( 82 ) -R2 36 P-Kt5 P-R5
37 P-Kt6 R-R4
Loss of a pawn was already un 38 P-Kt7 !
avoidable.
Threatening 39 R-B8ch. If the
27 RxBP ! QxR King moves to the 2nd rank, 39
28 QxR R-R1 RxPch wins.
29 Q-85 Q-Kt2
30 K-82 Resigns

First to secure the King's wing: An instructive blockading game.


then to the final attack. Rubinstein even at that date was
an excellent master of the prin
30 . . . . P-KR4 ciples of the " blockade,'' to be
31 B-K2 P-Kt3 later popularized by Nimzowitsch.
Chapter IV
Intemational Toumament at SL Petenburg. 1909

Game No. 20 Threatening 18 Q-R5.

Q U E E N'S G A M B I T D EC L I N E D 17 R-B2
18 Kt-B4 P-BS
St. Petersburg, 1909
Rubi nstein Schlechter Schlechter

1 P-Q4 PQ4
2 Kt-KB3 P-K3
3 P-QB4 Kt-KB3
4 B-Kt5 B-K2
5 Kt-QB3 Q Kt-Q2
6 P-K3 P-B3

More exact is 6 . . . 0-0.


7 B-Q3 Px P
8 BxP Kt-Q4
9 BxB QxB
10 o.o 0-0
11 QR-B1 R-Q1

Here Black can free his game Rubinstein


by 11 . KtxKt ; 12 RxKt, P-K4 ;
.

as is well known. In that case, he Thereby Black alms to play B-B2,


still has to contend with diverse and when possible R(B2)-Q2, with
tactical difficulties, which, however, a counter pressure on the Queen's
-

can be overcome by exact play. flle


. There is, however, a resul
After the move made he obtains a tant weakness on K3, which Rubin
cramped game. stein exploits decisively in amazing
fashion.
12 Q-B2 Kt-B1
19 Q-R 5 1 1
Before the Queen's Bishop is
developed, it is almost invariably Now the Rook Pawn is attacked.
bad to remove the Knight at Q2, If Bl ac k plays 19 Kt B1, tbere fol -

from its fine post. The text is lows 20 KtxKP ! the Rook at B2
indeed in harmony with the pre being flnally without protection.
vious move, merely indicating that
19 P-K Kt4
the method of development chosen

by Black, Is faulty. Black is compelled to make this


further weakness If he wishes to
13 P-K4 Kt-Kt3
save the Pawn. For if 19 . R

The Knight Is now favorably QR1 ; 20 P-Q5, KPxP ; 21 PxP,


posted. But If 13 . . . KtxKt ; 14 PxP ; 22 KtxP ! , with decisive ef
QxKt, White's superiority is evi- fe et .

dent.
20 Kt-K2 Kt-B1
14 B-Kt3 B-Q2 21 P.Q 5 1
15 Kt-K2 B-K1
This onslaught is overwhelming.
16 K R-Q1 Q R-B1
17 Q-B3 21 R ( 82)-Q2
48 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

After 21 . . . P-Kt3 ; Dr. Lasker Or 39 . . . P-R5 ; 40 PxP, PxKt ;


gives the following : 22 Q-B3, 41 PxP and wins.
KPxP ; 23 PxP, QxKt; 24 P-Q6ch,
R-B 2 ; 25 QxKBP, R-Q 2 ; 26 R-K1, 40 Ktx 8 P !
Q-Kt4 ; 27 RxB, ( . . . QxB ; 28 QxP 4 0 KtxRP seems stronger. But
ch,) and White wins. thereafter 40 . . . Kt-K3 would
follow,-and, if White tries to hold
22 Q Kt-Q4! 8PxP
the Pawn, K-Q3 etc. with some
23 PxP RxP
counter-play.
Loss of m aterial was unavoid
40 KtxP
able : 23 . . . PxP ; 24 B-R4, P-Kt3 ;
.

41 R-R7ch K-K1
25 Q-R6, and if the Rook moves Kt-Kt5
42 K-82
26 Kt-B5 etc. K-82
43 R x R P
24 8xR Rx8 44 K-K3 P-R4
25 Q-K1 45 K-K4 Kt-83
46 R-R6 Kt-K2
Rubinstein now marshalls his 47 P-Kt4! PxP
relatively slight advantage in mar 48 PxP K-Kt3
terlal with machine-like precision 49 R-R7 K-82
to victory. 50 Kt-Kt7 K-Kt3
51 Kt-Q6 Kt-83
25 Kt-Q3 52 R-Q87 Kt-Q5
26 Kt.K2 8-83 53 Kt-85 KtxKt (forced )
Schlechter defends himself as 54 PxKtch K-R3
55 K-83 Kt-R2
well as Is possible. After 26 .
56 K- Kt4 P-K5
R-Kt4 (27 Q-Q2, Kt-K5 ; 28 Q-K3,)
57 R-K7 P-K6
White wins more easily through
58 RxP K-Kt2
his control of both open lines.
59 R-K7ch
27 RxR 8xR If now 59 . K-R3 ; then 60
28 K Kt-Q4 P-K4
R-KB7, and If 59 . . . K-Ktl ; 60
Or 28 . . . BxP; 29 Q-R5, and K-R5 etc.
QxRP. Resigns
29 Kt-Q 83 ! Q-K 82 In the tourney at St. Petersburg,
30 Ktx8 QxKt Rubinstein, in my opinion, reached
31 Kt-Kt3 P-Kt3 the zenith of his artistry.
32 R-Q1 Q-83
33 Q-83

Forcing the exchange of Queens.


If 33 . Q-Q2? 34 Q-Q3.
.

33 QxQ
34 PxQ

Game No. 21

Now the winning procedure is Q U E E N'S PAW N GAM E


easy.
St. Petersburg, 1909
34 . . . . Kt-K5
E. Cohn Rubi nstein
35 P-Q84 K-82
36 R.QS K-K2 1 P-Q4 P-Q4
37 R-RS P-QR4 2 Kt-K83 P-Q84
38 P-83 Kt-86 3 P-Q84 Px8P
39 P-85 PxP 4 PxP
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 49

Petty. The natural continuation 19 K-K1 8xKt


was 4 PK3 : or 4 P-Q5 or 4 P-K4 20 Px8 Kt-Q3
was playable. 21 B-K27

4 . . . QxQch 21 B-Q3 should have been play


5 KxQ Kt-Q83 ed. If 21 . . . R-QB1 ; 22 P-B4 ! ,
6 P-K3 8-Kt5 was playable (22 . R-B6 ; 23
. .

7 8xP P-K3 K-Q2, R-Kt6 ? ? ; 24 K-B2) .

8 P-Q R3 8xP
21 R-Q81
9 P-Kt4 B-Q3
22 K-Q2
. .

10 8-Kt2 Kt-83
1 1 Kt-Q2 K-K2 If 22 P-B4, R-B6 ! could now be
played (23 K-Q2, Kt-K5ch ) .
For the ending, Black does well
to centralize his K. 11 . . . 0-0, 22 . . Kt-85ch
would be theoretically incorrect.
Rubinste i n
12 K-K2

12 P-KR3 should have been


played first.

12 8-K4!

After the exchange of the Bish


op at Kt2 White's Queen side is
somewhat weak.

13 8x 8 Ktx8
14 KR-QB1
Had White played P-KR3 ( B-R4) ,
he could now move P-Kt4 without
difficulty. Cohn
14 . . QR-Q81 Psychologically played ! Since
1 5 8-Kt3 White is merely trying to draw,
Avoids the doubling of the K Rubinstein properly reasoned that
Bishop's Pawns. his opponent would now grasp the
opportunity to exchange both the
15 K R-Q1 remaining pieces. But actually 22
1 6 Kt-84 . . . P-K4 was correct ( Dr. Lasker) .
That would have maintained the
Now 16 . P-KR3 was not
small advantage.
ent irely satisfactory. Black would
have had the choice of the follow 23 8xKt Rx8
ing excellent continuations : 16 . . . 24 R-Q 8 1 7
B-R4 ; 17 P-Kt4, KtxKt ; 18 KtxKt,
Now P-B 4 ! had to be played.
B-Kt3.
If then 24 . . . K-B 3 ; 25 K-Q3, (not
Or 16 . . . BxKtch ; 17 KtxB, (17 25 R-QB1 ? RxR etc.) P-QKt4 ; 26
PxB, P-KKt4) KtxKt ; 18 KxKt, R-KKtl, and White can hold the
( 1 8 PxKt, P-KKt4) RxR ; 19 RxR, game.
RQ3.
24 . . . . RxR !
16 . . . KtxKt ( 84) 25 Kx R K-83
1 7 RxKt RxR
Now follows an mstructive con
18 8xR Kt-K5 !
tribution to the chapter " Pawn
Threatening R-Q7ch. Endings."
50 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

26 K-Q2 K-Kt4 36 . . . . P-R5


27 K-K2 37 K-Kt1 P-Kt6
With his march to QB7, White 38 RPxP PxP
would be left too far behind : 27 If 39 P-B4, then follows : 39 . . .
K-Q3, K-R5 ; 28 K-Q4, K-R6 ; 29 PxP ; 40 P-K5, P-Kt7 ; 41 P-K6,
K-B5, KxP ; 30 KQ6, K-Kt7 ; 31 K-Kt6 ; 42 P-K7, P-B6 ; and P-B7
K-B7, PQKt4 ! etc. mate.
27 K-R5 Resigns

28 K-81 K-R6
29 K-Kt1 P-K4
30 K-R1
If 30 P-K4, there would follow:
30 . . . P-KKt4 ; 31 K-R1, P-KR4 ;
32 K-Ktl , P-R5 ; 33 K-R1, P-Kt5 ;
34 PxP, KxP; 35 K-Kt2, P-R6ch
and K-B6. Game N o. 22
30 P-QKt4
Q U E E N 'S PAW N GA M E
. . .

31 K-Kt1 P-84
32 K-R1 P-Kt4 St. Petersburg, 1909
33 K-Kt1 P-KR4
34 K-R1 Rubi nstein M ieses
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
Rubi nstein 2 Kt-K83 P-Q84
3 P-84 Kt-K83
4 PxQP PxP
5 KtxP KtxP
6 P-K4 Kt-K83

6 . . . Kt-Kt5, threatening QxKt


is also playable.

7 Kt-Q 83 P-K4

7 . . . P-K3 was preferable.


8 8-Kt5ch

If 8 KKt-Kt5, not 8 . . . QxQch,


which is weak, but 8 . . P-QR3 ! ,
Cohn which i s strong.
8 8-Q2
34 . . . . P-Kt5

9 Kt-85 ! Kt-83
35 P-K4
10 Kt-Q6ch 8xKt
The main variation was : 35 PxP, 11 Qx 8 Q-K2
RPxP ; 36 K-Ktl, P-B5 ; 37 PxP, 12 QxQch KtxQ
PxP ; 38 K-R1, P-Kt6 ; 39 BPxP, 13 8-K3 !
PxP; 40 PxP, KxP; with decisive
superiority of the Queen side White now has an overwhelming
Pawns. end-game.
35 8PxP 13 P-Q R3
36 PxKP

14 8x8ch Ktx8
Or 3 6 PxKtP, PxP; 37 KKtl, 15 K-K2 QR-81
P-K6 ; 38 PxP, P-K5 ; 39 K-Rl, P 16 K R-Q1 Kt-84
Kt6 ; etc. 17 8xKt
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 61

24 K-K4 K-QS
It Is astonishing that Rubinstein
25 R-K 8 1 R-QB 1
trades off this strong Bishop. More
26 R-87 R-85
consequent appears to be 17 QR-B1.
27 K-Q3 R-Kt5
17 . . . . Rx8 28 R x K KtP
1 8 QR-81 ! ! Kt-83
This Is simpler than the attempt
M leeea to win a Pawn by 28 P-QKt3, which
would be met by Kt-Kt4. Rubin
stein seeks victory by attack ra
ther than by gain of material.

28 . . RxP
29 R x R P RxKtP
3 0 R-R6ch K-Q2

The King must retreat : 30 .


K-B 4 ; 31 Kt-K4ch, and If KxP, 32
R-Q6ch mate; and upon any other
moves the advance of the Queen's
Pawn wins.

31 R-R7ch K.Q3
Rubi nstein 32 R-R6ch K-Q2

In order to gain tlme on the


18 . . . Castles would be In clock, White repeats his checks.
sufficient because of 19 Kt-Q5, but
the text-move is also inferior. 33 Kt-K4! RxQ R P
Relatively best appears to be 18 34 R-R7ch K-Q1
. . . R-B2, since 19 . 0-0; is. . 35 P-Q6
now threatened. White, however,
replies with 19 Kt-R4 ! and retains The threat Is 36 Kt-B6, and mate
the advantage, e.g. 19 . . . Kt-B 3 ; cannot be parried.
2 0 K-K3, 0-0 ; 2 1 Kt-B5, Kt-Q5 ; 35 . Kt-Kt4
22 Kt-Q3, etc. The excha nge-8xKt 36 K-84 R-R4
-was thel'efol'e well considered. 37 RxP
19 R-Q5! RxR Making QB6 available for hls
If 19 . . . R-B5, the following King: e.g. 35 K-Q5, Kt-B2ch; 311
continuation Is given in the book K-B6.
of the tourney : 20 P-QKt3, R-Q5 ;
37 . . Kt-R6ch
21 K-K3, (threatening RxPch) P
38 K-Kt4!
B3 ; 22 Kt-R4, K-K 2 ; 23 Kt-B5,
RxR ; 24 PxR, Kt-Kt5 ; 25 P-Q6ch How superbly simple Is the game
with advantage. of chess, If one has a superb mas
tery of it.
20 PxR Kt-Q5ch
21 K-Q3 K-K2
38 R-Kt4eh
22 P-84 !
.

39 R x R KtxR
Opening the Bishop file for the 40 K-85 K-Q2
White Rook, and at the same time 41 K-Q5 P-R4
attaining an object of attack on 42 Kt-85ch K-K1
K5. 43 KxP K-82
44 Kt-Kt7 !
22 . . . P-83
23 PxP
.

PxP Threatening 45 P-Q7 and forces


52 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

K-K1, thereby winning the Rook 10 B x K Kt Bx8


Pawn. 1 1 KtxP BxKt
12 Px8 Q-Kt41
Resigns
The double threat against Q5
An elegant example of the power and Kt2 forces the exchange which
of centralization, by virtue of follows, and Black obtains a su
which, White obtains an irresist perb development.
ible attack even in the ending. It is easy to see that Kt-B7ch
would be of no avail either at this
point or on move 15.

Game N o. 23 13 BxKt 8xB


14 Kt-K3 0-0-0
QU E E N'S G A M B I T D EC L I N ED
This appears to be very strong,
St. Petersburg, 1909 but proves to be insufficient. Pos
sibly Dr. Lasker over-valued his
Rubi nstein Dr. Lasker
position to some extent. Better
1 P.Q4 P-Q4 would have been : 14 . . . BxP
2 Kt-KB3 Kt-KB3 with the following continuations :
3 P-B4 P-K3 1) 15 KtxB, QxKt ; 16 Q-K2ch,
4 B-Kt5 P-84 K-Q1 ! ; 17 0-0-0, R-K1 ; and Black
In this position P-B4 is unfavor has some counter-play, his King
able. Entirely adequate are : 4 is protected by the Pawn at Q4.
. . . QKt-Q2 or 4 . . . B-K2 : very 2) 15 R-KKtl, Q-R4ch ; 16 Q-Q2,
worthy of note is 4 . . . B-Kt5ch; QxQch; 17 KxQ, B-K5 ; 18 R-Kt4,
5 Kt-B3, PxP ; 6 P-K4, P-B4 etc. B-Kt3 ; 19 R-B1, R-Q1 ; and Black
("The Vienna Defense") . can defend himself.
Perhaps Rubinstein would have
5 PxQP K Px P done better to have avoided the
6 Kt-B3 Px P Pawn sacrifice by 10 0-0 : in that
7 K KtxP Kt-83 manner he would have had the
If 7 B-K2, it is clear that 8
. . preferable game in any event.
P-KKt3 follows with advantage.
Rightly sensing that no quiet con 1 5 0-0 K R-K1
tinuation would be satisfactory, The position becomes more beau
Lasker seeks complications. tiful : now RxKt is threatened.

8 P-K3 16 R-81 !
But Rubinstein does not conform Lasker
to the plan of his opponent. 8
BxKt, QxB ; 9 KtxP?, QxKt; 10
Kt-B7ch, K-Q1 ; 11 KtxR, would
mean immediate loss on account
of 11 . . . B-Kt5ch. But if 8 BxKt,
QxB ; 9 KKt-Kt5, B-QKt5 (there
is nothing better) 10 Kt-B7ch, K
B1 ; 11 KKtxP, it would be doubt
ful if Black had sufficient com
pensation for his Pawn.
8 . . . . B-K2
BQKt5 was somewhat better.
9 B-Kt5 8-Q2
A spirited defense. Rubi nste i n
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 53

An extraordinarily subtle de more insufficient because of 25


fense, which even Lasker does not Q-R5ch and QxR.
fathom.
22 . . . . Q.K2
16 . RxKt?
Black must bring himself to the

This is refuted. 16 . . . K-Ktl exchange of Queens. As Dr. Tar


was necessary, but thereafter rasch made clear 22 .Q-B3
.

White had two favorable defenses : would lose immediately since 23


I 17 R-B2, threatening 18 R-Q2, R-Q4 ! forces the exchange of both
with the capitalization of his Pawn Rooks and Queens.
superiority. KxQ
23 QxQch
II 17 R-B5, Q-B 5 ; (. . . Q-K2 ;
18 P-QKt4) P-Q5, and now both 18 Or 23 . . . RxQ ; 24 RxP, RxP;
. . Q-Q3 and 18 . . . RxKt would
25 R-B7, and wins quickly.
be refuted by 19 Q-B1 !
24 RxP R-Q8ch
17 Rx8ch PxR 25 K-821
18 Q-81 ! !
Not 25 R-B1? because of R-Q7
This is the surprise! After 18 (26 R-Ktl, R-K7 or if 26 R-B1,
PxR, QxPch; 19 K-R1, QxP ; Black K-Q 2 ) and Black has drawing
eventually obtains the advantage. chances.
18 , . . . RxP 25 R-Q7ch
26 K-83 RxQKtP
Or 18 . . . R-K4 ; 19 QxPch, K
2:7 R-Q R 5 1 R-Kt2
Ktl ; 20 PxR, QxP ; 21 R-B1, with
28 R-R6! K-81
the superior game.
29 P-K4
19 Px R ! R-Q2
After his opponent has been
After 19 R-Q3, 20 RxBP etc. thrust back, White's extra Pawn
Black's game would be still more moves irresistibly to a decision.
precarious.
29 R-Q82
20 QxPch

K-Q1 30 P-KR4 K-82


21 R-84! I 31 P-Kt4 K-81
Splendid-and by no means ob 32 K-84 K-K2
vious. White threatens 22 Q-R8ch, 33 P-R5 P-R3
KK2 ; 2.3 R-K4ch, etc. and the Played in order to prevent P
counter-attack 21 . . . R-Q8ch ; 22 Kt5 (followed by K-B5, P-K5 etc. ) :
K-B2, R-Q7ch ; 23 K-K1, would only however, it creates a weakness at
lead to a critical loss of time. The Kt6. The game cannot be held
Black rook dare not leave the In any event.
Queen file since 23 R-Q4 would
decide the issue. 23 . . . QxKtP? 34 K-85 K-82
does not avail because of 24 R 35 P-K5 R-Kt2
Q4ch followed by win of the Queen 36 R-Q& K-K2
or mate. And the retreat of 22 37 R-R& K-82
. R-Q2 would enable White to
.
38 R-Q&
carry out his threat of Q-R8ch etc. Such repetition of moves to gain
21 . P-K84 time is often found in Rubinstein's
22 Q-851 games. He avails himself of this
expedient even when not in time
Threatens a mating attack be difficulty.
ginning with QKB8ch. The coun
ter-attack 22 . . . R-Q8ch ; 23 K-B2, sa . . . . K-81
&Q7ch ; 24 K-Kl, QxP; is once 39 R-Q86 K-82
54 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

40 P-R 3 ! 1 0 8-Q2
Zugzwang ! The attempt to obtain a space
I 40 . . . K-K1 ; 41 K-Kt6 and controlling development for the
wins, since the only useful answer Queen's Bishop is at the least,
41 . . . R-Kt5 is prevented. Evident premature. 10 R-Q1 should have
ly K-R7 and P-K6 and R-Q7, or been played.
similarly in any event the capture
10 0-0
of the King's wing.

1 1 Q R-81 R-Q1
II 40 . . . R-K 2 ; 41 P-K6ch,
1 2 8-Q3
K-Ktl ; 42 K-Kt6 ! R-K1 ; 43 P-K6
followed by R-Q6 and R-Q8. QPxP was preferable.
Resigns 12 PxP
A very beautiful and difficult 13 PxP
game, played masterfully by Rubin 13 KKtxP was better. If then
stein in nearly every phase. 13 . . . KtxKt, the Black Queen
1s imperiled.
13 . B-Q2

13 . . . KtxP ? ; 14 KtxKt, RxKt;


Game N o. 24 15 Kt-Kt5, and wins.
Q U E E N'S GAM BIT ACC E PT E D 14 Kt-K4 QR-B1
15 Kt-K57
St. Petersburg, 1909
Very pretty, but incorrect. 15
Speyer Rubinstein
P-QKt4 was also unsatisfactory,
1 P-Q4 P-Q4 since Black answers 15 . . . Q-Kt3.
2 P-Q84 P-K3 Therefore, 15 B-KKt5 was proper,
3 Kt-Q83 PxP with the threat of a dangerous
4 Kt-83 attack.
According to our latest experi 15 . . . . 8-K1 1
ences 4 P-K3 is the best continu
ation. The move is also logical, If 15 . . . Ktx P ? ; 16 KtxKtch,
inasmuch as the answer 4 . . . BxKt; 17 Q-K4, QxKt; 18 QxPch,
P-K4 is not playable, as the Black K-B1 ; 19 B-Kt4ch etc., or 17 .

Kt-K7ch; 18 K-R1, KtxR ; 1 9 QxP


King's Pawn has already moved.
ch, and 20 B-Kt4ch White wins in
4 . . P-Q R 3 1 every variation. But now on the
contrary the Pawn at Q4 has be
Compelling White's next move,
come very weak.
which, however, weakens his
Queen's wing. 16 KtxKtch
5 P-QR4 P-QB4 White rightly seeks salvation in
6 P-K3 Kt-K83 complications. For after 16 Kt
7 8xP Kt-83 KB3, (16 B-K3, KtxP ! 17 BxKt.
8 0-0 Q-82 QxR; etc.) Q-Ktl ; 17 BK3, QKt
Kt5 ; etc. or 16 KtxKt, BxKt ; etc.
In order not to be compelled to
Black would soon attain decisive
trade the Queen after PxBP.
advantage.
9 Q-K2
16 BxKt
P-Q5 was worthy of considera 1 7 8-83 KtxP!
tion.
Rubinstein has calculated keenly
. . . . B-K2 and deeply. He repulses the at-
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 55

tack and obtains a decisive superi 27 R-K3 R-Q8ch


ority in the ending. 28 R-K1 R-Q2
29 P-84 K-82
18 Q-K4 30 K-82 8-K5
18 BxKt would be quite hope 31 R-K2 P-K Kt4
less, because of 18 . . . QxR. 32 R-Q2 8-Q4

18 .. Kt-84 "And would not and said naught."


19 P-K Kt4 The exchange of Rooks would
make the win more difficult.
Rubinstein
33 K-Kt3 K-K3
34 R-K2ch 8-K5
.t 35 R-Q2 R-Kt2 !

Now the Rook enters the game,


and the game moves fast.

.-a 36
37
PxP
K-84
RxPch
R-Kt5ch
'W' 38 K-K3 R-R5
. . . . 39
40
R-K82
8-Q4
8-Q4
R-K5ch
a a a 41 K-Q3 8-83
II m 42
43
P-Kt4
K-83
8-Kt4ch
P-85
Speyer 44 8-85 K-84
45 K-Q2 P-KR4
19 8xKt ! 46 K-83 B-K7

With the following considera Threatening P-B6. Therefore the


tions : White Rook takes flight, but there
I 20 PxB, BxPch; followed by by gives the hostile Pawn a free
B-B3 and wins. road to her Queen ambitions.
II 2 0 BxB, QxR; 21 RxQ, RxR
ch ; 22 K-Kt2, B-B3; and wins or 47 R-K Kt2 P-86
22 B-B1, R ( Q ) -Q 8 ; and wins. Or 48 R-Kt7 8-Kt4
21 PxKt, Q-Kt4ch ; 22 B-Kt3, B-B3 ;
With the threat 49 . . . R-B5ch
winning.
followed by RxB and P-B7. Against
ro Qx8 Rx8 this there is no adequate defense.
21 QxQ
49 R-Kt3 R-85ch
Or 21 PxKt, QxQ ; 2 2 BxQ, RxR; 50 K-Q2 K-K5
23 RxR, P-B3 ; 24 R-B8, K-B1 ; 25
B-B3, PxP; etc. Again threatening RxB etc.
21 RxQ 51 B-Kt&
22 PxKt Px P
Or 61 KK1, RB8ch; 52 KB2,
22 . BxRP ; 23 P-B6, PxP; 24
R-B8 mate.
BxP, RxR; 25 RxR, R-Q8ch; was
. .

also very good, as Black obtains


51 RxP
the majority on both wings.

52 R-KR3 R-Kt7ch
23 P-R5 P-83 53 K-83 P-87
24 K R.Q1 Q R-Q2 54 R-K3ch K-85
25 R x R RxR 55 R-K& K-84
28 R-K1 8-83 Resigns
56 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Game No. 25 21 KR-B1ch, K-Kt3 ; 22 P-R5ch!


with advantage) 21 Kt-B3ch, K-K5 ;
Q U E E N'S GA M B IT ACC E PT E D (K-B4, 22 Kt-Q4ch) 22 KR-Q1,
St. Petersburg, 1909 Black falls into a mating net e.g.
22 . . . PxP ? ; 23 R-Q4ch, K-B4 ;
Dr. Vidmar Rubinstei n 24 P-Kt4ch, K-Kt3 ( KtxP, 25 R
1 P-Q4 P.Q4 B4ch) 25 Kt-K5ch, with a winning
2 P-QB4 P-K3 attack.
3 Kt-QB3 PxP
19 Q R-Kt1 KtxKt
4 P-K3 Kt-KB3
20 KtxKt R-85
5 BxP P-Q R3
21 8-Q4
6 Kt-83 P-QB4
7 0-0 Kt-83 Threatening 22 RxB !
8 PxP BxP
9 QxQch 21 P.QR4
22 P-837
9 P-QR3 was stronger. The Black
King from his central post co As Dr. Lasker points out, White
operates with his R's, and asserts could force a draw by 22 RxB ! !
himself In the end-game. In fact If 22 . . . PxR (RxR; 23 B-B5ch;
it Is therefore an advantage to K-Q1 ; 24 BxR, PxB ; 25 Kt-B5 ! )
forego castling in such positions. 23 BB5ch, K-Q1 ; 24 B-Kt6ch, and
9 . . . . KxQ White obtains the draw by per
10 P-QR3 K-K2 petual check, as the Black King
11 P-QKt4 B-Q3 must gravitate between Q1 and K2.
12 P-Kt5
22 P-83
A nervous attack, which causes 23 K R-Q1 7
no damage. After 12 . PxP ; 1 3 . .

KtxP, the Knight would b e well Even here the tactical saving
placed on Kt5. In Prague 1902 manoeuvre 23 RxB! etc. was sUll
(c.f. Game No. 15) Dr. Vidmar possible.
played practically the same vari
23 QR-81
ation against the same opponent,

and lost by lack of initiative. This With this move Black overcomes
time he does not want to make the the critical phase, and the advan
same mistake. tages of his position - (the two
Bishops, the open Bishop tile and
12 Kt-QR4
the attack against the Rook Pawn)

13 8-R2 8-Q2
quickly brings about a decision.
14 P-QR4 K R.QB 1
15 8-Kt2 Kt-85
24 R-Kt3 P-K4
16 BxKt RxB
25 8-Kt6 R-88
17 Kt-Q2 R-82
26 R-Q3 RxRch
Now B-Kt5 is threatened. (If 27 RxR B-K3
1 8 BR3, BxB ; 19 RxB, PxP). 28 P-R4 S.Kt6
29 R-R 1 R-87
1 8 QKt-K41
30 P-Kt4
Very proper! He must combi ne:
otherwise Black gets an advantage A desperate effort to gain some
-because of the Bishop.
counter-play. White's game ts
clearly lost.
18 S.Kt5
30 . . . . P-Kt3

After 1 8 . . PxP ; 19 KtxB,


. 31 P-Kt5 P-84
K.x:Kt; 20 B-R3ch, KK4 ; (KB3 ? 32 Kt-86 P-R4
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 57

33 R-Kt1 8-85 evidently have resigned Immedi


ately.
If 33 . . . BxP ; 34 Kt-Q5ch etc.
65 8-Kt6 R-Kt7ch
34 R-Q1 B-Q7 66 K-R1
35 P-K4 P-85
36 Kt-Q5ch 8xKt If 66 K-B1, R-QKt7 !
37 Px8 K-Q3 66 - . R-Kt5
38 K-81 8-K6 1 67 8-Kt1 RxPch
39 8xP 8-Q5 ! 68 8-R2 R-K Kt5
B-Kt4ch was threatened. 69 8-KtB RxP
70 K-R2 R-Kt7ch
40 R-Q2 R-88ch 71 K-R3 P-Kt4
41 K-K2 P-Kt3 72 8-87 R-KtB
42 8-Kt4ch KxP 73 K-R2 R-QB
43 P-R5 PxP 74 8-KtB P-Kt5
75 8-Kt3 R-Q7ch
Not . . . R-QKt8 ; because of 44 76 K-Kt1 Kx8
P-R6 ! ( RxB ? 45 R-R2 ! ) . 77 K-81 K-86
44 P-Kt6 78 K-K1 R-Q1

This swindle also goes astray. And mates on the next move.
Naturally not ( 44 . . PxB ? 45 Apparently Rubinstein desired to
P-Kt7 } . mate without an added Queen, and
Vidmar was obviously eager to
44 . . . . R-QKtB Jearn if this was possible.
45 8xP R-Kt4
46 R-R2 P-K5
47 PxPch KxP
48 R-R4 P-86ch
49 K-81 R-KtBch
Game No. 26
50 8-K1 P-87 !
FRENCH DEFENSE
Vidmar has no luck : 50 .
RxP ? ; 51 RxBch, KxR ; 52 B-B2ch, St. Petersburg, 1909
would certainly have pleased him
much. Forgacs Rubi nstein
1 P-K4 P-K3
51 Rx8ch KxR
2 P-Q4 P-Q4
52 KxP RxP
3 Px P
53 K-83 R-Kt4
54 8-Kt3 R-84c h If White wants to play for a
55 8-84 K-Q6 draw, he can attain his goal much
56 K-Kt3 K-K5 more easily with other variations.
57 8-KtB R-86ch
3 . . . . PxP
58 K-Kt2 R-Kt6
4 Kt-K83 Kt- K 83
59 8-Kt3 K-84
60 K-R3 R-Q6 4 . . . B-Q3 ; 5 QKt-B3, B-KKt5 ;
61 K-Kt2 K-Kt5 6 B-K2, Q-Q 2 ; and if possible 0-0-0
62 8-K1 R-QB gives much more play than mere
63 8-82 symmetry.
If 63 B-Kt3, R-Kt8ch etc. 5 8-Q3 8-Q3
R-Q7 6 0-0 0-0
63
7 Q 8-Kt5 Q8-Kt5
.

64 K-Kt1 K-86
8 Q Kt-Q2 QKt-Q2
After 64 . . RxB, White would 9 P-83 P-83
58 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTElRPIECES

10 Q-82 Q-82 materials,-and to carry it to a


11 K R-K1 K R- K 1 decisive conclusion.
12 P-KR3 8-R4
24 Q-K8ch K-Kt2
13 RxRch RxR
25 P-Kt5
14 R-K1 Rx Rch
15 KtxR 8-Kt3 The last two moves of White
have ruined his game irretrievably.
The real battle now begins
At K8, the Queen accomplishes
with reduced forces.
nothing, the Pawn at KKt5 is
16 8x8 R Px 8 weakened and is soon lost, and the
White King gets into a sorrowful
An important advantage for
plight. 24 Q-Q1 or even 24 PxBP,
Black : he has retained the good KtxP; 25 Q-Q1 would have offered
Bishop, White has the inferior one. much better resistance.
17 K Kt-83 Kt-81
25 . . . . PxQP
18 8 x Kt Px8
26 PxP Q-K2
Apparently, White wanted to 27 Q-Q88
move the Queen or the Queen's
Knight, but did not fancy Kt (B3) Or 27 QxQ, BxQ ; 28 P-KR4, P
K5. Hence the exchange. All in B3 ! and Black wins a Pawn ( KtP
all-White has no Bishop at all or QP) just the same.
now, and his disadvantage has be 27 . . . KtxKtP
come clearer. 28 Kt ( 8 ) -Q2 8-Kt5
1 9 Q-R4 29 P-K R4 Kt-K5
30 Kt-81 Kt.Q3
White is working without a plan. 31 Q-Kt4 Q-K5
He might have brought his Queen's 32 P-R5 Kt-84
Knight by way of Kt3-B1Q3, there 33 PxP PxP
by parrying his opponent's threat 34 P-R3 8-Q3
of Kt-K3-B5. Besides 19 P-QB4 35 Kt ( 8 ) -Q2 Q-K7
was worth considering. 36 Q-Kt5 Kt-K6ch
P-Q R3 37 K-Kt1 Q-Q8ch
19 .
20 Kt-81

Kt-88ch
,

38 K-R2
39 KtxKt QxKt( 83)
Here the Knight has no function.
Amusing is the plight of the Kt
20 Kt-K3 at B1 which has scurried aimlessly
21 P-KKt3? from Q2 to B1 several times. Such
a clown deserves to live a little
After this weakening m ove,
longer.
Black gets his attack. The en
suing greater disadvantage might 40 K-Kt1 Q-R6 !
have been avoided by 21 Q-B2, in
order to answer Kt-B5 by 22 Kt-K1
(See Diagram o n Page 59)
and Kt-Q3.

21 . P-K841 Threatening 41 . . . P-B6 ! where


22 K-Kt2 P-85 ! after White would quickly come
23 P-K Kt4 P-Q 84! to grief as the result of the Zug
Zwang : e.g. 41 QxQP, P-B6 ; 42
Three Pawn moves-three fate QKt5, K-R2 ; 4 3 P-Q5, P-Kt4. As
ful moves ! Now the various small
soon as White uses up his Pawn
oversights of White bring their moves, he will be mated. Hence
revenge. Rubinstein understands he must now excbange Queens.
how to inaugurate a strong attack,
in spite of the diversity of his 41 Q-Kt2 QxQch
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 59

Position after 40 Q-R6 6 . 0 0 P-KKt3


7 P.Q4 Px P I
Rubi nstein
8 KtxP 8-Q2
9 KtxKt 8xKt
10 0-0 8-Kt2
11 Kt-Q 83 0-0
12 P-K83

12 BxB, PxB ; 13 B-Kt5, was bet


ter. H then P-RS, White plays 14
B-KS and Q-Q2.

12 0 0 0 0 Kt-Q2
1 3 8-K3 Kt-K4
14 8-Kt3

14 P-B5 ? would lose a Pawn as


tollows : 14 . . Kt-B5 ; 15 Q-K2,
.

Forgaca KtxB ; 16 QxKt, BxB ; 17 KtxB,


PxP; (18 QxP??, B-Q5ch) .
42 KxQ 8-821
14 0 0 0 P-Kt3
With the threat of B-Kt3. The 15 P-84 Kt-Q2
attack is ended successfully, Black 16 8-Q4 Kt-84
wins easily. 17 8x8 Kx8
43 Kt-Q2 B-Kt3 18 8-82 P-QR4
44 Kt-Kt3 K-83 19 Q-Kt4?
45 P-83 P-K Kt4 QQ4ch was correct. Arter 19
46 K-82 K-84 .Q-B 3 ; 20 QxQch, the ending

47 K-81 P-Kt5 was quite even. If Black tries


48 PxPch KxP to avoid the exchange of Queens,
49 Kt-85 8xKt be gets into difficulty.
50 Px8 P-Q5
51 P-Kt4 P-Q6 19 0 0 0 0 Ktx K P I
52 P-R4 P-86
Reaigna
Thereby throttling a n incipient
attack against his King.

20 KtxKt P-K B4
21 Q-83 PxKt
22 8xP 8x8
Game N o. 27 23 Qx8 Q-83
24 R-82
R U V LOPEZ
Thereafter Black secures the
St. Petersburg, 1909 King's file, and obtains a clearly
D u ras Rubi nstein superior game. But if 24 Q-Kt7,
Black's attack would not have pro
1 P-K4 P-K4 ceeded so smoothly to its con
2 Kt. K 83 Kt.Q83 clusion.
3 8-Kt5 P-Q R3
4 B-R4 Kt-83 24 0 0 0 0 QR-K1
5 P-Q3 P-Q3 25 Q-Q5 Q-84!
6 P-84 Capturing the vital square K5.
A favorite variation of the 26 Q R.Q1 R-K5
Czechoslovak master. With it he 27 P-KKt3 K R- K 1
has won many successes. 28 K-Kt2 P-K R41
60 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTER.PIECEl:!

29 P-Kt3 R-K6 Now i n addition t o the superior


30 R-Q4 K-83 position, Black has a Pawn plus,
31 P-KR3 -the rest is a matter of the adroit
technique of Rubinstein.
R u b i n ste i n 37 R-K Kt2 R ( K)-KR1
3 8 K-83 R-R6ch
39 R-Q3 RxRch
40 KxR R-R6ch
41 K-Q4 R-K 86
42 K-Q5 Rx8P
43 K-86 R-Kt5!
44 R-K82 R-Kt2
45 K-Q5
K-K4 and R-B2 was threatened.
45 . . R"K2
46 R-81 K-Kt4
47 R-Kt1ch K-85
48 P-R3 K-86
Duras 49 R-8 1 c h K-Kt5
5 0 R-Kt1 ch K-R6
51 R-K 81 R-K4ch
Understandable nervousness, as
52 K-86 K-Kt7
the threatened attack P-KR5 could
53 R-84 K-Kt6
not properly be avoided and had to
give Black finally a decisive ad 54 R-81 R-84ch
55 K-Kt7 P-85
vantage. Dr. Lasker furnishes the
56 R-Q 8 1 P-Q4!
followjng variatio n : 31 QR-Q2, P
KR5 ; 32 QxQch, PxQ ; 33 R-B3, P-Kt4 was threatened.
PxP ; 34 PxP, R-K7ch ; 35 R-B2,
RxR (Q2 ) ; 36 RxR, R-K6 ; to be 57 R-Kt1ch K-87
followed by P-QR4-5-6, and the 58 R-QKt1 P-Q5
59 R-Q81 P-Q6
fl.nal posting of the Rook at Kt7 !
60 P-Kt4 R PxP
31 . . . P-K R 5 61 PxP P-Q7
62 R-82 K-K6
Now this thrust Is even stronger.
63 Px R P-QB(Q)
Perhaps White overlooked that he
64 R-83ch K-Q5
could not play 32 P-KKt4. For there
65 PxP KxR
upon would follow : 32 . . R-Kt6ch ;
Resi g n s
.

33 K-R2, Q-Kt8 ; 34 R-Ql, ( 34 R


Kt2, RxPch ! ) Q-K5 ; 35 QxQ (the A very good game !
threat was Q-K6 and if 35 Q-Q4,
then Q-K8) RxQ ; 36 R-KKtl, R ( K )
K6 and wins, as White dare not
exchange Rooks on Kt3.

32 QxQch PxQ
33 PxR P G a m e N o. 28

Loss of a Pawn cannot be R U Y LOPEZ


avoided.
St. Petersburg, 1909
33 . . R-Kt1ch
Spielmann R u b i nste i n
34 K-81 RxRP
35 K-K2 R-K1 c h 1 P-K4 P-K4
3 6 K-Q2 RxRP 2 Kt-K 83 Kt..Q 83
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 61

3 B-Kt5 P-Q R3 should lead to a decisive disad-


4 B-R4 Kt-83 vantage. 27 Q-Q3 was better.
5 0-0 B-K2
28 R x P ! Px 8P
6 R-K1 P-Q Kt4
29 QxQ B P Kt-K5
7 B-Kt3 P-Q3
30 KtxKt RxKt
8 P-83 B-Kt5
31 R-Q5 Q-K2
Formerly this move was played 32 R-Q85 R-K7
fre quently, but It is not quite 33 Q-K Kt3
satisfactory. 8 . . . QKt-R4 or 8
. . . 0-0 would appear to be better. R u b i nste i n
9 P-KR3 B-R4
10 P-Q3 0-0
11 Q Kt-Q2 P-Q4
12 PxP KtxQP
13 Kt-81

It 13 P-Kt4, there would follow


. . . B-Kt3 ; 14 KtxP, KtxKt ; 15
RxKt, Kt-B5 ; with a strong attack.
13 8-83
14 P-Kt4 B-Kt3
15 P-Kt5

Well calculated. The idea is by


no means the permanent win of a Spielmann
Pawn.
15 8-K2 33 RxBP could also have been
16 KtxP KtxKt played to advantage. Dr. Lasker
17 RxKt Kt-Kt3 gives the following continuation :
18 P-Q4 Kt-Q2 33 . . . RxKBPch; 34 K-Kt3, Q
19 R-K1 8xP Kt4ch ; 35 KxR, Q-B5ch; 36 K-K1,
20 BxB Qx8ch R-K1ch ; 37 K-Q1, B-R4ch ; 38 K-B2,
21 Q-Kt4 Q-B7ch ; 39 K-Ktl, QxRch ; 40 K-R2.
Now if Black exchanges Queens, The White King is now safe and
he has an unfavorable ending : the the Queen's Pawn is a potent fac
White majority on the Queen's side tor.
would be brought quickly to ef 33 Q-Q3
fectiveness. Hence the Queen must
retreat, and White wins time to A move which contains numer
obtain a fine development. ous threats, e.g. 34 RxBP? RxPch ;
35 R-Kt2, RxRch ; 36 KxR, QxQch;
21 Q-Q1 37 KxQ and wins. However, there
22 Kt-Kt3 Kt-83 is no satisfactory defense.
23 Q-83 Q-Q2
24 K-R2 P-QR4 34 QxQ ?
25 P-Q R3 Q R-Kt1
As Dr. Lasker indicates in the
26 R-K5 K R- K 1
book of the tourney, White has a
27 R-K Kt1
pretty win here by 34 BxPch &S
27 QR-K1 was still better. White follows :
has a fine position. a) 34 . . . BxB ; 35 R-K5 ! ! and
the double threat of 36 QxKtP
27 . . . . P-QKt5
mate and 36 RxR is decisive.
This attack is not timely and b) 34 . . . KxB ; 35 RxBPch,
62 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

K-K3 ; 36 P-Q5ch ! , QxP; 37 Q-Kt4 40 . R-R1


ch, and wins. 41 R-83 R-R5
Furthermore if Black rejects the 42 R-Q3 K-K2
sacrifice by 34 . . . K-Bl, White 43 K-Kt3
secures a clear advantage with 35
Even 43 P-Q5 was not sufficient,
BxB.
though the advance of the Black
34 . . PxQ King is thereby stopped for the
35 R-87 RxQKtP time being: 43 . . . K-B 3 ; 44 R
36 R ( Kt)-Q81 K-81 B3ch. And If 43 . . . P-B4 ; 44
37 8-82 R-R7 R-K3ch, and 45 R-K6. Black can,
38 8x8 R Px8 however, force the advance of his
39 R ( 8 )-82 RxR King after the necessary prepara
tion : 43 . . . P-Kt4 ; 44 K-Kt2,
If 3 9 . . . RxRP; 40 R-Q7 would
K-B 3 ; 45 R-B3ch, K-Kt3 ; 46 R-Q3,
follow with the threat of 41 R(B2)
( otherwise 46 . . . R-Q5) P-B 3 !
B7.
and now t h e King comes t o K4 by
40 RxR way of B4, since the White King Js
always rooted by the threat of
The position has been severely
R-Q5.
simplified : a Rook ending has been
b rought about, In which Black has
43 K-K3
Indeed the better position Inas
44 K-83
. . . .

K-Q4
much as his Pawns are divided
45 KK2
only in two groups, whereas
White's on the contrary are sep The Pawn at Q4 must fall sooner
arated into four parts. But one or later : hence White surrenders
would believe that in spite of this immediately in order to get some
White could secure the draw. freedom of action. Black, how
Should he succeed-for example ever, takes his own time in making
In exchanging his Pawns at QR3 the capture, and first takes other
and Q4 for Black's Pawn at Q3, precautions. In such endings if
the half-point would be certain. one aims to win, it is quite right
But Rubinstein clearly demon not to consummate one's advan
strates in the following moves that tage too early.
Wh Is lost. It is instructive
and recommended for every player, 45 P-Kt4 1
to study the ending which ensues 46 R-QKt3 P-831
in all its details. 47 K-K3

R u b i nste i n Or 47 R-Kt7, RxQRP ; 48 RxKtP,


RxRP ; 49 R-Kt6, K-K3 ; etc.

47 K-85
48 R-Q3

Forced: 48 R-Kt7, RxRPch ; 49


K-K4, P-Q4ch; 50 K-B5, RxP; 51
RxP, R-B3ch ; and wins.

48 P-Q4
49 K-Q2 R-R1
50 K-82 R-R2

To gain time.

51 K-Q2 R-K21
Spielmann 52 R-83ch
ST. PETERSBURG, 1909 63

Or 52 RK3, Kt2 ; 53 R-Q3, Game No. 29


R-Kt7ch; 54 K-K3, RxBP ; 55 R-Q1,
RQB7 ; etc. Q U E E N 'S GAMBIT DECLI N E D

52 KxP St. Petersburg, 1909


53 P-Q R4 R-QR2
54 R-QR3 R-R4 Rubi nstein Znosko-Borowsky
55 R-R1 K-85 1 P-Q4 P-Q4
56 K-K3 2 P-QB4 P-K3
Or 56 RQB1ch, K-Kt3 ; 57 R-B7, 3 Kt-QB3 Kt- K B3
RxP ; 58 RxKtP, R-B5 ; 59 K-K3, 4 B-Kt5 B-K2
K-B 6 ; etc. 5 P-K3 QKt-Q2
6 Kt.. B3 0-0
56 P-Q5ch 7 Q-82 P-Q Kt37
57 K-Q2 R-K B4
58 K-K1 K-Kt5 . . . P-B4, is correct.
59 K-K2 K-R4
8 PxP PxP
60 R-R3 R-85
9 B-Q3 B-Kt2
61 R-R2 R-K R 5
10 0-0-0 Kt-K5
62 K-Q3
If 62 R-R3, K-Kt5 ! would follow The manoeuvre which Is hereby
and the Rook must leave the vital initiated is as unsatisfactory as
square. 10 . . . P-B4 etc. Comparison should
be made also with the games
62 . RxPch against Teichmann, Karlsbad 1907,
63 KxP R-R5ch Dus-Chotlmirski, Lodz 1907 and
64 K-Q3 RxP Teichmann, Match at Vienna 1908.
65 R-K2
1 1 P-KR4 P-KB4
The last point of the winning P-84
12 K-Kt1 !
procedure rests upon the fact that
the White Rook cannot reach the Dr. Lasker recommends 12 .
seventh rank successfully. If 65 R-QB1 : Nimzowitch considers 1 2
R-B2 there would follow R-B5, 66 . . . P-KR3 ; 13 B-B4, B-Q3 ; 14
K-K3, K-Kt3 ; 67 R-B8, R-QR5 ; ( 68 BxB, PxB ; would not have been
R-Kt8ch, K-B3 ! ) etc. bad. However, that White in both
cases would have the better posi
65 . . . R-KB5 tion is not to be denied.
66 K-K3 K-Kt3
67 R-QB2 K-Kt2 1 3 PxP PxP7
68 R-81 R-Q R5
69 R-K R 1 K-83 Z nosko-Borowsky
70 R-R7 R-R2
71 K-K4 K-Q3
72 K-85 P-Kt3ch !
73 Kx KtP RxR
74 KxR K-K4
75 K-Kt6 P-Kt5
Resigns
Rubinstein should demonstrably
have lost this game. But he play
ed the second part of It so superbly
that the partie should not fail to
be Included in our collection. From
the 40th move the ending is a
single profound study: "Black to
play and win." R u b i n stei n
64 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

This m ove is basically refuted : The only course which still offers
Black would also get a decisive in some resistance. If 21 . . . Q-QKt3,
feriority after 13 . . . QKtxP, e.g. 1 4 22 Q-K5 ! ; followed by 23 PxP and
KtxP, BxKt, B-QB4, etc. But with Black may resign. But if 21 . . .
13 . . . R-QD1 the Pawn sacrifice PxP; then 22 QxP, P-KR3 ; 23 Q
recommended by Nimzowitch, Kt3 ! (. . . PxB ; 24 PxPch, and Q
Black can convert the game, which R3 ) . Or if 22 . . . Q-QB7 ; (instead
has been conducted along strategic of P-KR3) the reply of B-B 6 ! is
lines, into a bold tactical fight: decisive.
14 PxP, KtxP ; (to give one vari
22 RxQ Px P
ation ) . Or 14 Kt-Q4 (obviously
23 R-KKt1 RxBP
the best) 14 . . QKtxP etc.
This seems very threatening,
14 KtxKt l ! BPxKt
but the following move destroys
15 BxP PxB
every possibility on Black's part.
16 Q-Kt3ch K-R1
17 QxB 24 R-KB41

Rubinstein now wins a piece Now the KB square is doubly


since BxB is refuted by KtxB. The protected. And if one of the Rooks
whole combination had to be very captures the QKt Pawn, there is
exactly calculated. an adequate defense, (and an easy
win) as follows : 25 R-B8ch, RxR;
17 PxKt
26 KxR, R-B7ch ; 27 K-Kt3, P-B5ch;

1 8 RxKt Q-K1
28 KxP, RxRP ; 29 K-Q4 and K-K4
If 18 . . . PxP, White might play and K-B3 ( Or if 24 . . . QR-KB1 ;
19 R-Ktl. But 19 RxQ is still 25 RxRch, RxR ; 26 B-B4 ! ) .
clearer and more forceful. 19 . . .
24 R-QB7
PxR ( Q ) ch ; 20 QxQ and White

25 P-Kt3 P-K R3
wins the Bishop.
26 B-K7 R- K1
19 RxB Q-Kt3ch 27 K-Kt1 ! R-K7
ro R 1 Q Q K
21 Q-K4
Or . . . R-B6 ; 28 R-B8ch, RxR;
29 BxR, and RxP.
Forcing a decisive liquidation of
the position. 28 BxP R-Q1
29 B-Q4 R-Q B1
21 QxQ 30 R ( B4) -Kt4 Resi g n &
Chapter V
International Tournaments at San Sebastian and Karlsbad, 191 1

Game N o. 30 Capablanca
Q U E E N 'S GAMBIT D EC L I N E D
S a n Sebastian, 1 9 1 1
R u b i nste i n Capablanca
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 Kt-KB3 P-QB4
3 P-QB4 P-K3
4 PxQ P K Px P
5 Kt-QB3 Kt-Q B3
6 P-K Kt3 B-K3

Preferable is the quick develop


ment of the King's wing : . . . Kt
KB3 ; B-K2 ; 0-0 etc.
R u b i nste i n
7 B-Kt2 B-K2
8 0-0 R-8 1 well a s 1 5 . . . BxPch; 16 K-Kt2,
Compare the previous note ! Dr. Q-R3 ; 17 Kt-B4, etc. would lead
Lasker recommends 8 PKR3. to speedy loss. After the text
move the real combination begins.
. .

9 PxBP BxP
16 K-Kt2
10 Kt-KKt5! Kt-83
11 KtxB PxKt One piece is now protected
12 B-R3 directly; the other indirectly,
But . . .
White already initiates an im
mediate attack in the center : his 16 . . Q R-Q1
opponent, however has not yet
castled. Such situations are al What now ? Does it not seem
ways fraught with grave danger that Black must win ?
for the defense. 1 7 Q-81 ! ! !
12 Q-K2 This is the magnificent key-move.
1 3 B-Kt5 0-0 No matter how Black plays he
loses a Pawn at the very least.
Too l ate. Now the storm breaks. It is a peculiar coincidence that
14 B x Kt QxB two years before Rubinstein won
against the world champion also
by a very beautiful combination
( ( See Diagram in Next Column) devilishly barbed with Q-B1 and
that both astonishing moves oc
15 Ktx P ! ! curred almost at the same point,
-here on the 17th, and in the
An extraordinarily profound and other on the 18th move, (c.f. Ru
beautiful combination. binstein-Dr. Lasker, St. Petersburg,
15 . . . Q-R3 1909 ! ) .

It is clear that 1 5 . . . PxKt; 16 17 . . PxKt


QxPch, followed by BxR etc., as Not 17 . RxKt? because of

65
66 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

18 QxQ. PxQ ; 19 BxPch, and wins . . . K-Q3 would be forced by 31


forthwith. R-QKt5. In any event White would
still have had difficulty in winning.
18 QxB Q-Q7
19 Q-Kt5 ! Kt-Q5 31 R-B7ch K-Q3
20 Q-Q3 ! QxQ 32 R x K KtP P.Kt4
21 PxQ K R-K1 33 B-Kt8 P-QR4
22 B-Kt4 34 RxP P-R5
35 P.K R4 P-Kt5
White has a won game, but the
36 R.R6ch K-B4
technical conclusion is by no
37 R-R5ch K.Kt3
means easy, as Black is currently
38 B-Q 5 ?
much better developed. If 22 KR
K1 the continuation might be . . . A nervous move which should
Kt-B7 ; 23 RxRch, RxR; and the presently have rendered lt ex
White Rook has no clear future : if ceedingly difficult to win the bit
24 R-QB1 either Kt-K8ch and Ktx terly contested battle, with victory
QP, or 24 . . . Kt-Kt5 might occur. almost in White's grasp. Correct
And 24 R-Ql leads to too defensive was 38 BB 4 ! If then P-Kt6, then
a position. 39 R-Kt5ch, K-B 2 ; 40 BxP, PxB ;
41 PxP, and the White Pawns will
22 - R-Q 3 !
race to victory without difficulty.

23 K R-K1 RxR
24 RxR R-Q Kt3 ! 38 ,
P.Kt6?

Forceful counter-play ! The Pawn Capablanca, who has conducted


at Kt2 cannot be protected with the counter-attack in magnificent
advantage, for after 25 P-QKt3, style up to this point, now over
R-QR3 ; follows and 25 R-QKtl looks the strong move 38 . . .
would be deplorable. In such RxRP. Thereupon White would
events only counter-attack is of not dare to capture the Rook, since
value. after 39 BxR, P-Kt6 ; 40 BxP, PxB;
the last of the Mohicans would
25 R-K5 ! RxP crash through. White would have
26 RxP Kt-B3 had to play 39 B-B4, and there
The Knight must return to de- m ight follow 39 . . . R-QB7 ; (threat
fend. ening RxB ! ) 40 R-QKt5ch, K-B 2 ;
41 B-Kt8. Victory then would not
27 B-K6ch K-B1 have been attainable for White
28 R-B5ch without a further battle. But after
It 28 R-Q7, Kt-K4 would be un- the text-move, the matter ls quite
pleasant. easy.
39 PxP !
28 . . . K-K1
Calculated with precision. If
After 28 . . . K-K2 ; 29 B-B 4 ;
necessary 39 BxP was also avail
with the immediate threat o f R
able and sufficient.
B7ch.
39 P-R6
29 B-B7ch K-Q2

Now he must enter the second 39 . . . PxP; 4 0 R-KR6, etc.


rank perforce, in order to secure 40 BxKt!
some counter-play.
So that he may clinch the game,
30 B-B4 P-Q R3 after 40 . . . P-R7 by 41 R-Kt5ch,
Black wishes to avoid the ex K-R3 ; 42 R-Kt8.
change of Rooks, which after 30 40 . . . . R x KtP
KARLSBAD, 1911 67

41 8-QS P-R7 White would obtain a powerfUl


42 R-R6ch attack by 13 Kt-Q2 and P-KB4.
If now 42 . K-R4 or K-Q2, 13 PxPe.p. KtxP
R-R8 and 43 R-QR8 ; and if 42 . . .
K-Kt4 ; 43 B-B4ch followed by R If 1 3 . . . PxP ; the following
QR6. move Is even more potent.

Resi g n s 14 P-Q4 B-Kt5


1 5 P-Q5 Kt-K2?
One of the most famous accom
plishments of the Polish Grand Without doubt Black has the in
master. ferior game, but this ill-considered
move Is the source of serious dif
ficulties. 15 . . . KtKtl was ne
cessary in order to bring the
Knight via Q2 or even R3 Into
the game without interfering with
Game No. 31 the other pieces.
1 6 Q-Q3 Q.Q2
ENGLISH OPE N I N G
H 16 . . . P-KB4 ; 17 Kt-R4, fol
Karlsbad, 1911 lows with great effect.
R u b i n stein Duras
17 Kt-Q2 B-R6
1 P-Q84 P-K4
Kt-K B3
Considering the position of the
2 Kt.QB3
B-Kt5
center Pawns, which obviously
3 P-KKt3
constitute the key to the position,
4 B-Kt2 0-0
the Queen's Bishops on each side
5 Kt-83 R-K1
are destined for an attacking role,
6 0-0 Kt-83
and the King's Bishops a defensive
6 . . . BxKt would indeed have role. Therefore, It Is apparent that
prevented the following manoeuvre, the exchange Inaugurated by the
but was hardly satisfactory as text-move, increases the offensive
White obtains the mastery of the power of White's game.
center and two Bishops.
1 8 P-Q R4 !
7 Kt-Q5 8-81
To secure the square at B4 for
8 P-Q3 P-K R3
the Knight.
9 P-Kt3 P-Q3
10 B-Kt2 KtxKt 18 . . . . 8xB
Black seeks a speedy liquidation 1 9 KxB K R-Kt1
of the position in the center. He 20 Kt-84 P-QKt4
might also have played P-KKt3 The hostile Knight cannot be
and B-Kt2 and awaited develop successfully driven away by .
ments. In any event his position P-QKt3 ; . . . P-QR3 ; and . . . P
remained somewhat cramped. QKt4 ; e.g. 20 . . . P-QKt3 ; 21 P
QKt4, (threatening P-QKt5) P
1 1 PxKt Kt-K2
QR3 ; 22 P-QR5, and White gains
1 2 P-K4 P-QB4
the important support-post Kt6.
In order to forestall P-Q4 : be The counter-demonstration init!
sides Pawn weaknes s on the Queen ated by the move actually made,
Bishop file must be avoided. 12 merely reveals a new weakness
. . P-KB4 would be insufficient in the Black camp, namely QR2.
because of the position of the Consequently White will have to
King's Rook and King's Bishop ; concern himself simply with the
68 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

protection of the Pawn at QKt3, Loss of a Pawn cannot be


but Black on the other hand, will avoided.
have to worry about his Q3 as
29 Q-84!
well as his QR2. If in addition
we take in consideration the poor The Pawn will not run away. By
position of Black's minor pieces, the exchange of Queens the win
it is evident that White has a sub ning procedure is appreciably facil
stantial advantage. itated.
21 PxP QxP 29 QxQ
22 R-R3 Kt-KKt3 30 KtxQ R (at R ) -Kt1
31 Kt-Q2
Duras has had poor luck with
An invaluable Knight !
this Knight. Now he is placed
quite out of the game, instead of 31 . R-Q 82
being brought to the protection of 32 R x P
the weak points QR2 and QBl by
Finally the pay-off arrives. The
Kt-Bl. Certainly a plan of attack
rest is accomplished by Rubinstein
is bound up with Kt-Kt3, namely
with his wonted technical pre
B-K2 to be followed by Kt-QB1-Q2-
cision.
QB4. But this plan cannot be
carried out. 32 R-87
33 R ( R6)-R2 RxR
23 K R-Q R 1 P-QR3
34 Rx R 8-K2
24 B-81 R-Kt2
35 K-82 K-82
Acknowledging that his plan can 36 K-K2 K-K1
not be consummated. White threat 37 K-Q3 K-Q2
ens a regrouping by Q-Bl, B-K3 38 K-83 8-Q1
and KtQ2, and against this there 39 Kt-84 8-82
is no reply. 40 P-K Kt4
25 8-K3 P-K83 Now follows a complete tie-up of
26 P-K83 Kt-K2 the Black King's wing.
27 Q-81 ! Kt-81
40 . . . . 8-Q1
41 R-R6 8-82
Duras 42 P-R4 8-Q1
43 P-R5 8-82
44 P-Kt4 R-Kt2
45 R-R8 K-Q1
46 K-Kt3 R-Kt1
47 RxR 8xR
48 P-QKt5 Kt-K2
49 P-Kt6 P-84

Black wants to obtain a passed


Pawn.
50 KtPxP Kt-Kt1
51 8-821
Repulsing the last effort of h1s
Rubi nstein opponent to free his game.
51 K-81
28 Kt-Q2 1 Q-Kt5 52 8-R4 Resigns
KARLSBAD, 1911 69

Game No. S2 An error! It is true White gets


rid of his weak Bishop, but this
Q U E EN'S PAWN GA M E would have been warranted only
by the exchange of the Bishop for
Karlsbad, 1911 a Bishop. Compare the note to
Ala p i n R u b i nstein
4 . . . BxB ! In the after-play the
Bishop exhibits all the advantages
1 P-Q4 P.Q4 of a far-reaching piece, and Js
2 8-84 Kt-K83 thereby superior to the Knight.
3 P-K3 B-Kt5 The slight positional advantage
Rubinstein, too, can play psycho which Black obtained on the 4th
move, has now taken substance.
logical chess : to the great theorist
he presents something entirely But the Black advantage cannot be
new ! In recent times, moreover, translated into victory, since Ru
the opinion prevails that in this binstein must make long prepara
opening it is necessary for Black tion to break through at some
to hem in his Queen's Bishop. B-B4 poJnt.
is recommended. 16 . 8x8
4 8-K2 1 7 Q R-Q1 R-Q4
18 P-K R3
If 4 P-KB3, B-B4 ; and White
could hardly avoid the exchange If P-QB4, the Pawn at Q4 be-
of his King's Bishop on Q3. comes perceptibly weak.
18 K R-Q1
4 . . . . 8x8
.

19 R-Q2 P-KKtS
Usually it is more than a moral 20 K R-Q1 8-Kt2
victory for Black in a Queen's 21 R-Q3 Q-82
Pawn opening, to be able to ex 22 Kt-R2
change his Queen's Bishop for the White tries to understand what
White King Bishop at an early his opponent is aiming at. Hence
stage. In view of the Pawn for his nervousnes s : with the follow
mation, the Black King Bishop in ing moves of his Knight he dam
such an event has attacking pros ages his position. The Knight
pects, while the opposing Bishop stood best at KB3.
has only slight value for attack
and is committed to defense. 22 P-QKt4
23 Kt-81 P-KR4
5 Qx8 P-83 24 Kt-Kt3 Q-Q2
6 Kt-Q2 P-K3 25 Kt-K4 P-K41
7 P-Q 83 Q Kt-Q2
8 P-K4 Now Black assumes the attack.

8 KKt-B3 was preferable, in 26 Kt-85 Q-K2


order to plant a Knight at K6 as 27 Q-K2 Q-81
soon as possible. 28 Kt-Kt7 R-K1
29 Px P R ( K1)xPI
8 . KtxP
9 KtxKt Px Kt I f 29 . . . R(Q4)xP, White aisa
10 QxP 8-K2 gets an open file for his Rooks.
11 Kt-83 0-0 Q-K2
30 Q-83
12 0-0 Kt-83 PxR
31 R x R
13 Q-82 Q-Kt3
32 Kt-R5
14 K R-K1 Q R-Q1
15 8-Kt5 K R-K1 32 RxP ? would lead to Immediate
16 8xKt? loss, as follows : 32 . . . RxR; 33
70 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

QxR, Q-K8ch ; 34 K-R2, B-K4ch ; 35 pared a winning continuation


P-Kt3, Q-B7ch ; 36 Q-Kt2, BxPch ; worthy of study.
etc. But even after the move ac
tually made, Black obtains a deci 39 P-Q R S !
sive advantage in fine style. 40 QxQKtP Q-K5ch
41 K-Kt1
32 R-KSch Or 41 K-R2, Q-B S ; etc. precisely
33 RxR analogous to the moves actually
Not 33 K-R2? because of RxR, made.
34 QxR, Q-B2ch etc. 41 . P-R6
42 Q-85 8-83
33 QxRch
43 Kt-Kt4
.

34 K-R2 P-Q5
An amazing Zug-Zwang position
With this move the power of the
has arisen. Black threatens 43
Bishop makes itself felt In decisive
Q-Kt8ch, followed by QxRP. If
fashion.
43 K-R2 ; 43 . . . QK7 ; 44 Kt-Kt4,
35 Kt-86 PxP Q-QKt7 ; might follow, after which
36 PxP 8xP the threat of BQ5 is decisive. If
37 P-Kt3 43 Q-QBl, obviously 43 . . . B-Kt7 ;
wins.
If 37 KtxRP, B-Q5 ! ; wins as
43 B-Q5
follows : 38 P-Kt3, (38 KtxP, BxP;
. . . .

44 Q-81
etc.) BxBP ! ; (. . . BxKt ? ; 39 Q
R8ch etc. ! ) 39 Q-Kt2, P-R5 ! ! ; 40 Forced.
PxP, Q-K4ch ; 41 K-Rl , BxKt; 42
44 Q-86!
Q-R8ch, Q-Ktl. It is to be noted

that the advantage of Black in BxPch etc. would be petty. Now


all these variations, rests upon the the Bishop's Pawn and Knight's
Bishop. Pawn are attacked simultaneously
and there is no defense.
37 P-R4
38 K-Kt2 K-Kt2 45 Q-K84 BxPch
39 Q-Q3 46 K-R2 Q-K7 1

Forces mate or wins the Queen.


Rubi nstein
Resigns
"A logical game ! " as Rubinstein
used to express It, when he was
satisfied with his work.

Game No. 33

FRENCH DEFENSE

Karlsbad, 1911
Alapin
R u b i nstein Lowenflsch

With this move White regains 1 P-Q4 P-K3


the Pawn. But Rubinstein has pre- 2 P-K4
KARLSBAD, 1911 71

An unusual case! In this posi Position after 1 6 PxP ! !


tion Rubinstein had always played
Lowenfisch
2 Kt-KB3 or 2 P-QB4.
2
3
.

Kt-Q 83
. P-Q4
Kt-K83
.o.
4 8-Kt5 8-K2
5 P-K5 K Kt-Q2

:-:
6 8x8 Qx8
7 Q-Q2 0-0 a ,
8 P-84 P-Q84

:-;L
9 Kt- K 83 P-83
10 Px P ( 86) I B -0
Rubinstein wishes to attack the aaa 1
banging Pawns at K3 and Q4.
Sharply, spiritedly and with iron
II III
precision, he carries through his R u b i nstein
plan.
10 . QxP ? 17 KxKt P-Kt5
1 8 Kt-Q4 1 PxKtch

The previous move was indeed a 1 9 K-R 1 !


little premature : Kt-QB3 should
have been played. The text-move, With this move the enemy at
however, is a mistake : Black cap tack on the wing is repulsed, while
tures with the Queen, since he the White attack In the center
desires at the least to control the moves on relentlessly.
squares Q5 and K4. As it turns 19 . . KtxKt
out, however, he accomplishes
If 19 . . . B-Q2 ? ; 20 KtxKP ! ,
nothing thereby, and by 10 . . .
would follow. (BxKt; 2 1 RxB, QxR;
KtxP! followed by Kt-QB3 and
22 BxP).
B-Q2 he could not attain an ideal
but an essentially playable game. 20 QxKt QR-Kt1
It Is to be noted that the attempt 20 . . . B-Q2 was somewhat bet
to strengthen the center by 1 0 . . . ter. Whereupon 21 R-K3 follows
PxP would be refuted by 1 1 P-B5! strongly. But not 21 QxQ, RxQ ;
(if . . . PxP; 12 B-K2). 22 RxP?, on account of B-B 3 !
11 P-KKt3 Kt-Q83 21 R-K3 P-K Kt4
12 0-0-0 P-Q R 3 22 R x P !
1 3 8-Kt2 Kt-Kt3
Naturally h e does not play 22
Why not 13 P-QKt4 ; which PxP, permitting Q-B7! Now Black
appears even stronger? Because cannot capture the Pawn at B4,
thereafter a neat combination because the fatal check at KKt3
would be decisive : 14 PxP, KtxP; would ensue.
15 KtxQP, PxKt ; 16 QxPch, Q-K3 ; 22 . . . . PxP
17 Kt-Kt5 ! etc. 23 PxP B-Q2
14 K R-K1 ! Kt-85 24 P-86 QxQ
1 5 Q-K82 P-QKt4 Black is lost in any event.
16 PxP ! I
25 RxQ B-K1
(See Diagram in Next Column ) 26 8-R3 R-83
27 P-87 R-Q 81
The courage o f a grandmaster! 28 RxPI
16 . . . . KtxKtP It is to be observed that the
72 RUBINSTEIN'S CHmS MASTERPIECES

original weakness of Black's game Threatening to win a piece. But


(PK3 and PQ4) finally comes into the simple 7 . . . P-K3 was to be
view. The exploitation of the dis preferred.
advantage of such structures is
8 B-84 P-K3
much more important, and Rubin
9 B-Q3 Q-R4
stein has no equal in this art.
10 0-0 KtxKt
Unusually instructive in this ob
11 PxKt BxKt
servation are those games in which
12 PxB PxP
he had to meet the Tarrasch De
13 BxBP Kt-Kt3
fense of the Queen's Gambit.
Now it is apparent that Black
28 . . . . RxQBP
has been following a definite ob
2 9 BxPch Resi g n s
jective during the unsound de
Nimzowitch has treated this in velopment of the last few moves :
his "System" under the caption : e.g. 14 B-Q3, Kt-Q4 ! and White
"First to restrain, then to block would be faced by the unpleasant
ade, and finally to destroy." choice of sacrificing the Queen
Bishop's Pawn or of submitting
to a triple Pawn on the King Bish
op's file. This neat plan, however, is
refuted by a simple counter-stroke.

14 Q-Kt3 1 QR-Q1
Game N o. 34
If 14 . . . KtxB ; 1 5 QxKtP, would
Q U E E N 'S GA M B I T D EC L I N E D lead to an uncertain result be
cause of 15 . . . Kt-Kt3 ; 16 B-B7
Karlsbad, 1911 ( 1 6 QxPch, K-K 2 ; 17 B-Q6ch, K
R u bi nstein Alekhlne B 3 ) 16 R-Q1 etc. But with 15
QxKt, White would remain at a
1 P-Q4 P-Q4 clear advantage by reason of his
2 Kt-KB3 Kt- K B3 strong centre.
3 P-84 P-83
4 Kt-83 Q-Kt3 15 B-K2 B-Q3
5 Q-82 B-Kt5 Not 15 . . . Kt-Q4 ? because of
6 B-Kt5 16 QxKtP.
In the same tournament Schlech BxB
16 B-Kt3
ter played 6 P-B5 against Suchting,
17 R Px B 0-0
but obtained an inferior position. P-QB4
18 P-KB4
6 Q Kt-Q2 19 B-83 R-Q2
20 P-QR4! Kt-Q4
Black cannot win a Pawn. If 6 P-K Kt3
21 K R-QB1
. . . PxP ; it Is obvious that 7 P-K3, 22 Q-Kt5! QxQ
etc. would follow. And if 6 . .
23 PxQ

BxKt; 7 KtPxB, QxP ; 8 BxKt, and


9 PxP, and eventually RQ1, with The ending is clearly won for
a favorable recapture of the Pawn. White.
Even more decisive is 7 KPxB,
23 PxP
QxP ; 8 BxKt, KPxB ; (if . . KtP

24 B Px P P-QKt3
x B ; 9 PxP, PxP ; 10 KtxP, QxKt!
25 R-84 P-84
11 QB8ch, Q-Q 1 ; 12 B-Kt5ch, and
26 R-86 K-82
wins) 9 PxP, PxP ; 10 B-Kt5ch, Kt
27 BxKt PxB
B3 ; 11 0-0, and White has a prom
28 Q R-Q B 1 K R-Q1
ising attack.
29 K-81 K-K2
7 P-K3 Kt.K5 30 K-K2 R-Q3
KARLSBAD, 1911 73

31 R ( 86)-83 R ( Q3 ) -Q2 Position after 48 K-Kt3


32 K-Q3 R.QR1
Alekhine
33 R-86 R-Q3
34 K-K2

White marks time a little In or


der to formulate the winning plan
at his leisure.
34 RxR
35 RxR K-Q2
36 P-K B3 1

Well calculate d ! If 36 . . . R
QBl ; there would follow 37 RxR,
KxR; 38 P-K4 ! , BPxP; 39 P:xP,
P:xP; 40 P-KKt4, and White wins.

36 .. R-K1
37 K-Q3 R-K2 Rubi nstein
38 P-K Kt4 R-K3
39 R-81 O r 50 . . R-B 2 ; 51 K-Kt5, R
KBl ; 52 R-KBl, R-Kl ; 53 R-Kl,
Now 39 RxR would be insum R-KBl ; 54 P-K4, etc.
clent because after 39 KxR; 40 P
K4, Black plays QPxPch ; 41 PxP, 51 K-Kt3
PxKtP ; etc. However, if White The King has performed his ser
continues 41 P-KKt5, his King can vice! A bad weakening of the 6tb
no longer break through as the row was brought about, and there
position is too bottled up, e.g. 40 by R-B6 has become a permanent
. . . K-Q3 ; 41 P-K4, K-K3 ; 4 Z grave threat, e.g. 51 . . . R-Kl ;
PxPch, KxP; 43 K-B3, K-K 3 ; 4 4 52 K-B2, R-K2 ; 53 K-K2, R-Kl ; 54
K-B4, KQ3 ; 45 P-Q4, K-K 2 ; 46 K-Q3, R-K2 ; 55 R-B6, R-K3 ; 56
KQ3, K-Q2! etc. PxP ! ! This is the point ! Now
that the Pawn at Kt3 is not prl)o
39 R-K2
tected by the Pawn at R2, Black

40 R-K R 1 K-K3
cannot reply 56 . . . RxR. Com
41 R-Q81 K-Q2
pare the note to the 36th move !
42 R-K1 R-K82
After 56 . . . PxP; 57 RxR, KxR;
43 R .Q R 1 K-Q3
58 P-K4, wins as Black cannot ex
44 R-Q81 K-Q2
change on K4. But If he permits
If 44 . . . R-B 2 ; 45 RxR, KxR; P-K5, the White King goes to KR4,
46 KtPxP, KtPxP ; 47 P-K4, and and after the exchange of the
wins. King Pawn for the Rook Pawn that
follows, forces his way into the
45 R-86 R-K 8 1
game with decisive effect.
46 K-K2 R-82
47 K-82 R-81 51 P-R4
48 K-Kt3 52 K-R4 R-KR2
53 K-Kt5 8PxP
(See Diagram in Next Column) 54 PxP
Naturally not KxP? ? because ot
Finally the right idea : the King 54 . . . P-Kt6 ; 55 KxP, P-Kt7 ; 68
should cross over via KKt5. R-Bl, P-R5 ; and Black wins.

48 R-K1 54 . . . . PxP
49 R-83 R-K2 55 KxP ( Kt4) R-R8
50 K-R4 P-KRS 56 K-Kt5 R..QKt8
74 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

57 R-QR3 RxP 66 K-Kt5 R-88


58 R x Pch K-Q3 67 K-Kt6 R-Kt8ch
59 KxP R-Kt6
If . . . R-B5 ; 68 R-QRS, would
60 P-BS RxP
follow.
61 P-86
White has gained n o material, 68 K-86 R-BSch
but the better position which he 69 K-Kt7 R-Kt8ch
attained at the beginning of the 70 K-88 R.QS
game and held tightly in the Or . . . R-KS ; 71 R-QKt7, (.
depths of the end-game, brings the K-B 3 ; 72 R-K7 ) .
decision. Against the KBP there
Is no resource. 71 K-KS R-KSch
72 K-QS R-KBS
61 R-Kt6ch 73 R-Q7ch K-83
62 K-R7 R-KB6 74 K-KS R-BS
63 P-87 R-BS 75 R-K7 K-Kt4
64 K-Kt7 R-Kt5ch 76 R-QB71
65 K-86
Now if checked the King cap
Ever cautiou s ! First the Rook
tures the Pawn at Q5 and then the
is forced away from the Pawn at
Rook.
Q4.
65 K R-KB5ch Realgne
Chapter VI
International Tournaments at San Sebastian.
Pistyan and Breslau. 1912

Game No. 35 Positi o n after 12 . . 0-0.

Q U E E N'S GAM B I T D E C L I N E D Schlechter

San Sebastian, 1912


R u b i nste i n Schlechter
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 Kt-KB3 Kt- K B3
3 P-QB4 P-KS
4 Kt-QB3 P-QB4
5 PxQP KtxP
With 5 . . . KPxP; Black would
lead into the Tarrasch Defense.
6 P-K4 KtxKt
7 PxKt PxP
8 PxP B-Kt5c h
9 B-Q2 Q-R4 Rubi nstein

Leading Into an ending that Is Not to be avoided.


favorable to White. Correct Is 9 14 B-Q3 R-Q1
.BxBch; 10 QxB, 0-0; 11 B-K2,
.
15 K R-Q B 1 P-QKt4
(11 B-Q3, Kt-B3 ! ) Kt-Q 2 ; 12 0-0,
If 15 . . . Kt-B3 ; 16 KK3, and
Kt-B 3 ; 13 QB4, RrK1 ; and if now
Black has no adequate contlnu.
14 B-Q3, then 14 P-K4 ! with
tion.
e quality.
16 R-87 Kt-Q2
1 0 R-QKt1 ! BxBch
17 K-K3 Kt-83
Not 10 . . . Kt-B 3 ? ? because of 18 Kt-K5 B-Q2
1 1 RxB ! , KtxR; 12 Q-Ktl, QxRP; 19 P-Kt4 !
13 QxQ, KtxQ ; 1 4 B-B4, and White Excellent! White now obtains a
wins. strong bind on the King side.
1 1 QxB QxQch 19 . P-R3
12 KxQ ! 0-0 If 19 . . . B-K1, then 20 P-Kt6,
Kt-R4 ; ( . . . Kt-Q2 ? ? ; 21 Kt-B6 ! )
(See Diagram in Next Column) 21 B-K2, P-B3 ; 2 2 PxP, KtxP;
( . . . PxP ? ; BxKt, PxKt; 24 BxB,
PxPch ; 25 KQ3, RxB ; 26 R-Ktch,
K-K2 was Indeed to be preferred.
K-Rl ; 27 KxP, etc.) 23 RKKtl, P
1 3 B-Kt5 ! ! KKt6 ; 24 PKR4, and White has
not only a positional superiority
An exceptionally deep move !
but a strong attack.
Now Black can develop none of
The book of the tourney marks
his minor pieces without disadvan
the text-move with a question
tage. If he chases the Bishop he
mark, and avers that the proper
weakens the Queen's wing.
continuation was 19 . . . P-Kt4 ; 20
13 , P-Q R3 P-KR4, P-R3 ; 21 PxP, PxP; 22 P

76
76 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

KB4, PxPch ; -and that Schlechter Game N o. 36


was the unfortunate victim of a
transposition of moves. Against FR E N C H D E F E N S E
this it must be noted that White
San Sebastian, 1912
would still threaten P-Kt5, and that
Black would have no adequate de Schlechter Rubinstein
fense.
1 P-K4 P-K3
20 P-K84 8-K1
2 P-Q4 P-Q4
21 P-Kt5 PxP
3 Kt-Q 83 Kt-K83
PxP KR2
4 B-Kt5 PxP
Forced. I f . . . Kt-Q 2 ; 23 Kt-B6 ! , 5 KtxP Q KQ2
and i f 2 2 . . . Kt-R4 ; 2 3 B-K2, 6 Kt-K83 8-K2
gives a decisive advantage. 7 KtxKtch KtxKt
23 P-KR4 K R-Q81 8 B-Q3 P-Q Kt3
24 Q R-Q81 RxR
Daring, but well calculated.
25 RxR R.Q1
26 R-R7 P-K83 9 Kt-K5

This could have been played on If B-Kt5ch, 9 . . . B-Q 2 : if 9


the previous move (Capablanca) . BxKt, BxB ; 10 B-K4, R-QKtl ; 1 1
Kt-K5, BxKt ; a n d Queens are ex
27 PxP PxP
changed. In both cases White at
28 Kt-Kt4 B-R4
tains no advantage.
29 Kt-R6ch K-R1
30 8-K2! 8-K1 9 . B-Kt2
31 RxRP 1 0 8-Kt5ch P-83
At last the first tangible result.
Now the game proceeds apace. R u b i nstei n

31 K-Kt2
32 Kt-Kt4 P-84
33 R-R7ch K-R1

I f 33 . . . K-Kt3 ; 34 P-R5ch,
K-Kt4 ; 35 R-Kt7ch, K-R5 ; 36 PxP,
PxP ; 37 Kt-R6, Kt-B l ; 38 KtxPch,
K-R6 ; 39 B-Elch, K-R7 ; 40 R-KU.ch,
( K-Rl ; 41 Kt-Kt3 mate ) .

34 Kt-K5 PxP
35 8xP I K83
36 8x8 Rx8
37 K-84 K-Kt1
38 K-Kt5 R-K 8 1 Schlechter
39 K-Kt&

Threatening 40 R-Kt7ch, K-Rl ; 11 8xPch


41 Kt-B7ch.
Thereafter Black obtains a slight
Resigns superiority. If 11 KtxP or 11 Q-B3,
Q-Q4 ! Best was probably 11 B-KZ.
A game marked by wonderful
depth of conception and sureness 11 8xB
of execution. 12 Ktx8 Q.Q41
SAN SEBASTIAN, 1912 77

Now two pieces are loose, and 24 R-K R3


in addition KKt2 is attacked.
Black regains his Pawn with an To prevent the attack by R
excellent game. KR4.

13 Kt-K5 QxKtP 24 . . P-KR4


14 Q-83 QxQ 25 R-K83
1 5 KtxQ V a r I o u s commentators have
White's Pawns are weaker, be noted this move as an error and
ing divided Into three groups have recommended R-K1 and R
against two Black groups. Still K3 as preventing P-K4. This view
this Is not critical. is not convincing as it overlooks
the fact that Black's chief threat
15 . R-Q81 is 24 . . . R-B 4 ! e.g. (24 R-K3 ) ,
1 6 o.o.o ? R-B4 ; 25 R-K2, R-Q3 ; 2 6 R-Q1,
(threatening P-B4 ) R-B5 ! ; 27
This increases his disadvantage. R(Kl ) -Q2, R-Q4 ; 28 P-B4, R(Q1)
White is weaker on the King's B4 ; etc. with practically a winning
wing, but has a slight superiority game. Hence Schlechter's move is
on the Queen's side. He must not to be censured. That it offers
therefore prepare to attack on the no salvation is due to the position.
Queen's side. 16 P-QB3 with the
Intent of P-QR4-R5 was indicated. 25 . . . . P-K4!
After the text White's attack can 26 Px P RxKP
not be started without danger to 27 R-K3
the King.
27 R-QBl in order to continue
16 . Kt-Q4 ! with P-QB4 was possibly somewhat
better.
Quite correct ! Rubinstein does
not wish to castle for his King will 27 RxR
28 PxR
.

best operate in the center.

17 8 x 8 Kx8 Now the defense of the White


1 8 K-Kt1 K R-Q1 Pawns has become even more diffi
19 K R-Kt1 P-Kt3 cult.
20 Kt-K5 Kt-Kt5!
Kt-83 28 R-K3
21 P-Q83 . . .

29 R-K1 R-K83
22 KtxKtc h ?
30 R-K2 K-K3
Schlechter apparently does not 31 K-82 K-K4
sense the danger, while his op 32 P-Q84
ponent hopes to exploit his ad
Now the counter-attack on the
vantage in a simple Rook-endlng :
Queen's side comes much too late.
This i s evident from the previous
manoeuvre of his Knight. 22 Kt 32 . . . . K-K5
Kt4, and Kt-K3 was preferable. 33 P-Kt4 P-K Kt4
RxKt 34 K-83 P-Kt5
22 .
35 P-85 P-RS
..

23 R-Q3 R-Q4
36 R-K Kt2 R-K Kt3
Now the scope of the plan by 37 K-84 P-Kt6
Rubinstein becomes clear : the 38 R Px P R PxP
Black Rooks threaten to go by the 39 K-Kt5 PxP
fifth rank to the attack of the 40 PxP K-86
White King wing. This is difficult 41 R-Kt1 P-R3ch
to parry. Resigns
78 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Game No. 37 16 P-KR3 B-R4


17 P-QR4 B-Kt3
F O U R K N I G H TS GA M E 18 Q-84 Q-K7
19 QxQ RxQ
San Sebastian, 1912 20 8-R3! R-87
21 8x8 Px8
S p i e l mann R u b i nste i n RxQ8P
22 K R-K 1 1
1 P-K4 P-K4 23 R-K7 R-Kt1
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83 24 P-R 5 ?
3 Kt-83 Kt-83 With his last moves White ha.s
4 8-Kt5 Kt-Q5 obtained excellent counter-pla.y,
5 8-84 8-84 by eliminating one of the hostile
6 KtxP Q-K2 Bishops, as well as by the control
7 Kt-83 of the King's file and the 7th rank.
As to 7 Kt-Q3 compare the game As a result the loss of a Pawn is
against Belitzmann, Warsaw, 1917. of practically no importance. With
It is clear that White cannot cap the correct continuation 24 QR-Kl !
ture the KBP, e.g. 7 BxPch, K-Q1 ; White had good prospects of hold
or 7 KtxP, P-Q4 ! etc. Ing the game. A probable con
tinuation would have been : 24 . . .
7 P-Q4 K-B1 ; 25 R-Q7, B-B4 ; 26 RxQP, B
K3 ; 27 P-Q5, K-K2 ; 28 PxB, KxR;
With 7 . . . KtxP ; Black secures
29 PxP, threatening Kt-Kt5 to KG
approximate equality. Such, how
ever, is not Rubinstein's purpose : or simply 30 Kt-K5 and P-KB4.
he wishes to attack. 24 K-81
8 KtxKt 25 R-Q7?

Apparently 8 BxP, KtxB ; 9 Ktx This leads to material loss.


Kt ! , etc. refutes Black's play. Such In addition, White has no com
would be the case only if Black pensation for his lost Pawn. If
replies 8 . . . KtxB ? After 8 . . . 25 QR-K1, then B-B 4 ! with the
B-KKt5 ! ; however, Black would threat of B-K3. White must with
have attained his primary purpose, draw his beleagured Rook, and
to wit ; a. strong attack. If White Black thanks to his extra Pawn,
plays 9 BxKtP, then 9 . . . QR-Ktl : -as well as to ths Bishop, which
or if 9 P-KR3, then . . . BxKt; 10 is here clearly superior to the
PxB, 0-0-0 ; in each case with an Knlght,-must gradually win.
excellent game for Black. 8-841
25

8 . . . Px 8 26 RxQP 8-K31
9 Kt-83 KtxP The Rook is now hemmed in,
10 0-0 0-0 and the threat K-K2 cannot be
This defense has again proved parried.
Its worth: Black has two Bishops
27 R-Kt1 R-82
and a good position.

11 P-Q4 PxP e.p. (See Diagram on Page 79)


12 PxP KtxKt
13 PxKt Q 8-Kt5 27 . . . K-K2 ? would be pre
14 P-Q4 8-Q3 mature on account of 28 RR6.
15 Q-Q3 Q R-K1 28 R-R6
Thereafter White cannot pre If 28 Kt-K5 Black cannot reply
vent the hostlle entry into the K 28 . . . K-K2 but 28 . . . QR-B l !
file. and the Rook Is still held.
SAN SEBASTIAN, 1912 79

Position after 27 R-82. At that time Rubinstein had just


introduced his defense ( 4 . . Kt
R u binstein
.

Q 5 ) , and did not yet understand


it thoroughly. Hence the trans
position of moves which might
have resulted in favor of White.
The proper order is 4 . . . Kt-Q5,
and if 5 KtxP, then Q-K2, etc.
Compare the game against Spiel
mann at Baden-Baden 1925.
6 8-R4?

Thereafter everything c 1 1 c k s
merrily again. To-day it is ac
cepted theory that White gets the
advantage by 6 B-K2!

Spielmann 6 . . . . 0
7 P-Q3
28 R-R1
With 7 KtQ3, BKt3 ; 8 P-K6,
29 Rx8
.

Px R
Kt-K1 ; Black obtains an attack by
The rest requ i res no comment. the immediate P-KB3, and hence
compensation for the Pawn. The
30 Kt.Kt5 K-K2
outcome of this variation is not
31 R-K1 K-83!
clear, but offers many chances.
32 P-K84 R-83
33 KtxPch K-K2 7 P-Q4
34 Kt-Kt5 K-Q2 8 QB-Kt5 P-83
35 R-K5 R-K81 9 Q-Q2
36 P-Q5 PxP
White has a Pawn plus but the
37 RxPch R-Q3
position is difficult. If 9 Kt-KB3,
38 R-QKt5 K-83
then follows B-Kt5 : if 9 0-0, R
39 R-Kt4 R-84
K1 ; 10 Kt-KB3, B-Kt5. And finally
40 R-84ch K-Q2 1
if 9 P-KR3, Black gets the better
41 Kt-K4 R-Q83
of it with 9 . . . R-K1 ; 10 Kt-B3,
42 R-QR4 R-QR3
KtxKP! !
43 P-Kt4 R ( B4) x R P
44 R-Q4ch K-82 9 R-K1
45 Kt-83 R-Q3 10 P-84
Resigns
If 10 Kt-B3, P-Kt4 ; 11 B-Kt3,
PxP; 12 KtxP, (PxP, P-Kt5 ! ) Ktx
Kt ! with advantage for Black.

10 P-Kt4 1
Game N o . 38
This is directed against possible
FOU R K N I G HTS GAM E castling ( Q ) , as well as to drive
the Knight from B3.
San Sebastian, 1912
Dr. Tarrasch R ubinstein 1 1 8-Kt3 P-K R3
12 B-KR4
1 P-K4 P-K4
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q 83 If 12 BxKt, Q.xB ; 13 PxP, B l ack
3 Kt-83 Kt-83 obtains a clear-cut attack by the
4 B-Kt5 8-84 well initiated sacrifice of RxKtch.
5 KtxP Kt-Q5 However, if White plays 13 ().().(),
80 RUBINSTEIN'S C HES S MASTERPIECES

then P-QR4 ; and 14 PxP is refuted If 19 Kt-B3, B-K6 ; 20 P-KKt3,


by . . . P-R5 ; 15 Kt-K4, Q-K2 ; 16 P-QB4.
P-Q6, PxB ! ! etc.
19 P-KR4
Apart from 12 . . . QxB ; Black

20 Kt-82 B-K6
has the powerful continuation of
21 8-Q1 1
12 . . . PxB ; 13 Kt-B3, PxP ; 14
PxP, P-Kt5 etc. Thereafter the Since the weakening P-KKt3 is
move actually made was forced. not to be avoided, the Bishop must
p r o t e c t the vulnerable White
R u b i nstein squares. White defends himself
spiritedly.

21 P-K R 5
22 P-KKt3 P-R4
23 8-83 P-Kt5

Opening the lines in order to


bring the Bishops to full force.

24 K-Kt2 PxB P
25 Px 8 P 8-R3
26 P-84! QR-Q1
27 8 PxP 8PxP
28 K R-Q1 R-K2
29 Kt-Kt4 PxP
30 PxP 8-Q5
Tarrasch
31 QR-81 R-Kt2
32 R-82 K-82
12 Ktx K P I
33 Kt-82 R-Kt7!
,

Black recovers his Pawn and


secures the superior position. Five moves later Black effects
the exchange of the other Rook.
13 8xQ KtxQ
This is done in order to increase
Several commentators have in the scope of the King.
dicated that 13 . . . P-QKt4 was
essential so that White could not 34 RxR 8xR
trap the Knight by 14 B-KR4. This 35 R-Q2 8-Q5
is an error. Black would win by 36 Kt.R3
Kt ( Q 7 ) -B6ch.
White wishes to bring his Knight
14 KxKt RxB via B4 to K6.
1 5 Kt-K2 However, it was difficult to find
P-QR4 was threatened. a good plan, the opposing Bishops
are too powerful and hamper the
15 KtxKt White game, while the Black King
1 6 KxKt R-K1 comes quickly to the scene of
17 K-81 action.

K-Q2 was more economical. 36 K-K3


Possibly White feared 17 . . . P-B3 ; 37 R-Q82 K-Q3
18 KtxP, B-K6ch, whereupon, how 38 P-85 R-Q 81 1
ever, 19 K-K2 ! could be played. 39 8-Q1 RxRch
40 8xR K-K4
17 B-Kt2 41 P-KKt4 8-K6
1 8 P.Q 83 P-K83
1 9 Kt-Kt4 With this move the game is won.
PISTYAN, 1912 81

42 K-83 K-Q5 An unusual move which is not


43 B-Kt3 B-Kt2 good. To be sure after 6 . . .
44 K-K2 8-QR3 PxP; 7 KtxP, White stands bet
45 8-82 ter. But at that Black would have
fared better than with the dis
If 45 BxP, BxPc h ; 4 6 K-B3, B-B 8 !
advantage he now obtains.
wins.
7 P-Q5 Kt-Q5
45 8-QKt4
8 KtxKt PxKt

46 P-QR4
9 Kt-Kt5 0-0
To prevent P-R5, which would
Or 9 . . . P-QR3 ; 10 KtxP, KtxP ;
force White to play B-Ktl.
11 Kt-Kt3, Kt-B3 (Q-Kt5ch ? ; 12
46 . . 8-Q2! B-Q2, QxP; 13 R-QB1, Q-Kt4 ; 14
R-B5, and wins ) , 12 PB 5 ! with
The finale ! Now P-KKt3 is
advantage.
threatened, hence White must
move his King. 10 0.0 P-Q R3

47 K-83 K-86 If . . . Kt-K1 ; 11 P-K3 plus.


48 Kx8 P-Q5ch l
11 KtxP KtxP
49 K-K2

I f 4 9 K-K4, B-B3ch; etc.


Duras
49 . Kx8
50 Kt-84 8xR P
51 Kt-K6 8-Kt6!
52 KtxPch K-Kt7
53 Kt-Kt5 P-R5
54 K-K3 P-R6
55 KtxP KxKt
56 K-Q4 K-Kt5!
Resigns
One of Rubinstein's grand end
ings.

R u b i nstein
Game N o. 39
12 P-85 1 1 Q-K83
ENGLISH OPEN I N G
Forced. After QxP; 13 Kt-
Pistyan, 1912
Kt3 wins.
R u b i nstein Duraa 13 P-K3 Kt-Kt5
1 P-Q84 Kt- K 83 14 8-Q2 Kt-83
2 Kt-Q83 P-84 1 5 8-Q83
3 P-KKt3 Kt-83 Now White has far the better
Preferable is 3 . . . P-Q 4 ; 4 PxP, game. The Bishop Pawn exercises
Ktx P ; 5 B-Kt2, KtxKt; 6 KtPxKt, a cramping effect on the Black
P-KKt3 ; etc. This de fense has position.
often proved its value.
15 . P-K4
4 8-Kt2 P-KKt3 1 6 Kt-82 Q-K2
5 Kt-83 8-Kt2 17 Q-Q5 R-Kt1
6 P-Q4 Q-Kt3 1 8 Kt- R 3 ! P-Kt3
82 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Unavoidable. Otherwise Kt-B4 45 PxP K-K4


follows, and Black is completely 46 R-QR4 P-R4
tied up. 47 K-84 R-Q4
48 P-83 ! P-Q3
19 PxP RxP 49 P-K4 R-B4eh
20 Kt-84 R-Kt4 50 K-Q3 P-Q4
21 Q-Q6 R-K1 51 R-Q4 PxPeh
22 K R-Q1 P-K5 52 PxP P-Kt5
Loss of a Pawn is no longer to 53 R-QS K-85
be avoided, as BxKt was threat 54 P-86 R-88
ened and the Knight can neither Of no further moment.
move nor be protected.
55 R-Q5 R-KB8
23 BxB KxB
56 R-B5ch Resigns
24 QxQ RxQ
25 Kt-Q6 R-Kt1
26 BxP Kt-P2
27 P-Kt3 Kt-Kt4
28 B-Kt2 KtxKt
29 RxKt R-K3

Black has lost a Pawn and has


had a bad position. Rubinstein Game N o. 40
handles the ending with his ac
Q U E E N 'S GAMBIT D EC L I N ED
customed care.
30 R-Q4 K-81 Breslau, 1 9 1 2
31 R-Q B1 K-K2
Rubi nstein M a rshall
32 R-87 R-Q3
33 B-Q5 P-84 1 P-Q4 P-Q4
34 K-B1 K-Q1 2 Kt-KB3 P-QB4
35 R-85 K-K2 3 P-84 P-K3
36 K-K2 B-Kt2 4 PxQP K PxP
37 BxB RxB 5 Kt-83 Kt-QB3
38 RxR KxR 6 P-K Kt3 Kt-83
39 R-88 R-Kt3 7 B-Kt2 PxP
40 K-Q3 K-Q4
Not to be recommended .
Except for his poor opening,
B-K2 is correct.
Black has played in exemplary
fashion. His handicap, however, 8 K KtxP B-QB4
is too great. The Pawn plus wins. 9 Kt-Kt3 B-Q Kt5
41 P-K R4 P-R3
9 . . . B-Kt3 has also been tried.
42 R-84 P-Kt4
If then 10 KtxP, KtxKt ; 11 QxKt,
43 PxP PxP
QxQ ; 12 BxQ, Black gets an at
44 P-KKt4!
tack by 12 . . B-R6. However,
Capturing another Pawn. White need not go into this, but
44 . R-Kt4 can play simply 10 Castles, and
thereafter Black's Queen Pawn re
Or : mains quite weak.
I 44 . . . PxP ; 45 RxP, R-Kt3 ;
46 P-B4. 10 0-0 BxKt
II 44 . . K-K4 ; 45 R-B5ch, P 11 PxB 0-0
Q4 ; 4 6 PxP. 12 B-Kt5 B-K3
III 44 . . . R-KB3 ; 45 PxP, 13 Kt-85 Q-K2
RxP ? ? ; 46 P-K4ch. 14 KtxB PxKt
BRESLAU, 1912 83

Mara hal l 21 P-K4! Q-K R4


22 P-84!
After 22 QxBP, R-R3 ; 23 P
KR4, Q-Kt5, White could hardly
avoid the draw.

22 . . . . Q-R4
23 P-K5 R-R3
Not an attacking move, but a
forced displacement of the rook!

24 R-Q82 Q-Kt3ch
25 K-Kt2 R-Q1
26 KR-82 R-Q81
27 K R-Q2 K-R1
R u b i nstein
28 R-Q6

15 P-Q84! PxP White's attack has now reached


16 K 8xKt ! Its goal, and its objectives must
fall. Now begins the winning pro
Rubinstein Is never petty. He cedure.
has emerged from the opening with
two Bishops and a fine position. 28 Q.Kt8
29 Rx8P

Yet he suddenly gives up his fian R-KKt1


chettoed Bishop for an innocuous
Knight, and to this end, he even After . . . RxR; 30 QxR, Black
sacrifices if only momentarily, a would be mated shortly.
Pawn. This conception, which 30 R-88 Q-Kt2ch
would have occurred to but a few 31 K-Kt1 I
masters, is-as the sequel attests,
Indeed a brilliant one. The shat 31 QB6, RxR; 32 QxQ, RxRch ;
tered Pawn position proves a 33 KB3 would obviously have won
source of endless worry for Black. also, but not as easily.
16 Px8 31 Q-Kt3ch
1 7 Q-Q4 Q-Q1 32 Q-85

The Queen aims at Q4-a worthy Now RxR fails.


idea.
32 QxQ
Rx8

18 8xKt!
19 QxBP Everything else loses even more
The Knight might have support quickly.
ed an attack upon the White King. 33 R ( 82 ) xQ P-Kt4
The weaknesses of the Black po 34 RxRch KxR
sition can be exploited most easily 35 PxP R-R4
by the heavy pieces. Rubinstein 36 P-R4 P-R3
handles such positions in a manner 37 PxP RxP ( R3)
unsurpassed.
19 Q-Q4 Black might have quietly re
20 QR-Q81 Q R- K 8 1 signed.

I f 20 . . . QxQ, Black could 38 R-88ch K-Kt2


hardly maintain his hold on his 39 R-87ch K-Kt3
isolated Pawns. 40 RxP K-84
84 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

White might have prevented this 50 P-Kt4 P-K5


by 38 R-B7. But what does one 51 P-R7 R-81
not do out of sheer boredonL 52 P-Kt5 P-K6
53 P-Kt6
41 R-R5 R-R1
42 K-Kt2 R-QKt1 A cynicism-which, however, his
43 K-R3 R-Kt8 opponent does not take to heart.
44 R-R3 R-KR8ch He plays on.
45 K-Kt2 R-QR8
46 R-83ch KxP 53 . PxR
47 R-82 K-Q5 54 P-Kt7 K-K6
48 P-R5 R-Q88 55 P-Kt8(Q) K-K7
49 P-R6 P-K4 !16 Q-K6ch Resigns
Chapter VU
International Tournaments at Lodz, 1916; Warsaw and Lodz,
1917. Match and Quadrangular Tourney at Berlin, 1918.

Game No. 41 17 Q R-K1 R ( Q2)-K2


1 8 P-KR4
RUY LOPEZ
A further weakening. Now after
Lodz, 1916 P-R4 a hole is created, and besides
Factor R u b i nstein the White Bishop is condemned
to complete uselessness by reason
1 P-K4 P-K4 of the Pawn position.
2 Kt-K 83 Kt-Q83
3 8-Kt5 P-QR3 18 P-K R41
4 8xKt 1 9 P-84 P-R4
20 P-R4 K-Q2
In the Exchange Variation, White 21 K-81 8-83
obtains the better Pawn position. 22 P-Kt3 K-81
Against this Black gets the two 23 R-K3 8-Q2
Bishops. In order to utilize the 24 K-Kt2 P-83
latter, one must attack. Since 25 Q Kt-Kt1 8-82
Rubinstein, in addition to being 26 Kt-83 Kt-R1
an excellent player, is also an out
standing artist in his handling of Rubinstein gradually improves
the two Bishops, this variation is his position : he prepares the
a. useless weapon against him. break-through.
4 . . Q Px8 27 R-Q3 Kt-82
5 P-Q4 PxP 28 R ( K1 )-Q1 8-Kt5
6 QxP QxQ 29 R (Q 1 ) -Q2 Kt-R3
7 KtxQ 8-Q3 30 8-Kt1
8 P-KB4 P-83
9 8-K3 Kt-K2 If 30 P-B5 the break-through be
comes possible at once by 30 . . .
10 Kt-Q2 Kt-Kt3
P-Kt3 ! followed by doubling R's
1 1 P-KKt3
on the KKt file striking at KKt6.
A pointless weakening of the
position : 0-0 immediately was in 30 . . . . 8-Kt1
order. 31 8-82 8-K3
32 R-Q1 B-K82
11 P-Q84
33 8-Kt1
- -

12 K t ( Q4)-83 P-Kt3
13 0-0 B-Kt2 White can do nothing. He can
14 K R-K1 0-0-0 merely look on as his opponent
15 8-82 prepares his threats.

He would like to play Kt-B4, but 33 . . . . 8-KtS


does n ot succeed in so doing as 34 Kt-Q2 Kt-82
his King's Pawn would be vulner 35 R-K1 8-R2
able. 36 K-83 Kt-RS
15 K R-K1 37 8-82 Kt-Kt5
1 6 R-K2 R-Q2 38 8-Kt1

85
86 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Rubinste i n Having secured the attack, Ru


binstein conducts the game vigor
ously to the end.

43 PxP
The threat was 43 . . . PxP with
the same continuation as in the
game. If 43 P-K5, then BxKP ! ;

and now if 44 PxB, then KtxPch ;


45 K-K3, P-B5ch ! ; etc. and White's
game collapses.
43 B ( R2)xP
44 Kt-K4
.

Factor Or 44 R-B3, R-Kl ; followed by


. . . R(Kt2 ) -K 2 ; etc. with a de
38 . P-KKt4! vastating attack.
This breathrough had to come
sooner or later. At this moment 44 . . . BxKtch
1t Is made more effective by the A surprise, but very good ! Black
position of the King at B3 and the gets the Pawn at B4.
Rook at Q3.
39 R-K2 45 KxB R-K1ch
46 K-83 R-KB2
The double exchange on Kt5 is
out-of-question because of Kt-K5ch The subtle point! BxP is threat
etc. Also 39 RPxP, PxP ; 40 P-B5, ened. The Pawn cannot be held.
is Insufficient as Black gets the
47 R (Q3)-Q1 R ( K ) B1
exchange with Kt-K5ch, then cap
48 R-K 81 BxP
tures the Pawn at Kt3, and wins
49 Ktx8
easily. He can also win another
way. In order to repulse the attack,
39 Px 8 P White has to permit the exchange
The opening of this file is also of Rooks.
decisive. 49 R x Ktch
40 PxP R-KKt1 50 K-Kt2 RxR
41 R-K1 R ( K2)-KKt2 51 RxR RxR
42 Kt-K2 P-84! 52 Kx R Kt-R3!

R u b i nstein The final thrust ! Black fllches


the Pawn at Kt3.

53 K-K2 Kt-84
54 8-82 Kt-Q5ch
55 K-Q3 KtxP
56 8-K3 K-Q2
57 K-83 Kt-Q5
58 BxKt PxBch
59 KxP K-Q3
60 K-Q3 K-K4!

More exact than 60 . . K-B4 ;


61 K-B3, P-Kt4 ; etc.

61 K-83 P-QB4
Factor Resigns
WARSAW, 1917 87

Game No. 42 Position after 14 P-QB3.


R ubinstein
FOU R K N I GHT'S GAM E

Warsaw, 1917

Belitzmann Rubinstein
1 P-K4 P-K4
2 Kt-KB3 Kt-QB3
3 Kt-83 Kt-83
4 B-Kt5 Kt-Q5
5 B-84 B-84
6 KtxP Q-K2
7 Kt-Q3
For 7 Kt-B3, which is better,
compare the game against Spiel
mann at San Sebastian in 1912. Belitzmann
7 . . P-Q4
It is clear that other moves are

8 KtxP
just as useless. White is lost.
8 BxP is preferable.
15 P-R5
8 . QxPch 16 Q-K2
9 Kt-K3
There is no practical defense
If 9 K-B1, B-R6 ! would be a against the mating threat.
powerful answer. QxRPc h
16 . .

9 B-Q3 1 7 KxQ PxP Obi. ch.


10 0-0 18 K-Kt1 R-R8 mate

Bold ln the extreme ! But at all


events Black gets a strong attack.
10 . P-Q Kt4 1
11 B-Kt3 B-Kt2 Game No. 43
12 Kt-K1 Q-KR5
Q U EEN'S GAM B I T D EC L I N E D
13 P-Kt3
Lodz, 1917
If 13 P-KR3, Black might con
tinue the attack with P-Kt4 and Gottesduner Rubi nstein
PKR4 ; if 13 P-B4, KBxP; 14 P
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
Kt3, BxP ; 15 PxB, QxPch ; is n ot
2 Kt-KB3 Kt-KB3
clear inasmuch as 16 Kt-Kt2 fol
3 P-QB4 P-K3
lows with the threat of BxBP,
4 B-Kt5 B-K2
since later Kt-Kt2 could be an
5 Kt-BS Q Kt-Q2
swered with . . . Kt-Kt5 !
6 P-KS 0-0
13 Q-R6 7 R-81 P-83
1 4 P-QB3 8 PxP K PxP
9 B-QS Kt-K5
If 14 P-Q3, Black replies as in
10 BxKt
the actual game.
Better is 1 0 BxB, QxB ; 11 BxKt,
(See Diagram in Next Column) PxB ; 12 Kt-Q2, and White has an
excellent position.
14 P-K R4 1 10 . . . . BxB
1!1 PxKt 11 B-Kt1
88 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Inconsequent. The Bishop :Is 25 KtxQ


better placed at Q3 : QKtl should
be reserved for a Rook for the Now the combination can be ap
praised: Black has Rook and two
eventual attack P-QKt4 and QKt5
Pawns for two pieces. This alone
which is in order.
would not be sufficient, but here
11 R-K1 it is important to note that a pair
12 0- 0 of Rooks has been exchanged, so
that White has at his disposal only
12 KtxB was more prudent so minor pieces. In such cases the
as not to give Black the two Bish advantage of the Rook is almost
ops. always sufficient.
12 - B-K2 25 P-KKt3
13 Kt-K2

B-Q3 26 Kt-Q3 P-Kt3


14 Kt-Kt3 Kt-B3 B-K1
27 Kt-K5
15 Kt-Q2 B-B2 28 K-B2 P-Q R4
16 R-K1 Q-Q3 29 Kt-K2 P-KB3
17 P-K B4 B-Q2 30 Kt-Q3 K-B2
18 Kt-Kt3 Kt-Kt5 31 Kt-B3 K-K2
19 Q-B3 Q-R3 32 Kt-R4 R-Kt1
20 P-K R3 33 B-B2 K-Q3
This allows a pretty combina 34 P-R3 B-Q2
tion. 20 Kt-Bl should be played. 35 P-Q Kt4?
Black would then have a slight Greatly facilitating Black's task.
edge. Now he can count upon an en
trance by way of the Rook's file.
R u b i nstein Besides the Pawn at Kt4 can more
readily prove a s ource of weakness
than at Kt2.
35 . . . . PxP
36 PxP B-B4
37 K-K3

The threat was 37 . . R-QRl


(38 KtxP ?, R-R7) .
37 R-K 1ch
38 K-Q2 R-K5

A surprise ! White has no good


defense against this attack.
39 P-Kt4
Gottesduner
39 KtxP, RxP :Is also unfavorable
as the White defense has been de
20 Ktx K P
prived of the best supporting
21 RxKt RxR
Pawns. If 39 K-B3, R-K7 and the
22 QxR BxBP
game 1s decided on the King's
23 Q-QB3 BxR
wing.
24 QxB
39 B-K3
If 24 KtxB Black gets an o 40 Kt-B3 RxQ P I
portunity for a King's side attack 4 1 Kt-K2
by R-Kl.
If 41 K-K3 then might follow :
24 QxQ R-QB5, 42 K-Q2, P-R4.
LODZ, 1917 89

41 . R-K5 59 Kt-K2 K-85


42 Kt-83 60 K-84 P-87
Now White's plan is apparent : The threat was KtxP and K-K5.
the hostile Rook is caught. But
61 K-K3 K-Kt6
Black already has three Pawns and
62 K-Q4
that is too much for the defense.
Or 62 Kt-Q4ch, K-Kt7 ; 63 KtxP,
42 R-Q5 BxKt ; 64 K-B4, B-Q8 ; etc.
43 Kt-K2 R-K5
62 . . . . K-Kt7
Rubinstein is evidently ponder 63 K-K3 B-84
ing whether to sacrifice the Rook 64 K-84 B-Q6
on K5 or QB5 : hence the repeti Resigns
tion of moves.

44 Kt-83 P-KB4
45 PxP Px P
46 KtxR B PxKt
47 Kt-82 P-84 Game No. 44
48 PxPch Px P
Q U E EN'S GA M B I T DECLI N E D
These three passed Pawns are
irresistible. White's only chance Lodz, 1917
lies in the return of a piece as
soon as possible. Regedzinsk;y R u b i nstein

49 K-K3 K-K4 1 P-Q4 P-Q4


50 BxP 2 Kt-KB3 Kt-KB3
3 P-QB4 P-K3
Or 50 KtxP, PxKt; 51 BxP, B-
4 B-Kt5 Q Kt-Q2
B4 ! etc.
5 Kt-83 B-K2
50 . PxB 6 P-K3 0-0
5 1 KtxP P-85 7 B-Q3
52 P-R4 P-R3 As long as the QB Pawn remains
53 Kt-Kt3 at B7, this move is weaker than
In order to prevent the opposing 7 R-QBL
King from approaching the Rook 7 . . . PxP
Pawn by way of B5, e.g. 53 Kt-B3, 8 BxP P-Q R3 !
K-B 4 ; 54 K-B3, B-Bl, or B-B2, fol 9 0-0 P-QKt4
lowed by check with the Bishop, 10 B-Q3 B-Kt2
and the Black King penetrates 11 Q-K2 P-84
either by Kt5 or K5 and Q5 with 12 QR-Q1 PxP
effect. 13 PxP
53 . . B-84 More or less required by the
54 Kt-K2 B-R2 previous moves. Had White de
55 Kt-Kt3 B-Kt3 sired to play KtxP, he would pre
56 Kt-R1 ferably have posted his Rooks on
the QB and Q squares.
Or 56 Kt-K2, K-B4 ; 57 K-B3,
B-R4 ch ; etc.: and if 57 K-Q4, B 13 . . . Kt-Kt3
B 2 ; etc. 1 4 Kt-K4?
56 . . P-86 The isolated center Pawn only
57 Kt-Kt3 K-Q4 offers certain advantages if it can
58 P-R5 B-R2 be employed as the base for an
90 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

attack. In a quiet positional game 28 R ( K2)xQ RxR


it usually becomes a source of 29 RxR Kt-Kt5
weakness. Therefore White should 30 R-Kt2 R-QB1
not simplify but should play 14 31 K-81 R-BBeh
Kt-K5. 32 K-K2

14 KtxKt Or 32 Kt-K1, RxKtch ! 33 KxR,


15 BxB QxB Kt-Q6ch; etc.
16 BxKt K R-Q1 32 R-QR8
17 R-Q3 BxB 33 K-Q2 RxP
18 QxB Q R-81 34 RxR KtxR
35 Kt-K5 Kt-Kt5
As a result of the simplification
36 Kt-Q7 P-83
White has now no prospects for
37 P-Kt3 K-82
an attack. The disadvantages of
his isolated Pawn gradually make 38 Kt-Kt6
themselves felt. Black's position Hastening the end. The Knight
is superior. should go to B5.
19 K R-Q1 Kt-Q4 38 K-K2
20 R ( Q3)-Q2 Kt-83 39 K-83 P-QR4
21 Q-K3 Q-Kt2
Now there is no defense to the
22 P- K R 3 P-R3
threat of K-Ql and K-B2 : the
23 R-K2 Q-Q4
White Knight is lost.
24 P-QKt3 Q-Q3
25 R-QB1 Kt-Q4 Resig ns
26 Q-Q2 Q-85
A game without any unusual
combinative brilliance. Yet it is
R u b i nstei n notable as furnishing a simple ex
ample of the exploitation of the
various weaknesses of the isolated
Queen's Pawn.

Game N o. 45

Q U E EN'S G A M B I T D E C L I N E D

Match: Berlin, 1918


Rubi nstein Schlechter
Regedzinsky 1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 Kt- K B3 Kt-KB3
Decisive ! White cannot play 27 3 P-QB4 P-83
QxQ because he would lose the ex 4 Kt-83 PxP
change after 27 . . . KtxQ. If 5 P-K3 B-Kt5
27 R-Ql then 27 . . . Kt-B6 ; 28 At a later period Alekhine has
R ( K2 ) -Kl ( 28 QxQ ? ? KtxRch ) , pointed out that here 5 . . . P
QxQ o r even 2 7 . . . QxQ at once, QKt4 ; 6 P-QR4, P-Kt5 ; etc. affords
and the ending is very unfavor a suitable defense.
able for White.
6 BxP P-K3
27 R-82 QxQ 7 0-0 Q Kt-Q2
BERLIN, 1918 91

8 P-KR3 8xKt against the same opponent in 1909


seems convincing ( see Game No.
. . . B-R4 was preferable. But 20) .
even then Black's position would
not be good as White's center is 13 . K PxP
too strong.

14 PxP Q-Kt3

9 Qx8 8-K2 If 14 . . . PxP, Black loses the


10 R-Q1 0-0 QKtP to say the least : 15 KtxP,
11 P-K4 R-K1 KtxKt ; 16 BxKt, Q-Kt3 ; 17 BxKtP,
12 8-84 Kt-81 R-Q1 ; 18 B-Q5, and now 18 . . .
QxKtP is refuted by 19 BxPch,
White certainly has the superior KxB ; 20 B-K5ch.
position, by reason of his strong
center and his two Bishops. Nev 15 P-Q6 8-Q1
ertheless It is amazing how quickly 16 P-KKt4!
Rubinstein annihilates the oppos
Threatening 17 P-Kt5, Kt(B3)
ing army. Q2, 1 8 BxPch, and B-K3ch. If
Black plays 1 6 . . . QxKtP, there
14 P-Q5 ! !
would follow 17 P-Kt5, Kt-Q4 (Kt
( B3)-Q 2 ; 18 BxPch ) , 18 KtxKt,
Schlechter PxKt; 19 BxP, and no less than
four terrible threats impend. 20
BB1 ; 20 B-K5, 20 BxPch, and 20
BxKtP, followed by P-Q7.

16 Kt-K3
1 7 P-Q7!

Winning a piece.

17 R-K2

With 17 . . . R-KB1 ; 18 B-Q6,


KtxP, Black might have put up
a better fight.

1 8 8-Q6 RxP
Rubinste i n
1 9 8xKt Px8
20 P-Kt5!
Simple, yet White obtains an
Irresistible attack. It is interesting Now the Knight cannot move
to note that Rubinstein plays for because of Q-B8 mate. If 20 . . .
ideas that are psychologically ab QxKtP, then 21 QR-Ktl, followed
horrent to his particular opponent. by PxKt.
Aside from the consideration as
to the chess merit of the move 20 Rx8
21 RxR Q-84
which more often than not is good
-such strategy is an Important Losing a piece. But 21 . . . B-B2,
weapon to the master tournament 22 RxKP, etc. was also hopeless.
player. There has been much
speculation about what Grandmas 22 Rx8ch RxR
ter Rubinstein used to think about 23 PxKt Q-Kt4ch
In the first 10 or 15 minutes that 24 Q-Kt4 QxP
he used at the beginning of each 25 R-K1 P-K4
game. That this time was em 26 Q-Kt3 R-K 1
ployed in remembering his game 27 Kt-K4 Q-K2
92 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECE

28 R-Q1 R-K 81 18 P-K85 Kt-84


29 R-Q6 K-R1 19 8-84 8-81
30 Q-Kt4 R-Q1 20 8-83 Kt( 83)-Q2!
31 R-K6 Q-Kt5
Half-famished S chlechter - what
32 Q-Kt5 Q-K8ch
a great contestant he was ! He
33 K-R2 R-K81
stands confined and senses the
34 R-K7 Resigns
highly dangerous attack of the
For after 34 . . . RxPch ; 36 White King Knight Pawn. Hence
KtxR, QxKtch ; 36 Q-Kt2, Q-B5ch ; he resolves upon the spirited sac
37 K-R1, Q-QB8ch ; 38 Q-Ktl, and rifice of a Pawn, which even at
there are no more checks. White's best play, offers far better
drawing chances than a passive
defense.
21 8xQP 8x8
22 Rx8 Kt-K41
Game No. 46 23 RxR Ktx8ch
24 PxKt RxR
I N D I A N D E F E N S E ( O L D STY L E ) Now the value of the sacrlflce
Quadrangular Tourney, Berlin, 1918 becomes apparent : White has lost
his Bishop, and at the same time
Rubi nstein Schlechter has a tripled pawn. Obviously the
1 P-Q4 Kt-K83
material advantage of White has
2 Kt-K83
become almost worthless.
P-Q3
3 P-QB4 8-Kt5 25 Kt-K4 !
4 Kt-83 Q Kt-Q2
But now it is apparent that Rubin
5 P-KR3
stein has detected a slight weak
5 P-K4 would be more natural, ness in his opponent's combina
followed by B-K2. But Rubinstein tion : with the Pawn at B2 pro
has an unusual predilection for his tecting his King, and the Pawn
two Bishops, and hence forces the at B5 as the spear-head of his
following exchange, although a future attack ( P-B6 ) . the Pawn
slight weakening of his Pawns is at B3 serves as a valuable sup.
involved therein. port in the center. White, there
fore, still has a slight superiority.
5 . 8xKt
6 K Px 8 P-K4 25 . . RxRch
7 B-K3 P-83
Schlechter yields. He should
Slightly weakening the position. play P-QKt3 and possibly P-KB3
B-K2 and 0-0 were to be preferred. later, although thereafter White
would control the key-square K6.
8 8-K2 8-K2
But in no event should Black con
9 0-0 0-0
cede the Queen's file.
10 Q-82 Q-82
11 QR-Q1 PxP 26 QxR P-QKt3
12 8xP KR-K1
13 P-84 QR-Q1 (See Diagram on Page 93)
14 R-Q2 P-Q R3
15 K R-Q1 Kt-81
27 Q-Q4!
16 8-K3 Kt-K3
Attack is the soul of the game.
Black wishes to continue with
White sacrifices an important Pawn
P-QKt4 but his opponent demurs.
in order to make a breech 1n the
17 P-Q R4 P-Q R4 enemy's King position.
BERLIN, 1918 93

Position after 27 Q-Q4! 31 Q-Kt3! Q-Q1


32 Q-KS P-R5
Schlechter
33 P-R4 P-R3
34 K-Kt2 Q-K 81
35 K-Kt3 Q-Q1
36 K-Kt2

QxQBP must be played. Hence


the King retreats so that Black
will not be able to counter it wJth
Q-QKtlch.

36 . . . . Q-Q 81
37 QxP Q-K3
38 Q-K7 Q-81
39 P-85 P-Kt4

Black falls Jnto Zug-Zwang. If


Rubinstein 39 . . . Q-QKtl, then 40 Q-Q7 ! ,
Q-QR1 ; 4 1 P-R5, P-Kt4 ; 4 2 P-KB4 !
27 . KtxP etc. And i f 3 9 . . . Q-QR1 ; the

Other continuations are equally decisive continuation is 40 P-R5,


unsatisfactory. P-Kt4 ; 41 Q-Q7, K-B 1 ; 42 K-Ktl ;
43 P-KB4 ! The White Q will
I 27 KtxKt ; 28 PxKt, P
penetrate on the KKt file.
. .

KB3 ; 29 P-QB5, with advantage.


II 27 Q-Q 2 ; 28 Q-K5 !
. . 40 PxP PxP
III 27 Kt-Q2 ; 28 P-B6, KtxP ; 41 Q-K3 Q-K3
29 KtxKtch, PxKt ; 30 QxBP, Q-Q2 ; 42 QxPch K-81
31 K-Kt2, with the threat of P 43 Q-Kt7ch K-K1
KR4, R5 and R6 with advantage. 44 Q-Kt8ch K-Q2
45 Q-Kt4
28 P-86! Kt-84
Refuting the final effort to free
Forced. The threat is obviously
the position.
29 PxP followed by 30 Kt-B6ch.
28 . . . PxP is naturally not play 45 K-K1

able, and if 28 . . . P-Kt3 ; 29 Q


46 QxQch PxQ
K3, Q-B1 or Q-Q1 ; 30 Kt-Kt5, Q 47 K-Kt3 K-82
KB1 ; 31 Q-K7 ! P-KR3 ; 32 Kt-R7, 48 K-84 KxP
is quickly decisive. 49 K-K4
29 KtxKt PxKt
30 Q-Kt4 P-Kt3 Now the liquidation {undoubltng)
of the doubled Pawn cannot be
The ending must lose for Black prevented.
step by step as his King is caught
permanently in a mating net. Realgn1
Chapter VID
International Tournaments at Gotebrug. 1920 and The Hague. 1921

Game N o. 47 15 8-84 K-R1


16 8-81 PxP
DUTCH D E F E N S E 17 KtPxP Kt-R4
18 8-R2 P-Kt5
Goteborg, 1920 19 PxP Ktx P 7
R u b i nstein Dr. Tarrasch Now the variation i n note on
Black's 13th move has actually
1 P-Q4 P-K3
occurred. Black should have played
2 P-Q84 P-K84
19 . . . QxP with a playable game.
3 Kt-Q83 8-Kt5
4 B-Q2 P-QKt3 20 P-K4! 8-K83
5 P-K3 8-Kt2 21 PxP PxP
6 P-K83 22 Kt-Q5 Q R-K1
23 Q-83 8-Kt2
Page Stelnitz! 24 Q-Kt3 8xKt
25 8x8
6 8-Q3
Kt-KB3 was preferable. Perhaps Threatening 26 Kt-B4, Q-R3 ; 27
Dr. Tarrasch was thinking of the Kt-K6 etc.
game Rubinstein-Lowitzky, Bres 25 . . . . Q-Kt3
lau, 1912, where Black chose a 26 Kt-84 Q-83
quite similar set-up and won
quickly.
Tarrasch
7 Kt-R3 Kt-K83
8 8-Q3 Kt-83
9 Q-K2 0-0
10 Q R-Q1 P-Q R3
11 0-0 Q-K1
12 P-R3 Q-R4
13 P-Q Kt4 P-K Kt4

Logical, but the attack does not


make much headway. It will be
a question as to which side suc
ceeds in attacking in the center.
With this in view, White has the
better chances, and should be suc
cessful, thereby exposing the weak R u b i n stei n
ness of P-Kt4.
27 Kt-R5
14 P-85 8-K2
Carefully calculated ! If 27 .
It would be a m istake to con
QxPch? which Black possibly In
tinue 14 BxRPch ? ; 15 KxB,
tended, then 28 RxQ, BxRch; 29

P-Kt5; 16 KBPxP, BPxP; because


K-Rl, Kt-B7ch; 30 QxKt! and wins,
of 17 K-Ktl ! ! and White gets a
as 30 . . . BxQ is refuted by 31
decisive advantage as 17 . . . PxKt ;
B-Kt2ch.
would be answered by 18 RxKt ! ,
QxQ ; 1 9 RxRch and KtxQ, or BxQ. 27 . . . . Q-Kt3

94
GOTEBURG, 1920 95

28 Ktx8 QxKt 2 Kt-K 83 Kt-K83


29 QxP Kt-Q83 3 P-K5 Kt-Q4
30 8x Kt Px8 4 Kt-Q83 P-K3
31 QxP 5 P-KKt3
White has a winning game both
This set-up is not justified here.
in material and in position. Rubin
Better i s 5 KtxKt and 6 P-Q4.
stein plays strongly until the end.
Compare the opening with the
31 R-K7 game against Dr. Euwe at the
32 8-84 R-KKt1 Hague, 1921.
The threat was 33 P-KR3, Kt-B 3 ;
5 Kt-Q83
34 B-K5, against which there was
.

6 8-Kt2 KtxKt
no good defense. Hence Black at
7 KtPxKt P-Q3
tempts a " swindle" of which Rubin
8 PxP 8xP
stein takes nc cognizance.
9 0-0 0-0
33 Q-83 10 P-Q3 8-K2
There was also a win by 33 P
In order to play B-B3 if the op
KR3, Kt-B3 ; 34 B-K5, for if 34
posing Queen's Bishop occupies
. . . RxB ; 35 PxR, Kt-K5 ; 36 P
the long diagonal.
KKt4 ! , PxP ; 37 QxKt, PxPch; 38
K-R1, Q-Kt7ch ; 39 QxQ, PxQch;
40 K-R2, PxR ( Kt) ch ; 41 RxKt, etc. 11 8-K3 8-Q2
Black could indeed play 34 . . . 12 Q.Q2 Q-82
RxKtPch ( instead of 34 . . . RxB) 13 K R-K1 Q R-Q1
14 8-84 8-Q3
35 K-R1, R-Kt3 with better pros
pects. The simple move actually 15 8x8 Qx8
is much more efl'ective. 16 Q-K3 P-Q Kt3
17 Kt-Q2 Kt-K2
33 . . Q-K2 18 Kt-84 Q-82
Another "swindle" if 34 B-K5ch, 19 Q-K5
then 34 . . . RxB ; 35 PxR, QxKP.
In that case White would win also, White has no compensation for
e.g. 36 Q-R3 QxPch ; 37 K-R1, Kt his inferior Pawn PQSition. He
B7ch ; 38 RxKt, QxR; 39 Q-QB3ch, should try 19 P-QR4. The ending
and mate the next move. is unfavorable for him.

34 8-Q 6 ! Q-K3 19 QxQ


35 P-Q 5 ! Q-K1 20 KtxQ 8-R5 1
36 8-Kt3 R-K6
37 K R-K1 From now o n the weakness of
QB2 cripples White's game.
Thereby banning all further
"swindles." 21 R-K2 Kt-Q41
Resigns
The following move is now
forced, as 22 P-QB4 is refuted by
22 . . . Kt-QKt5 !

22 8xKt Px8
Game No. 48
S I C I LIAN DEFENSE
Now another ending occurs In
which the Bishop is superior to
Goteborg, 1920 the Knight.
Reti Rubi nstein
23 Q R-K1 K R-K1
1 P-K4 P-Q84 24 P-K84
96 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIEC:E::3

If White plays P-Q4, now or 40 8-83


later, he is met by the blockading 41 K-K2
move P-QB5.

24 . . . P-K83 Rubinstein
25 Kt-83 K-82
26 K-82 RxRch
27 RxR R-K1
28 RxR KxR
29 Kt-K1 K-K2

The exchange of Rooks has In


creased the effectiveness of the
King and Bishop.

30 K-K3 K-K3
31 P-Kt4

Weakens the King's wing, but


could not be avoided. The threat
was 31 . . . K-B4. If then 32 P Retl
KR3, P-KR4 ; would follow, and
White runs out of moves and must
finally play K-Q2, after whlch P Or 41 P-QB3, PxPch ; 42 KxP,
KR5 is decisive. B-Kt7 ; and White loses because of
Zug-Zwang, for his Knight Is
31 . K-Q3 hemmed in and cannot be freed
32 P-KR3 P-KKt3 in time even by the march of the
33 K-Q2 B-Q 2 ! King to KB2 : 43 K-Q4, P-QKt4 ;
34 Kt-83 K-K2! 44 P-QR3 (44 K-K3? P-Kt5 ! and
B-Q4) P-R4 ; 45 K-K3, P-R5 ; and
Directed against P-KKt5. 46 K-B2 falls because of P-Kt5 !
35 K-K3
41 . . . 8-Q4
If 35 P-Kt5, BxRP ; 36 PxPch, 42 P-R3 P-QKt4
KxP ; 37 Kt-Kt5, B-Q2 ! ; 38 Ktx 43 Kt-81 P-R4
RPch, K-B4 ; 39 K-K3, BR5 ; etc. 44 Kt-Q2 P-R5
45 Kt-K4ch
35 P-KR4
36 Kt-R2
Or 45 K-Ql, P-Kt4 ! etc.
Or 36 PxP, PxP; 37 P-KR4, K
K3 ; and K-B4 wins. 45 . 8xKt
46 Px8 P-QKt5
36 . . K-Q3 47 K-Q2 PxRP
37 K-K2 P-Q5 1 48 K-81 P-Kt4!
Rubinstein conducts the ending
The continuation m ight be : 49
brilliantly. White's possible moves
PxP (49 P-K5ch, PxP ; 50 PxKtP,
are reduced step by step.
P-K4 ; etc.) PxKtP ; 50 K-Ktl, K
38 8PxP 8PxP K5 ; 51 K-R2, KxP ; 52 KxP, P-Q6 ;
39 K-Q2 PxP 5 3 PxPch, KxP ; 5 4 KxP, K-K5, etc.
40 PxP
Resigns
After 40 KtxP, BxKt ; 41 PxB,
P-Kt4 ; Black wins the Pawn end Another very fine and Instruc
ing. tive ending.
GOTEBURG, 1920 97

Game N o. 49 KtKt5 was threatened. Now


the advantage of having the Black
Q U E E N 'S GAM BIT DEC L I N E D Knight on QB3 Is apparent.

Goteborg, 1920 18 B-B3 Q-R2

The Queen's Rook needs an out


R u b i nstein M a roczy
let, and besides the Queen cannot
1 P-Q4 Kt- K B3 remain In the path of the hostlle
2 Kt-KB3 P-Q4 Bishop.
3 P-QB4 P-K3 19 Kt-R5 ! B-QKt5
4 B-Kt5 B-K2 20 Kt-B4 B-Q2
5 P-K3 Q Kt-Q2 21 Kt-Q5 KtxKt
6 Kt-B3 0-0 22 BxKt B-K3
7 R-B1 R-K1 23 Q-K4! BxB
8 Q-B2 PxP 24 RxB
Not customary and weaker than Because of the threat on the
8 . . P-B3. Generally the cap King's Pawn, White obtains the
ture of the Pawn Is In order only Queen's file and this is decisive.
after White's King Bishop has
moved. 24 Q R-B1
25 Q R.Q1 B-B1
9 BxP P-84
Not 25 . . . P-B4 ? because of
1 0 0-0 PxP
QxP ! , RxKt ; 27 R-Q7, Kt-R1 ; 28
1 1 KtxP
BxKP, BBl ; ( . . . B-K2 ; 29 RxB ! )
Rubinstein avoids the Isolated 2 9 BxKtP ! , BxB ; 30 RxBch, KxR ;
Queen's Pawn. Hence he rejects 31 RQ7ch, etc. Now there Is In
11 PxP. deed the threat of P-B4 as Black
would have time, after 27 QxP to
11 P-Q R3 bring the Rook at B5 to safety.

. . . Kt-K4 ; followed by B-Q2 ; 26 P-QKt3 P-QKt4


and eventually Kt-QB3 ; was 27 Kt.Q6 BxKt
indicated. 28 RxB R-B2
29 P-KR4!
1 2 K R-Q1 Q-R4 White dominates the board and
1 3 B-R4 Kt-K4 now Initiates the final attack.
14 B-K2 Kt-Kt3?
29 P-KB3
Here the Knight is misplaced : it 30 Q.Q5ch K-R1
belongs on the Queen's side-pos
sibly on QB3, in order to assure Or 30 . . . R-B2 ; 31 P-KR5, Kt
QB2 for the Queen-at the very Bl ; 32 P-R6, etc. And if 30 . . .
least. K-B l ; 31 Q-K4, with the threat
of 32 P-KR5, etc. The text-Tllove
15 B-Kt3 P-K4 loses even quicker.

Releasing the Queen's Bishop, 31 P-R5 Kt-B1


It is true, but at the same time 32 P-R6 Kt-Kt3
Jlelding the square Q4. However, 33 Q-K61
Black's game is unfavorable in any The point! The White Queen
event. enters the game decisively.
1 6 Kt-Kt3 Q-B2 33
R-KB1
17 Q-Kt1 Q-Kt1 34 R-Q7 PxP
98 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

M aToczy then it should occur on the fourth


move. Now he must reckon with a
forced retreat of the Queen. This
was best covered by 6 B-QB4, so
that after 6 . . . Kt-QB3 ; 7 Q-K4,
and the further threat of 7 . . .
P-KB4 either at once, or after 8
PxP e.p., Ktx P ; he could retreat
the Queen to K2 w ithout shutting
in the King's Bishop.

6 Kt-Q83
7 Q-Q1

7 Q-K4 was preferable. If then


7 . . P-KB4 ; 8 PxP e.p., KtxP;
R u b i nstein 9 Q-B2.

35 8-R4 ! ! 7 K Kt-K2!

Now KB6 cannot be protected. Threatening on the one hand 8


If Black plays 35 KtxB ; 36 . . . KtxKP ! and Q-R4ch etc. and
Q-K7 ! is deadly. on the other hand 8 . . . Kt-Kt3
etc. White is already in difficul
Resi g n s ties, for his concern over the
Pawn at K5 hampers his sound
development.

8 8-Q2 Kt-Kt3
9 Q-K2
Game N o. 50
A sorry move !
S I C I L I AN D E FE N S E
9 . . Q-82
1 0 8-83 P-QKt3
Hague, 1921
1 1 P-KR4
Dr. Euwe Rubi nstein
There is nothing else. If 11
1 P-K4 P-Q84 P-KKt3, B-Kt2 ; 1 2 B-Kt2, then
2 Kt-K83 Kt-K83 QKtxP was Jn order.

An old variation which has been 11 . P-Q3 !


revived. 1 2 PxP 8xP
13 Q Kt-Q2
3 P-K5 Kt-Q4
4 P-Q4 13 BxKtP would be bad : R
KKtl ; 14 B-B3, Kt-B5 ! ; etc. White
Holding no terrors for Black. has gotten rid of his problem
But 4 Kt-B3 ! , and if 4 . . . KtxKt, child ( PK5 ) , but has further weak
then 5 QPxKt! gives White the ened his position by P-KR4.
initiative and an effective co
ordination of his pieces. 13 . Kt-85
1 4 Q-K3
4 . . PxP
5 QxP P-K3 Q-Ql was a little better.
6 P-Q847
14 - 8-84
After this White's game i s in 1 5 Q-K4 P-K84
ferior. If P-QB4 is to be played, 16 Q-82
THE HAGUE, 1921 99

The sixth move of the Queen 27 P-Q B5 Q-R3


which can bode no good. 28 K-K1 P-K5
29 R-R4 Q-Kt4
16 0-0 30 Q-KR3 Kt-K6 ! !
17 P-KKt3 Kt-Kt3 31 BxKt
18 P- K R 5
Forced, as B and R are both
18 B-Kt2 was preferable. How threatened.
ever, White wishes to drive the
Bishop from B4 with the gain of 31 PxB
a move. 32 B-B4ch

18 K Kt-K4 Or 32 KtKt3, RxBch ; 33 KxR,


1 9 KtxKt KtxKt B-R3ch and mate follows. The
20 P-Q Kt4 same occurs after 32 KtxP.
This is the point ! Now if the 32 K-R1
Bishop retires White relieves the 33 Kt-81 Q-83 1
pressure somewhat by 2 1 B-KKt2. Resigns

Rubi nstein

Game No. 51

KI NG'S G A M B I T D E C L I N E D

Hague, 1921
Rubi nstein M a rco

1 P-K4 P-K4
2 P-KB4 B-84
3 Kt-KB3 P-Q3
4 B-84 Kt-KB3
5 Kt-83 0-0
Euwe
5 . . . Kt-B3 ; 6 P-Q3, B-K3! is
better. Black is setting up a spe
20 BxKBPc h ! I cial formation which is too passive.
This sacrifice would have fol 6 P-Q3 Q Kt-Q2
lowed 20 B-KKt2 also. Black gets
two united passed Pawns and the A kind of Hanham Defense of
attack, as compensation for the the King's Gambit, as it were.
piece. In view of the poorly de
7 P-85
veloped position of White this Is
decisive. This move is usually very strong
when Black has castled early.
21 KxB Kt-Kt5ch
22 K-K2 7 . . . . P-83
8 P-Q R3 P-QKt4
Forced.
8 . . P-Q4 could have been
.

22 QxKtP played, for 9 PxP was refuted by 9


23 B-Q4 B-Kt2 . . . Kt-Kt3 ! But White might an
24 R-R3 Q-Q3 swer simply 9 B-R2 and the ad
25 Q-83 P-K4 vanced Pawn at Q4 would be hard
26 B-Kt1 P-85 to maintain.
100 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

9 8-R2 P-QR4 19 PxKt Kt-Kt3


1 0 Q-K2 Q-Kt3 20 P-Q6 QxP
11 Kt-Kt5 21 P-Kt6 !

Here the Knight Is a constant It 2 1 Q-rui, then might follow


threat. Nor can it be driven away QxKtch ; 22 QxQ, RxQch ; 23 KxR,
as P-KR3 would be met by P-KR4. Kt-Q4 ; 24 R-BI, B-Bl ; and In spite
of the loss of the exchange, Black
11 P-R5 has a fair game. By the sacrlfl.ce
of the Pawn, White drives the op
Loss of time. 1 1 BKt2 and
posing King into the open.
.

P-Q4 would have been better.


21 PxP
12 Kt-Q1 P-Q4

22 8xRch Kx8
13 P-83 8-R3
23 PxPch KxP
14 Q-83 PxP 7
Obviously forced, for it 23 .
Black should not open the dia
K-Ktl ?, Q-rui etc. follows.
gonal of the opposing Bishop. 14
. . . QR-Ql was playable, for 15 24 8-K3! 8x8
PxP, PxP ; 16 BxP, KtxB ; 17 QxKt, 25 Ktx 8 ! Q-Q7ch
was refuted by B-Kt2 etc. Obvi 26 K-81 P-Kt5ch
ously White would have continued 27 K-Kt1
15 P-KKt4 but then 15 . . . B-Kt2
followed by . . . B-Q3 ; . . . PxP and Now mate in two is threatened.
P-B4 was playable. ( 28 Q-B5ch and Kt-Kt4ch) And 28
R-Q1 also!
1 5 PxP QR-Q1
1 6 P-K Kt4 Q-82 27 8-K7

Now the result of the premature The only defense.


exchange on K4 Is clear : Black
28 Q-85ch K-R3
has no defense against the threat
29 Q-R3ch K-Kt3
of 17 KtxKBP and 18 P-Kt5.
30 Q-85ch
M a rco To gain time.

30 K-R3
31 QxP !

Threatening Kt-B5ch, etc.

31 R-Q2
32 P-R4

The chief threat Is R-KR2.

32 . . . QxKtP
33 QR-K1

Threatening 34 RxB, as well as


34 R-R2 and 34 Kt-B5ch.
R u b i nste i n
33
8-Q6
34 Kt-Kt4ch K-Kt3
1 7 Ktx K 8 P ! R x Kt
1 8 P-Kt5 ! Kt-Q4 If . . . K-R2 ; 35 Q-R5ch, K-Ktl ;
36 R-K8 mate.
Other moves would be still worse.
Loss of material Is unavoidable. 35 Q-Kt5ch
THE HAGUE, 1921 101

If 3 5 . . . K-B2 mate follows 1 1 K R-81 Q-Q84


in a few moves by 36 R-KR2 o r
Here B-K2 was also to be con
36 Kt-K5ch.
sidered.
Resigns
1 2 KtxKt KtPxKt
A very characteristic game of
Rubinstein. The King's side at 12 . . . QPxKt would have been
tack beginning with move 17 re simpler, as Black could then have
qcired very cool calculation, as played P-K4 and B-K3. Obviously
the White King was also in a pre Maroczy feared that White in such
carious position for a time. a case would control the Queen's
file. That, however, would hardly
have occurred.

13 P-QR3 8xKt
14 Rx8 P-Q R4
Game No. 52 1 5 P-Kt3

N I MZOWITSCH D E F E N S E . . P-R5 must be stopped.


R u b i nste i n M aroczy 15 P-K84
1 P-Q4 Kt-K83
It was more advisable to play
2 Kt-K83 P-K3
P-Q3, and perhaps even better, to
3 P-84 8-Kt5ch
first make the preparatory move
4 Kt-83 16 . . . R-R2. Black must give
At this time the Indian defenses thought chieflly to placing his
were still quite new, and it was Pawns on Black squares, for only
not clear whether the doubled in this way can the Bishop be
Pawns arising from 4 . . . BxKtch brought into full play.
was a permanent disadvantage or
1 6 P-K4 R-Kt1
not. Rubinstein as a noted ad
vocate of the "two Bishops" in . . R-R2 was better.
clined at first to the view that
White, because of the two Bishops, 1 7 P-Q R4
had the better game. More re
cently the general opinion is that Freeing both Rooks. Otherwise
White's game is inferior due to the constant menace . . . P-R5 bad
the doubled Pawns. to be guarded against.
4 . P-84 17 PxP
1 8 8xP R-82
Simplest and best was 4 .
1 9 R-K1 B-Kt2
BxKtch ; 5 PxB, P-Q3 ; followed by
QKt-Q2, and P-K4. 20 K-Kt2 Q R-K 81
21 P-83 P-Kt3
5 P-KKt3 Kt-K5
6 8-Q2 Ktx8 . . . P-Q3 was In order: the text
7 QxKt Q-R4 move should not have been made
8 8-Kt2 0-0 until actually forced.
9 0-0 PxP
10 KtxP Kt-83 22 R-Q1 8-R1

Now BxKt would be very ques Suddenly Black finds himself


tionable. If 11 PxB, 12 Kt-Kt5 without effective moves. The
is a threat : and if 11 . . . P-QR3, Queen bas long been stranded on
then 12 Kt-Kt3 and 13 P-QB5 ! with B4, because of the terrible block
advan tage to White. ading move P-QB5.
102 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

M aroczy order to be able to answer 26


P-KB4 by P-K4.
26 P-84 Q-Kt5

If 26 . . . P-K4 ? ; 27 P-KB5 !
would follow (KtPxP? 26 Q-Kt5
ch). However, R (B2) -Q2 was to
be preferred to the text. In any
event White has the superior game.
27 R-K3 1 Q-Kt3

The ending after QxQch would


have offered better chances.
28 8-83 P-841

R u b i nstein Losing at once. R-K2 was pre-


ferable.
23 P-R4 8-Kt2
29 8x8 Qx8ch
24 R (Q 1 ) -Q81
30 K-R2 Q-K2
In order to play R-Q3 without 31 R (at Q)-K1 R-83
giving Black the opportunity to 32 Qx R P R (at Q ) - K 81
answer P-Q4 ! 33 Q.Q2 P-R3
34 R (at K)-K2 K-R2
24 - - - - P-Q3 35 Q-Q5 1 Resigns
At last! But it is now very late. White Is only a Pawn up, but
25 R-Q1 R-Q1
has clearly a winning position. If
35 . . . R-Kl ; 36 P-KR5 can follow
R-Q2 was a trifle superior In very effectively.
Chapter IX
International Tournaments at Teplitz-Schonau and Vienna.
1922. Six-Master Toumey at Hastings. 1922

Game N o. 53 manner. For example, here he


translates the weakness of Black's
Q U E E N'S G A M B I T D EC L I N E D isolated Pawn into another form.
Teplitz-Schonau, 1922 14 PxKt
R u b i nstein Dr. Tarraseh 1 5 Kt-Q4 Q.Q4

1 P-Q4 P-Q4 This Is not good, but Black was


2 P-QB4 P-K3 in terrible straits : e.g. : 15 . .

3 Kt-QB3 P-QB4 B-Q4 ? ; 1 6 Kt-B5 ! or 15 . . . Kt-B5;


4 PxQP K PxP 16 KtxB, KtxB ; 17 QxQ wins.
5 Kt-83 Kt.QB3 Or In this variation 16 . . . QxQ;
6 P-K Kt3 K.t-83 17 QRxQ, KtxB ; 1 8 R-Q7 with a
7 B-Kt2 B-K2 superior endgame. Or again 16
8 o.o o.o . . . PxKt ; 17 B Q4 retains the -

9 P-Q R3 advantage of the Bishops.

At that time, the variation in 16 Q-82 P-84


troduced by Reti, 9 PxP, BxP; 1 0
Kt-QR4 was considered the strong Dr. Tarraseh
est line. Since then, however, it
has been shown that Black could
obtain forceful counter-play. Shall
we conclude that Rubinstein, the
greatest exponent of the system.
initiated by 6 P-KKt3, avoided the
gambit variation with the correct
judgment, because he at that time
clearly understood, what others
were only to discern years later.
9 . B-K3
1 0 Px P BxP

Now that White is ready with


P-QKt4, the gambit move 1 0
R u b i nste i n
.

P-Q5 etc. is unsatisfactory.


1 1 P-QKt4 B-K2 1 7 Q-83!
1 2 B-Kt2 Kt-KS
Decisive.
This turns out badly. 12 .
RQB1 was preferable, but in any 17 . . . Kt-85
event White gets the better game. There is nothing else. The at
1 3 P-Kt5 ! Kt-R4 tempt 17 . . . B-B 3 ? would Jose
14 Ktx Kt! the Queen after 18 QxKt, BxKt;
1 9 QR-Q1, B-Kt3 ; 20 Q-B3 !
This is to be observed in many
of Rubinstein's games : he never 1 8 Ktx P ! B-83
clings to an advantage in a routine 1 9 QxB

103
104 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

White might have ended the 43 K-84 Kt-Kt3


game more speedily by 19 Kt-K7ch, 44 P-KR4 R-K82
K-Rl ; 20 KtxQ, BxQ ; 21 KtxB, 45 K-Kt5
KtxB ; 22 BxP, winning another
Threatening 46 P-B6ch !
Pawn.
45 P-R3ch
19 PxQ
.

46 K-84 K-81
.

20 Kt-K7ch K-82
47 P-R4 R-Q82
21 KtxQ 8xKt
48 P-Q R5 Kt-85
22 K R-Q1 K-K3
49 P-86! R-Q2
23 8-Q83 K R.Q1
50 R-86! KtxP
24 R-Q4 P-84
51 R-88ch K-82
25 P-Kt4! Kt-Q3
52 K-K5 Kt-Kt2
26 Q R-Q1 KtxP
53 8-85 Res i g n s
Here the Book of the Tourney
notes the following sparkling vari Rubinstein was awarded the 7th
ation : 26 . . . B-Kt6 ; 27 PxPch, Brilliancy Prize for this game.
KxP ; 28 RxKt ! , BxR; 29 B-R3ch,
K-B5 (or K-Kt4 ; 30 B-Q2ch etc. ) ;
30 P-K3ch, K-B6 ; ( K-Kt4 ; 31 B
B6ch ; etc.) ; 31 R-B6ch, K-K7 ; 32 Game No. 54
B-B1 mate.
N I MZOW ITSCH D E F E N S E
27 PxPch K-82
28 Rx8 RxR Teplitz-Schonau, 1922
29 RxR Ktx8 Rubi nstein Teichmann
30 R-85
1 P-Q4 Kt-K83
Better than 30 R-Q7ch, K-B3 ; 2 P-Q84 P-K3
31 RxP, KxP. Or 30 R-Q2, RKl. 3 Kt-Q83 8-Kt5
30 . KtxPch 4 Q-Kt3
31 K-81 Kt-85 We still do not know which Is
32 8xP R-Q1 the best move in this position. The
33 R-87ch K-83
text still has many adherents : 4
34 K-K1 R-K 1
Q-B2 is played frequently and was
35 P-83 Kt-Q4
long preferred by Rubinstein. 4
36 RxKtP Kt-86 P-QR3, which seems contrary to
37 R-Kt4! Kt-Q4
all theory, has proven effective in
38 R-R4 R-K2
practice : and 4 P-K3, also b rought
39 K-82 Kt-Kt3
to the front by Rubinstein, has
40 R-R5 R-Q82
been played.
41 K-Kt3
4 . . . . P-84
White has snared another Pawn,
and has made his advantage se Nlmzowitch and Dr. Alekhlne
cure by careful play. Now the have at times tried 4 . . . Q-K2 and
King gets into the game and the 4 . . . Kt-B3.
win is quite easy.
5 PxP 8xP
41 Kt-Q2
5 . : . Kt-QB3 Is now recognized
42 R-R6ch K-Kt2
as best.
Tbe King must go back. If 42
6 Kt-83 0-0
K-Kt4 ? ? ; then 43 P-B4ch,
7 P-K3
. .

K-R4 ; 44 B-B3 mate. Or 42 . . .


K-K4 ; 43 R-K6ch, K-Q5 ; 44 R-K7, In later games 7 B-Kt5 has
and if 42 Kt-Kt3 ; 43 P-QR4 !
. proved more satisfactory.
TEPLITZ-SCHONAU, 1922 106

7 P.Q4 25 Kt-Kt5
This leads to an uncomfortable 25 . . . Kt-Q2 would have brought
position. It is better to develop about wholesale exchanges : but
the Queen's Bishop at Kt2. the chief weakness of his game,
the uselessness of his Bishop,
8 PxP PxP
would have been even more clearly
9 B-K21
apparent. e.g., 26 KtxKt, QxKt ; 27
9 B-Q3 would block the im R-B7, RxR; 28 QxR! ( 28 RxR, R
portant Queen's file. QB 1 ! ) ; R-QB1 ( QxQ ; 29 RxQ, R
QB 1 ? ? ; 30 KtxB ! ) ; 29 QxRch,
9 . . . . KU
QxQ ; 30 RxQch, BxR ; 31 KB1,
Apart from the Queen's Pawn, K-B 1 ; 32 K-K2, K-K2 ; 33 K-Q3,
which needs protection, Black also K-Q3 ; 34 P-QKt4 ! and P-KB4.
has difficulties in development. The Thereafter, would follow a liberat
text aims to make possible B-K3. ing move of the Knight, to be
followed by K-Q4, and with the
10 o.o a.Ks
Knight free to attack, White's
11 R-Q1 Q.K2
superiority wi11 gradually be
12 Q-R4 Kt.83
brought to account.
13 P-QKt3 K R-Q1
14 8.RS Q-K1 26 Q-84

14 , , . B-QB4 ; 15 BxB, QxB ; The continuation 26 Kt-B5 is too


1 6 QR-B1, would also be favorable uncertain. White needs a freeing
for White. move for his King, before ventur
ing on any combination.
15 Q-R4 8-82
16 Q R-81 P-Q R3 26 . . . Kt-83
17 8-Q3 P-R3 27 P-K R3 ! R-82
18 Kt-R4!
Losing a Pawn. But Black has
M obilization is complete ; White no satisfactory continuation.
now moves to attack, and in a few
moves obtains an overwhelming
position. Teichma n n

18 . B-Q3
19 8xB RxB
20 Kt-B5 Q-K2
21 Kt-Q4 Kt-K4
22 Q-B4
There would be no point in re
taining the Bishop. White is much
more concerned in the retention of
Black's Bishop, as it is the weakest
of the six minor pieces now on
the board, in view of its passive
role.

22 . . . . KtxB R u b i nste i n
23 R x Kt R-Q81
24 R-( Q3)-B3 R (Q3)-Q1 28 QxR QxQ
25 Q-K5 29 Ktx8 QxR
25 P-KR3 would have lead im Forced : otherwise White gets
mediately to the position White two Rooks and a Knight for the
attains two moves later. Queen.
106 RUBINSTEIN'S CHS MASTERPIECES

30 RxQ PxKt 57 KxP Is more exact: as It Is,


31 KtxP White first captures the Knight's
Pawn.
After the foregoing exchanges,
White hasa won ending. 57 - Kt-Kt5ch
58 K-83 K-Kt3
31 R-Q2

59 KtxP K-Kt4
32 P-83 K-82
60 K-Q4 Kt-87ch
33 Kt.Q4 P-KKt3
61 KxP KtxPch
34 K-82 K-K2
KtxP
62 K-85
35 R-88 Kt-K1
63 Kt-84 Resigns
36 K-K2 K-82
37 K-Q3 Kt.Q3
38 R-85 Kt-K1
39 P-QR4 K-K2
40 P-R4 P-KR4
41 Kt-K2 Kt-82
42 Kt-84 K-Q3 Game No. 55
43 R-81 R-K Kt2
44 P-K Kt4 PxP FOU R K N I G H TS G A M E
45 PxP P-R4
TepUtz-Schonau, 1922
If 45 . . . P-KKt4 ; 46 PxP, and
46 . . . RxP Is not playable be H. Wolf Rubi nstein
cause of 47 RxKt! etc. 1 P-K4 P-K4
46 R-K R 1 2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q 83
3 Kt-83 Kt-83
The threat i s 4 7 P-R5. 4 B-Kt5 8-Kt5
46 . P-K Kt4
Since it was found that after 4

47 Px P RxP
. . Kt-Q5, White could bring
K-K4
.

48 R-R6ct; about a drawlsh position by 5


Against any other King move, KtxKt, PxKt; 6 P-K5, Rubinstein
49 R-R7 ! followed by RxKt and seldom essayed his own particular
Kt-K6ch will win. defense of 4 . . . Kt-Q5. For In
spite of his apparently quiet style,
49 Kt-Kt6ch he Is usually a fighter.
Driving the King back and foro 5 0-0 0-0
lng the exchange of Rook and 6 P-Q3 P-Q3
Knight, after which the winning 7 B-Kt5 8xKt
procedure becomes obvious. 8 Px8 Q-K2
9 R-K1
49 . . . . K-83
50 Kt-88ch K-82 Here White can also simplify
the game by 9 BxKt (at Q B6 ) , but
50 . . . K-K4 Is refuted by 51 Wolf Is playing for a win.
Kt-Q7 ate and 50 . . . K-Ktz;
51 R-R7ch, leads to a Rook ending 9 Kt-Q1
that is hopeless for Black. 10 P-Q4 8-Kt5
Recently this move has been
51 R-R7ch R-Kt2
adopted again by Capablanca. For
52 R x R ch KxR
10 . Kt-K3 etc., compare the
53 Kt-Q7 Kt-R3
.

game against Duras at Karlsbad,


54 K-Q4 Kt-Kt5
1907 (No. 2 ) .
55 Kt-85 P-Kt3
56 Kt-Q7 Kt-87ch 1 1 P-K R 3 B-R4
57 K-Q3 1 2 P-Kt4 B-Ktl
TEPLITZ.SCHONAU, 1922 107

13 Kt-R4! That would have given him a play


able game, as most of his Pawns
As to 13 P-Q5, compare the game
rest on the White squares and the
against Dr. Tarrasch at Mahrlsch
Black-squared Bishop would have
Ostrau, 1923 (No. 65). Integrated the position nicely.
13 P-K R3 ! 18 Q R-K1

1 4 Ktx 8 7
The threat was 1 9 BxKt, RxB ;
White gets the worst o f i t now. 20 PxP, and Q-B5ch, followed by
The better continuation 14 BxKt, QxKP.
QxB ; 15 Kt-B5, etc. or 14 B-QB4
(Drewitt-Rublnstein, H a s t I n g s , 19 Q-K3 P-QKt3
1922) ; . . . B-R2 ! (not 14

Kt-K3 ? as Rubinstein played, be Not 19 . . . PxP ? ; 20 PxP, Ktx


cause of 15 KtxB, PxKt ; 16 P KP??, because of 21 QxKt, QxQ ; 22
KB4 ! ! with advantage) , is not in RxQ, RxR ; 23 B-Q3, followed by
my opinion satisfactory, as there 24 P-KB3 and White wins a piece.
Is no adequate defense against the 20 8-Kt57
entrance of the Black Knight at
B5. However, White's moves up Missing the lost opportunity of
to this point are quite correct, playing 20 BxKt! Now the White
and logically there must be a good game collapses quickly.
continuation. This no doubt is 1 4
Kt-B5 ! ! Black must remove the 20 . . . . R-Q1
Knight as after 14 QK3 ? ? and
. .

15 P-Q5 the Queen is lost. After R u b i nste i n


14 . . BxKt; 15 BxKt, QxB ; 1 6

KPxB (or even KtPxB-which,


however, is open to question, owing
to 16 . . . P-KKt3) ; Kt-K3 is pre
vented. Then In view of his free
development as well as his effec
tive Bishops, White has a good
game.

14 . PxKt
1 5 8-84ch K-R2
1 6 8-R4

The Bishop could retreat to Q2.


Black could not win a Pawn, e.g.
1 6 . . . PxP ; 17 PxP (the Pawn Wolf
sacrifice by 17 P-B4 is also very
promising \ , 17 . . . KtxKP ? ; 1 8 21 P-QR4 Kt-R1
B-Q5, Q-R5 ; 19 BxKt, RxP (QxPch 22 P-R5
is even weaker) ; 20 R-K3, threat
ening B-K1, and the attack is re The opening of the lines on the
pulsed with advantage. Queen's side later proves disas
trous to White. It is true that other
16 P-K Kt4 continuations were equally unsat
1 7 8-Kt3 Kt-82 isfactory.
1 8 Q-83
22 . . . Kt-Kt3
White should not retain his 23 P-83 Kt-85
Bishops, but should proceed : 18
BxKt, and 19 P-KB3, and R-KBI. Now this Knight can only be
108 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

removed by the "good" Bishop, 38 . . . Q-Q1, followed by RQKtl.


and the White game will grow sick
with the incurable weakness ()f 37 Q-Q1
the Black squares. 38 R-QKt1 R-Kt1
39 R-Kt4 P-R3
24 B-81 K-R1 40 K-K2 R-Kt3
25 8xKt 41 Q-R1 K-Kt3
42 K-Q2 K-Kt4
Now we have it! White wants
43 R-Kt1
to plug B4 at the very least. Black
sets about a regrouping of his Resistance on the Knight tile
pieces, Kt-R2, R-B2, Kt-B1 etc., and cannot be maintained. Black threat
if BxKt had been delayed, White ens QQKtl-R2, and PR4. If White
would have recaptured with a seeks to prevent the last by Q
piece. R5, . . . Kt-Kt2 follows.

25 KtPx8 43 , Q.QKt1
44 R-R1
,

26 Q-82 P-K Kt4


27 P-Q5
If 44 K-B1, then RxRch ; 45 QxR,
The blockade merely furthers QxQch; 46 KxQ, Kt-R5 ; 47 P-B4,
Black's plans on the King's side. Kt-B6ch; 48 KBl, KtK7ch ; 49 K
27 B-Kt5, 27 B-B4, or even 27 P Q2, Kt-Kt8 ; 50 B-Kt2, P-R6 ; 61
KR4 would have been better. B-R1, P-R4 ! and White must resign.

27 P-R4 44 P-R4
28 8-Kt2 K-Kt2
A pretty Pawn sacrifice which
29 Q-K2 R-K R 1
cannot be accepted because of 45
30 K-82
. . . R-Kt7 ; 46 QR3, Kt-Kt6ch ; 47
3 0 QQR6 would have threatened KQ3, Q-Kt4ch ; 48 P-B4, Q-Kt3!
nothing Inasmuch as 31 QxRP etc.
would have been answered by R
QR1, 32 Q-Kt7, KR-QKtl ; 33 Q-B6, 45 8-Kt2 P-R5
PxRP, with advantage to Black. 46 Q-K1 Q-K R 1
47 Q-Q81 R-R3
30 R-Q R 1 ! 48 8-81 R-R1
Preparing an attack on the other 49 8-84 P-Q R6
wing also. 50 B-R2
Now White has blockaded both
31 K R-QKt1 Kt-Q2
passed Pawns. But Rubinstein
32 Q-Kt5 R Px P
works out the decisive plan, and
33 K R Px P Kt-84
now makes a few routine moves In
34 R-R1 R-R 5 !
order to gain time.
35 RxR PxR
The threat is P-R6 ! 50 Q-R2
51 R-R3 Kt-Q2
36 8-R3 Px P ! 52 Q-K81 Q.R1
53 R-R 1 Kt-84
Black Is practically a Pawn 54 Q-81 R-QKt1 1 1
ahead. Besides he threatens to
enter the White position by the The plan Is now ready : with
Queen's Knight file. two merry Pawn sacrifices, Black
obtains a decisive attack.
37 QxP
55 QxP
Or 37 RxP, P-R3 ; and If the
Queen retires on the Knight tlle, Otherwise R-Kt7 ensues.
HASTINGS, 1922 109

Rubinstein 5 KtxP Kt-K83


6 8-Kt2 Kt-83
7 0-0 8-84
8 P-K3 0-0
9 Kt-Q83 P-Q R3
10 P-Q R3 Q-82
11 P-QKt4 8-K2
12 8-Kt2 Kt-K4
Apparently very strong, but it
has a serious flaw. 1 2 P-Q3 . .

was better.
1 3 P-85 Kt-85

Dr. Tarrasch
Wolf

55 R-Q R 1
56 Q.Kt2 P-R 6 !
57 8-84 Q-R5
58 8-K2 Q-87! I
59 RxP Q-K6ch
60 K-K1 Kt-R5
Forcing mate in a few moves.
Resigns
For this game Rubinstein re
ceived the 6th Brilliancy Prize.

R u b i nstein

1 4 Ktx 8 P l !
Splendid ! The point of this
Game No. 56 move does not lie In the prosaic
continuation 14 . . . PxKt ? ; 15
DUTC H D E F E N S E
QKt3 ! but i n the strong attack
Hastings, The Six-Master which White gets In the actual
game-at the cost of a Pawn.
Tourney, 1922
14 . . 8xP
R u binstein Dr. Tarrasch 15 Px8 Qx8P
1 P-Q4 P-KS Now Black recovers the piece,
French-Indian, leading usually but . . .
either to the Dutch or to the 1 6 Kt-R6ch PxKt
French.
. . . at the price of a disorgan
2 P-QB4 P-K84
Ized King position.
3 P-KKt3 P-84
Producing weaknesses in the 17 8-81 Q-K47
center, particularly on the Queen's Black neglects his development.
file. Kt-KB3 and B-Kt5ch would 17 . . . P-Q3 was natural and
be more normal. necessary.
4 Kt-K83 PxP 18 Q-Q3 ! Q-QB4
110 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

If the Knight moves, 19 B-Kt2 33 B-R6ch


follows, and if 18 . . . P-Q4, 19 Winning a Rook : 33 . . . Kt-Kt2 ;
P-K4 Is quite devastating. 34 BxKtch, RxB ; 35 QxQPch and
1 9 P-Q R4 1 P-Q3 QxR.
20 P-K4 R esig n s
Now that P-QKt4 is no longer
possible, this move Is in order.
20 K-Kt2
21 Kt-Q1 !
Simple and strong! Next the Game N o. 57
Knight at QB5 must be dislodged.
R UY LOPEZ
21 8-Q2
22 Kt-K3 P-Kt4 Hastings, The Six-Master
23 Ktx K t ! Px Kt
Tourney, 1922
24 Q-Q2 Kt-K1
Yates Rubi nstein
'l'he primary threat was 25 B
QR3. 1 P-K4 P-K4
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83
25 P-K5 ! 3 B-Kt5 P-QR3
4 8-R4 Kt-83
Disorganizing the hostile center
also, as 25 . . . P-Q4? falls be 5 0-0 B-K2
6 R-K1 P-Q Kt4
cause of 26 QxRPch, and B-QR3.
7 B-Kt3 P-Q3
Obviously Black is beyond all help.
It Is to be observed that White 8 P-83 0-0
has conducted the whole game This continuation instead of
without the active cooperation of Tschigorin's variation Kt-R4 and
his Rooks, which almost seem to P-B4 has frequently been played
play a decisive role by their sim by Rubinstein with success.
ple presence! But above all Ru
binstein is very much present! 9 P-Q4

25 . . . . Q R-Kt1
9 P-KR3 is more prudent, where
26 QxPch K-Kt1 upon Black has nothing better than
27 Q-Kt5ch K-82
Kt-R4 and P-B4 etc.
9 . . B-Kt5 !
If 27 . . . K-R1 ; 28 Q-K7, is

decisive! And not first 9 . . . PxP, because


R-Kt1 after 10 PxP, B-KKt5 ; White does
28 8-83 !
not have to fear the disruption of
Or 28 . . . Kt-Kt2 ; 29 BQR3, his King's side, and can simply
etc ! continue 11 Kt-QB3.
29 Q-R5c h ! K-Kt2 10 P-Q5
30 8-K41 QxKP
Not a good move, but other
Or 30 . . . R-KR1 ; 31 B-R6ch, moves also, like 10 B-K3 or 10
K-Ktl ; 32 Q-Kt5ch, K-B 2 ; 33 Q QQ3 (Leonhardt) were not entirely
B4ch, etc. satisfactory. For 10 B-K3, compare
the game against Yates at Marien
31 QxPch K-81
bad, 1925 ( No. 7 6 ) .
If 31 . . . K-B3 ; 32 QxR, QxB ;
10 Q Kt-R4
33 B-Kt5ch, K-B 4 ; 34 QR7ch, etc.

1 1 B-82 P-83!
32 Qx8 QxB 1 2 P-KR3
HASTINGS, 1922 111

The s imple 12 PxP was better. 18 Kt-85


12 . BxKt! Pretty, but weak.
1 3 QxB PxP
18 B-Kt4
14 PxP Kt-85
.

Black has now the majority on Naturally not 18 . PxKt ? ; 19


the King's side, and also good pros QxP, Kt-B 3 ; 20 B-R6 ! , K-R1 ; 21
pects of a minority attack (P B-Kt5, and wins.
QKt5) on the Queen's side. As the 1 9 Q.Kt4 BxB
center is locked and P-Q5 is es 20 QRxB
sential for the defense, the White
Bishops have little scope. How Threatening Kt-K7ch.
ever, White's game is still play 20 . . . . Kt-Kt2
able. 21 KtxKt
1 5 Kt-Q2 R-81 If 21 Kt-R6ch ?, K-R1, followed
1 6 Kt-81 1 by . . . P-KB4, and the Knight
Whither goes the Knight? Q5 is cannot return.
occupied and B5 is not a good
21 KxKt
square in this position. With the

Pawn at K4 gone, there is danger 22 R-Kt1


that the opposition will attain a P-QKt3 was somewhat better, but
pov;erful game by P-KB4. Should the superiority of the Black posi
he force . . . P-KKt3 in such cases, tion is no longer in doubt.
he brings about no weakness in
Black's ranks, but merely makes 22 . . . . P-84
the second player's task easier. 23 Q-K2 Q-Kt4
Therefore in the actual game 24 P-Q R4 P-KS
KtxKt was in order. If in reply 25 Px P Px P
Black plays PxKt, then 17 B-R4
26 R-R1 R-82
and if . . . RxKt; 17 P-QR4.
27 K-R1
16 . . . . P-Kt3
In order to avoid the check or
1 7 Kt-Kt3 Kt-K1
the Knight at B3, e.g. 27 P-QKt3?,
Here Is the point of the previous Kt-K4 ! ; or 27 B-Kt3?, Kt-Q7 ! ; etc.
note ! P-KB4 is the threat, with
a splendid game. 27 . . . . QR-84
28 K R-Q1

R u b instein Grounded in desperation. If 28


B-Kt3, Kt-K4, follows and then
Kt-Q6.

28 . . . . KtxKtP
29 R ( Q ) -QKt1 Kt-85
30 R-R6 RxP
31 R-Q1 R-K4
32 B-Kt3 P-Q4
33 BxKt KtPx8
34 R-Q6 P-BS
35 Q-Q2 P-K&
36 Q-K2 P-86 !
37 KtPx P Q- 84
Yates Resigns
112 RUBINSTEIN' S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Game No. 58 It was absolutely necessary to ad


vance the Queen's Pawn.
R U Y LOPEZ
17 QR-K1
Hastings, The Six-Master 1 8 P-QR4?
Tourney, 1922 Kt-Kt3 and P-Q4 were still Im
Rubinste i n perative. The opening of the lines
Thomas
always favors the better developed
1 P-K4 P-K4 position. Therefore, here it favors
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83 Black.
3 8-Kt5 P-Q R3
4 8-R4 Kt-83 18 . R-K R 1
5 Q-K2 P-QKt4 1 9 PxP Px P
6 8-Kt3 8-84 20 Kt-81
7 P-83 0-0 Losing the last chance to play
8 0-0 P-Q3 Kt-Kt3 etc.
9 P-Q3 Kt-K2?
20 . . . . P-R4!
A weak move which is not ex 21 P-83 P-RS
ploited by his opponent. R-Kl was 22 8-82 8x8
correct. 23 Qx8 P-K Kt5 !
10 8-Kt5 ? The threat Is P-Kt 6 : Black's at-
It is noteworthy that White does tack gains momentum.
not punish his opponent's over 24 PxP KtxP
sight ( for Kt-K2 can be explained 25 Q-83 P-R 6 1
in no other way) . With 10 P-Q4 ! 2 6 P-K Kt3
he might have suddenly obtained
the superior position, in spite of Or 26 PxP, RxP !
a harmless opening as 10 . .
PxP would have been forced. 26 Q-Kt4
27 Kt-K3 R-R1
10 Kt-Kt3
1 1 Kt-R4 Compare our note to the 18th
move !
11 QKt-Q2 was better, and if
. PKR3, then 12 B-K3. 28 KtxKt 8xKt
29 Q-82 RxR
11 Ktxl<t
30 RxR

1 2 8xKt P-K R 3 !
The prelude to a dangerous at Rubi nste i n
tack.
13 K-R1 P-Kt4
14 8-Kt3 K-Kt2
15 Kt-Q2 Q-K2
16 8-82
Whither now? 16 KR-Kl was in
order. The Bishop was well
placed at Kt3.
16 8-Q2
1 7 KR-K1
The previous move could only
have been a preparation for Kt
Kt3 and P-Q4. Now it is essential. Thomaa
VIENNA, 1922 11 3

30 R-R1 40 R-K1 P-Q4 1 !


A painful surprise for White! All very fine !
Rubinstein has carefully prepared
the attack and now carries it to a 41 PxP
conclusion in the grand manner. For the Queen dare not relin
Naturally the Rook cannot be cap quish K3.
tured.
41 R-88
31 R-QKt1 Reaign11

31 R-QB1 was somewhat better.


Thereupon if 31 . . . P-KB4, the
proper reply would not now be
32 PxP because of QxP ! ! but 32
P-Q4 ! , and Black could still get
into trouble. Hence 31 . . . P Game N o. 59
KB3 is the correct continuation.
K I N G'S I N DIAN DEFENSE
31 P-Kt5 1
Vienna, 1922
All this is quite brilliant! Now
if 32 PxP, R-QKtl, etc. is the ob Rubi nstei n Dr. Alekhine
vious rejoinder.
1 P-Q4 Kt-K83
32 8-Kt3 P-K83 2 P-Q84 P-KKt3
33 P-84 3 Kt-K83 8-Kt2
4 Kt-83 P-Q4
A dismal move. But 33 B-Q5
would have been no better : the The Grunfeld Variation, which
answer is 33 . . . PxP ! ! scored a signal victory in the game
I 34 BxR, P-B7 ! ; 35 QxP, Q Alekhine vs. Grunfeld in the same
K6 ! ; 36 R-KB1, B-B6ch ; 37 RxB, tourney. Several years later, how
Q-K8ch ; and mate the next move. ever, Grunfeld gave up this de
I I 34 PxP, R-R6 ! and Black fense : it now ranks as very doubt
wins either the B ishop Pawn or ful.
the Queen Pawn. 5 P-K3
33 P-K84 Grunfeld considers 5 B-B4 very
Now comes the last chapter : the strong.
complete rout of the White forces. 5 0-0
34 K-Kt1 PxP 5 . . . P-QB3 leads to Schlechter's
35 R-K81 Defense. Compare the game against
35 PxP is equally hopeless. Dr. Bogoljubow ( No. 62) in the same
Tartakower gives the following tourney!
beautiful variation: 35 . . . R-KB1 ; 6 PxP KtxP
36 Q-Kl, B-B 6 ; 37 B-B2, B-Kt7 ; 38 7 8-84 KtxKt
Q-K2, R-B 6 ; 39 R-Kl, RxP ; 40 8 PxKt P-84
PxR, QxP, and mate the next move. 9 0-0 Kt-83
35 P-K6 1 0 8-R3 PxP
36 Q.87ch K-R 1 If 10 . . . Q-R4 ; 1 1 Q-Kt3.
37 Q-Q5 P-83! !
1 1 8PxP P-Q R3
Winning time for P-K7. 12 R-Q81 P-QKt4
38 Qx8P R-Q81 A neat combination. At the cost
39 Q-K4 P-K7 of a. Pawn Alekhine relieves the
114 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

threatening pressure on the posi his threatened Rook ? Because


tion. As compensation he gets the White would not capture the Queen,
two Bishops and an unhindered de but would offer a winning sacri
velopment. fice ! To demonstrate :
I 18 . . . R-QKt2 ; 19 P-K4, BxR;
13 8xPc h Rx8 20 QPxB, B-B5 ; 21 KtxB, PxKt; 22
14 RxKt 8-Kt2 QxP.
1 5 R-85 II 18 . . . R-KKt2 ; 19 P-K4, BxR;
( B-Kt2 ; 20 Q-Kt3, Q-K1 ; 21 R-B7 !
Threatening 16 Kt-Kt5 followed etc.) ; 20 QPxB, B-Kt2 ; 21 P-B6,
by QKt3ch, etc. and . . . R-QB1 or . . . R-QB2, then
8-Q4 22 Q-Kt3! If 21 . . . BB1, then
15 .

22 R-Ql. All these variations would


Parrying the threat. have been ruinous for Black.

1 6 Q-82! 19 KtxR KxKt


20 8x8 Q-Kt4!
But Rubinstein plays vigorously 21 P-K Kt3
also. His plan Is not simply to
carefully hold his Pawn, but more Not 2 1 P-K4 ? because of BxP ?
pertinently to obtain attacking If 21 P-B4, Q-B4, and because o f
chances. If 16 . . . BxKt ; 17 PxB, his weaknesses on the White
RxP; 18 QK4 ! and though the squares, White has no more win
material is even once more, White ning chances.
has a vastly superior position.
21 . Q-Kt5?
16 . . . . P-K3
1 7 R-Q81 8-81 It is a pity that by this error,
18 Kt-K5 the game which has been played
by both sides with great brilliance,
Alekhine comes to an unexpected end. 2 1
. . . Q-B4 ! had to b e played, where
upon 22 P-KB3? would be refuted
by BxP ! If White exchanges
Queens, the ending apparently must
be drawn. Or if 22 Q-K2 (since
Q-B6 is the threat, then 22 .
R-QB1, as 23 P-KB3 ? Is met by
BxP !

22 P-K 83 ! 8x8 P ?

Losing outright. 22 . . . QKt4


might have been played, where
upon doughty resistance was pos
sible. However, with 23 R-K1 and
R u b i nstei n P-K4 White must win.

23 R-81 P-K4
18 . . 8x R !

24 P-K4! K-Kt2
After 1 8 . . . R-QKt2, or R-KKt2 ;
19 R-B8, BxB ; 20 R:x:Qch, RxR; 21 There Is no saving the Bishop.
R-Ktl , B-Q3 ; followed by R-QB2, 25 Q-K82 BxP
and Black has a very strong game,
though he is behind in material. 26 B-B8ch and mates In two
Why did not Black first remove moves.
VIENNA, 1922 116

Game No. 60 10 . PxKt


11 BxPc h KxB
B L U M E N F E L D CO U N T E R 12 Q-Kt3c h P-BS
GAMBIT 13 Kt-K5c h ! K-Kt1
14 QxB Kt-B3
Vienna, 1922 15 KtxKt Q-K 1 c h
16 B-K3 PxP
R u b i nstein Spielmann 17 QxKtP PxKt
18 0-0
1 P-Q4 Kt-KB3
2 Kt-KB3 P-B4 The opening chapter is con
3 P-QS P-Q Kt4 cluded and has again shown that
4 P-B4 B-Kt2 Rubinstein Is anything but materi
5 P-QR4 PxBP alistic. He is now a Pawn down,
6 Kt-B3 P-K3 but his position is sound, while the
By a transposition of moves we opposing forces exhibit positional
have the Blumenfeld Gambit, a and dynamic weaknesses. As a
defense which Spielmann preferred consummate attacking player Ru
for a long time. blnstein understands how to turn
these circumstances step by step
7 P-K4 Ktx K P into advantage.
This sacrifice was tried b y Jan 18 B-Q3
owski In a similar situation, c.f. 19 Q-B3 Q-K3
the game Haida-Janowski, Marten 20 QR-81 K-B2
bad 1925. In the Vienna tourney, 21 K R-K1 !
Spielmann also essayed this
against Vukovic, and in fact with After 21 QxP, the game would
success. flatten out, and White could hardly
win, even though he would win
8 KtxKt PxP another Pawn.
9 Kt-QB3 P-Q5
21 . . . K R-K1
22 B-B4! Q-Kt3
Spielmann 23 QxPch

But now the right moment has


come.

23 K-B1
24 BxBch QxB
25 R-K3 ! !

25 KR-Ql followed by 26 QxBP


etc. would again be too cautious
and unworthy of the great attack.
Black cannot exchange on K3, as
the other Rook would control the
Bishop file. If after the exchange
of Rooks, Black plays Q-Q4, White
Rubi nstein gets a free Pawn.

10 Bx P ! 25 . . . . Q-Q4

If the threatened Knight retires, There is nothing better.


Black gets a very strong game by
10 . . . P-Q4. 26 QxP
116 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Now this gain of a Pawn Js 48 R-KR6 etc. Js also threatened.


decisive, as the White Rooks, at There is no adequate defense.
the same time, attain a mighty
Resigns
effectiveness.
A game which repays careful
26 QxQ study. A masterpiece !
27 RxQ K R-Q1
28 P-Kt3 R-Q2
29 P-Q R5 R-Kt1
30 P-R4 R-Kt4
31 P-R6 R-QR4 Game No. 6 1
32 K-Kt2 R-R7
33 P-R5 ! R U Y LOPEZ
Vienna, 1922
Rubinstein conducts the ending
with accustomed mastery. Now Reti R u b i nstein
P-KR6 is threatened, and against
1 P-K4 P-K4
this there is no satisfactory de
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83
fense.
3 8-Kt5 P-Q R3
33 R-R4 4 8-R4 Kt-83
5 0-0 8-K2
Positionally the lesser evil would 6 Q-K2 P-QKt4
have been 33 . . . P-KR3 but this 7 8-Kt3 P-Q3
move is also insufficient : e.g., 34 8 P-83 0-0
R-B8ch, K-B 2 ; 35 R-B3ch, K-K3 9 P-Q4 8-Kt5
(K-K2 ; 36 R-KKt8, K-K3 ; 37 R 10 P-Q5
K8ch, KQ3 ; 38 R-Q3ch etc.) ; 36
This is premature and hence
R-K8ch, KQ3 ; 37 R-Q3ch, K-B2 ;
against the spirit of the opening,
38 RxRch, KxR ; 39 R-KKt8 and
but was often played by Reti. Cor
wins. rect here is 10 R-Q1, whereupon
34 P-R6 Dr. Lasker's 10 . . Q-B1 should
PxP
be the best reply.
Now the Bishop Pawn is free. 10 Kt-Q R4
But the dart In the flesh would 1 1 8-82 P-QB4
not have been bearable (R6). 12 PxP e.p.

35 RxP K-Kt2 It would have been better to


36 R-Q86 R-K84 have foregone this capture.
37 R ( K3) -83 R ( 84)-82 12 . Q KtxP
38 P-84 R ( 82)-K2 13 P-Q R4
39 K-R3 R-K82
40 R ( 83)-85 K-81 This is not of value here as
41 K-R4 K-K2 Black has the better development.
42 R-QKt5
QKt-Q2, R-K1, and Kt-Bl, etc. were
K-81
in order.
43 P-85 R ( 82)-K2
44 P-Kt4 K-82 13 P-Kt5
45 K-R5 R-K8 14 Q K t-Q2 Q-82
46 K-Kt5 R ( K8)-K2 15 8-Q3 P-Q R4
47 R-Kt8 1 16 Kt-84 PxP
17 PxP
The threat Is 48 R-KR8, K-Kt2 ;
49 P-B6ch ! , KxR; 50 R-B8ch, and White now gets a weakness on
mate In two moves. In addition the QB file, and hence is com-
VIENNA, 1922 117

pelled to seek a. decision in the 27 B-84 Kt-83


attack. 28 Q-R4 Kt-K1
29 Kt-K3 Kt-Q5 !
17 Kt-Q1 !
30 R-R6
. .

Q-Q2 !
1 8 Kt-K3 8 x Kt
31 Kt-Q5 RxR
19 Qx8 QxP
32 8xR R-Q Kt1
Rubinstein has accepted the 33 8-84 K-Kt2
challenge. But now White is well
Rubinstein Is a Pawn ahead and
developed and has good attacking
can counter-attack. Hence the com
prospects, thanks to his two Bish
plete security of his King is more
ops. Be It noted in passing that
vital than the Pawn at R4, which
Ret! has not relinquished the Pawn
voluntarily, Had he sought to pro he could now capture without spe
cial danger.
tect it by say 18 B-Q2, Kt-K3 would
have followed, and 19 Kt-K3 would 34 P-K84
no longer be playable on account
This loses quickly. White had
of . . . Kt-B5.
to take defensive measures, be
20 Kt-85! Q-82! ginning with 34 Kt-QB3. However,
I f 20 . . . QxR ? ; 21 B-R6 ! , Q-B6 ! ; the game could not be long held
22 BxP, R-Kl ; 23 Q-KKt3, with a even then.
decisive attack. 34 Qx P !
21 B-R3 Kt-K3 This i s now a killer, a s there Is
This move would also have fol- no way of protecting the attacked
lowed 21 B-Kt5 or B-R6. Bishop. 35 Q-Kt3, R-Kt6 ! or 35
22 Q-Kt3 K R-Q1 Q-R3, Kt-Kt6 ! or finally 35 R-B3,
23 K R-Q81 Q-R2 Q-Q8ch ; etc.
24 R-86 B-81 35 Px K P
25 Q R-Q 81
Desperation !
The White position seems very
fine, but In spite of this, Rubin 35 QxQ8
stein soon initiates his counter 36 R-81 Q-84!
attack. The Knight at B5 is first 37 Kt-K3 R-Kt2
driven off. 38 Q-Q8 Kt-Q 83
39 QxKt QxKtch
25 Kt-R4
40 K-R1 KtxP
.

26 Q-Kt4 P-Kt3 Resi g ns

Rubinstein This Is a. study of Rubinstein as


master of defense.

Game N o. 62

K I N G'S I N DI A N D E FE N S E

VIenna., 1922
Rubi nstein 8ogoljubow
Retl 1 P-Q4 P-Q4
118 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

2 P-Q 84 P-Q83 18 Q-R5 QR-Kt1


3 P-K3 Kt-83 19 R ( 8) -85
4 Kt-Q83 P-KKt3
A most formidable occupation
The famous Schlechter Defense, of the critical squares.
a correct form of development. It
can also be transposed Into a 19 K R.Q1
King's Indian. If 19 . . . P-K3 ; 20 QB3. B
KB3 ; 21 Kt-K5 ! and the guardian
5 Kt.83 8-Kt2
of the Black squares is forced to
6 8-K2 0-0
the unfavorable exchange on K5.
7 0-0 QKt-Q27
If this Is to be played, Black 20 Kt-K5 8-K83
must first capture the Pawn. Other A pretty Idea, which does not
good moves are 7 . . . B-Kt5 or 7 work out. If 20 . . . BxKt ; 21 PxB,
. . . Kt-K5. QxP ; 22 RxB ! , RxR; 23 QxRch.
8 Px P ! KtxP
9 KtxKt PxKt 8ogoljubow
10 Q-Kt3
Now it ls apparent wherein QKt
Q2 was weak. White has cleared
the QB tile and threatens a. siege
of the Queen's wing, where Black
has special difficulty in develoir
ment.

10 Kt.. K 83
Black should try Kt-Ktl and Kt
QB3. The Knight was needed on
the Queen's wing.

1 1 8-Q2 Kt-K5
R u b i nstein
1 2 K R-Q1 Ktx8
White's development is measur 21 Kt-86 P-K3
ably improved by this exchange.
Black desires to play Q-Q3 and Not 21 . . . BxKt? because of
wishes to be secure again st a pos 22 R ( B 5 ) xB, winning the Queen.
sible B-Kt4. But one evil draws Bogoljubow expected 22 KtxR and
another in its train. believed that after 22 . . . RxKt,
he would recover the exchange
13 RxKt Q.Q3 because of the threat B-Ql.
14 R-Q81 P-QKt3
15 R ( Q2)-82 22 P-KKt3 ! !
8-Kt2
16 Q-R4! Masterful ! Since Black is com
Stopping . . . R-QB1, as the pletely tied up, White takes the
Rook's Pawn Is threatened, and opportunity to give himself a loop
necessitating the following Pawn hole of escape.
moves, which make the Black 22 R ( Q).Q 8 1
squares on the Queen's side woe 23 KtxR R x Kt
fully weak for Black. 24 8x P ! !
16 . P-Q R3 The second surprise ! If 24 . .

1 7 R-87 P-QKt4 PxB ; 25 Q-R7 wins.


VIENNA, 1922 119

24 .
. 8-Q1 26 . . . 8xQ
25 B-KS! Q-81 27 R x R
If 25 . . . BxR; 26 QxB, QxQ ; The threat is 28 BxPch.
27 RxQ, RxB ; 28 RxB, and the
Rook ending is won for White ! 27 . . . Q-Q3
The text protects KB2, since 26 28 R-Kt7 8-Kt3
BxPch would be followed by QxB, 29 R-86 Q-Kt5
with dlstinct advantage. 30 8xPeh Resigns
26 R x 8 ! I
This game was awarded the first
Now the attack is devastating. Brilliancy Prize.
Chapter X
International Tournaments at Earlsbad and Mahrisch-Ostrau,
1923: Meran and Berlin, 1 924

Game N o. 63 Dr. Tarraach

Q U E E N 'S GA M B I T DECLI N E D

Karlsbad, 1923
., ,.,
R u b i nste i n Dr. Tarraach

1
2
P-Q4
P-Q84
P-Q4
P-K3
3 Kt-Q 83 P-Q84
4
5
PxQP
Kt-83
K Px P
Kt-Q83 .@) a
6 P-K Kt3 Kt-83 a a D J II
7
8
8-Kt2
0-0
8-K2
0-0 II trB I II
9 8-Kt5 8-K3
10 PxP 8xP R u binstein
11 Kt-K1
converted Into an open game.
Then a novelty. However, It is White sacrifices a Pawn in order
not particularly significant In it to get a brisk attack.
self : the real point comes later.
16 . . QxP
11 P-Q5
This should not have been play
. . .

12 Q 8x Kt QxB
ed by Black. 16 . . R-K1 ; would
13 Kt-K4 Q-K2
.

have been better. White could


14 Ktx8 QxKt
then have captured the Bishop, but
15 Kt-Q3 Q-Kt3
it is questionable if he could have
Black, who, In this variation, opened up the game very much.
usually has to contend with diffi
1 7 Ktx8 PxKt
culties, now stands quite well : the
18 R-Kt1 Qx R P
Pawn at Q5 is apparently well pro
1 9 RxP
tected, and exerts pressure on the
opposing position. Were White to A position after Rubinstein's
remain passive he would quickly heart : his opponent has a. Pawn
get an inferior position. in sooth, but his game evinces
several weaknesses, and the Knight
is powerless against the strong
(See Diagram in Next Column) Bishop.
19 . . . Q-R3
16 Kt-84 ! ! 20 Q-Kt3 !
For 20 Kt-R4 ? would be
Another of the spirited varia refuted by 21 Q-Kt5 ! QxQ ; 22
tions, which can often be observed RxQ.
in Rubinstein's play. The close
position which is quite satisfac 20 . . . . Kt-Q1
tory to Black, is at one stroke 21 R-Q7 R-81

120
KARLSBAD, 1923 121

22 Q-Kt21 P-K4
23 R-QR1 Tarraach

23 P-KB4 was also very strong.


But the text is more logical. If
Black now answers 23 . . . QKt3 ? ;
R (R ) x P ! follows, with the threat
of mate on KKt2.
23 0 Q-K83
24 P-K31 PxP
25 PxP Kt-83
26 Q-Q2
Preventing . . R-Q1 and threat
ening 27 RKB1 ! and Q-Q5ch, etc.

26 Kt-Kt1
27 R (Q7) x R P R u binste i n
White has finally won back his
b u t without analysis : However, it
Pawn. Black has simplified the
is not apparent why White sac
game in the best possible way,
rifices the Pawn at K3, and why
--considering the Pawn position
Black does not capture. Then it
but in spite of this, he has a dif
38 . . . QxKP ; 39 Q-Q5, or 39 Q-B7,
ficult game for the opposing pieces
Black replies Q-Kt4 with the threat
work together splendidly, the Bish
of perpetual check on R4 and K7.
op particularly playing a major
Hence the offer of the Pawn was
role.
pointless, and hence we must con
27 0 QR.Q1 clude that the by no means ob
28 Q-K2 P-R3 vious 38 Q-B 4 ? must be traced to
29 8-K4 R-Q2 the mistake of an annotator. The
30 R-R8 R ( Q2)-Q1 text threatens 39 QxKP. The check
31 R-K81 ! on K3 is innocuous : the continu
ation might be 39 KKt2, R-QB1 ;
Surprising but very strong! If
40 Q-Q3.
Black exchanges twice, he gets a
bad ending, as the tie-up of his
38 Kt-Q2
pieces cannot be readily relieved,

39 Q-86! RxR
and in addition the White King
40 Qx Rch Kt-Kt1 7
gets in to the game.
31 . . Q-Q3 Here 40 . . . Q-Ktl was in order.
32 RxRch RxR After 41 QxQch, KtxQ ; 42 K-Kt4,
33 K-Kt2 Q.Kt5 etc. White gets the Pawn at K5,
34 Q-Q3 K-R1 but Black would have had drawing
35 R-R7 Q-Kt7ch chances in the resultant ending.
36 K-R3 Q-Kt3
41 Q.QS !
37 R-R8 R-Q1
Now White gets a decisive at
tack in spite of the paucity of
(See Diagram in Next Column) pieces.

41 0 Q-82
38 Q-83
The threat was 42 Q-B7. Black
The books and the newspapers had no other defense, as 41 . . .
unanimously recommend 38 Q-B4, Kt-R3 would be met by 4 2 Q-B7,
122 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Q-Q1 ; 43 Q-Kt6, winning the 4 0 Kt-KB3


Kn ight. A good Pawn sacrifice. I f 4 . . .
42 B-85 ! QKt-B3, Rubinstein, who also was
wont to handle the King's gambit
Preventing the exchange of positionally, often played 5 B-Kt5
Queens and putting his opponent with success, instead of 5 B-B4.
in Zug-Zwang. Black must move
his Knight. 5 B-84
42 . Kt-83 If 5 PxP, PxP; 6 KtxP, the con
If 42 . . . Kt-R3 ; 43 Q-K6 wins. tinuation 6 . . . Q-Q5 ; 7 Kt-Q3, Is
favorable for White. But the gam
43 Q-QB4! bit line 6 . . . 0-0 ; 7 Kt-B3, ( 7
Exemplary ! P-KKt4 followed by P-Q 3 ?, Q-Q5 ! ) , Kt-B3 ; 8 P-Q3, B
B-K4 is threatened. I f Black plays Kt5 ; 9 B-K2, R-K1 ; 10 Kt-QR4,
43 . . . P-KKt4 ; 44 Q-K6, follows. Q-Q3 ! gives the second player a
Or If 43 . . . P-KR4 ; 44 K-Kt2, strong attack.
Q-Kt2 ; 45 B-K4, Q-Kt7ch ; 46 K-R3,
5 Kt-83
and wins.

6 P-Q3 B-K Kt5


43 Q-Q3
The old continuation is question
If Q-Kt2 or Kt3 ; 44 Q-K6 ! is able. 6 . . . B-K3 ! is much better,
decisive. and thereby Black gets a good
44 Q-87 Q-Q1 game in any case.
45 Q-Kt6
7 P-KR3 BxKt
Winning the Knight. 8 QxB Kt-Q5
9 Q-Kt3
Resigns
A very good game ! Rubinstein An ancient line. The acceptance
of the offered exchange is disad
has conducted the attack with
vantageous to Black.
great force.
9 Q-K2
1 0 PxP ! PxP
1 1 K-Q1
Foregoing the exchange is of
Game No. 64 no great moment. The two Bish
ops and the strong pressure on the
K I N G'S GAM B I T D E C L I N E D Black King's wing gives the first
Mahrisch-Ostrau, 1923 player good chances.

Rubi nste i n H romadka 11 - . P-83


1 2 P-QR4!
1 P-K4 P-K4
2 P-KB4 B-84 . P-QKt4 was threatened.
Many experts, Spielmann among
12 R-K Kt1 7
them, consider this defense very
good. Formerly it was judged Too passive ! Better prospects
somewhat inferior. of relieving the pressure were af
forded by 12 . . . Kt-KR4, and If
3 Kt-KB3 P-Q3
13 Q-Kt4, then P-KKt3. Black
4 Kt-83
wants to castle quickly, but the
For 4 P-B3, compare game num precariousness of the King's wing
ber nine. becomes more urgent.
MAHRISCH-OSTRAU, 1923 123

13 R-81 P-KR3 H romadka


14 Kt-K2 0-0-0
15 KtxKt 8xKt
16 P-83 8-Kt3
17 P-R5 8-82
18 B-K3 K-Kt1
Threatening 19 . . . KtxKP.

1 9 K-82
White now has a powerful posi
tion. He has the Bishops and at
tacking possibilities on both wings.

19 . K-R1
Loss of time. . . . R-Q2 or P
QR3, also would have been better. Rubi nstei n
But lt is doubtful if the game can
now be held. 25 Q-Kt6 ! !
20 R-83 Kt-Q4 Brilliant and devastating! ! Of
course the combination was pre
Clouding the issue and merely
pared in advance by 23 P-KKt3 or
throws water onto the mill of his Black might now equalize with
opponent. In any event White KtxB.
threatens 21 Q-B2 with an attack
against the Pawns on both wings. 25 . . . . R-Q2
In that case Black could have de
There is no adequate defense.
fended himself doughtily by 21 . . .
If 25 . . . PxQ, then 26 PxPch,
P-QR3 ; 2 2 BxKRP, KtxKP ; 23
B-R2; 27 RxBch, K-Ktl ; 28 R(B7)
PxKt, PxB ; 24 RxBP, Q-Q3 (25 R
xPch, K-B 1 ; 29 B-R6, and wins.
KB6 ? RxKtP! etc.) 25 RxB, QxR ;
26 BxR, RxB. 26 8-85
21 8-Kt1 And now this move is precisely
21 PxKt would be bad because of the point of the combination. Black
21 . . . PxP ; 22 B-R2, P-K5 ; 23 is defenseless, as the Queen can
B-KB4, PxR; 24 BxB, R-QB1 and not move. It 26 . . . Q-B2 the
now if the threatened Bishop re simple rejoinder 27 QxQ wins.
tires, 25 . . . Q-K7ch, and P-B7 26 . RxR
is decisive. 27 8xQ R-87ch
21 . . Kt-85 28 Qx R !
22 Q-82 8-Kt1 But not 28 K-Kt3 ? ? because of
28 . . . BxB ; 29 QK3, KRB1 and
White has to fight for the draw.
(See Diagram in Next Column)
28 . . KtxR
23 P-K Kt3 ! ! 29 8-85!

Beginning a m ighty combination. Winning the Knight, whereas 29


BxR would merely win the ex
23 Ktx R P change.
24 R x P Q-Q3
Resigns
If 24 . . . Ktx Q ; 25 RxQ, R ( Kt)
Bl ; 2 6 R-KBl and White has a Another combinative br!Jliancy
winning ending. by the renowned positional expert.
124 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Game No. 65 With this move Black Initiates


a direct attack, which must natur
FOU R K N I GHTS GAM E ally be crowned with success
against the weakened position of
Mahrisch-Ostrau, 1923
White.
Dr. Tarrasch R u b i nstein
19 8-R3 Kt-K3
1 P-K4 P-K4 20 Kt-84 P-84
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83 21 8-Q 81 PxP
3 Kt-83 Kt-83 22 Px P Kt-R2!
4 B-Kt5 8-Kt5 23 K-Kt2 Kt ( R2) -Kt4
5 0-0 0-0 24 P-83 Q R..Q1
6 P-Q3 P-Q3 25 Kt-Kt2 P-Q41
7 8-Kt5 8xKt
8 Px8 Q-K2 Crossing his opponent's plan of
9 R-K1 Kt-Q1 B-B4 and Kt-Q3.
10 P-Q4 8-Kt5
26 PxP RxP
11 P-K R 3 ! 8-R4
27 P-Q84 R-Q5 1
12 P-Kt4 8-Kt3
28 8-K3
13 P-Q5
If 28 RxP, Q-B3 ; 29 R-Kl, Kt
This Is weaker than 13 Kt-R4.
B5ch ; 30 BxKt, RxB ; with a vic
Compare the game against H. Wolf
torious attack.
from the Teplltz-Schonau Tourney
1922.
28 . . . . R-Q3
13 . . P-831 29 Q-K2
1 4 8-Q84?
B-Q3, or B-B1 would have been R u b instei n
preferable.

14 . Q R-81

Black Is already threatening to


win a Pawn by 15 . . . PxP, etc.

1 5 PxP
There was no defense against
the threat noted.

15 . . . PxP
1 6 8-Q3 Kt-K3
17 8-Q 81
The Bishop must guard B 4 :
D r . Tarrasch
hence 1 8 B-R4 is out o f the ques
tion.
29 . . . . P-K 5 !
17 Kt-84
Completely shattering the King's

18 Kt-Q2
wing.
The Pawn can be defended In n o
other way. 1 8 B-R3 is refuted b y 30 PxP KtxP
QKtxKP ; 1 9 BxKt, KtxB ; 20 R.xKt, 31 Q-83 Kt( K5) -Kt4
BxR ; 21 BxP, Q-Q1 ; 22 BxR, QxQ 32 Q-Kt3 Q-Kt2ch
ch ; 23 RxQ, BxKt ; 24 R-Q3, P-K5. 33 K-81 R-Kt3
34 Kt-R4 8x8ch
18 P-K R4 ! 35 Px8 P-K841
MERAN, 1924 125

Threatening P-KB5. 7 BxBP P-QKt4


8 B-Q3 P-Q R3
36 BxKt PxPch
9 0-0 P-84
37 K-Kt1
10 P-QR4
Or 37 K-K2, Kt-Q5ch ; 38 K-Q2
According to most recent re
(38 K-Q1, R-Kt8ch ; etc. ) , R-Kt7c h ;
searches, White gets an advantage
39 K-B1, Kt-K7ch ; 40 RxKt, RxR,
by 10 P-K4 ! The text leads to
etc.
older forms of Queen's Gambit Ac
37 . . . KtxB cepted.
38 KtxR Kt-B6ch
39 K-82 KtxRch 10 P-Kt5
11 Kt-K4 B-Kt2
Winning decisive material in 12 Kt ( K4)-Q2 B-K2
every event : 13 Q-K2 0-0
I 40 KxKt, Q-R8ch, followed by 14 R-Q1
QxR.
II 40 K-K2, R-K1 ch ; 14 K-Q2, Here 14 P-R5 ! should have been
Kt-B6ch, and QxKt. Or 41 K-B2, played at once.
Q-B2c h ; 42 K-Ktl, Kt-B6ch, and
14 P-Q R4 !
PxKt.
. .

1 5 Kt-84 Q-82
Resigns 1 6 B-Q2

After such games we can only 16 P-QKt3 followed by B-Kt2


conje cture how Rubinstein might was correct. The weakness at B3
fare against Morphy's opponents. could have been overcome, and
the Pawn at R4 must be pro
tected by P-QKt3 sooner or later.

16 . . . . K R-Q1
17 QR-81 Q-83
Game No. 66 18 P-QKt3 Q-Q4
19 B-K1
Q U E E N'S G A M B I T D EC L I N E D
White no longer has a good game.
Meran, 1924
19 Q-B1 in order to be able to
G ru nfeld Rubi nste i n answer PxP by 20 KtxP might per
haps have been better.
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 P-QB4 P-K3 19 PxPI
3 Kt-QB3 P-QB3 20 PxP K R-QB1
4 Kt-83 Kt-83
Now that the situation on the
4 . . . PxP followed by P-QKt4
Queen's file has been cleared up,
gives Black s harp counter-play, as
_ Black needs a Rook on the Queen's
was shown m the match Spiel
Bishop file. Since the Queen's
mann-Eliskases.
Rook has its function, the King's
5 P-K3 Q Kt-Q2 Rook is needed to prevent White
6 B-Q3 PxP ! from penetrating by R-B7. But
it should not thereby be concluded
This is the game that intro
that at move 16 KR-QB1 should
duced the Meran Defense, a crea
have been played.
tion of Rubinstein. It is indeed
treated principally as a variation 21 B-Q2 Kt-K5
leading to the Queen's Gambit Ac 22 R-K1 Kt-Q3
cepted, but the continuation is of
great significance. The strongly posted Knight at
126 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

B4 must be liquidated before Black I f 29 PxQ there follows naturally


can advance. BxPch, etc. A neat turn !

23 Q-81 KtxKt 29 QPx8


24 Px Kt
It Is especially tough that White
Since 24 BxKt, Q-Q3 ( QR4 ; 25 must capture with this Pawn. Fur
B-K2) ; followed by Kt-B3 is also ther resistance is futile.
favorable for Black, the first play
29 . . . . Q-K2
er resolves to capture with the
30 8-K3 Q-Q2
Pawn. It is true that his opponent
31 8-K2
obtains a defended passed Pawn
thereby, but the strengthening of
If the Rook's Pawn is protected,
the White center offers various
Q-B3 follows.
hopes of counter-play.
31 . . . . Qx P
24 . . . . Q-R4 32 P- K Kt4 P-Kt6
25 Kt-K5
33 K-82 8-K5
34 B-Q4 R-Q1
25 B-K2 or B-K4 would be better.
35 K-K3 8-87
After the move made the White
36 R-R 1 Q-Kt5
game collapses quickly.
Resigns

Rubi nstein

Game No. 67

SCOTCH GA M E

Berlin, 1924

M i eses Rubi nstein

1 P-K4 P-K4
2 Kt- K 83 Kt.Q83
3 P-Q4 PxP
G ru nfeld 4 KtxP Kt-83
5 KtxKt KtPxKt
6 8-Q3 P-Q4
25 . . . KtxKt! 7 Kt-83 8-QKt5
26 RxKt Q-R5 ! 8 P-K5

If now 27 B-K3, the Rook at K5 Mieses has favored this variation


gets into difficulties : 27 . . . BQ3 ; for a long time. But It is not
28 P-Kt3, Q-B3 ; 29 R-QKt5, B-B3, sound : PxP is correct here.
and the Rook cannot move.
8 . . . . Kt-Kt5
27 P-84 8-K83 9 0-0 0-0
28 P-Kt3
Here P-KKt4 is considered the
28 B-K3 would have made pos strongest and most vigorous con
sible more sturdy resistance. tinuation. However, Rubinstein
was always very careful In his
28 . . . . 8xR ! development. That should have
BERLIN, 1924 127

given him the repute of a pure R u b i nstei n


position player, but it is precisely
great care In the opening that
marks the real attacking expert.

10 8-K84 P-83 !

With this simple continuation,


Black obtains the better game
without any risk.

1 1 PxP Ktx P ( 83)

Here also a more vigorous and


by no means bad continuation was
In order, e.g. 11 . . . QxP. But M ieses
Rubinstein was not partial to book
variations. He gets the preferable
game by the text-move also. 22 8x 8 !
23 Px8
12 P-Q R3 8-Q3
13 8x8 Qx8 Mieses must have overlooked on
14 8-K2 his previous move that this gross
weakening was forced. If 23 QxB ?
Directed against Kt-Kt5. there would follow Kt-Kt5 ; 24 P
Kt3, Q-R4 ; 25 P-KR4, Kt-K4 ! with
14 P-84

decisive advantage. The move made
15 8-83 P-83
stops the mating attack, but leads
16 R-K1 R-Kt1
to loss of a Pawn.
17 p.QKt3 8-84
18 Q-Q2 Q R-K1 23 Kt-Kt5 !
19 RxR? 24 P-Kt3 Q.Q5 !

This would only be good if 20 If 24 . . . Q-R4 ; 25 P-KB4, might


R-K1 could follow. Since this is have followed. Now, however, Ktx
impossible because of the need of BP Is threatened. This cannot be
protecting the Queen's Bishop prevented as 25 R-KB1 would be
Pawn, the surrender of the King's
met by Kt-K 4 ! and 25 Kt-Ktl by
file was a m istake.
R-KB1 ; 26 R-KBl, Kt-K4 ; etc.
19 RxR
25 K-Kt2 Ktx K 8 P !
20 8-K2 Q-K4
26 QxKt QxKt
21 R-Q1 P-K R 3
27 R-K 81 K-R1
I f 2 5 . . . P-Q5 ? ; 2 2 B-B4ch etc., 28 Q-87 R-K7ch
and Black has needlessly weakened 29 K-R3 QxQP
his Pawn position. 30 Q-88ch K-R2
31 R-87 Q.Kt3
22 8-Q3 7 32 R-82 Q-K3ch
33 K-Kt2 Q-K5ch
The decisive mistake! White
has the worst of It, but by no 34 K-R3 RxR
means a lost game 22 P-KR3 was 35 QxR P-Q5
in order. 36 P-R4 P-Q6
128 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

37 Q-Q2 Q-Q4! three moves follows. 38 K-R4 is


met by Q-Kt4ch and 38 K-Kt4 by
Now White :Is :In Zug-Zwan g : :If P-KKt3 with the threat of mate
he moves the Queen, the Pawn ad and thereafter by one of the win
vances. If he plays 38 P-QR5, P ning lines set forth.
QR3 ! and if 38 P-KKt4 mate in Reelgne
Chapter XI
International Tournaments at Baden-Baden and Marienbad. 1925

Game N o. 68 14 KtxQ 8P
1 5 KtxKt QxKt
FOU R K N I G H TS GAM E
It Is noteworthy that by the dis
Baden-Baden, 1925 covered check that has been
threatened for several moves,
Sp ielmann Rubi nste i n
Black gets only a Pawn.
1 P-K4 P-K4
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83 1 6 P-QKt4
3 Kt-83 Kt-83 Aiming at Kt-Q4-and In order
4 8-Kt5 Kt-Q5 to avoid the pin by QQB4.
5 KtxP
16 P-Q R41
The line Initiated by this move

1 7 8-R3 PxP
was tested successfully In the
match Bogoljubow-Rublnstein, but 17 . . . Q-QR5-a tempting ad
lost its effectiveness after the re venture-was properly avoided by
searches of Teichmann. Black. 18 Kt-Kt5 or 18 B-Kt2 would
Q-K2 have followed. The strength of
5
Black's game does not rest on the

6 P-K 84 Ktx8
P-Q3 material advantage but in the two
7 KtxKt
Bishops and in the counter-attack
8 Kt-K83 QxPch
which he can soon inaugurate.
9 K-82 Kt-Kt5ch
10 K-Kt3 18 8xP Q-K84
1 9 Q-K3 P-R 3 !
If 10 K-B1 then Q-B5ch followed
by the exchange of Queens. And
20 Q R-81 R-K Kt1 !
21 K-Kt1 P-KKt4!
If 10 K-Ktl, the Rook remains tied
22 Q-83 R-Q81
in.
23 PxP PxP
10 . Q-Kt3! 24 K-R1 P-Kt5
25 Kt.Q4 Q-Q4 1
Teichmann ! In his match with
Bogoljubow, Rubinstein played the If the Queen retires - e.g. to
weaker move 10 . K-Ql. KKt3, then 26 B-R5, P-Kt3 ; 27
Kt-B6ch, BxKt ; 28 QxB, followed
1 1 Q-K2ch by 29 BxKtP, the White attack
carries through.
Other possibilities here and on
the next move are dismissed by the 26 Q-K3 P-Kt6!
theoretical researches. In every
case Black obtains a more or less The King's side must be locked.
superior game.
27 8-83
11 . K-Q1
1 2 R-K1 8-Q2 White is already concerned
13 Q Kt-Q4 Kt-K6, d is. ch merely with 11taving ofr defeat.
1 4 K-82 Perpetual check is now threatened
by 28 Kt-B6ch, BxKt ; 29 B-B6ch,
If 14 Kt-Kt5, P-KR3 ! with ad K-Q 2 ; 30 Q-K7ch, BxQ ; 31 RxBch,
vantage. etc.

129
130 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

27 . R-Q R 1 Game N o. 69
28 Kt-83 PxP
29 8-86ch K-81 K I NG'S I N D I A N D E F E N S E
30 Q-83 Q-QB4
31 Q.Q3 Q-KR4 Baden-Baden, 1925
32 Kt-K5
R u b i nstein Carla
With the following thought : 32
. . . PxKt ? ; 33 RxKP, Q any; 34 1 P-Q4 Kt-K83
RK8ch ! and Q-QS mate. 2 P-Q84 P-K Kt3
3 P-K Kt3

Rubi nstein 3 P-B3 or 3 Kt-QB3 are more


consequent.

3 . . P-831
4 P-Q5
Thereafter the game becomes
more difficult. In any event, after
4 B-Kt2, P-Q4, whereupon Black
has good prospects of equality.

4 8-Kt2
4 . . . PxP is better. In a game
Dr. Euwe-Spielmann 1933, Black
obtained a good game after PxP,
PQ3 ; 6 Kt-QB3, B-Kt2 ; 7 B-Kt2,
Spielmann 0-0 ; 8 Kt-KB3, QKt-Q2 ; 9 0-0,
Kt-B4 ; 10 Kt-Q4, Q-Kt3.
32 RxKtP ! !
5 B-Kt2 P-Q3
A pretty refutation ! By this 6 Kt.Q83 o.o
sacrifice Black gets an irresistible 7 P-K4 P-K4
attack. 8 Kt-K2 P-Q84

33 K x R PxKt Now Black is cramped because


34 RxP Q-Kt5c h ! he himself has closed the lines of
35 Q.Kt3 his King's Bishop and has occupied
the squares QB4 and K4 necessary
Or 35 K-R1 ? , B-B3ch; 36 RxB,
for his pieces.
Q-Kt8, mate. If 35 KxP, Q-B5ch ;
36 Q-Kt3, QxPch (not QxB ? ? be 9 0-0 Kt-K1
cause of 37 R-K8ch and QxBP
mate) ; and QxR winning. Black wishes to play P-KB4. That
is truly the only possibility of free
35 QxQch ing his game, but the game is
36 KxQ 8-Q3 thereby opened and the better de
37 KxP RxP velopment as well as the superior
38 K-Kt1 RxP! space controlled by White make
39 R-K R5 P-Kt3 themselves felt strongly.
40 8-K5 8-84ch
41 K-81 K-Kt2 10 P-KR3 P-K84
42 8-Kt3 8-Kt4ch 11 P-K84! Kt-Q2
43 K-K1 R-K7ch 12 Px 8 P KtPxP
44 K-Q1 R-KKt7 13 Q.Q82 Kt-83
45 R-83 8-K7ch 14 8-K3 P-K5
R es i g n s 15 p.Q R3 P-QR4
BADEN-BADEN, 1925 131

16 QR-Kt1 8-Q2 Carla


17 K R-Q81 P-R5
18 P-Q Kt3! PxP
19 RxP
The diversion to the Queen's
side comes somewhat as a surprise
for in such positions usually the
decisive "break-through" is initi
ated by P-KKt4 and a consequent
King's side attack. Rubinstein's
procedure is still better. First the
Black position is fixed on the
Queen's side, then P-KKt4 follows
with devastating effect.

19 . P-QKt3 Rubi nste i n


20 K R-QKt1 B-R5
21 Ktx8 RxKt 3 9 R-KKt3 1 R-K 8 1
22 Q 8-81 !
If the Rook Pawn moves, there
The third rank now serves as would follow : 40 Kt-B7ch and B
an i mportant link between the two K4ch etc.
wings.
40 R-K1 Kt-K83
22 - - Kt-Q2 41 R-K7 Kt-R4
23 8-81 ! Kt ( K 1 )-83 42 Kt-87ch Resigns
24 Kt-Q83 R-R3
25 Q-K2 Q-K2 For mate in two moves follows.
26 P-K K t4 Kt-K1
27 PxP 8-Q5ch
28 K-R2 Kt-Kt2

The King's Pawn cannot be held.


Hence Black seeks a minor attack,
which proves abortive due to the
formidable position of his op Game No. 70
ponent.
R U Y L O P EZ
29 QxP Q-R5
30 Kt-Kt5 ! KtxP Baden-Baden, 1925
31 8-Q2 K-R1 Yates R u b i nstein
32 8-K1 8-87
33 8x 8 Qx8ch 1 P-K4 P-K4
34 8-Kt2 Kt-Q5 2 Kt- K 83 Kt-Q83
35 R-K81 3 8-Kt5 P-Q R3
4 8-R4 Kt-83
The hostile attack has now been 5 0-0 8-K2
completely repulsed. Black must 6 R-K1 P-Q Kt4
exchange Queens. If 35 . . . QxR; 7 8-Kt3 P-Q3
36 BxQ, KtxR; 37 Q-K7, etc. and 8 P-Q83 0-0
wins. 9 P-Q4 B-Kt5
10 P-Q5 Kt-QR4
35 - Q.Q 87 11 8-82 P-Q83
36 QxQ KtxQ 12 P-KR3 8xKt
37 R-Q83! Kt-Q5 13 Qx8 PxP
38 KtxQP K R-QR1 14 PxP
132 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

The same position occurred 2 5 R-Q3 Q-R4


against the same opponent at 26 R-K81
Hastings in 1922. In that case
Rubinstein played 14 . . . KtB5. R u b i nstein
Now he chooses a move which is at
least equally strong and in addition
contains a trap.

14 Q-82!
15 Q Kt-Q2?
And already his opponent has
succumbed ! 15 P-QR4 should have
been played. The entire variation,
however, as we now know, is not
to be recommended for White.
( Either 9 P-KR3, or 9 PQ4 was
preferable. )

15 P-Kt5 ! Yates
White has only the choice of
The threat was 26 . . . Kt-Q2 ; or
various evils. Shall he permit
26 . . . KtxB ; 27 RxR, RxR; 28
himself to disrupt the Pawn posi
PxKt, R-B8ch ; 29 R-Q1, RxR; 30
tion on the Queen's side ? Shall
QxR, QxQP, etc.
he play 16 PxP, QxB ; 17 PxKt,
whereupon Black can immediately 26 K-Kt2!
win the Pawn at R5 (Q-B4 ; 18
Kt-K4, etc. ) . But even stronger Apparently quite a usual defense
is 17 . . KR-QB1 ; and QR-Ktl ; move : hence Yates plays con
initiating a formidable pressure on fidently.
the Queen's side.
27 P-KR4? P-K5!
Shall White finally retreat crest
fallen by 16 Kt-QKtl only to dis Now it suddenly becomes clear
cover that after 16 . . . Kt-Kt2, that K-Kt2 contained a sharp
the development Kt-QB3 cannot be threat ! Black wins the exchange.
attained ? Yates decided to leave
28 KtxP Kt-K4
his Queen's side to fate.
Now it is clear that K-Kt2 was
16 Kt-81 PxP necessary to prevent KtxKtch.
17 PxP QR-81
18 8-Q2 Kt-85 29 Q-84 KtxKt
19 8-K3 Q-R4 30 QxKt KtxR
31 8xKt
Capturing the Pawn at B3, for
it is clear that the Queen's Pawn White has two Bishops and hence
must be protected. can put up resistance for some
time. But the game cannot be
20 Q R.Q1 Qx8P saved.
21 8-Kt1 R-82
22 Kt-Kt3 P-KKt3 31 8-83
23 R-Q81 Q-R6 32 P-RS K-Kt1
33 Q-83 8-K4
Tying up the Bishop at K3. White
34 P-Kt3 Qx R P
gets no attack and hence must
35 K-Kt2 P-QR4
lose.
36 R-K R 1 P-R5
24 K R-Q1 K R.Q 8 1 37 PxKtP 8PxP
BADEN-BADEN, 1926 133

38 Q.K Kt4 QxQPch He has a notable set-up in the cen


39 B-K4 Q-82 ter, controls the Rook file, and hls
40 Q.Q1 Q-K1 pieces are more mobile than his
41 Q.Q5ch K-R1 opponent's . With the text Black
42 R-R6 Q-83 ! initiates a direct attack.
43 Q.Q3 Q-87 1
44 Q.Q5 Q-85 1 1 5 Kt-K2 Q-83 1
45 QxQ RxQ The contrast between the posi
46 8xKtP R- ( 85) 82 tions of the Queens is worthy of
47 P-K84 8-86 note_ The Black Queen is mobile
48 8-K4 P-Q R6 and secure while the White is Im
49 8-Q5 R-85 mobile and threatened by Kt-R5
50 RxQP P-R7 etc.
5 1 8xR Rx8
Resigns 16 Kt-84
The Pawn at QKt2 was not con
veniently defended. If 16 P-QB3,
Kt-K4 and KtxB, followed by P
KB5 was in order. Hence Mieses
sacrifices a Pawn in order to enter
Game N o. 7 1 the game with his Queen.

16 KtxKt
SCOTCH GAM E
.

17 QxKt QxKtP
Baden-Baden, 1925 18 Q-87

M i eses Rubi nstein Rubi nstein


1 P-K4 P-K4
2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83
3 P-Q4 PxP
4 KtxP 8-84
5 8-K3 8-Kt3 !
This simple and good move
avoids numerous book-variations
and offers the best prospects_ It
Is an in novation of Dr_ Lasker.
The usual move is 5 . _ . Q-B3_

6 8-K84 K Kt-K2
7 KtxKt
The line inaugurated is inferior. M i eses
White should proceed quickly with
his development. This seems quite threatening,
and one gets the impression that
7 KtPxKt
White now recovers his Pawn at

8 Q-83 P-Q4
the very least_ But Rubinstein
9 PxP PxP
demonstrates that the notion Is
1 0 8x8 R Px8
deceptive_
1 1 0-0 0-0
1 2 Kt-Q83 P-Q83 18 Q-86!
19 QxKtP
.

1 3 8-Q3 Kt-Kt3 RxRP


14 K R-K 1 P-KB4!
The open file has gained its
Black has emerged from the revenge ! Now Black retains his
opening with the superior game. spoil_
l34 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

6 Kt-QB3 Kt-K51
20 Q R-QKt1 P-BS
21 R-K7 R-R8! Compare the game against Spiel-
22 R-QB7 P-86 1 mann at Prague in 190 8 !

For nothing is really threatened! 7 KtxKt BxKt


8 0-0 0-0
23 R-R7 RxRch
9 B-84 P-Q3
24 QxR PxP
25 R-K7 P-84 . . . P-Q4, followed by . . . P
26 Q-Q1 QB4 ; deserves serious considera
Threatening Q-R5. But a sur- tion here.
prise is now unfolded. 10 Q-Q2 Kt-Q2
11 K R-Q1 P-QR4
26 . - Q-K B3 !

12 QR-81 Q-K1
The surprise lies I n the fact that 13 Kt-K1 Bx B
Black now wins a piece. The Queen 14 KtxB P-KB4
attacks B2 and the R at K2. If 15 Q-82
White protects by 27 Q-K2 or R-K2,
Hereafter Black has to reckon
after 27 . . . P-B5 the Bishop is
with the break-through by P-Q5.
trapped. Or if he plays Q-K1, he
can save the Bishop on 27 15
P-K Kt4
P-B5, but loses the Rook. The 16 B-Q2 Q-R4
sequel is self-evident. 17 P-K B3 8-83
18 B-K1 QR-K1
27 Bx R Pch KxB 19 8-82 Q-82 ?
28 Q-R5ch Q-R3
29 QxQP Q-B8ch Samlsch is preoccupied with end
30 KxP R-84 less preparatory measures, but ac
31 Q-K4 Q-Kt4ch tually undertakes nothing. It was
32 K-R1 Q-Kt3 highly essential to make the ad
33 P-KB3 R-K Kt4 vance P-K4 at once. For this pur
34 Q-KR4ch R-KR4 pose the Pawn at B4 had to be pro
35 Q-82 B-K3 tected : hence 19 . . . B-Kt2 or Q
36 Q-81 B-Q4 Kt3 was first in order.
37 P-QB4 Q-87 20 P-Q R3 Q-Kt2
38 R-K2 BxP 21 P-QKt4 PxP
R esigns 22 Px P

Rubinstein by h i s far-sighted
play has attained a superior posi
tion.

22 . . .
R-R 1 ?

Game No. 72 Were it at all possible to obtain


a convincing counter-attack, this
Q U E E N 'S I N D I A N D E F E N S E could only arise by 22 . . . P-K4
(23 PxP, BxP ) . As so often S am
Marlenbad, 1925 isch has conducted the game in an
inspired fashion, but has there
R u b i nste i n Samlsch
after lost the threads of it.
1 P-QB4 P-K3
23 P-Q5 !
2 P-Q4 Kt-KB3
3 Kt-KB3 P-Q Kt3 Rubinstein carries the attack be
4 P-K Kt3 B-Kt2 gun herewith to its conclusion in
5 B-Kt2 B-K2 splendid style.
MARIENBAD, 1925 135

23 Q.K2 Position after 36 Kt-K3


After 2 3 . . . PxP; 24 PxP, the Samisch
Queen's Bishop Pawn or the King's
Bishop Pawn would be lost.
24 PxP QxP
25 Kt-K3 8-Q1
26 P-Q Kt5 1
Securing a dominant post for the
Knight on Q6.
26 . . Kt-K4
27 Kt-Q5 P-K R 3
28 R-R 1 !
Excellent ! White seizes the Rook
file.
28 . . . . RxR
Rubinstein
29 Rx R P-K Kt5
FQreshadowing the end. But the I 42 . . . K-Kt4 ; 4 3 Q-B6 mate.
Knight could not maintain itself II 42 . . . KxP; 43 Q-B6ch, K-
permanently on K4. K6 ; 44 QB4 mate.
30 P-84 Kt-Kt3 III 42 . QxP; 43 QKt8ch,
.

31 R.R7 R-82 K-R6; 44 B-Blch and mate in two


32 8-Q4! moves.
White has first consolidated his 40 R-K8
general positional superiority. Now
Naturally decisive. Yet 40 R
the attack on the King begins,
R8ch ! was prettier : - 40 . . . KtxR;
supported by the powerful range
41 QxKtch, K-Kt3 ; 42 P-K 4 ! , QxP;
of the Queen's Bishop.
( forced) 43 P-B5ch, QxP; ( again
32 K-R2 forced) 44 Q-Kt8ch, K-R3 ; 46 B
33 R-R8 R-Q2 Blch and mate in two moves.
34 8-Kt2 P-R4
Resigns
35 Q-83
The threat is 36 RxB. A very good game.

35 . . . . Q-82
36 Kt-K3 1
A beautiful climax ! The King's
Bishop is lost. The threat is Game No. 73
KtxBP and RxB against which
R U Y LOPEZ
there Is no defense. If 36 .

B-K2 the sequel is 37 KtxBP. Marienbad, 1926

(See Diagram in Next Column) M ichell R u b instein

1 P-K4 P-K4
36 Q-81 2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83
37 K tx 8 P ! P-Q4 3 B-Kt5 P-QR3
38 PxP QxKt 4 8-R4 Kt-83
S9 Rx8 R-K2 5 0-0 B-K2
If 39 .QxP; ( which indeed
. 6 R-K1 P-QKt4
was originally Intended) Black is 7 B-Kt3 P-Q3
mated by 40 R-R8ch, KtxR ; 41 8 P-Q 83 0..()
QxKtch, K-Kt3 ; 42 P-B5ch ! ! 9 P-Q3
136 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

This Is not as good as 9 P-KR3. 1 9 8-Kt3


As to 9 P-Q4 compare several of
the games against Y ates. 19 KtxKP? would have been a
snare. 19 . . . KtxKt ; 20 RxKt,
9 . . . . Kt-QR4 BxB ; 21 RxKt, Q-Kt5 ! and Black
1 0 8-82 P-84 wins. After 19 BxB White would
1 1 Q Kt-Q2 Kt-83 have to play P-KKt3 (to keep the
12 Kt-81 P-Q4 ! Kt from B5 l which In view of the
scope or the hostne Queen's Blah
A sharp continuation, character op, could hardly eventuate favor
Istic of Rubinstein's style. Black ably.
is ready to sacrifice a Pawn in
order to secure the attack. 19 . 8-Q3
20 Kt-K3 K-R2
13 PxP
21 P-K R3
13 P-Q4 was more prudent.
An understandable precaution
13 QxP against P-KB4 and KB5.
14 Q-K2 21
Ktx8
22 PxKt P-84
Playing to win a Pawn. But
soon White decides that this is
Black now has decidedly the
too dangerous. Hence 14 P-QR4
superior position, but considerable
was better. After the exchange of
time elapses before he can pro
Rooks the threat on K5 must be
ceed to the final attack. However,
given first consideration. Similar
he can mark time until the best
positions frequently occur In the
opportunity presents itself, for
Ruy Lopez. White Is cramped af
White can do nothing.
ter the removal of the King's Pawn,
but has many tactical prospects as 23 Q R-Q1 8-Kt1
experience indicates. Hence It Is 24 Kt-81 R-Q1
not easy to assert a real advantage
25 Q-K2 Q-Q3
for Black.
26 8-82 Q-83
14 8-Kt2 27 K-R2 K-R1
28 Q-82

8-R2
Hereby K5 is indirectly pro 29 Q-K2 QR-K 1
tected.
"Jockeying" for position.
1 5 8-Kt3 Q-Q2
16 8-Kt5 30 Q.Q2 Kt-Q1
31 R-K2 Kt-82
After 16 KtxKP, KtxKt ; 17 Qx 32 Q-K1 8-Kt1
Kt, KR-Kl ; 18 Q-K2, B-Q3 ; White
33 Kt- ( 8 1 ) Q2 R-K2
has a difficult game. Yet it was
34 Q-82 8-Q3
the proper line.
35 R-K81 P-Kt3
16 . Q R-K1 36 K-R1 K-Kt2
1 7 Q.Q2 37 Kt-R2 Kt-Kt4

Now KtxKP was no longer play Finally the real attack begins.
able : 17 KtxKt ; 18 QxKt, B
The threat is KtxRP.
Q3 and Black wins the Queen.
38 Kt(Q2)-83 P-K 5 !
17 P-R3 39 Kt-Kt1 R ( 81 ) -K1
1 8 8-KR4 Kt-KR4! 40 P-KR4
MARIENBAD, 1925 137

Rubi nste i n 52 R-Q1 P..QR4


53 Kt-Q4 8-K4
54 K-Kt1 P-Kt5
55 Kt-82
Black threatened among other
things P-QR5 ; BxKt; P-Kt6 ; and
RxB, and P-B6.

55 8xP
56 K-81 P-85
Resigns
Zug-Zwang ! !

M ichell

40 . PxP!
T h e decisive combination ! White Game No. 74
gains a piece but the Black Pawns
Q U E E N'S GA M B IT ACC E PTED
carry the day.

41 PxKt QxP Marlenbad, 1925


42 RxRch RxR Rubl!l'ste i n Dr. Tartakower
43 8xP BxP
44 Kt ( Kt1 ) -83 1 P-Q84 P-K3
2 Kt- K 83 P-Q4
Or 4 4 QxQBP, BxKt (R2) etc. 3 P-Q4 Kt- K 83
44 . . . . 8xQ 4 Kt-83 PxP
5 P-.K3 P-Q RS
The astonishing point of the 6 P-Q R4
combination. Black wins In the
ending. Many masters consider this move
to be an unnecessary weakening.
45 KtxQ 8-Kt6!
46 Kt( Kt5)-83 P-Q 8 5 ! 6 . . P-84
47 8-Kt1 R-K7 7 8xP Kt-83
8 0-0 PxP
This concludes the matter. In
spite of a piece to the good, White Thereafter White gets an open
Ing advantage. 8 . . . B-K2 Is
Is helpless. correct. Whereupon White could
48 R-Q1 8xKt( R7) I get no advantage from the gain of
a tempo by 9 PxP because of the
Again very pretty and strong ! weakening P-QR4.
Since White cannot recapture the
Bishop, he must remove the Rook. 9 Ktx P !

49 R-Q7ch K-81 This seems t o be better than


50 R x 8 8-Kt6 the usual 9 PxP. By the exchange
of the King's Knight for the
Threatening a devastating recap Queen's Knight, White gets com
ture of the piece by RxQKtP. plete control of the Q5 square.
Hence the White Rook must re
turn to the protection of the B. 9 .
KtxKt
10 PxKt B-K2
51 R-Q7 RxQKtP 1 1 P-Q5 ! PxP
138 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

12 KtxP KtxKt unfavorable as the White Rooks


1 3 8xKt 0-0 possess much greater mobility
1 4 Q-83! than the Black.
A new advantage arises from the
Dr. Tartakower
exchange Initiated by the 9th
move : the White Queen gains the
beautiful square KB3 and the
Bishop operates strongly against
QKt7.

14 B-Q3

In order to answer BxKtP by


BxPch and Q-B2ch. Dr. Tartakow
er defends himself very cleverly
from now on, but cannot fully over
come the difficulties of the position.
1 5 R-K1 Q-R5
If 15 . . . Q-Kt3 ; 16 R-K8, B-K3 ; Rubinstein
17 RxQR, RxR; 18 BxQKtP, etc.
'Zl R-Q7 B-K6
1 6 P-RS Q-QKt5
Losing a Pawn and thereby the
Now R-K8 would be weak be
game is decided. If 27 . . . R
cause of the threat of B-K3 with
Kt3; 28 B-Kt2, RxP; 29 BxPch,
threat of mate on K8.
K-Ktl ; 30 B-B3, etc. If 27 .

1 7 R-Q1 R-Kt1 P-KR3, or KR4; 28 B-Kt2, R-KKt3 ;


18 P-Q Kt3 29 QR-B7, etc. Similar lines re
sult from 27 . . . P-QKt3 or QKt4.
18 B-Q2, QxKtP ; 19 B-QB3 de After the text, White's task becomes
served careful consideration. The comparatively simple.
threat 19 B-QR3 appeared deadly,
but Black finds ways and means 28 RxQKtP R-Q Kt3
of defending himself. 29 R x R ( Kt6) 8x R
30 R-86
18 B-K3
31 B-Q6 1s threatened.

1 9 8x8 Px8
20 Q-K2 B-84!
30 P-KR4
21 QxPch K-R1

31 8-Q6 R-Kt2
22 8-R 3 1
32 P-QKt4 P-R4
White must return the Pawn, 33 P-Kt5 K-R2
since 22 B-K3 would be followed 34 P-Kt4 PxP
simply by QR-K 1 ; 23 BxB, QxB, 35 PxP K-Kt1
and the King's Bishop Pawn falls. 36 K-Kt2 K-82
37 K-83 B-Q1
22 Q-R4 38 K-K4 K-K1
23 R-Q 5 1 8xPch 39 K-Q5 P-Kt4
24 K - R 1 Q-86 40 K-K6 B-Kt3
25 R-Q81 Q-K83 41 R88ch B-Q1
Q-K6 is refuted by 26 R-K5 etc. 42 B-85 R-Kt1

QxQ RxQ A harmless stalemate jest.

Black has extricated himself com 43 R-86 R-Kt2


paratively well, but his ending 1s 44 P-Kt6 R-Kt1
MARIENBAD, 1925 139

45 R-871 16 KtxKt Kt-Kt3 ?


1 7 8-Kt2 P-K83
4 6 R-KR7 is threatened. Black
18 R-83
must capture the Rook.
White's attack now attains a
45 8xR commanding power and easily fol
46 Px8 R-81 lows through.
47 B-Kt6 R-R1
48 8-R7 ! 18 R-K81

If R-BI ; 49 BKt8, K-Bl ; 50 K-Q7. Janowski


Resigns

Game No. 75
Q U E E N 'S I N DI A N D E F E N S E
Marienbad, 1925
Rubinstein Janowski
1 P-Q84 Kt- K 83
2 P-Q4 P-QKt3
Rubinstein
3 Kt-Q 83 8-Kt2
4 Q-82 P-K3? 19 Kt-Kt5 PxKt
Here 4 . . . P-Q4 ! must be 20 8xPch K-R1
played. In this opening P-K4 must 21 8xPch
not be permitted.
21 Q-Kt6 would have won im
5 P-K4 8-Kt5 mediately as . . . RB3 is met by
6 B-Q3! QR5, and R-R3 by 23 QxR.

Since White has already played 21 . . . Kx8


P-K4 the double Pawn on the QB 22 Q-Kt6ch K-R 1
file is Immaterial. 23 R-R3 Q.Q2
24 8-Kt8ch Qx R
6 P-Q84
25 PxQ
.

7 P-Q5 PxP
8 K Px P P-QKt4 Now 26 Q-R7 mate is threatened.
And if RxB ; 26 Q-R6 mate. Or if
This is all very good, but the
25 . . . R-B 2 ; 26 BxR and 27 Q
opening favors White as the Black
R6 mate.
Bishops remain In limbo.
Resigns
9 P-QKt3 ' 0-0 A pleasing gamelet.
10 Kt-K2 P-Q3
11 0-0 PxP
12 PxP Q Kt-Q2
13 P-84 R-K1 Game No. 76
14 Kt-Kt3 8-R3 ?
R U Y L. O P EZ
This and the moves that follow
foreshadow disaster as the Black Marienbad, 1925
King remains entirely unprotected. Yates Rubi nstein
1 5 QKt-K4 KtxKt 1 P-K4 P-K4
140 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

2 Kt-K83 Kt-Q83 master of the situation and in


3 8-Kt5 P.Q R3 creases his advantage step by step.
4 8-R4 Kt-83
14 R-K2
5 0-0 8-K2
6 R-K1 P-Q Kt4 Or 14 R-KB1, KtxQP, with the
7 8-Kt3 P-Q3 threat KtxB and B-QB4 etc. Hence
8 P-83 0-0 White dare not relinquish the King
9 P-Q4 file.
After thls, Black's 9th move be 14 KtxQP
comes strong. More prudent and
Not 14 . . . KtxKtP, which per
more usual is 9 P-KR3 and there
mits White to escape, e.g., 15 Q
after P-Q4.
B2, Kt-B5; 16 KtxKt, PxKt; 17
9 . - . . B-Kt5 BxP, BxKt; 18 PxB, KtxP; 19
10 B-K3 R-Q1, P-B3 (KtxB? BxPch with
advantage ) ; 20 BxKt, PxB ; 21 P
In similar positions Spielmann QB4, etc.
prefers P-Q5 : if Black then plays
P-QB3 or P-QB4, which can scarce 15 Kt-K4
ly be avoided, Spielmann captures Yates seeks counter-play at all
the Pawn, and seeks to obtain costs. Careful defensive measures
pressure on the Queen's flle. This like 15 Q-B2 were never his forte.
is Indeed a noteworthy suggestion.
By the move actually made and the 15 BxKt
next move thereafter, Yates aims 16 Px8 KtxB
to maintain the tension in the cen 17 PxKt P-841
ter but soon gets into difficulties. The strength of this fine move
rests on this, that 18 P-QB4 ? fails
10 R-K1 due to PxP; 19 BxP, Kt-K4 !
1 1 Q K t-Q2 P-Q41
18 R.Q2 P-85
Releasing the pressure in a man
19 B-82 Q.Kt31
ner favorable to Black. White ts
badly hampered In the fight for the If White now protects the King's
central files by the position of his Pawn, by 20 R-K2, for example,
minor pieces. (Kt at Q2, B at K3, Black gets a decisive advantage
and Kt tied to KB3.) by 20 . . . KtxP; 21 Q-Ktl, Kt-Q6;
22 BxKt, PxB ; 23 QxP, QR-Q1 ;
12 QPxP QKtxP followed by P-KB4, etc. The ac
Black would also get a superior tual continuation is also bad for
position after 12 . . KKtxP ; 13

White as his King is exposed. But
KtxKt, PxKt ; 14 QxQ, QRxQ (BxQ? the situation Is already' very criU
In order to win the King Pawn cal for him.
is met by B-Q5 ! etc. ) ; 16 Kt-QZ, 20 8xKt QxPch
KtxP; 16 KtxP, Kt-Q6. Still It is 21 K-R1 Px B
doubtful If a larger advantage could 22 RxP Q.Kt3
be attained In view of the equal 23 Q-Kt3 B-81 1
division of the Pawns. The move 24 QR-Q1 R-K4!
made is stronger. 25 R-Q7 R-K841
13 PxP Kt-Q61 Three splendid defensive moves !
The Rook at B4 is very efl'ecUve.
Thus early the White forces are
brought to disorder. Though Yates
26 Kt-Kt3?
from now on knows how to com Instead of this jest ( 26 . .
plicate matters, Rubinstein remains RxP ? ? ; 27 Q-Q5 ! ) 26 P-QB4 ! would
MARIENBAD, 1925 141

have been much better. But White Q4, Q-Kt5ch, and QxR! Now the
wa.s also thinking of 26 . . . RB5 King Bishop Pawn fs lost in any
after which 27 QQ5 would also event, and with It, the game. But
have been strong. in the ensuing phase Black must
play with precision.
Rubi nstein
27 R (at Q)..QS RxP
28 Q-Q1 R-87
29 Kt-K4 RxKtP
Rubinstein does not know the
meaning of fear.
30 Q-83 Q-K3
31 R-Q1 R-K1
32 R (Q7)-Q4 RxQ R P
33 R-K Kt1 Q-K4!
34 Kt-86ch K-R 1
35 Kt-Kt4 Q-K3
36 R-K84 P-83
37 KtxP

Yates A sacrifice induced by despair.


But Rubinstein does not permit his
26 . Q-Q83 ! ! opponent to linger long.

This splendid answer refutes the 37 . PxKt


move of the Knight. If 27 KtxR, 38 RxP 8-Q3 1
QxPch; 28 K-Ktl, B-B4ch ; 29 Kt- Resigns
Chapter XU
International Toumament at Semmering, 1926

Game No. 77 An unha.ppy thought ! White


wants to play P-QB5, hoping that
Q U E E N'S G A M B I T D E C L I N E D the awkward position of the Bish
Semmerlng, 1926 ops on both sides would hold the
scales even. This considera.tion
Kmoch Rubl.wtein is not sound as the backwardness
1 P-Q4 P-Q4 of the Queen's Pawn and the de
2 P-QB4 P-K3 fensive role of the Rooks on that
3 Kt- K B3 P-83 file, put White on the defensive
4 QKt-Q2 Kt-83 and give Black the initiative. 19
5 P-K3 Q Kt-Q2 P-QR4 was in order : White would
6 B-Q3 P-KKt3 then have compensation for the
weakness of Q4, in the greater
An innovation, but by no means space-control of his pieces.
of special value. The game now
takes on a. similarity to the
R u b i nstei n
Schlechter Defense of the Queen's
Gambit, with the difference that
here Black's Queen Bishop remains
hemmed in.

7 0-0 B-Kt2
8 P-K4 PxP
9 KtxP KtxKt
10 Bx Kt 0-0
11 B-Q2 Q-82
12 B-83 Kt-83
13 B-82 K R-Q1
14 Q-K2 B-Q2
15 Kt-K5 B-K1
16 K R-Q1
Kmoch
White has a good position, but
now begins to play weakly. Ob
viously 16 QR-Q1 was in order, for 19 P-Q Kt4
it is clear that the Knight at K5 A thunder-clap ! Not only is P
must be made secure by P-KB4 or Kt5 threatened, but also PxP and
KR-K1. White's prospects lay in P-QB4 thereafter. Suddenly White
a King's side attack ; hence the is lost.
King's Rook should remain on this
wing. 20 R-Q2

16 Kt-Q2 After 20 PxP, PxP; 21 P-QR3,


17 Ktx Kt? Q-Kt3, wins.

Why? 17 R-K1 followed by QR 20 , . .


P-Kt5
Q1 still gave White a. good game. 21 BxP BxP
22 Q-83
17 RxKt
1 8 Q-K3 Q R-Q1 Or 22 QKt3, BK4 ; 23 RxR, RxR;
19 B-Kt37 24 Q-R3, BxKtP; etc.

142
SEMMERING, 1926 143

22 P-Q84 Game No. 78


23 8-83 R-Q3 !
Q U E EN'S GAM BIT ACCEPTED
Directed against B-R4.
Semmering, 1926
24 Q R-Q1 P-K4
Dr. M ichel Rubi nstein
25 B-82 8-83
26 Q-Kt3 1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 P-Q84 P-K3
The Queen must retreat as 26
3 Kt-QB3 PxP
B-K4 ? would lose a piece : 26
4 P-K3 Kt-KB3
QBx B ; 27 QxB, BxB ; etc.
5 BxP P-84
26 Q-Kt2 6 Kt-KB3 P-QR3
7 0-0 P-QKt4
Now the consequences of 19 . . . 8 8-Q3 B-Kt2
P-QKt4 are apparent. Black has 9 Q-K2
an overwhelming position.
Worthy of careful consideration
27 BxB is 9 PxP to be followed by 10 P
QR3 etc.
2 7 P-Kt3 would have afforded
greater resistance. 9 . . . . Q Kt-Q2
1 0 R-Q1 Q-Kt3
Z1 K Px B
Many masters hold that here (as
28 B-Q3

In similar positions) Q-B2 is better.


The basis for this is indicated by
As the Pawn at QKt2 is unpro
tected, White must yield the King's White's 12th move.
file. 1 1 P-QR4

28 - . . . R-K3 The most vigorous continuation.


29 P-KR4 R (at Q)-K1 11 P-Kt5
30 P-R5 P-R4 12 P-R5
31 P-84
The point! This Pawn exercises
This attack, traceable to despair, a powerful pressure on the Queen's
is easily repulsed, and merely pre wing. The advance is even more
cipitates the collapse. But even dangerous when it is accompanied
apart from this, Black has a won by the gain of a tempo. However,
game due to the protected passed such advanced Pawns also have
Pawn and the King file. elements of weakness. Hence the
text is double-edged.
31 . Q-K2
32 R-KB1 R-K6 12 Q-82
33 Q-R2 P-84 13 Kt-K1 B-K2
34 PxP PxP 14 Q Kt-Q2 0-0
35 Q-R6 Q-83 15 Kt-84 K R-Q1
36 K-82 Q-K31 16 B-Q2
If there is any serious weakness
Threatening 37 . . . RxB and
in the White position, it rests in
preparing the ensuing attack.
the fact that the Queen's Bishop
37 R-K R 1 R-B6ch l l is hard to develop. 16 P-K4 would
Resigns be insufficient because of PxQP
and Kt-B4. On the other hand 16
If 38 K-Ktl, Q-K8ch, and mate in P-QKt3 not only weakens the
3. If 38 PxR, then 38 . . . Q-K6ch Knight Pawn, but also the square
and QxPch and mate in 3 also. QB3.
144 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Rublnateln
16 Kt-K5
17 K Kt-K5
This could have been deferred.
17 B-K1 to be followed by QR-Bl
would have been more consequent.
17 KtxKt
1 8 PxKt Ktx8
19 Rx8 8-Q 83 1
Starting a deeply-conceived coun
ter-offensive. White has, himself,
closed the Queen's Bishop file and
seeks to utilize every possibility
of entrance by the Queen's file.
But his mobility is restricted by M ichel
the necessity of taking care of the
Pawn at R5. The point of Black's
26 P-85 1 1
counter-play, resting on the sacri

27 Qx P
fice of the Pawn at R3, becomes
apparent as the game proceeds. Forced, as the Bishop was threat
ened. If 27 BxP, RxP ; would have
20 Kt-Kt6 R-R2
followed.
21 P-84 8-K1
22 Q R-Q1 27 Q-84 ! 1

Naturally 22 BxRP? is refuted As is readily apparent, White


by RxR, etc. cannot exchange Queens. But how
can he fend off the threats of
22 P-Kt3 !

QxKP as well as QxRP? If 28
And . . . Q-Kt2 ? is met by 23 Q-K2 or Q-Q3 or R-K2 or Q3. 28
BxKRPch, etc. _ _ _ RxB, followed by B-Kt4, etc.
wins. If the King's Pawn is sac
23 8-84 rificed in order to protect the
The consequence of BxRP would Rook's Pawn, there might follow :
be a locked position. White would 28 R-R2, QxPch ; 29 K-Bl ( forced :
win if he could exchange Bishops, if 29 R-B2, then B-B4 ! If 29 K-Rl,
and thereby maintain his. Knight RxB ! ) , B-B4, and Black wins.
on B4. However, this cannot be Hence the following is once more
executed, and without this ex forced.
change of Bishops, the Kn ight 28 K-82 Qx R P
cannot be kept on B4 on account 29 Kt-88
of B-Kt4. Hence the White game
quickly comes to an impasse. The only way of avoiding im
mediate loss of a piece.
23 . . . . RxR
24 RxR K-Kt2 29 8-R5ch
25 P-QKt3 P-R4 30 P-Kt3 Rx8
26 8xRP 1 31 Kt-Q6
After this, Rubinstein, the magi W h i t e makes purely forced
cian, conjures up a series of won moves. If 31 PxB, R-B3 and RxKt,
derful moves, and wins. White and Black wins a piece.
should have remained entirely in
31 R x Kt
active, whereupon the game ob

viously would have remained quite This had to be figured very


even. exactly. It is true Black gets two
SEMMERING, 1926 Uli

pieces for a Rook, but White gets but has no luck withal. Dr. Las
a powerful passed Pawn. ker's P-QB4 ! is considered the best
move at this point. This is no loss
32 PxR B-Q Kt4
of time, but a powerful answer to
33 Q-87
the delirious development of the
33 Q-B5 offered stiffer resistance. White Queen's Knight.
Black would have had to play 33 6 P-Q Kt31
. . . BQl and would still have the
by no means easy task of stopping This Is quieter, but more con
the hostile Pawn. sequent than the attacking line in
the game above cited.
33 Q-R81
6 . . . . Q-R4
Now we see why 33 Q-B5 would
have been better! Mate Is threat In order to be able to play B
ened, the Bishop at R4 must be Kt2, without having to meet B-R3.
captured, yet there Is no salvation,
7 8-K2
only a deferring of the end.
At ihis point it had to be cal
34 PxB Q-B8ch
culated that the attack initiated
35 K-Kt3 Q-K8ch
by 7 . . . Kt-K5 could be repulsed
36 R-82 Q-Kt8ch
successfully. White would answer
37 K-83 Q-R8ch
8 Q-B2.
38 R-Kt2
Or 38 K-Kt3, B-B3 ! etc. 7 8-Kt2
8 0-0 0-0
38 Q-Q8ch 9 Q-82 QKt-Q2
39 K-Kt3 Q-Kt5ch 10 8-Kt2 R-Q1
40 K-82 Q-K7ch 11 P-Q R3 Kt-K1
And mates the next move. An Indication that natural de
Resigns veloping moves are not available.
Black is very cramped. If 11 . . .
Once again Rubinstein has com P-QB4 ; 12 P-QKt4 ! would be very
bined in the grand manner. strong as 12 . . . PxKtP ; 13 PxP,
QxP? would be refuted by P-B 5 !
and loss o f the Queen b y KR-Ktl
etc.

12 K R-QB1 Q-82
13 P-Q Kt4 Kt-Kt3
Game No. 79 14 P-Q R4 ! Ktx8P
Q U E E N 'S GAM B I T D E C L I N E D 15 KtxKt PxKt
16 QxB P !
Semmering, 1 9 2 6
1 6 BxP would be loss of time as
R u b i nstei n Spielmann
White wishes to play P-Kt5.
1 P-Q84 P-Q83
2 P-Q4 P-Q4 16 8-Q2
3 P-K3 Kt-KB3 17 P-Kt5 ! Q R-81
4 Kt-K83 P-K3 18 Kt- K 5 ! Kt-Q3
5 Q Kt-Q2 P-KKt3 19 Q-Kt3 8-K1
20 R-82 Kt-84
Compare the game against 21 PxP PxP
Kmoch from the same tourney !
Sp ielmann plays his own defense Spielmann has defended himself
against the White Pawn formation cleverly, and has brought his
146 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

pieces Into the game. Nevertheless Spielmann


a weakness has resulted at QB3,
which gives him new worries.
22 QR.Q 8 1 Kt-K2
2 3 8-K83 R-Kt1
24 Q-R2 8xKt
Otherwise the Pawn at B3 is lost.
However, Spielmann has another
idea.
25 Px8 Kt.Q4
26 8xKt
White had nothing better as the
Knight was too strongly placed.
Thus Spielmann has brought about Rubi nste i n
Bishops of opposite colors, and
thereby apparently has attained long run will prove too much as
well founded prospects of main the Black King position is too
taining the game. But Rubinstein's weak.
unusual and implacable conduct of 31 R-Q1
the attack renders this hope abor

32 Q-Q83
tive.
Careful play ! After 32 Q-K3,
26 Rx8
which apparently would be much

27 8-Q4 Q.R4
stronger, Black could get some
28 P-R3 Q-R3 freedom by 32 R (Q)Ktl !
In order to play R-Kt5, which
32 . . . . R ( Kt2)-Q2
would otherwise be met by B-B3.
33 Q-K3
29 R-84 P-R4
Now B-B5, etc. Is threatened.
Gradually it becomes apparent The Black King is quite helpless
that in spite of Bishops of opposite against the coordinated attack of
colors, Black has a very difficult the Queen and Bishop.
game as his pieces lack co-opera
tion. 33 K-R2
30 Q.R3 1 34 8-85!

The first lightning flash ! QK7 A simple but powerful attack !


Is threatened to be followed by Q White now can be spared the pre
B6 or Q-Kt5 and a serious threat paratory move of K-R2.
against the Black King, e.g. P
KKt4. 34 . R-QBch
30 . R-Kt2 35 K-R2 RxR
36 B-88 1 1
Stopping Q-K7.
Threatening mate, which cannot
be parried, as 36 . . . KKtl ; Is
(See Diagram In Next Column) met by 37 Q-R6. Had Black play
ed 35 . . . K-Ktl, the rejoinder
would have been 36 Q-R6 with
31 P-K41
. .

the threat of 37 B-B8.


Now the Queen gains the third
rank for its purposes. This in the Realgna
SEMMERING, 1926 H7

Game No. 80 If 11 . B-B6? 12 BxB, KtxBch;


.

13 K-Kt2 etc. Black should have


K I N G'S INDIAN DEFENSE tried P-QB4, but even then White's
position would have been pref
Semmering, 1926
erable.
Rubi nste i n Retl
1 2 P-K B 3 1 B-Q2
1 P-Q4 Kt-KB3
The Bishop must retreat, for 12
2 P-QB4 P-KKt3
. . . KtxPch ? 13 K-R1 and Q-Q3,
3 P-KKt3 B-Kt2
or 12 . . BxBP; 13 BxB, KtxBch ;
4 B-Kt2 P-Q4
14 K-Kt2 would lose a piece for
In the Grunfeld variation Kt-QB3 Black.
is met by P-Q4, so that after PxP,
13 B-K3 P-QB4
KtxP, and P-K4, Black can ex
14 PxP e.p. QKtxP
change by KtxKt. After the text
1 5 Kt-Q5 Q-Q3
P-Q4 is questionable as the Black
Knight would now be chased from Q-Q1 was much better.
pillar to post. The preparatory
P-QB3 which would have been best 1 6 KtxKt! KtxKt
on the 3rd move, is preferable.
This Is forced as Rubinstein
5 PxP KtxP points out. If 16 . PxKt; 17
6 P-K4 Kt-Kt5 ! B-B4, B-K4 ; ( Kt-K4, 18 K-R1 ! ) 18
BxB, QxB ; 19 P-KB4 etc. with the
Threatening the capture of the better game.
Queen Pawn, which cannot be pro
tected, and at the same time pre 1 7 P-KB4!
pares the well-known Klel trap :
Rubinstein writes : "There Is no
7 Q-R4ch, QKt-B3 ; 8 P-Q5, P
QKt4 ! ; etc. Black's attack here satisfactory defense to this move.
would be even stronger than In If the Knight moves, the advance
of the Pawn-P-B5 and P-BS be
the analogous Kiel variation which
arises from the Scandinavian de comes too strong."
fense. 17 . . . 0-0
1 8 BxKt PxB
7 P-Q R3 Kt( Kt5)-B3
19 P-K5 Q-B4
8 P-Q5 Kt-Q5
20 P-Q Kt4! Q-B5
9 Kt-K2 B-Kt5
10 QKt-B3 !
Reti
He does not fear the momentary
weakening of the point-KB3. If
10 . . . Kt-B 6ch ; 11 KB1 with the
threat of 12 P-KR3. And if 10 . . .
BB6 ; 11 BxB, KtxBch; 12 K-B1,
(Q-Q 2 ; 13 P-KR3) to the advantage
of White.

10 . . . . P-K4
1 1 0-0 Q-B3?

A thoughtless move! The point


KB3 is but apparently weak. Hence
11 . . . Kt-BGch would also have
been unfavorable because of 12 K
R1 ! with the threat of P-KR3 ; and Rubinstein
148 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Game No. 81
21 Q R-81
A L E K H I N E'S D E F E N S E
Forcing the gain of material, as
after 21 . . . QR7 (which perhaps Semmerlng, 1926
Ret! had intended) 22 RKB2 ! Qx
RP; 23 RQR1 is decisive. Yates R u b i nstei n
1 P-K4 Kt-K83
21 Q-R3
22 Kt.87 QxRP 2 Kt-Q83 P-Q4
23 KtxR R x Kt 3 P-K5 K Kt-Q2
4 P-K 84 ? ?
The attempt to protect the Queen
Pawn by 23 . . . Q-K6ch would have Dr. Tartakower recommends 4
a sorry ending. 24 K-R4, RxKt ; 25 P-K6 ! followed by 4 . . . PxP; 6
BxKtP, R-Ktl ; 26 R-B3 and White PQ4. This move proved excep
wins the Queen. tionally etrectlve in a match Splel
mann-Landau, Rotterdam 19 33.
24 QxP 8-Kt4 Since 3 . . . P-Q5. after 4 QKt-K2,
25 K R-K1 Kt-K5 ; 5 P-Q3, Kt-B4 ; 6 Kt-KB3,
Kt-QB3 ; 7 P-QKt4, proves advan
As Rubinstein himself points out,
tageous to White, 2 . . . P-Q4 seems
this is the prelude to a combina
to be very questionable. The safer
tion which merely prolongs the
2 . . . P-K4 is better, leading to
winning process. The safer course
the Vienna Game. However, if one
was 25 RQR1, Q-Kt6; 26 B-Q5,
wishes to win in a tournament
QB7 ; 27 KRQB1 and RB7.
with Black, some risk must gen
25 8-81 erally be taken.
26 P-K6 PxP After the text Black quickly gets
the superior game.
After 26 . . . QxKtP? or BxKtP ?
27 PxPch and White wins at once. 4 . . P-K3
27 R-87 QxKtP 5 Kt-K83 P-Q84
28 Q-K5 R-K1 6 8-Kt5
29 R x KtP Q-84ch
In view of the Pawn position,
30 K-R1 ! QxQ
this Is the good Bishop, and White
31 RxQ P-QR3
should hold on to lt In any event.
32 P-KR4 8-Q3
Hence 6 P-Q3 and P-KKt3 etc.
33 R-K1
were in order.
If 33 RxP? RxR; 34 BQ5 White
gives up his advantage because of 6 - P-Q R3
24 . . . BB3 ! 7 8xKtch 8x8
8 0-0 Kt-83
33 8-Kt5
9 P-Q3 P-K Kt3 !
. . .

34 K R-Q81 R-K2
35 RxR 8xR Preparing the following move.
36 R-87 K-82 Until now P-B5 would have been
37 8-K4 P-KR4? unfavorable for White, since . . .
Without this mistake Black PxP ; KtxQP ; B-K3 ; could have
might have otrered even longer followed. After Q-B2, however, the
resistance owing to his two Bish White Knight would reach Q5 with
ops. If 37 . . . P-QR4 Rubinstein the gain of a tempo.
Intended to continue with 38 B-B6. Q-82
10 Q-K1
SB 8xKtPch Resigns 1 1 Kt-Q1 0-0-0 !
SEM M ERING, 1926 149

12 P-Q83 B-K2 31 R-QKt1 R-Kt6


13 B-K3 K-Kt1 32 Q-Q 82 P-QR4
14 Q-82 P-Q5! 33 K R-K81 R (at Q5)-QKt5
34 Kt-Q1 Q-84
An unexpected stroke! White
would have done better to have 35 Q-Q2 Q-Q5
played 14 B-B2. Perhaps he might 36 Kt-83 8-84
then have effected the favorable 37 Q-Q82 B-Kt3
exchange by B-R4 ! 38 Q-Q2 P-K R5
1 5 PxP 39 P- K R 3 Q-K6
40 Q-Q82 8-Q5
Here 15 B-Q2 was preferable. But
White hoped to win a Pawn. Rubi nstein
15 Kt-Kt51
16 Q-Q2
If 16 Kt-K1 there might follow :
B-Kt4 ; 17 PxBP, QBxP ; 18 KtxB,
KtxKt; 19 QB2, BxP; 20 BxB,
QxBch ; 21 QxQ, KtxQ ; with a
superior ending for Black.

16 B-83 1
17 P-Q R3 8xKtl
1 8 PxKt
Or 18 RxB, PxP; 19 PxKt, PxB;
20 KtxP, QKt3 ; etc. as in the ac
tual game. Yates
18 PxQP
41 K R-Q81
1 9 Rx8 Px8
20 KtxP Q-Kt3 If 41 QR-K1, RxKtP etc. Now
on the other hand 42 Kt-Q5 ! Is the
Now the situation has clarified
threat ; PxKt ; 43 Q-B7ch, K-R1 ; 44
Itself. White again loses a Pawn,
Q-Q8ch, K-R2 ; 45 QxPch, K-Ktl ;
and gets a sorry position besides.
46 Q-Q8ch, K-R2 ; 47 R-QR1ch, and
The consequences of 16 KtK1 etc.
mate in two moves.
would have been somewhat better.
21 K-R1 QxP Black cannot play 41 . _ . QxBP?
as the result would be the same : 42
22 Q-K2
Kt-K2, QxKP; 43 KtxB and wins,
In such positions, if one is to as the Knight cannot be taken
have any hope, the Queens should without the loss of a Rook ; e.g.
not be exchanged. A long death 44 Q-B7ch, K-R1 ; 45 Q-Q8ch, K-R2 ;
struggle follows. 46 QxRPch, K-Ktl ; 47 R-QR1, etc.
Yates was a sly fox !
22 R-Q5
23 Q R K 8 1 Q-Kt4 41 K-R21
24 Kt-Q1 K R-Q1
Now all combinations are out!
25 Kt-83 Q-Q2
26 R-Q1 P-KR4 42 R-Q R 1
27 Q-Q82 Q-83
An outburst o f despair.
28 Q-Kt1 R-Q Kt5 !
29 Q-82 R (at Q).Q5 42 RxP
30 Q-Q2 Q-Kt3 43 Q-Q1
160 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

If 43 RxRPch, K-Kt3 wins for must forego the attack against B4,
Black. whereupon R(Q4)-Q8 follows.

43 8xKt7 53 R ( Kt8)-KR8
R ( 88)-K87 1
A pity! The game is an example 54 R ( R8 ) x P
of Rubinstein's shattered nerves,
which particularly in the post-war Or 54 R-KKt8, P-B5; 5 5 K-Ktl,
period accounted for many of his P-B 6 ! 56 R-QKt4ch, RxR ; 67 KxR,
errors. This great master, noted PxP; 68 KxP, R-B5, etc.
for his remarkable correctness now 54 . ,RxK KtPch
releases the pressure. Here, for 55 K-R1 R-R7ch
example, was a beautifully con 56 K-Kt1 R (Q Kt7)-K Kt7ch
ducted game, spoiled by this in 57 K-81 R ( Kt7) -Q7
accuracy. He should have con 58 R (Q R4)-QKt4ch K-82
tinued with the artistic 43 . . . 59 K-Kt1 R ( R7) -K7
RxP! (44 KxR, Q-Kt6ch, and mate 60 R-QKt1 RxQP
follows) .
Another minor mistake ! More
44 Rx8 Q.Kt3 exact was 60 . . . RxKP, and i f
45 Q-KKt1 QxQch 61 R(R4)-QKt4, then 61 . . . P
46 KxQ K-Kt3 QKt4 and Black wins easily. Now
it takes longer for the Pawn at
Obviously Rubinstein has lost K4, which bears a charmed life,
the thread of the game. He might to succumb.
have decided the issue on the pre
vious move and here, as well as on 61 R ( K R4)-QKt4
the next move by R-QKt8. R (Q6)-Q2!
62 R ( Kt4 ) x KtPch K-Q1
47 R-84 R-Q7 63 R ( Kt7)-Kt5 K-K2
48 P-85 64 R-Q R5 R-Q7
65 ,K.81 R-K R7
Continuing perplexity ! Rubin
66 R-QR7ch K-81
stein could now play simply 48
67 K-Kt1 R ( Q7) -Kt7ch
. RxR followed by PxP.
68 K-81 R-QR7
48 . KtPxP White threatened a counter-at
49 R-88 R ( Kt5)-Kt7 tack by R-QR8ch. And R (QKtl )
50 R-K K t8 P-Q R 5 7 Kt8.
Now h e even loses a Pawn ! 69 K-Kt1 R ( K R7 ) -Q Kt7
Rubinstein must have overlooked RxR
70 RxR
that after 51 RxP, the King Rook K-Kt2
71 R-R3
Pawn would be loose, so that the K-R3
72 R-K Kt3ch
threat of mate by doubling the 73 K-81 R-Kt4
Rook on the eighth rank, would K-Kt4
74 R-K3
not be .possible. K-85
75 R-Kt3ch
51 R x R P R-Q8ch 76 R-Kt7 R-Kt2
5 2 K-R2 R-K88! n P-KR4 KxP
78 K-Kt2 K-83
At last he recovers his senses 79 R-Kt8 R-Kt7ch
and begins to play strongly again ! 80 K-R3 R-Kt6ch
If White now plays 53 RxKRP, 81 K-R2 P-85
he loses through Zug-Zwang and 82 R-Kt4 P-K4
in fact 53 . . . P-KB5 ! (the threat 83 R-Kt5 R-KKt6
is R-(Kt7)-Kt8) 54 R ( Kt8) -Kt4, P 84 R-K R5 R-Kt1
QKt5 ! 55 P-Q4, RxP, and White Resigns
SEMMERING, 1926 151

G n mfel d
A game that Ia spoiled by several
crude oversights. It belongs In
this volume, as 1t offers an in
sight into the artistic fate of Ru
binstein.

Game No. 82
Q U E E N'S G A M B I T ACC E PT E D

Semmering, 1926
R u b i n stein Gru nfeld
R ubi nste i n
1 p.Q4 P-Q4
2 P-QB4 P-K3
Q-B2, P-KB4 ; 18 BxKt, QRQB1 ;
3 Kt.KB3 PxP
1 9 Kt-Q4 ! as for example: 1 7 QR
4 P.K3 KKt.B3
QB1 ; 18 BxKRPch, K-R1 ; 19 Q
5 BxP P-QB4
QKtl, and Black cannot play P
6 o.o P.Q R3
KKt3, or finally 17 . . . KR-QB1 ;
7 Q-K2 Kt.QB3
18 BxKRPch, K-Bl ; 19 Q-Ktl, P
The immediate P-QKt4 Is better. KKt3; 20 BxKtP, PxB ; 21 QxKtP,
Kt-QB3 is usually good only i f P with a decisive attack.
QR4 has been played. After P If Black plays 16 . . . P-KR3 or
QKt4 and B-Kt2 the Queen's
16 . . . P-KKt3 there would follow :
Kn ight is better placed at Q2. 17 Q-Q3, KR-Q1 ; 18 Q-QB3 with a
8 Kt-QB3 B-K27 decisive advantage. The following
move, which weakens the Black
Since White has not played P King's position, Is therefore prac
QR4, B-K2 should be played only
tically forced.
after PxP. As 1t Is White gains
two tempi in a symmetrical posi 16 P-KB4
tion and thereby gains a clear 1 7 B-Kt1 P-K4
advantage. 18 P-K4! Kt-Q5
9 PxP! BxP White would have obtained an
10 P-Q R3 B-Q3 equally overwhelming position af
11 P-QKt4 0-0 ter P-B5, by B-R2ch and B-Q5.
12 B-Kt2 Q-K2
19 KtxKt PxKt
13 Q R-Q1 P-QKt4
14 B-Q3 B-Kt2 20 BxP PxP?
15 Kt-K41 20 . . . BxKP; had to be played.
Thereby beginning the attack. If then 21 P-KB3, then BB3 ! And
if 21 BxB, PxB ! ; (22 QKt4, QR
15 .
KtxKt Q1) . In each case Black would
1 6 BxKt have a very difficult, but perhaps
a playable game. After the text, a
Pawn goes.
(See Diagram In Next Column)
21 K R-K1 QR-K1
22 Q-KKt41
Now on the one hand 17 BxRPch
and 18 Q-Q3ch, and 19 QxB, is The threat Is 23 B-R2ch, and
threatened, and on the other, 17 BxKtPch, etc. However, If Black
152 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

had played KR-Kl in order to con 37 K-R3 R-K3


tinue now with 22 . . . QR-Q1, the 38 R-QR8 B-83
answer would be 23 P-B3 ! and 39 R-R 7 !
Black could not defend himsel!
Now 40 P-B3 ! is threatened, win
by R-KB5.
ning the Pawn, as the Pawn can
22 B-Kt1 not move because of the threat
23 8-R2ch K-R1 41 RxRP mate. Or if 39 . . . B-K2 ;
24 8xKtPch Qx8 40 B-R2 wins.
25 QxQch KxQ 39 B-Kt2
26 R-Q7ch K-R1
27 Rx8 Grunfeld
Perhaps Grunfeld aimed for this
variation, as now there are op
posite colored Bishops. But the
Pawns at K5 and R2 are very
weak. But White has an attack
and can thereby increase his ad
vantge decisively.

27 B-K4
28 8-87! R-Qt
29 P-KKt3 R-QS
30 K-Kt2 R-Q 8 1
31 R-K2 R-82
Apparently R-B6 would have
been stronger. The simplest con R u b instein
tinuation would have been : 32 R
K7, B-Q3 ; 33 R(K7) xP, etc. The 40 Bx K P ! !
more forceful 32 B-K6, RxRP ; 33 A beautiful and astonishing
B-B5, had much to commend it, as finale.
White gets a decisive attack If he
can bring the second Rook into 40 . . . . R ( QS) x8
the game. 41 RxR RxR
42 R x Pc h K-R4
32 R-Kt8ch K-Kt2 43 P-83 !
33 8-R2 B-83
The threatened mate can only
34 R-K Kt8ch K-R3
be parried by 43 . . . RxPch.
35 8-Kt1 R-K2
36 P-K R 4 ! 8-Kt2 Realgna
Chapter XUI
International Tournaments at Dresden. Budapest
and Hanover. 1926

Game No. 83 16 P-Q4 ? would have been an


error because of . . . PxP ; 17 KtxP,
A L E K H I N E'S D E F E N S E KtxKt ; 18 RxKt, Kt-B5 ! ; winning
material for Black. But even now
Dresden, 1926
White had to try P-QB3.
Yates Rubinstei n
16 K R-K1
1 P.K4 Kt-K83 1 7 Q-K4
2 P.K5 Kt-Q4
3 B-84 Kt-Kt3 The last chance for P-B3 ! P-Q4
4 8-Kt3 P-Q84 was still Impossible as Black ob
5 Q-K2 Kt-83 tains the superior position, by 17
6 Kt-K83 P-Q4 . . . PxP ; 18 KtxP, Kt-B 5 ! ; 19
7 PxP e.p. P-K31 BxKt, KtxKt ; 20 Q-K3, Q-B3.
8 Kt-83
17 Kt-83
Beginning an over-subtle man 18 Q-KR4
oeuvre that gives Black the better
game in a few moves. White There is nothing to be accom
plished by an attack against the
might have obtained a playable
King.
game by 8 P-QB3, BxP ; 9 P-Q4,
( Px P ; 10 PxP, B-Kt5ch; 11 B-Q2,
Ktx P ? ? ; 12 KtxKt, QxKt; 13 Q 18 Kt-Q5
Kt5ch ) . It must be noted in retro
Assuring himself finally of su
spect that with 3 B-B4 White chose
periority in the centre.
a variation that held little promise.
19 Kt-K5 Q-82
8 . . 8xP
9 Kt-K4 8-K2 20 Kt-R5 KtxKt
10 P-Q3 Kt-Q4 21 Q x Kt 8-Q3
11 0-0 0-0 22 Kt-Kt4 Ktx8
12 8-Q2 P-QKt3 23 RPxKt P-84
13 Q R-Q1 8-Kt2
14 K R- K 1 In view of his position, which
from every angle 1s superior,
14 P-B3 was more forceful. If Black's attack now proves irresist
then 14 . . . B-R3 ; then 15 P-QR4, ible.
and B-B4. White must give thought
to repulsing the threat against Q3, 24 Kt-K3 Q-83
If possible by P-Q4. Whether this 25 Q-R3 P-QKt4!
could have been attained Is ques
Preventing Kt-B4.
tionable, but there was no other
way to freedom.
26 Kt-81 P-K4
14 Q-Q2 27 8-Kt5 R-Q2
1 5 8-81 Q R-Q1 ! 28 P-K84 R-K82
16 Kt-Kt3 29 Q-K Kt3 R-K3 !

153
154 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

R ubinstein This also instead of the usual


P-K3 is a good continuation.
4 . . . . P-QB4
5 BxP PxP
6 KtxP
6 QxP is more consequent. After
6 . . . QxQ ; 7 KtxQ, White re
mains somewhat ahead in develop
ment.
6 P-QR3
7 B-K3
Better is 7 ()..(), (P-QKt4 ; 8 B
Q3) .
Yates 7 Kt- K B3
8 Kt-Q2
30 Q-82 R-Kt3
31 Kt-Q2 PxP With this move White gets into
32 Kt-83 P-KR3 difficulties-due to his effort to
33 P-KR4 protect the Pawn at K4. Blocking
the Queen's file is not good, but
If the B ishop moves, the Knight 8 Kt-QB3, P-QKt4 ; 9 B-Q3, B-Kt2 ;
is lost. was also unpleasant as P-Kt5 was
33 PxB threatened. It is only in certain
34 PxP Q..Q2 circumstances that the Queen's
35 R-Q2 BxKt Bishop belongs at K3, the prefer
36 QxB RxP able square is KKt5.
37 Q R-K2 Q-QKt2 8 . . . P-Q Kt4
38 R-K8ch B-81 9 B-Kt3 B-Kt2
39 Q-R3 R-Kt6 10 P-83 B-Q3
40 Q-R2 P-Kt3 !
41 K-82 R-R2 If 10 B-K2, the answer is B-Kt5.
42 Q-Kt1 Q..Q4 1 1 P-QR4
Resigns
Apparently very strong, but
Rubinstein played many tourna there is a painful surprise.
ment games against Yates. It is
a curious coincidence that Yates
almost always had the White R ubinstein
pieces.

Game No. 84

Q U E E N'S GA M BI T ACC E P T E D
Dresden, 1926
P. Johner Rubi nstein
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
2 P-QB4 P-K3
3 Kt-KB3 PxP
4 P-K4 Johner
DRESDEN, 1926 155

11 B-K4! In spite of the opposite colored


Bishops, White must lose as the
Obviously Johner anticipated that
two Pawns minus cannot be over
Black must play 11 . . . P-Kt5 ?
come. However, the position stlll
whereupon White gets a substan
contains some difficulty.
tial advantage by 12 Kt-B4.
29 P-R41
1 2 Kt-B1 Kt-B3 1

13 KtxKt QxQch The threat was 30 R-Q8ch, RxR;


14 BxQ ? 31 RxRch, K-R2 ; 32 P-R5, and
mate is unavoidable.
Leading to difficulties. 1 4 RxQ.
BxKt ; 15 PxP, and 16 B-Q4, was 30 R-Q B 1 R-KB5
Jn order. 31 B-K5 R-B4
32 R-B5 B-B3 7
14 . . BxKt
15 R-B1 B-Q2 An error which renders the wln
16 P-Q Kt3 0-0 doubtful. 32 . . . B-B 5 ! was correct.
17 Kt-Kt3 PxP
18 PxP K R-Kt1 Rubinstein

Black now has the superior game.


He is better developed and thereby
gets an attack against the oppos
ing Rook Pawn.

1 9 0-0 P-Q R4
20 R-KB2 R-Kt5
21 R-Q2 B-K1 !
BxRP? would have been an er
ror, indee d : 22 PB4, ( 22 B-B5,
R-QB1 ! ) KtxKP; (the Bishop at
B5 cannot move) 23 KtxKt, RxKt ;
24 PxP, BxR ; 25 RxB, and wins
because of the mate threat. Johner
22 Kt-K2?
33 R-Q3
R-R2 first was essential.
Instead of this 33 RxRP! was
22 . . . Bx R P ! called for. If then 33 . . . RxR;
23 P-B4 BxB 34 R-Q8ch, and White gets a draw
24 PxB by perpetual check o n R8 and Kt8.
This would have won a piece But White could not have obtained
before, but now i t is useless, as a safe draw by 33 RxP, as in
the Bishop at Q1 can recapture. dicated in the book of the tourney.
Black could have answered 33 . . .
24 . . . . BxKt R-K 1 ; and still retained a very
25 PxKt B-Kt4 strong Pawn plus. If Black had
26 R ( B1 )-Q1 P-K R3 ! played 32 . . . B-B5 ; 33 RxP, would
have been refuted by the freeing
2 6 . . . PxP? cannot be played check 33 . . . R-B8.
because of 27 B-R6 ! and White
has a strong position. 33 B-K51
34 Rx P ?

27 B-Q4 PxP
28 BxP RxP Incorrect-just a t this time and
29 P-R4 leading to immediate loss. But
156 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

the game was hopeless. If 34 R-K3, 12 . . . Kt-K5 ; would be a mis


there might follow : P-B3 ! ; 35 R take because of 13 BxB, QxB ; 14
KKt3ch, ( 35 RxP, RxP; and wins BxKt, PxB ; 15 Kt-Q2, B-B4 ; 16
easily) K-R1 ! ; 36 B-Q4, RxR ; 37 PB3, etc. But Kt-KR4 is better
BxR, R-KKtl, etc. And nothing than the move actually made.
but fruitless exchange was to be 1 3 Kt-Q2 K Kt-Q2
attained by 34 R-KKt3ch, K-B1 ;
35 B-Q6ch. Here again Kt-KR4 ! was in order.

R-B8ch 14 B-841 B-Kt4?


34 .

35 K-R2 This does not turn out well and


After 35 KxR, BxRch; and RxR, should have been deferred.
and Black wins a Rook. B-R4 ; or . . . Kt-KB3 followed by
B-Q3 ; would have been better.
.

35 RxR
36 R-Q8ch K-R2 1 5 P-K R 3 1
37 R-R8ch K-Kt3 Very good ! Now 15 . . . BxB
38 R-K Kt8c h K-R3 cannot be played, since the Bishop
If 38 . . . K-B4 ? ? ? 39 R-:kt5, (at Kt5) would be trapped after
mate would follow with shouts to 16 P.xB !
high heaven. But now there is 15 B-R4
no perpetual check, as Black has 1 6 B-R2 B-Kt3
opened the confines of his Bishop.
Resigns The Bishop Is threatened again.

17 BxB R PxB
18 Q-Kt3 Q-Kt3
19 Kt-Q R4! QxQ
20 KtxQ Kt-K3?

Takacs
Game No. 85

Q U E E N 'S GA M B I T D E C L I N E D

Budapest, 1926
Rubi nste i n Takacs
1 P-QB4 Kt-KB3
2 P-Q4 P-K3
3 Kt-Q B3 P-Q4
4 B-Kt5 Q Kt-Q2
5 P-K3 B-K2
6 Kt-83 0-0
7 R-81 P-83
8 Q-82 P-Q R 3
R u b i nstein
Here 8 . . . P-KR3 ; 9 B-R4, P
QB4 ; can be played. R-K1 Is also
somewhat more precise than the The Bishop exerts powerful
text. pressure, and it was not easy for
Black to find a continuation In
9 PxP K Px P any way satisfactory. The chief
10 B-Q3 R-K1 trouble Is that the QKt Pawn can
11 0-0 Kt-81 be protected neither by R-QKtl
12 R-K1 B-K Kt5 nor by R-K2. Still there were
BUDAPEST, 1926 157

.wo continuations that offered up on the Queen's side, White


Black substantial drawing chances. achieves the decisive breach on
I 20 . . . PQR4 ; 21 Kt(Kt3) the King's side.
85, (21 Kt(R4)-B5, P-R5 ! ) P-QKt4 ; 35 . . P-K Kt3
22 KtxKt, KtxKt ; 23 Kt-B5, KtxKt; 36 R-K Kt1 Kt-82
24 RxKt, R-R3 ; 25 KR-QB1, R-K3 ; 37 P-K R4 1 KtPxP
26 P-QR4, PxP ; 27 B-B7, P-R6 ! ; 3 8 PxP PxP
28 PxP, B-K 2 ; 29 RxP, RxR; 30
BxR, BxP. After 38 . . . P-KKt4, the strong
est continuation Is 39 Kt-B 4 ! with
II 20 . . . B-Q1 ; 21 Kt(Kt3)-B5, the threats of Kt-Q6ch, followed
KtxKt ; 22 KtxKt, R-R2 ; and since by RxP, as well as K;t-Q2 and K-Kt4
White cannot play 23 R-B3, Black etc.
will have time to drive away the
Knight by B-Kt3, and thereafter 39 R-Kt7
to bring the fleeing Rook back Into This move was handed up by
the game. Rubinstein just before the evening
After the text, Black Is en intermission. At the resumption
meshed In a fatal impasse. of play, a minor incident occurred.
Rubinstein came a few minutes
21 Kt-R5! R-R2 late. Meanwhile the tourney offi
22 K-81 cials had opened the envelope and
Protecting the Rook against the had made the move R-Kt2. Rubin
threat . . . KtxP ; and preparing stein immediately demonstrated
23 R-B3. that he had intended R-Kt7 as his
sealed move. After repeated dem
22 . 8-Q1 onstration it became clear that
23 P-QKt4 ! ! P-K84 Rubinstein had indicated the text.
Or 23 . . . B-B2 ; 24 BxB, KtxB ; 39 , , Kt-Q1
25 Kt-B5, KtxKt ; 26 KtPxKt, with 40 R-Kt8 P-85
a winning position for White by 41 R-KR8
means of the attack on the QKt
file. 41 KtxKtP would be premature.

24 Kt-Kt2 ! P-K Kt4 41 . PxP


25 Kt-Q3 42 PxP K-Q2
43 R-KKt2! R-K1
Rubinstein plays the ending In 44 RxP R-K2
notable style. 45 R-R8 K-82
46 R ( Kt2) -Kt8 R-Q2
25 K-82
47 Kt-Kt3 ! P-R4
. .

26 R-82 8-Kt3
48 Kt-81 R-R1
27 8-Q 6 ! Kt-Q1
28 Kt-85! KtxKt Finally this Rook returns from
29 8xKt 8x8 exile : but it can no longer save
the situation.
Finally the formidable Knight
file must be opened. 49 Kt-Q3 P-Q Kt4

30 KtPx8 K-K2 The Knight threatened after


31 R-Kt2 K-Q2 proper preparation to reach K6,
32 K R-QKt1 K-81 and to complete the tie-up on the
33 K-K2 R-K2 8th rank. Hence the desperate
34 K-83 R-K5 climax.
35 P-K Kt4!
50 PxP e.p, KxP
After his opponent is fully tied 51 Kt-85 R-Q3
158 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

52 P-Q R4 R-QB1 Frh. v. Holzhausen


53 K-Kt4!
Now might follow : 53 . . . R-R1 ;
(RQKtl ; 54 R-Kt7, and 55 RxKt ! )
54 K-B5, R-QB1 ; 55 R-B8 (to pre
vent . . Kt-B2ch after the next

move) R-QKtl ; 56 K-K5, clearly


winning a piece.
Or 53 . . . K-B2 ; 54 R-Kt7ch,
K-Ktl ; ( K-Kt3, RxR! ) 55 R-R7
and the threat 56 Kt-R6ch and 57
R-R7 mate is decisive.

Resi.gns
A remarkably fine ending! R u b i nstei n

1 2 P-KKt4!
Very forcefully played ! Rubin
stein once more assures himself of
the two Bishops.

Game N o . 86 12 KtxKt

Q U E E N'S G A M B I T ACCEPTED White also gets far the superior


position after 12 . . . B-Kt3 ; 13
Hanover, 1926 KtxB, RPxKt ; 14 P-QR5, Kt-Q 4 ;
15 P-K4. The Rook file I s with
Rubi nstei n Frh. v. Holzhausen out significance.
1 P-Q4 P-Q4 1 3 PxB Kt( K4) -Q2
2 P-QB4 PxP 1 4 P-R5 Kt-Q4
3 Kt-KB3 B-Kt5 15 P-K4 Kt-Kt5
The Queen's Gambit Accepted
Neither . . . KtxKt ; or . . . Kt
otrers a good defense in its usual
KB3 ; was any better.
variations. Hence Black had no
need of such artificial manoeuvres. 1 6 P-K B4 0-0
17 P-K5 Q-82
4 Kt-K5 B-R4
18 B-K3 P-KB4
5 QKt-83 Kt-Q2
5 . . . P-K3 leads to a lost posi This leads to a clear loss. But
tion, after 6 P-KKt4, B-Kt3 ; 7 P there was no defense against the
KR4 ( Dr. Alekhine-Grunfeld, Sem oncoming King's side attack. If
mering 1926). Black plays P-KKt3 in order to
stop P-B5, the continuation would
6 Ktx K B P P-Q B3 be B-K4 and the control of the
7 P-K Kt3 ! P-K3 Knight file and obviously the
8 B- Kt2 K Kt-K B3 Black King position cannot hold
9 0-0 B-K2 up long.
10 P-QR4 Kt-Kt3
11 Kt-K5 K Kt-Q2 19 Q-Kt3! Kt-Q4
20 Ktx Kt!
Black has an Inferior game and
takes special pains to dislodge the That this exchange in conjunc
formidable White Knight at K5. tion with the next move, brings
HANOVER, 1926 159

about a decisive result, is astonish The most forceful continuation


ing and very pretty. is 5 . . . B-Kt5. White thereafter
cannot well avoid the doubling of
20 . K Px K t
the Pawns of the QB file. In truth

Or 20 . . . BPxKt; 21 KR-QB1, he retains the two Bishops and


Q-Ktl ; 22 BxQP ! ; etc. valuable supporting points in the
21 K R-Q 8 1 !
center, but the game remains two
edged.
Now the Queen's Pawn can be
protected only at the cost of the 6 KtxKt KtPxKt
Queen's Knight Pawn. 7 P-KKt3 P-Q4

21 . K-R1 Weakens the Pawn position. But


the continuation 7 . . . P-Q3 etc.
Or 21 . . . Q-Ktl ; 22 BxPch, is not playable, as the Bishop be
etc. Black is lost. comes restricted, and the immedi
22 8xQP Q-Q1 ate attack Kt-QR4 and P-QB5 i s
23 8-83 R-QKt1 provoked. Th e best continuation
24 P-Q5 ! Q-K1 might be 7 . . 0-0 ; 8 B-Kt2, P
.

QR4 ; 9 0-0, B-R3. If then the


Sheer desperation ! Bishop is attacked by the Knight,
25 8 x R P Black can play Q-K2, as White's
Q-R4 contains no threat. And if
Even stronger than 25 P-Q6. All White plays P-QKt3, he must pre
lines are now opened. pare himself for the break-through
25 . . . . R-R 1 P-R5. Black has prospects of get
26 QxKtP PxP ting equality.
27 R-87 R-K82 8 8-Kt2 0-0
28 P-K6 8-84! ch
29 Rx81 A spirited Pawn sacrifice ! It
has only the disadvantage that
Black was hoping for 29 BxB, White doesn't have to accept it.
KtxB ; 30 PxR, Q-K6ch and KtxQ.
29 . Kt-K4 9 0-0
30 PxR Ktx8ch
31 K-R1 Q-K81
32 Qx R ! QxQ M l esea
33 Q R-81 Resigns

Game No. 87

ENGLISH OPENING

Hanover, 1926
R ub i nstein M ieses
1 P-Q84 P-K4
Rubi nstein
2 Kt-Q83 Kt-K83
3 Kt-83 Kt-83
4 P-Q4 PxP If 9 PxP, PxP; 10 KtxP, KtxKt ;
5 KtxP 8-84 there can then follow : -
160 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

I 11 BxKt, B-Kt5ch ; 12 K-B1, B stein permits no hope or a counter


R6ch ; 13 K-Ktl, P-B 3 ; 14 B-Kt3, attack.
Q-K2 ; with a strong attack ( 15
B-K3?, Q-K5 ! ) 17 . Q-K3
1 8 K R.Q1 P-K84
II 11 QxKt, B-Kt5ch ; 12 K-B1
An e ffort to bring about com
( 1 2 B-Q2 ?, QxQ ; 13 BxQ, BxBch ;
plications, which but speeds the
14 KxB, R-Q1 ; wins a piece) 1 2
end.
. . . B-K3 ! ; ( Naturally not 12 . . .
QxQ ; 13 BxQ, R-Q1 ; 14 B-Kt3 ! and 19 R-K5 Q-82
White can defend hlmselt) 13 QxQ, 20 Kt.Q5
QRxQ ; 14 B-K3, P-QR4 and Black
is clearly better. The threat B-K2- The threat 1s 21 RxKBP ! , and
B3 1s difficult to meet. KtK7ch, etc. If 21 . . . P-KKt3 ? ;
22 R-K7, wins the Queen.
9 8-R3
20 Q R.Q1
Now there Is no adequate de
tense for the Pawns. If 9 . Comparatively best was 20 .
B-K3 ; 10 Q-R4. QR-K1, Black counted on 21 Rx
KBP, whereupon QxR; 2 2 Kt-K7ch,
10 PxP PxP K-R2 ; 23 KtxQ, RxRc h ; with two
1 1 Q-R4 8-Kt2 Rooks for the Queen.
12 8-Kt5 R-Kt1
21 Kt.. K 7ch K-R1
It 12 . . . PQB3 ; 13 QR-B1, or 22 RxR RxR
13 QR-Q1, as actually played. 23 Ktx8 P R-K 81
24 Kt-R41 P-K Kt4
13 Q R-Q1
25 QxQ
13 KR-Q1 Is weaker, as after 13
. . . P-KR3; 14 BxKt, the Pawn 25 Kt-Kt6ch would prove to be
at KB2 Is menaced. a delusion after 25 . . . K-Kt2 !

P-K R 3 25 RxQ
13 .

K-R2

26 Kt-85
If 13 . . . P-QB3 ; 14 P-K4, ( . . . 27 P-KKt4 R-83
P-Q5 ; 15 B-K3,) would win a Pawn 28 R-K7ch K-Kt1
at least. Hence Mleses makes no 29 P-Q Kt4 P-QR4
effort to protect the Queen's Pawn. 30 P-Kt5 P-Q84
31 P-K4 K-81
14 8xKt Qx8
32 R-QKt7 P-85
15 8xP 8x8
33 P-K5 R-KS
16 Rx8 8-Kt3
34 R-Kt8ch K-82
17 Q-K841
35 Kt-Q6ch K-KtS
The game Is decided. Rubin 36 R x 8 Realgne
Chapter XIV
International Tournament at Kissingen and Tageblatt
Tourney at Berlin. 1 928

Game N o. 88 and is even ready-as we shall


see-to exchange his best placed
B E N O N I COU N T E R-GA M B I T
piece-the Bishop at Kt2. How
Kissingen, 1928 ever, he would have done better
to have brought a gradual pres
R u b i nste i n M i eses
sure to bear on the King's file, by
1 P-Q4 P-QB4 . . . Q-Q2 ; . . . R-K2 ; and . . .
2 P-Q5 P-Q3 QR-Kl ; and above all to prevent
the advance P-K5.
Better Is 2 P-K4 ; 3 P-K4,
P-Q3 with a view toward playing 1 5 Kt-QB3 Kt-R47
P-KB4. The game transposes Into 16 K-R2 BxKt7
a King's Indian Defense. 1 7 Px B ! Kt-KB3

3 P-QB4 P-KKt3
M i eses
4 P-KKt3! B-Kt2
5 B-Kt2 Kt-KB3
6 P-K4 0-0
7 Kt-K2 Q Kt-Q2
In this very difficult defense the
greatest exactitude Is essential.
Black could have gotten some
counter-play by 7 . . . P-K3 and
PxQP; to be followed by . . .
R-K l ; and . . . QKt-Q 2 ; and as
soon as possible P-QB 5 ; and
Kt-B4.

8 P-K B4 Kt-Kt3
9 Q-B2 P-K3 Rubi nstein
1 0 0-0 PxP
. . R-Kl was somewhat better. It is strange that Rubinstein has
In any event White could continue never had the reputation ascribed
by 11 P-QR4 with good effect, since to Janowski, Kashdan, etc. of be
the reply 11 . . . P-QR4 permits Ing "masters of the Bishop," for he
the Queen's Knight to reach QKt5 plays for Bishops vs. Kts in the
by QR3. majority of his games with such
obvious relish! More Important
1 1 BPxP R-K1 than his play for Bishops is his
12 Q K t-B3 B-Kt5 knowledge of what to do when he
13 P-KR3 BxKt has them!
Black has no real use for the 18 P-Q B41
Bishop and no good square.
1 4 KtxB Q-K2 The King's Pawn could not be
protected. If 18 R-Kl ?, KtxQP !
This is much too daring! Black
wants to win the King's Pawn, 18 . . Ktx K P

161
162 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS :MASTERPIECES

Black has gained his end, but 7 PxP QxP


has also sealed his doom. The long 8 P-KKt3 !
scope of the White Queen's Bishop
Typically Rubinstein! Instead of
Is devastating.
capturing the Queen's Bishop Pawn
19 B-Kt2 P-KR3 and giving his opponent attacking
chances, he ofl'ers the sacrifice
Or 19 . . . Kt-KB3 ; 20 Q-B3, himself in order to obtain an at
QKt-Q2 ; 21 QR-K1, Q-B1 ; 22 P-Kt4, tack as soon as possible.
etc. If 19 . . P-KR4 ; 20 PB5 !
1s even stronger than QR-K1. 8 . . QxQKtP
9 B-Kt2 P-Q3
20 Q R-K1 P-84 10 0-0 0.0
21 P-KKt4! K-R2
22 PxP PxP Dr. Tartakower criticizes this
23 R-K Kt1 R-K Kt1 move and avers that 10 . . . BB4 ;
24 BxKt was preferable (P-K4, B-Q2 ; and
I! 24 . . . PxB ; 25 RxP ! , and if Q-0-0 ) .
24 . . . RxR; 25 BxPch, etc. (Or
1 1 Kt-Kt3 1
24 RxKt ! )
Beginning a clever enclrcllng of
Realgna
the Bishop at Kt5.

11 Q.B3
Not sensing his opponent's plan.
Otherwise P-KR3 would have been
played.
Game No. 89
12 Kt-Kt5 P-K R3
B U DA PEST D E F E N S E 13 Kt-K41 Q-82

The Bishop, as well as the Queen


Kisslngen, 1928
was in danger. e.g. 14 . . Q-K2 ;
Rubi nstei n Dr, Tartakower 15 P-QR3, and White wins a Pawn,
as 15 . . . BR4 ; Is met by 16
1 P.Q4 Kt-KBS
KtxB, KtxKt ; and 17 Q-Q5ch.
2 P-QB4 P-K4
3 PxP Kt-Kt5 14 P-QR3 B-R4
4 B-84 B-Kt5ch 15 KtxB
5 Q Kt-Q2
Although Black has escaped the
This move, recommended by Dr. main variation of the opening ( 6
Bernstein, rests on the thought . . . PB3) Rubinstein has his Bish
that White forgoes any chances of ops and at the same time has
gaining material, but gets a good secured several advantages. We
position and retains his Bishops. shall soon see!
Retains his Bishops ? Rubinstein
needs no other admonition. 15 KtxKt
1 6 P-K R3 1 Kt-K4
5 Kt-QB3
Forced. It 16 Kt-B3 ? ; 17

6 Kt- K B3 P-K B3
KtxKtch, Is decisive as Black must
The main variation goes : 6 . . . retake with the Pawn.
QK2 ; 7 P-QR3 ! , KKtxKP; 8 Ktx
17 P-QB5 ! !
Kt, KtxKt ; 9 P-K3, (PxB ? ?, Kt
Q6ch) BxKtch ; 10 QxB, and ob Black has no adequate defense
viously White has the better game. against this threat.
KISSINGEN, 1928 163

Tartakower 23 P-K Kt4 Q-85


24 8xP 8x8
24 . . . QxQ ; 25 BxBch etc.
25 QxBch K-R2
26 P-K3i Q-86
27 QxKtP

The threatened mate can in no


wise be prevented. If 27 . , .
R-KKtl or R-B2 ; 28 Q-R5ch, and
1l 27 . . . Q-B2 ; 28 Q-R4ch and
mate next move.
27 QxRP
28 Q.Kt7 m ate

Rubi nste i n

17 . P-KKt4
Understandable nervousnes s ! The
weakening of the King's position is
much more serious than the loss
of a. Pawn. If 17 . B-K3 ; 18 . .
Game N o. 90
PxP, PxP; 19 KtxP, (19 QxQP,
E N G L I S H O P EN I N G
QKt-B5) Q-B 3 ; (20 Q-Q4 ?, KtB6
ch) etc. Berlin, Tageblatt Tourney, 1928
17 . QKtB5 ; 18 PxP, R-Q1 ;
. .
R ub i nste i n Dr. Tarra ach
still offered at least the possiblllty
of all kinds of complications. 1 P-QB4 P-Q84
2 Kt-KB3 Kt-KB3
18 8-Q2 P-Q4 3 P-Q4 PxP
4 KtxP P-Q4
As a result of the emasculated
King's position, Black's situation The English opening has de
is quite hopeless. If 18 . Kt-Kt6 . . veloped Into a variation of the
the answer is not the modest 19 Queen's Gambit Declined.
R-QKtl but 20 PxQP ! (or accord
5 PxP KtxP
ing to Dr. Tartakower 20 B-B 3 ! ,
6 P-K4 Kt-K 83
KtxR ; 21 PxQP! ! ) KtxR; 2 1 QxKt,
7 Kt.Q83 P-K4
or 21 B-B3 with an irresistible
8 Kt (Q4)-Kt5
attack.
At St. Petersburg In 1909, against
18 . . QKt-B5 would also be
Mieses, White played 8 B-Kt5ch,
.

insufficient because of 19 PxP,


and the comparison of the two
PxP; 20 B-B3, P-Q4 ; 21 Kt-Q6 ! ,
games is Interesting. The text
KtxKt ; 2 2 BxKt, and BxP.
move is two-edged.
1 9 Ktx KtP ! PxKt
8 . QxQch?
20 8xKt 8-K3
,

21 8-Q83 Kt-83 A grave and in fact the decisive


error, as the resulting ending
Kt-Kt3 was no better. There
proves to be very unfavorable for
was no longer any salvation : Black. 8 . P-QR3! would have
Black's moves are equally unavall
. .

been a strong move. Thereupon


1ng.
White could not very well trade
22 Q-Q2i Q-84 Queens a.s the proud Knight at
164 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Kt5 would have only the sorry re 29 . . K-KS


treat to R3. Therefore 9 Q-R4
would have been necessary. But Tarraach
it Is questionable whether in that
case after 9 . . . Kt-QB3 ; 10
B-Kt5, B-K2, Black's game w ould
not be more desirable.
II II &
9 KxQ Kt-R3
10 P-83
1 1 Kt-R4
8-Q84
8-K2
This should have been played on II -\
the previous move. But in that a a
event White would Immediately
have played the following move. II . J. II II
12 8-K3 8-Q2

13 R-81 0-0 Rubinstein
14 P-Q R3 K R-Q1
15 K-K1 Kt-K1
30 Ktx K P I
16 8-K2 Kt-Q3
17 Kt( R4)-Q831 KtxKt A pretty little combination ! As
18 KtxKt P-QKt3 fruit of the unsurpassed technique,
White gains the most important
19 P-Q Kt4 ! 8-K3
Pawn, and the position can n o
20 K-82 R-Q2
longer b e held.
21 K R-Q1 ! RxR
If 21 . . . QR-Q1 ? 22 RxR, RxR; 30
Kt-82
23 R-B8ch, B-Q1 ; 24 KtxRP. By If 30 . . . BxKt ; 31 B-B4ch, K
exchanging Queens Black has got B 3 ; 32 R-Q6ch, and 33 BxB.
ten into a very bad position, his
Queen's side is permanently crip 31 8-84ch K-K2
pled. Rubinstein exploits the open 32 Kt-86ch K-81
ing error of his opponent in con 33 8x8 Px8
structive fashion. 34 R-QBch Kt-K1

22 R x R K-81 If 34 . . . K-Kt2, a verry pretty


2 3 P-Kt3! K-K1 finale might arise : 35 R-Kt8ch,
24 P-84 ! P-83 K-R3 ; 36 Kt-QS, B-Kt5 ; 37 Kt
B7ch, K-R4 ; 38 RxB ! ! , KxR; 39
Even more unfavorable, if pos B-K2ch, K-R3 ; 40 K-Ktl ! , and there
sible, would be 24 . . . PxP; 25 Is no available defense for the
PxP, P-B3, (what else?) 26 Kt threat of 41 Kt-R6 and 42 B-B1ch
Q6ch, BxKt; 27 RxB, B-B1 ; etc. mate.
25 PxP PxP 35 P-Kt5 B-Kt2
26 8-Q 8 1 ! B-Q 81 36 R-Q7 BxKt
27 8-Kt2 8-83 37 Px8
28 Kt-Q6ch K-K2
In view of the threat of R-B7ch
29 Kt-84 !
and the further discovered check,
Dashing the last hope of Black. White wins a piece.
If 29 KtxBch, RxKt ; 30 BxKt?, and
Resign
the game becomes quite even af
ter R-B7ch and RxB. An outstanding game !
BERLIN, TAGEBLATT, 1928 165

Game No. 91 now he destroys the fruit of all


his work. He should In no wise
N I MZOW I TSC H D E F E N S E have been deterred from the fur
ther advance of P-QR5. . . . KR
Berlin, Tageblatt-Tourney, 1928
QKtl, followed by . . . Q-Q1 was In
R u b i nste i n N i mzowitsch order.
1 P-Q4 Kt-K83 19 P-84 ! PxP
2 P.Q84 P-K3 20 PxP Kt-81
3 Kt-Q83 8-Kt5 21 8-81 ! Q-Q1
4 Q-82 P-Q3 22 Q-K82!

The safest and best continua- Rubinstein is In his element !


tion is 4 . . . P-Q4. H i s opponent unashamedly wants
to "swindle" him : 22 B-Kt2 ?, Kt
5 P-K3 P-84 Kt5ch ; 23 PxKt ( forced ) , Q-R5ch ;
6 8-Q3 Kt-83 24 K-Ktl, QxKt ; 25 P-Kt5, R-K6
7 Kt-K2 P-K4 and Black has an obvious advan
The Pawn set-up K4, Q3, QB4, tage.
is, generally speaking, unfavorable. 22 . . P-R5
It is better to reserve either K4 23 8-Kt2 Kt-Kt3
or B4 for one of the minor pieces. 24 QR.Q1 PxP
25 PxP R-R2
8 P-Q5 8xKtch
9 Qx8 The Queen's Rook file is value
less for Black. It offers neither
If 9 KtxB, QKt-Kt5, and KtxB attacking possibilities nor points
might follow. of entry.
9 Kt-K2 26 QR-K1 ! RxR
10 Q-82 0-0
11 0-0 Kt-Kt3 2 6 . . . R-QR1 was a little better.
12 Kt-Kt3 R-K1 27 RxR Kt-81
13 P-83 8-Q2
14 8-Q2 P-QR3 Here again R-QR1 was some
15 P- K R 3 what better. The threat 28 BxKt, !
PxB ; 29 Kt-R5 and QQKt2 would
P-QR4 would only lead to a weak have tied him up. Ultimately
ening of his own Queen's wing, Black's position was lost in any
as Black might reply with the very event.
effective P-QKt4. Hence Rubin
stein foregoes the preliminary 28 8xKt ! !
protection of the Queen's wing, A surprise and very brilliant!
and prepares a strong attack The hostile Queen is stalemated.
against the King.
28 . . . . QxB
15 P-QKt4
1 6 P-Kt3 Q-Kt3 Or 28 . . . PxB ; 29 Kt-R5, etc.
17 K-R2 P-QR4 29 Kt-K4.
18 QR-Kt1
As long as the Black Knight re
Preventing P-QR5. mained on Kt3, this was not pos
sible, in view of the weakness of
18 P-Kt5?
the King's Bishop Pawn. Even the

With great care Nimzowltsch preliminary move P-B5 and there


has prepared a beautiful counter after BxKt (which was previously
attack on the Queen's side. But possible) would have lost much
166 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

of its punch as Black could an Position after 35 Kt-Q2


swer the Knight's move by Q
N i mzowitsch
K4ch.

29 Q-R3

Forced.
30 P-85 R-R6
31 R-QKt1 R-R3
32 P-Kt41
Threatening 33 P-Kt5 and B-K2.
Black's next move Is forced.

32 P-83
33 K-Kt3!

The King takes over the pro


tection of KB4 and KR4, thereby R u binstein
Increasing the mobility of his
Queen, while the Black Queen re
39 Q-B7ch K-R1
mains hemmed in.
40 R-KS R-Q1
33 . . . . B-81
So as to bring about perpetual
Intending . . Kt-Q2 and K4,
check after 41 RxR '! by Q-K6ch
but White immediately calls a halt. etc.

34 R-K1 41 QxBPch K-Kt1


42 Q-K6ch K-Kt2
If 34 . . . Kt-Q2 ; 35 KtxQP, 43 P-B6ch Resigns
RxKt ; 36 R-K8ch, and RxB, etc.
Or if 35 . . . Kt-K4, then would An e x t r a o r d i n a r i l y beautiful
follow, not the dubious gain of a game !
piece by 36 RxKt and KtxB, but
the simpler and stronger QxP!

34 B-Kt2
Game No. 92
35 Q-K2

Stopping-as we shall see-Kt Q U E EN'S GA M B I T DECLI N ED


Q2, and threatening P-R4 and P
Kt5, as the Queen now controls Berlin, Tageblatt-Tourney, 1928
the square R5. Rubinstein Retl

35 Kt-Q2 1 P-Q4 Kt-KB3


2 P-QB4 P-K3
3 Kt-QB3 P-Q4
(See Diagram In Next Column) 4 B-Kt5 Q Kt.Q2
5 P-K3 P-QB3
6 Kt-83 Q-R4
36 KtxQP!
7 PxP
Ruinous !
This was long a favorite vari
36 RxKt ation, but was discarded when it
37 Q-KSch Kt-81
appeared that Black obtained a
38 R-K7 P-KKt3 good game with the South-Slav
variation : 7 . . KtxP ; 8 QKt3,
.

After 38 . . . P-KKt4 ; 39 PxP e.p. B-Kt5 ; 9 R-QB1, P-K4 ! etc.


BERLIN, TAGEBLATT, 1928 167

7 . KK5
If 17 B-QB4, 17 . . . Kt-R5 ! is
very strong. White could not then
Not without merit, but Indeed prevent the exchange of the King's
weaker than 7 KtxP. Bishop as after 18 B-Kt3 ? ? mate
in three moves would follow : 1 8
8 PxKP PxP
9 Q-R4
. Kt-Kt7ch a n d B-R3ch o r B
.

B4ch etc.
The Pawn cannot be maintained.
17 . . . . Kt.. K3
Hence 9 B-R4, B-Kt5 ; 10 Kt-Q2,
18 Kt-K83!
etc. was preferable.
Not 1 8 B-KB4 ? ? because of
9 . . . . QxQ 18 . . . BxKt etc. Nor can 18
10 KtxQ 8-Kt5ch B-R4 be played because of 1 8 .

Rubinstein now gets into great KtxKt; 19 PxKt, B-K3 ; 20 R-B2,


difficulties, but he defends him B-B4 etc.
self with unruffled calm. 18 . . . . Ktx8
1 1 K-K2 P-Q Kt4 After 18 . . . Kt-B4, the game
would obviously be drawn by repe
Regaining the Pawn.
tition of moves. But Reti still
12 Kt-83 ! hopes to win by the following
combination.
12 P-QR3 would be bad because
of 12 . . . Ktx B ; 13 KtxKt, B-K2 ; 19 KtxKt 8-Kt5c h
14 KtxKP, PxKt ; 15 Kt-B7ch, K The fact that 19 BxKP offered
B 2 ; 16 KtxR, B-R3ch ; etc. Equally better drawing chances is irrele
to be avoided was 12 Kt-B5, QKtx vant, inasmuch as Reti could have
Kt; 13 PxKt, BxP; 14 R-QB1, 0-0; obtained a draw with much less
since it is poor strategy to further danger by 18 . . . Kt-B4 etc.
the opponent's development, when
we are ourselves poorly developed. 20 K-82
To avoid 20 0-0-0 and R-
12 KtxKt

Q7ch etc.
13 PxKt 8xP
14 R-81 P-Kt5 20 . . . 0-0-0
15 K-Q1 2 1 8-Q3 8-K7

Now White has the superior Reti has counted on this move.
Pawn position. If he has time to Still he appears to have over-rated
complete his development, it must this move.
prove decisive. Reti rightly ap
praises the situation and decides Reti
upon a vigorous attack.

15 - P-K4!
The Pawn sacrifice aims to
quickly exploit the superiority on
the Queen's side. White's situa
tion becomes most critical.
1 6 Px P !

Not 16 KtxP? a s KtxKt; 1 7 PxKt,


B-K3 ! ; 18 R-B2, P-QR4 ; leads to
an irresistible attack.
16 Kt-84
17 Kt..Q 4! R u b i nstein
168 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

22 K R-Q1 ! ! 39 K-K2 R-Q88


40 K-Q2 R-85
A brilliant move ! Obviously 2 2
41 K-Q3 R-88
B-B5ch, K-Kt2 ; 23 Kt-K4, B-Q6ch;
42 R-K Kt7 R-Q8ch
24 K-Kt3, BxKt; 25 BxB, R-Q7 ; 26
R-B2, would have been an adequate Or 42 . . . R-KKt8 ; 43 K-Q4,
defense. But Rubinstein is playing R-Kt5 ; 44 RxPch, RxR ; 45 P-B5ch,
for a win. K-B 2 ; 46 PxRch, KxP ; 47 K-B5,
K-B 2 ; 48 K-Q 6 ! and wins.
22 RxB
K3

K8ch
This a ppears to be very strong 44 K-Q4 R-Q8ch
as now the other Rook gets to Q7.
45 K-85 R-QB8ch
On the other hand 22 . . . BxRch P-84
46 K-Kt6
would clearly have been unfavor
able as after 23 RxB, White would Or 46 . . . R-KKt8, 47 RxPch, etc.
get a decisive advantage by the
double threat of 24 P-KB4 ! and 24 47 RxPch K-K2
Kt-B7. 48 P-85 R-85
49 K-86 RxP
23 RxR Bx Rch 50 K-Q5 RxRP
24 KxB R-Q1ch 51 R-Kt7ch K-81
25 K-84 R-Q7 52 P-86 R-K 85
26 Kt-K4! RxRP 53 K-K6 R-Q R5
27 KtxB PxKt 54 R-QB7 R-R3ch
28 P-84 ! ! 55 K-85 P-K R5
56 R-88ch K-82
A surprise and much more force 57 P-K6ch Resigns
ful than 28 R-KBI, P-B7 ; 29 R
QBl ! , which would also have won.

- - RxP
29 RxP!
The point of the previous move !
If now 29 . . . RxP; 30 R-Q3 ! !
Black has no satisfactory defense Game No. 93
against the threatened advance of
DUTCH D E F E N S E
the King's Pawn.
Berlin, Tageblatt-Tourney, 1928
29 . K-Q2
R u b i nste i n Dr. Tartakower
To prevent the King from being
cut off. 1 P-Q4 P-K3
2 P-QB4 P-K84
30 R-R 3 ! K-K3 3 P-K3 Kt-K83
31 RxP 4 P-KB4
Now Wbite has an easily won Rubinstein has essayed this de
game. velopment several times with suc
cess. The advance of the King
31 P-R4
Pawn, P ( K3 ) -K4, which Black aims

32 P-R4 R-Kt5
at in the Dutch Defense is thereby
33 K-Q4 P-Kt3
rendered very difficult.
34 R-K Kt7 R-Kt8
35 K-K4 R-Kt7 4 Kt-K5
36 R-QB7 R-QB7 5 Kt-K83 8-Kt5ch
37 K-Q3 R-Q88 6 Q Kt-Q2 P-Q Kt3
38 P-K4 R-Q8ch 7 B-Q3 8xKtch
BERLIN, TAGEBLATT, 1928 119

8 8x8 Ktx8 Tartakower

This second exchange furthers


the development of his opponent.
Better was 8 BKt2. White's
. .

Queen Bishop Is generally innocu


ous in this opening.

9 QxKt 8-Kt2
10 o.o 0-0
1 1 QR-K1

It becomes apparent that White


cannot well play P-K4. Hence an
other Rook move was In order, or
perhaps PQKt4.
Rubi nste i n
11 Q-83
12 P-QKt4 2 1 P-Q 5 !
If 12 P-K4, there might follow : Completely disrupting Black s '

PxP; 13 BxP, BxB ; 14 RxB, P position.


Q4 ; 15 R-K2, QxBP; 16 QxQ, RxQ ;
17 RxKP, PxP ; 18 R-K8ch, R-KB1 ; 21 B-81
PxP
. .

19 RxRch, KxR; 20 Kt-K5ch, K 8xP


Ktl ; 21 R-B7, Kt-B3 ; 22 RxBP, 23 R-84 8-8 1 1
KtxKt ; 23 PxKt, R-Kl. But Ru
binstein is not playing to draw. . . R (Kt2)-B2 was in order,
whereupon 24 Q-Kt2 would have
followed. The weakness of the
12 Kt-83
KB4 in conjunction with the
. . .

13 Kt-K5 QR.Q1
cramped King's position must lead
14 KtxKt 8xKt
to loss in the end.
15 P-Kt5 8-Kt2
16 R-81 P-Q3 24 P-K4!
17 P-QR4 P-Kt4
Winning the Pawn, whereupon
Daring, but more promising than White also attains a superiority
say P-Kt3 with the thought of P-K4. on the King's side.

1 8 PxP QxKtP 24 . . . . K-R1


1 9 R-K82 R-Q2 25 Px P 8-Kt2
20 Q R-K81 R-K Kt2 1
If 25 . . BxP ? ; 26 Q-KB2 ! Is
.

This leads immediately to a clear a crusher. The same reply follows


loss ! As has frequently been dem 24 . . . R(Kt2)-B2. Dr. Tartakower
onstrated, Black in setting up the must have overlooked this when
Pawn formation Q3, K3 and KB4 he played B-Bl, counting only on
must always keep the Bishop Pawn the fact that the Rook at B4 was
guarded in such a manner as to momentarily pinned.
be able to answer White's P-Q5
26 R ( 8)-82 R-83
by P-K4. Compare also the games
27 8-81 R-K2
against Spielmann ( Prague 1908,
28 Q-83 R-K4
No. 16) and Samisch (Marienbad,
29 P-R4 Q-Kt2
1925, No. 72) .
30 K-R2 Q-K2
Hence Black should have played 31 P-Kt4 ! R-KS
QR-B2 ! 32 Q-Q4 Q-K4
170 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

33 B-Kt21 41 P-Kt6ch K-83


42 PxP! RxRch
White would merely make his
task more difficult by 33 QxQ? 42 . . . R-Kt8ch ; 43 R-Kt2, R ( at
Kt)xRch ; wins a Rook, but there-
33 8x8 after P-RS, Queen cannot be pre-
34 Kx8

QxQ vented.
35 RxQ K-Kt2
43 KxR R-K1
36 P-Kt5 R-K81
44 R-K2! R-K R 1
37 P-RS R-K Kt1
45 R-K6ch K-82
Or lf 37 . . . P-KR3 ; 38 P-B6ch, 46 K-Kt5 RxP
and P-Kt6. 47 R-Kt6 K-81
48 P-86 P-84
38 R-Kt4 R-K4 49 R-Kt7 RxR
3 9 P-R6ch K-82 50 R PxRch K-82
40 K-Kt3 R-K 8 51 K-R6 Realgne
Chapter XV
International Touraments at Karlsbad and Rohitsch-Sauerbnum
1929; Scm Remo. 1930; Prague Olympics. 1931.

Game No. 94 grandmasters, like Spielmann for


example, lose their zest fo r the
R U Y LOPEZ game, and concede the draw. Or
they are apt to take all kinds of
Karlsbad, 1929 chances in the opening moves,
Mattison Rubinstein avoiding simplification, 1t Ia true,
but freauently also courting di&
1 P-K4 P-K4 a.ster. Rubinstein is different. He
2 Kt-KB3 Kt-QB3 prefers to bait no traps in tbe
3 B-Kt5 P-Q R3 opening, but to play correctly and
4 BxKt QPxB according to "theory,'' and does
5 p.Q4 PxP not shun simplification. But be
6 QxP QxQ knows how to spot the chances for
7 KtxQ B-Q3 an attack even in the simplest
positions. In such cases he playa
Rubinstein prefers this line, undaunted for the win and baa
whereas other masters play 7 . . gained numerous successes in this
BQ2 and 0-00. manner. c.f. his games against
Vidmar ( Prague, 1908, No. 16),
8 B-K3 P-QB4
also No. 25 (St. Petersburg, 1909 ) ,
9 Kt-K2 P-KB3
against the same opponent.
10 B-84
The game before us is a piquant
This move is directed against example of this technique. Ob
Rubinstein, the maestro of the two viously Rubinstein wins only be
Bishops. cause his opponent is guilty of
several errors. But no game can
10 . 8-K3 be won without some mistake on
11 8x8 Px8 our opponent's part, and what Is
12 Kt-84 8-82 more important, mistakes do not
13 Kt-QB3 Kt-K2 merely happen of their own accord.
14 o.o.o 0-0-0 Ample opportunity must be afforq
15 Kt( 84)-Q5 ed for their occurrence ! From this
Now Black has a strong Bishop. angle the following ending Is in
Against this White occupies the structive and thrilling.
strong polnt-Q5, assuring him full 1 9 K R-Q1
equality.
Apparently Mattison wlll not per
15 . K R-K1 mit Black's Queen Pawn to ad
1 6 P-K83 KtxKt vance. For now if 19 RxR, QPxR
17 KtxKt 8xKt would be the obvious reply. But
1 8 Rx8 R-K4 there would have been no ad
vantage to Black in this.
A new game begins. Thanks to
the modern, highly developed open 19 . Rx R
ing technique, even the greatest 20 RxR K-Q2
masters cannot secure in the first 21 P-QB4 P-K Kt3
15 or 20 moves any advantage from 22 K-82 K-K3
an opponent bent on drawing. Many 23 K-83 P.841

171
172 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

Suddenly it is revealed that etc. Due to the unfavorable posi


Black has slightly the better game. tion of his pieces, White's passed
Why? Because his King has Pawns remain fixed and Immobile.
greater mobility and his Rook has
more scope. Based on these facts 28 R-K2ch K-84
Black now takes the initiative. 29 R-K4 PxKtP
Where did White err? The 19th 30 RPxP R-KKt1
move ! Instead he should have 31 R-84ch
played 19 RxR. Here White might have played
31 P-Kt4ch, PxP; 32 RxP, as after
Rubinstein 32 . . . RxR ? ; 33 PxRch, KxP;
34 PxP, PxP; 35 P-R4 Black is lost.
So also if 32 . . . P-Kt5ch ; 33 K
Q3, RxR? ; 34 PxRch, KxP; 35
K-K4, etc. But by 32 . . . R-KRl !
Black retains the attack. In spite
of this, White should have chosen
this line as he now gets Into In
surmountable difficulties.

31 . K-K3
32 R-K4ch
Or 32 P-KKt4, P-R5 ; 33 P-Kt5,
RxP ; 34 RxP, R-Kt6 ; 35 R-B4, P
Kt5ch, and White soon loses either
Mattison the Queen's Rook or the King's
Bishop Pawn.
24 PxPch
32 . K-Q2
If 2 4 K-Q3, PxPc h ; 25 KxP, then
33 P-KKt4 R-K81 l
25 . . . R-QKtl ! with the threat
P-QKt4 etc. If 26 . . . P-QKt4 at Now Black can strengthen his
once, the reply 26 P-QKt4 ! brings position at one more point before
an immediate liquidation. he plays P-KR5.
24 . PxP 34 R-K3
25 R-Q2 After 34 PxRP, RxPch ; 35 K-B2,
Or 25 P-KKt4, PxP; 26 PxP, R R-R6 and RxRP, a Rook and Pawn
KBl ! and now if White exchanges ending results, where the extra
Rooks at B5, he gets a bad and Pawn suffices to win, though
probably lost Pawn ending. Pawns alone would only draw.

25 P-Q Kt4 34
P-R5 1
26 P-QKt3 3 5 P-R4

White plays too timidly 26 P If 35 K-Q2, or K-Q3, the simple


QKt4 was much stronger. continuation would be 35 . . . P
R6 etc. White i s lost.
26 P-KR4
27 P-Kt3 P-85! 35 PxRP
36 PxP R-K1 1
On the other hand Rubinstein 37 K-Q2
attacks with great vigor. If 28
P-KKt4, RPxP ; 29 KBPxP, R-KRl, Or 37 R-Q3, P-R6 ; 38 K-B2 (38
with the sequel .30 K-Q3, K-K4 ; 31 P-B4, P-R7 ; 39 R-KR3'!, R-K6ch;
R-K2ch, K-B3 ; 32 K-K4, K-Kt4 ; etc. Or 39 R-Ql, R-K6c h ; 40 K-Q2,
KARLSBAD, 1929 173

R-KB6 : 4 1 R-KR1, RxP ; 42 RxP, QxQ ; 19 PxQ, BxB ; 20 KxB, and


RxQB P ; etc. ) , R-K7ch ; 39 K-B3 White overcomes the weakness of
(39 KQ1 or K-B1, R-Kt7 ! ; etc.) the center Pawn by a hair. 20
R-KB7 ! , and wins. . . . KR-Q1 ; 2 1 KR-Q1 ! RxR; 22
RxR ( at B), RxP ; 23 R-B7, P
37 RxR
QR4 ; 24 RxKP, R-Q7 ; 25 R-Kt7. In

3 8 KxR P-Q4 !
fact P-Q4 for White on his 11th
After 39 P-Kt5, P-Q5ch ; etc. and move was also questionable. After
after 39 PxP, P-R6 wins. 40 K-B2, permitting Black to play P-Q4,
P-R7 ; 41 K-Kt2, P-B5 ; etc. White had to content himself with
seeking mere equality.
Resi g n s
14 . . Q-Q3
15 K R.Q1 QR-Q1
16 R-Q2 R-Q2
17 QR-Q1 K R-Q1
18 P-KR4 P-K4
19 P-K3
Game No. 95 Weakening the Queen's Pawn.
But the constant threat of Kt-Q5
R ET I SYST E M
was too disturbing. White must
Karlsbad, 1929 also have been of the opinion that
he could play P-Q4. That was a
Canal Rubi nstein delusion.
1 Kt-K83 Kt-K83 19 . . P-K R 3
2 P-QKt3 P-K Kt3 20 8-R3
3 P-Kt3 P-Kt3
4 8-QKt2 8-K Kt2 If 20 P-Q4, there would follow :
5 8-Kt2 8-Kt2 20 . . . KPxP ; 21 PxP, Q-KB3 ! ;
6 0-0 0-0 or even more sharply 20 .
7 P-84 P-84 BPxP ; 21 PxP, P-K5 ! ; ( 2 2 Kt
8 P-Q3 ? K5, KtxKt ; 23 PxKt, QxR ! ) etc.
20 R-K2
In such symmetrical positions

21 8-Kt2
the attack goes to the player who
flrst advances in the center. Hence If now 21 P-Q4, then 21 .
P-Q4 was in order here. BPxP ; is no longer sufficient, but
21 . . . KPxP ; 22 PxP, Q-KB3 ! ;
8 . . . P-Q4 ! (23 B-Kt2, KR-Q2) etc. maintains
9 PxP KtxP the advantage.
10 8x8 Kx8
11 Q-Q2 Kt-Q83 21 Q-K83
12 Kt-83 KtxKt 22 Kt-R2 P-K R4
13 QxKtch K-Kt1 23 Kt-83 Kt-Kt5 1
14 Q-Kt2? 24 Kt-K1 8x8
25 Kx8 P-R4 1
White plays without a plan and
surrenders to his opponent full In order to frustrate any attempt
command of the board. At this of White to break through present
point he had the last opportunity ly by P-QKt4.
to oppose the threatened attack on
26 Kt-82 K R-Q2
the Queen's file : 14 P-K3, ( 14 KR
27 KtxKt
Q1 is weaker because of Kt-Q5 ! )
R-B1 ; ( Q-Q3 ; 15 P-Q4, Q-KB3 ; 16 Thereafter the White Queen's
QR-B 1 ! ) 15 QR-B1, Q-Q3 ; 16 P-Q4, side remains entirely Impaired. But
PxP ; 17 KtxP, KtxKt ; 18 QxKt, White has no good moves.
174 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

27 R Px K t position has been lost for a long


28 Q-82 Q-83ch time, though the winning pro
29 P-83 R-Q4 cedure requires the utmost care.
30 K-82 Q-Q2
48 . P-K85 1 1
31 K-Kt2 P-84

49 K Px P
32 Q-84 K-Kt2
33 K-82 R-K81 ! O r 49 KtPxP, QxRPch ; 5 0 K
Kt2, P-Kt4 ! ; with a winning attack
The threat is P-B5 ! etc.
against the King. The further ad
34 P-84 R-Q1 vance of P-Kt4 would have follow
35 PxP RxKP ed sooner or later, even if Black
36 Q-84 R-Q4 had not been given this opportunity
37 Q-84 Q-83 of P-KB5.
38 Q-82 Q-83 49 . . . . RxP
39 Q-84 Q-83 50 RxR Px R
40 Q-82 P-QKt4!
41 R-Q81 R (Q1 ) -Q3 Now the course is comparatively
42 P.Q4 easy as the passed Pawn is very
strong.
In order to avoid the constant
threat of P-QB5. But White does 51 R-Q3 Q-83
not free himself by the text-move, 52 Q-Q2 Q-Q3
as he can never capture the Pawn 53 K-Kt1 K-Kt2
on QB5. 54 K-R2

42 . . . . Q-Q2 ! Also after 54 P-B5, PxP; 55 Q


43 R (Q81 )-Q1 K-82 Kt5ch, QKKt3 ; the game could
not be saved.
43 . . . PxP would be refuted
by 44 Q-QKt2 ! 54 . . . Q-84
55 K-Kt2 Q-Q4ch
44 Q-Kt2 Q-Q1 56 K-R2 Q-K5
45 K-Kt2 R ( Q3) -Q2 57 K-Kt1 K-83
46 K-R2 K-Kt1 58 K-82 K-K3
47 K-Kt2 K-R2 59 R-K83 R-Q82
48 K-R2 60 P-85ch K-Q4 1
60 . . . PxP? would be weak
R u b i nste i n
because of 61 R-B4 !

6 1 R-84 R-87!
Bringing about a Rook ending
that is clearly won.
62 RxQ RxQch
63 K-83 PxP
64 R-KS RxP
65 R-K88 R-QKt7!
That the decision comes on the
Queen's wing is rather surprising.
66 RxPch K-83!
67 R x R P RxPch
Canal
68 K-K4
After this a decisive break Or if 68 K-B4, R-K6 ; and P-Kt6,
through takes place. But the White etc. The advanced Pawn is for-
ROHITSCH.SAUERBRUNN, 1929 175

midable as it cannot be attacked Commendable enterprise. 3 . : .


from the rear. P-Q4 would have merely been com
mendable prudence, for, in the
68 . RxP Double Stonewall, the advantage of
69 KxP K-Kt3 White is quite small and drawing
70 R-KKt5 R-KR6 prospects numerous.
71 R-Kt1
4 Kt-K83 Kt-KB3
In view of the advanced Pawn 5 B-Q3 P-84
on QKt5 White must abandon his 6 0-0 Kt-Q83
Rook's Pawn. But all his sacri
7 P-84 B-K2
flee is futile.
8 Kt-83 B-Kt2
71 RxPch 9 P-Q R3 Q-81
72 K-Q3 R.QB5
The Queen yields the square to
73 R-Q Kt1 R-B6ch
the Knight, which, on P-Q5 ! will
74 K-Q4 K-R4 have to retire.
75 R-R 1 c h R-R6
76 R-R1 K-R5 1 0 P-Q Kt3 0-0
77 R-R8 R-K Kt6 1 1 B-Kt2 Kt- K Kt5
78 K-85 R-QB6ch
Attempting a sacrifice that would
79 K-Q4 R-B5ch be fatal to White ! It is even more
80 K-Q3 P-Kt6 subtle than at first appears, as
Res i g n s White cannot reply 12 R-K1 ? be
cause of 12 . . . KtxKP ! ; 13 RxKt,
A masterpiece of technique. Af PxP; etc. But 12 Q-K2, KtxKP;
ter the opening, Canal drifted into 13 P-Q5 ! , KtxR; 14 PxKt, BxP;
an unfavorable position, which, 15 RxKt, would rather seem in
however, was in nowise lost. But White's favor; Black's center is
Rubinstein maintained this small blockaded and White has good
advantage with inimitable preci chances of getting a favorable at
sion, and translated it into victory. tack before his opponnet can
utilize the superiority of Rook and
two Pawns against two Knights.
But 12 Q-K2 would also be a mJs.
take, as Black plays 12 . . . Kt-R4,
and now if 13 B-B2 ( 1 3 Kt-Q2,
KtxKP ; etc.) , then 13 . . . BxKt ! ,
and n o matter how White answers
Game N o. 96 Black plays KtxKP and PxP with a
favorable recovery of the piece, or
DUTCH D E F E N S E
even winning the Queen by B-B4.
Rohitsch-Sauerbrunn, 1929 Flohr has figured this all out very
cleverly. But . . .
Rubi nste i n Flohr
1 2 B-81 1
1 P-Q4 P-KB4
Rubinstein has no false pride.
2 P-K3 P-K3
He simply retracts his last move
3 P-K 84 with the evident intent of answer
Rubinstein has a certain pre ing 12 . . . Kt-KB3, not with 13
dilection for this Pawn formation B-Kt2, but first 13 P-KR3. But
either before or after P-QB4. Flohr's 11th move embodied not
only a tactical but a strategic pur
3 . . P-Q Kt3 pose.
176 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

12 B-83 1 of this thrust would have been


1 3 Kt-K21 s omewhat less in this manner, but
its positional value would have re
If 13 PKR3 ?, KtxK P ! mained unimpaired.
13 Q-82 17 . PxKtP

Now this move can be made with Forced, for, if the Bishop moves,
out the necessity of P-QR3. The 18 P-Kt5, followed by P-Q5 would
KB stands well and the QKt can go be decisive.
to K2. Only the KKt is a bit out
of play, but that is not important. 18 8xPch K-R1
19 Kt-Kt5 ! PxQP
14 P-R3 Kt-R3 20 PxQP PxP
1 5 Q-82 Q R. K 1 21 8-Kt6 !
16 8-Kt2 P-Q3
Not 21 B-Kt8?, because of Kt-B4 :
Black's position, which at move I 22 KtxKP, RxKt ; 23 BxR,
11 was already seriously compro QKtxP, plus.
mised now makes a favorable im II 22 BxP, BxKt ; 23 BxKt, RxB ;
pression. If Flohr now has time 24 QxR, plus.
for P-KKt3, he can envisage a
strong counter-attack by P-K4. 21 R-K2
However, Rubinstein recognizes 22 Q.Q3 P-R7ch
this, and finds a powerful weapon 23 KxP P-K4
to counter the plans o f his op
ponent. An adequate defense is scarcely
possible. Flohr, therefore, tries to
complicate the game, but with no
Flohr
success, and merely hastens the
end.

24 P-Q5 Kt.Q5

On any other move of the Knight,


25 PxKP! wins. If 24 . . . P-K5 ;
25 Q-B2.

25 Ktx Kt PxKt
26 Kt-K6 Q-81
Avoiding loss o f the exchange ;
for if 27 KtxR ? ?, R-K6 ! wins.

27 Q R- K 1 K-Kt1
R u b i nstei n 2 8 K-Kt3
And now 28 KtxR, would be fol
1 7 P-KKt4 ! ! lowed by Kt-Kt5ch and Kt-K6.
This bayonet attack finally dem 28 Q-Q2
onstrates that Black's position was
29 K R- R 1
not fully satisfactory. The move
and the clear assertion of White's If 2 9 KtxR?, Q-Kt5ch!
adva ntage could not be prevented.
If Black had played 16 P-KKt3 ; 29 . . . . R-Kt1
17 Kt-R2, and 18 P-KKt4 would 30 8xP R-K B1
have followed. The tactical effect 31 B-R7ch K-R1
ROHITSCH-SAUERBRUNN, 1929 177

32 B-85 9 BxP Kt-Kt3


10 B-Kt3 K Kt-Q4?
Finally threatening to take the
Rook. However, Black again finds The wrong Knight ! , as the Knight
an effective defense, forcing Rubin stood well at KB3. Now, as the
stein to proceed in another direc Knight at Kt3 Is poorly placed,
tion. Black will have to exchange both
knights, and P-QB4 will no longer
32 . Q-K1 be possible.
33 B-Kt6 Q-81
34 P-KB5 K-Kt1
11 0-0 KtxB
35 R-R5 BxB
12 PxKt Kt-Q4
36 QxB R-83?
13 P-Kt3 KtxKt
However, mate could not be 14 QxKt Q-Q3
prevented.
14 . P-K4 ; 15 QPxP (or 15

37 RxKt R ( B3) x Kt KtxP), BxRP is also not quite


38 R-R8ch Resigns satisfactory as White has a strong
advantage In development In an
open position.

1 5 QR-81 B-Q2
16 Kt-K5 QR-Q1

In such positions KR-Q1 and B


Game N o. 97
K1 is usually better. Here this Is
Q U E E N 'S GAM B I T DEC L I N E D
prevented by 17 P-B5 !

Rohitsch-Sauerbrunn, 1929 17 K R-Q1 B-81


18 P-R3 B-83
R u b i n ste i n Canal
19 Q-K3 Q-K2
P-Q4 Kt-KB3 20 P-K R4 1 R-Q3
2 P-QB4 P-K3 21 P-R5 K R-Q1
3 Kt-QB3 P-Q4 22 R-83 P-KKt3
4 Kt-83 B-K2
Practically forced as White
P-B4 is more forceful. threatened P-KKt4 and KKt5.

5 B-84 P-83 23 B-82 Q-81


24 Px P R PxP
Why ? Castles was better. P
QB3 should only be played when
White will now take possessi
it is clear that P-QB4 might not
of the Rook file : But this adv1
be in order.
tage is not easy to exploit: T
6 P-K3 Q Kt-Q2 Pawn at Q4 must always be p
tected, and in addition, Black's J
7 P-KR3 0-0
is an excellent defensive piece.
8 Q-82 PxP

Here P-QB4 merited considera 25 P-K Kt4 Q-K 1


tion. If then 9 KtQKt5, Q-R4ch 26 P-Kt5 B-Kt2
or Kt-K1 (9 . . . P-QR3 ? 10 BB7, 27 B-K4 Q-K2
Q-Kl ; 11 Kt-Q6 ! ) . 28 K-Kt2 Q-82
178 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

29 P-Kt4 P-R3 Pawn. That, however, would be


30 R ( 83)-Q3 P-Kt3 a. mistake, for if 37 . . . QxP; 38
K-Kt2, Q-K2 (otherwise R-KR1,
Black must make a. demonstra etc. ) ; 39 RKR1 ! , QxQ; 40 PxQ,
tion on the Queen's side a.s White followed by R(Q3)-R3 and mate.
threatens to triple Queen and
Rooks on the open file. 37 QxQ

31 Q-R3 8-Kt2 Forced, but the ending is lost


for Black.
Rubinstein has pointed out that
31 . . P-QB4 would lose a Pawn. 38 KtPxQ K-R2
32 QPxP, PxP ; 33 RxR, RxR; 3 4
R-QB1, B-Kt2 ; 3 5 Q-KB3, etc.
The only defense against the
threatened mate.
32 Q-83 Q-K2
33 K-R2 Q-82
39 K-Kt4 R-K R 1 1
34 K-R3 Q-K2
40 R-R 1 c h K-Kt1
35 P-R4
41 RxRch KxR
Black could counter the danger 42 P-Kt5!
on the King's side by weakening
his Queen's wing. But White has Preparing to free the Pawn at
prevented P-QB4 and now threat KB6.
ens the Pawn at QB3 by P-QKt5.
Hence Black is forced to the fol 42 . . . . 8PxP
lowing exchange, which, however, 43 8x8 Rx8
gives free play to White's attack. 44 Px P Px P

35 . . 8xKt 44 . . . P-QR4 was somewhat


36 8Px8 R (Q3)-Q2 better, as Black would then have
a threat in reserve--R-QR2 and
the advance of the Pawn.
Canal

45 P-Q5 1 Px P
46 RxP K-R2
47 RxP R-Kt1
48 P-84 K-R3
49 R-Kt1 K-R2
50 K-Kt5 P-Kt4
51 P-K 6 ! PxP
52 R-R1 c h K-Kt1
53 KxP

Mate In three Is threatened. 54


P-B7ch followed by 55 K-B6 and
56 R-R8 mate. If 53 . . . R-KB1 ;
R u b i nste i n
54 R-QR1, P-Kt5 ; 55 R-R7, P-Kt6 ;
56 R-Kt7ch, K-R1 ; 57 R-R7ch, K
3 7 Q-861 Ktl ; 58 P-B7ch, etc.

Perhaps Canal hoped to win a Resigns


SAN REMO, 1930 179

Game No. 98 Otherwise 2 0 Q-Q2! !

Q U E E N'S G A M B I T D E C L I N E D 20 R-Q6 RxR


21 PxR Q-K 1 1
San Remo, 1930 22 P-K4 P-K4!
Rubi nstein Dr. VIdmar 23 P-85 Q-83
24 8-83 R-Q1
1 p.Q4 P-Q4 25 Q-Q2 Kt-Q2
2 Kt.K83 Kt- K 83 26 P-Kt4 ! P- K R 3 7
3 P.84 P-83
4 P.K3 P-K3 Th i s weakening Is serious. Af
5 Kt.83 QKt-Q2 ter 26 . . . P-QKt4, threatening
Kt-Kt3-B5, or Kt-Bl, Black would
6 Kt-K5
have captured the loose Pawn, and
White would have had to try to
Rubinstein against Rubinstein ! open an attack upon the King by
The Pollsh grandmaster Introduced 27 QK1, Kt-Kt3 ; 28 Q-R4, P-KB3
the text move to overcome the (RxP? 29 Q-Q8ch ! ) ; 29 P-Kt5, RxP ;
Meran variation, which he him
2 0 R-KBl, etc. However, I t would
self originated. This line has
have been doubtful If the attack
proved effective on several occa would have been successful. Up
sions, but Is double edged. to this point Dr. Vidmar ha s de
fended himself splendidly.
6 . KtxKt
27 P-K R4 1
The best answer is 6 . . . P-QB4,
recommended by Dr. Alekhlne. The threat of P-KKt5 is now
decisive.
7 PxKt Kt-Q2
8 P-84 8-Kt5 27 Kt-83
9 8-Q2 Q-Kt3
Other continuations would give
White an easy game. Now his
If 9 . . . QPxP ? ; 10 Kt-K4 ! !
task is comparatively difficult.
But not BxP?, because of KtxP ! ;
11 PxKt, Q-R5ch ; and QxB. This
strategy is quite old. V idmar

10 8-K2 0-0

If 10 . . . P-Q5 White can con


tinue favorably with 11 PxP, QxP ;
12 Q-B2, and 0-0-0.

11 0-0 8xKt
12 Px8 PxP
13 8xP R-Q1
14 Q-82 Q-84
15 8-K2 P-QKt3
16 Q R-Q1 Kt-81
17 B-81 8-Kt2 Rubi nstein
18 R-Q4 ! Q-K2
19 K R-Q1 P-Q84 ! 28 P-Kt5 1
180 RUBINSTEIN'S CH&";S MASTERPIEC&";

This would also have followed 41 QxB QxQch


26 . . . Kt-KB3 ? 42 RxQ RxP
43 RxP R-Q8
28 PxP 44 B-K3 P-Kt5
29 PxP KtxP 45 PxP Px P
46 R-K4 R-Q6
After this the Knight is lost. 47 K-82 R-86
But other moves would have been 48 R-K8ch K-R2
worse, if possible, e.g. : 29 . . .
49 R-K B8 ! Resigns
Kt-K1 ; 30 P-Q7, Kt-B2 ; 31 Q-R2,
RxP ; 32 RxR, QxR ; 33 P-Kt6, PxP ;
34 PxP, Q-Q6 ; 35 B-Kt5 ! Or if
34 . . . Kt-K3 ; 35 B-Kt4, threat
ening 36 Q-R7ch, and 37 B-Kt5 etc.

30 Q.Q B2 !
Game N o. 99
Not 30 Q-Kt2? because of 30
. . . Q-R5 ! Now, on the other Q U E EN'S G A M B I T D E C L I N E D
hand, Black loses because of the
pin on the Knight. Prague Olympics, 1931

Rubi nstein Bogoljubow


30 P-85
1 P-Q4 P-Q4
If 30 . . . RxP, the answer is
2 P-QB4 P-Q B3
not 31 RxR?, because of QxR; 32
BxKt, BxB ; 33 QxB, Q-Q8ch ; etc., 3 Kt-QB3 Kt-KB3
but the simple 31 R-Kl. 4 P-K3 P-K3
5 P-84
31 R-K1 Q-B4ch
32 B-K3 Q-Q4 Another battle against the Meran
Defense. Compare the previous
Dr. Vidmar makes one more game!
gamble. If 33 B-B2?, then Q-Q6 !
34 QxQ, PxQ ; 35 BxKt, BxB ; 36 5 . P-84
RxB??, P-Q7 ! and wins. 6 Kt-83 Kt-83
7 B-K2 B-K2
33 R-Q1 ! Q-83 8 0-0 0-0
34 K-R2! 9 Kt- K 5 1 QPx P
10 KtxKt ! PxKt
Now, finally, White threatens to 11 PxP ! BxP
win the Knight by B-Bl and R-K1,
12 BxP
since the variation given after
Black's 30th move is no longer
possible. By several fine moves, White
has now weakened his opponent's
Pawn position. However, this does
34 P-Kt3
not amount to much, as a practi

35 P-86 P-R4 cal control of the QB file does not


36 B-81 P-Kt4 seem possible in the immediate
37 R-K1 Q-Q2 future.
38 BxKt Q-Kt5
39 Q-K2 Q-R5ch 12 - QxQ
40 K-Kt2 BxBch 1 3 RxQ Kt-Q4
PRAGUE OLYMPICS, 1931 181

Appears to be quite good, as move yields the square Q5, but


Black can force equality in the secures Q6.
Pawn positions by the double at
tack upon B6 and K6. Obviously
27 . . . Kt-Kt3
White cannot capture the Knight,
28 Kt-Q1 8-K5
and must permit the exchange on
QB3. Nonetheless, the Knight 29 R-Q2 8-Q4
move is a mistake. Black should 30 P-KKt3
have played 13 . . . P-K4 ! If, then
14 PxP, Kt-Kt5 with perhaps the Protecting KB4 so that in certain
following continuation : 15 Kt-K4, circumstances Kt-Q4 can be ans
BxPch ; 16 BxB, KtxB ; 17 QR-QB1, swered by BxQBP.
KtxB ; 18 RxKt, B-K3 ; 19 RxBP??,
B-Q4 ! , Black would indeed attain 30 . . 8-Kt6
counter-play sufficient to equalize, 31 Kt-83 K-Kt2
as the QKt and K files offer at
tacking chances, and the Bishop K-B1 was somewhat better.
threatens to take a strong posi
tion at Q4.
32 Kt.K4 R-Q81

14 K-82 P-QR4
Nothing could be achieved via
the QKt file.
Now he perceives that 14 .
KtxKt is not good, as after 15
PxKt, he would have few possibili
ties for development. If Black
plays 15 . . . P-K4, the sequel
might be 16 PxP, B-B4 ; (or R-K1 ) ;
17 B-K 2 ! and B-B3 with advantage
to White. Hence Bogoljubow
makes a virtue of his necessity
and seeks to obtain pressure on the
QKt file. But White's control of
the QB file is thereby weakened,
but not removed.

15 K-83 8-Kt2
16 B-Q2 Kt-Kt3
17 8-K2 8-K2
18 P-K4 P-Q84 R-83 ?
33 Kt-Q 6 !
19 K-82 K R-Kt1
The decisive error! Naturally
20 8-K3 P-RS
neither 33 . . . BxKt; 34 RxB,
21 QR-81 8-Q83 nor 33 R-QKtl ; 34 Kt-m ! etc. was
22 R-82 P-Kt3 satisfactory.
23 8-Kt5 8-Kt2
24 P-QR3 R-R4 34 B-Kt51
25 B-K2 8-Q83
26 K R-Q81 Kt-Q2 Forcing the win of material, as
27 P-K5 34 . . . R-B 2 ? is refuted by 35
Kt-K8ch. Now it becomes clear
To prevent 27 . . . P-K4. The that K-B1 was preferable.
182 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

This move has a value only after


34 RxB
Black has played P-B3, as now
. .

35 KtxR
. .

the second player can reply as in


the text with a satisfactory game.
The ending, while not dtmcult,
7 R-B1 1s preferable.
requires exact handling.

35 . . Kt.Q4 7 P-K R3
36 Kt-83 P-R4
Also P-B4 at once is to be
37 Kt-K4 Ktx8
.
.

considered.
Or 37 . . . P-B5; 38 B-Q4 etc.
8 B-84 P-84 1
38 KxKt R-82
39 Kt-Q6 This would follow also after 8
B-R4.
The Knight has for a long time
borne the brunt of the attack. His 9 8PxP
wanderings are quite absorbing.
See note to move 8 In game No.
Now 40 Kt-K8ch Is threatened.
97.
39 . . K-81
9 8 Px P I
40 R-Q3 R-83
.

1 0 K PxP
41 Kt-B4 R-82
42 P-R4 R-R2
Forced. Very bad would be 10
43 Kt-Kt6 1 R-82 QPxP; 11 PxKt, PxP ! ; etc. And
44 R-Q7 R-83 10 KtxP doesn't work because of
45 Kt-84 R-R3 10 . . . P-K4 ; 11 Kt-B5, PxB ; 12
46 R-Kt7 R-R1 P-Q6, BxP; 1 3 KtxB, PxP ; 14
47 Kt-Kt6 ! R-Q1 PxP, Kt-K4.
48 KtQ7ch K-K1
49 KtxP Resigns 10 . . . KtxP
1 1 KtxKt PxKt
12 P-Q R3

The position Is even and Kash


dan tries to avoid exchanges and
to retain the possibilities of an
attack. Somewhat better was B
K2 and 0-0. 12 B-Q3 would lose
Game No. 100 time on account of 12 . . . B-Kt5ch
followed by . . . R-K1ch.
Q U E E N'S G A M B I T D E C L I N E D

Prague Olympics, 1931 12 . . R-K1

Kashdan Rubinste i n Setting a little trap ! If 13 B-B7,


1 P-Q4 P-Q4 B-Q3 dis. ch.
2 Kt- K 83 Kt- K 83
13 8-K2
3 P-84 P-K3
4 Kt-83 Q Kt.Q2 Threatening 14 B-B7.
5 8-Kt5 8-K2
6 P-K3 0-0 13 Kt-83
7 Q-82 1 4 8-87
PRAGUE OLYMPICS, 1931 183

mann gives as best here 8 B-Q1


Rubinste i n followed by B-Kt3.

19 . Kt-K5
20 Kt-85 8-83
21 K R-Q1 R-85
22 Q-K 83 R ( 85)-81

Much stronger was 22 . . . R-B2.


But Black wants to gain time on
the clock by a repetition of moves.
His opponent, however, is not
obliging.

23 Q-Kt4 K-81
24 8-83 P-Kt3 !
Kashdan
Refuting the attack.

14 8-K84!
25 Kt-K3

Kashdan overlooked this star


On 25 KtxP follows as Spiel
tling reply.
mann points out . . . R-B2 to pre
vent 26 Q-Q7 and then . . . BxP,
15 Qx8 etc. The KBP will be attacked
and White's Kt will be out of play.
After 15 BxQ, etc. Black has the
better development for the end 25 8xP
game. If 15 Q-B 1 ? ( Q-B3, Kt-K5 ?) ,
26 KtxP 8xPch
Q-Q2 ; 16 Kt-K5, Q-K3 with the
27 K-81 ?
threat of QR-B1 and White will
ftnd himself with an untenable
This loses quickly. He had to
game.
play 27 K-R1 and then Black
would be forced to play Q-K3,
15 Qx8
when the Queens would be ex

1 6 0-0 Q-Kt3 changed. White would have fair


drawing chances.
If 16 . . . BxP, then 17 B-Kt5,
BxP ; 18 QR-Ktl, B-R6 ; 19 BxR,
RxB, and Black has two connected 27 Q-Kt4c h l
passed Pawns for the exchange. 28 B-K2 Q-83
But still the position is uncertain 29 P-KKt3
on account of the possibilities of
attack for White, e.g. : 20 Q-Q3, On 29 B-B3 there follows the
B-Q 3 ; 21 KR-B1, or possibly bet overwhelming 29 . P-KR4 ; 30

ter 20 R-R1, Q-B6 ; 21 Q-Ktl ! with Q-B4 (30 Q-R3?, Kt-Kt4 ! ) , P-KKt4 ;
the double threat of QxP and Q-R2. 31 Q-B5ch ; 32 B-K2, Kt-Kt6ch ; 33
KxB, RxBch; 34 KxKt, Q-R5ch ;
17 QR-Kt1 QR-81 35 K-B3, Q-B7 mate ! ( S pielmann)
1 8 Q-Q3 P-R3
1 9 Kt-R4? 29 B-R2
30 Q-84 K-Kt2
A nervous attack is repelled 31 Q R-81 Q.K3
skUlfully here by Rubinstein. Spiel- 32 B-Kt4?
184 RUBINSTEIN'S CHESS MASTERPIECES

The final blunder. In any event Forced. Otherwise he loses a


the position could not be main piece.
tained. The threat was . . Ktx
33 RxRch
.

Pch, etc.

34 K-K2 R-Q7ch
Resigns
32 RxRi
3 3 BxQ K any, . . . RxB and wins.
LIST OF OPENINGS
N. B. The (w) after opponent's name means White ; the (b) Black

Opening Game No. Opponent Page


ALEKHINE DEFENSE - -- - -- - - - -- --- - 81 Yates (w) ------------148
83 Yates (w) -----------153

ENGLISH OPENING - - - -
- -- - -
- -- ---- 31 Duras (b) -- - - - -- -- - - 67
39 Duras (w) ------ -- --- 81
87 Mieses (b) ----------159
90 Tarrasch (b) ---------163

FOUR KNIGHTS' GAME - - - - - - - -- -- - 42 Belitzmann (w) - ---- 87


2 Duras (w) - - - --- - --- - 16
1 Janowski (w) - - -- - --- 13
18 Marshall (b) -- -- -- --- 43
37 S pielmann (w) --- --- - 78
68 Spielmann (w) _______ 129
38 Tarrasch (w) - - - - -- - - - 79
65 Tarrasch (w) ---------124
55 Wolf (w) ------------106

FRENCH DEFENSE --- --- --- -- - ----- 26 Forgacs (w) - - - -- --- -- 57


33 Lowenftsch (b) - -- - - - 70
36 Schlechter (w) -- - - --- 76

GIUOCO PIANO - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- - -- 3 Salwe (w) ---- - - - - - -- 17


11 Salwe (w) --- - -- - -- - 32

INDIAN DEFENSE (Old Style) - - --- - - 46


- Schlechter (b) - -- ---- 92

KING'S GAMBIT DECLINED -- --- -- - - 14


- Alapin (w) - - - - - - - -- - - 37
64 Hromadka (b) ------122
51 Marco (b) --- - ------ - - 99
9 Salwe (b) - -- -- ---- - - 27

QUEEN'S GAMBIT ACCEPTED - - - -- - 82


- Grunfeld (b) _________ 151
86 v. Holzhausen (b) ----158
84 Jahner (w) -----------154
78 Michel (w) _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ 143
10 Salwe (w) - --- - --- --- 30
24 Speyer (w) ---- -- --- - 54
74 Tartakower (b) _______ 137
25 Vidmar (w) - - - -- -- - -- 56
QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED
Cambridge Springs Defense -- - - -- - - - - 92 Reti (b) --------------166

Irregular Variation - - - - - -- -- - - - --- - - - 99 Bogo!jubow ( b ) _______ 180


98 Vidmar (b) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ 179

185
Open i n g Game No. Opponent Page
Pillsbury Attack ---- --- - - - - - - - - - - - - 5 Teichmann (b) - - -- -- - 21
13 Teichmann ( b ) ------- 36
29 Znosk<>-Borovsky (b) __ 63

Old Normal Variation - - - - - - - -- ------ 6 Rotlewi (w) ----- - --- 23


15 Vidmar (w) ---- - --- -- 38

Orthodox Defense - - - - - - - - - - - -------- 97 Canal (b) ------------177


43 Gottesduner (w) - ----- 87
66 Grunfeld (w) -------- -125
100 Kashdan (w) -- -------182
49 M aroczy (b) - - ------- - 97
44 Regedzinsky (w) - ---- 89
20 Schlechter ( b ) --- - - - - - 47
35 Schlechter (b) ----- - - 75
85 Takacs ( b ) -----------156

Slav Defense - - - - - - - -- - - - -------- - - - 34 Alekhine (b) - -- ------ 72


45 Schlechter (b) ------- 90

Spielmann Defense - - - - - - - - - --- - ---- 77 Kmoch (w) _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ 142


79 Spielmann (b) ________ 145

Tarrasch Defense - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - 30 Capablanca (b) - - - - --- 65


23 Lasker (b) ----------- 52
40 Marshall (b) - - ----- - - 82
8 Salwe (b) ------------ 26
19 Salwe (b) -- -- - ----- - - 45
53 Tarrasch (b) _________ 103
63 Tarrasch (b) _________ 120

QUEEN PAWN GAME -- - - - - - --- -- - --- 32 Alapin (w) - - - - - - ----- 69


12 Duras (b) - - - - - - - - - -- 35
7 Dus-Chotomirski (w) _ 24
21 Cohn (w) - - - - - -- -- -- - - 48
17 M arshall (w) ------- - - 41
22 Mieses (b) - - - - -- - - - - - 50

Benoni Counter Gambit ----- ------ - 88 Mieses (b) -----------161

Blumenfeld Counter Gambit -------- 60 Spielmann ( b ) - - ------ 1 16

Budapest Defense - - - - - - - - - -- - ---- --- 89 Tartakower ( b ) _______ 162

Dutch Defense - - -- - - - - -- - - - - -- - - --- - 96 Flohr (b) __________ 176


16 Spielmann (b) - - - - - --- 40
47 Tarrasch (b) --------- 94
56 Tarrasch (b) _________ 109
93 Tartakower (b) _____ 168
186
Opening Game No. Opponent Page
King's Indian Defense ---- - - - - - - - ----- 59 Alekhine (b) _ _ _ _____ 113
62 Bogoljubow (b) ______ 117
69 Carls (b) ------------130
80 Reti (b) _ _ _ _ _ _______ 147

Nimzowitsch Defense - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - 52 Maroczy (b) _________ 101


54 Teichmann (b) _______ 104
91 Nimzowitsch (b) _____ 165

Queen's Indian Defense - - - - - -- - - - - - - 75 Janowski (b) ________ 139


72 Samisch (b) _________ 134

RETI SYSTEM - - - - - - - - - - - - ----- - - - - - - - 95 Canal (w) ____________ 173

RUY LOPEZ -------------------------- 27 Duras (w) --- - - - - - - - - - 59


41 Factor (w) ----- - - - - - - 85
4 Johner (w) ---------- 19
94 Mattison (w) _________ 171
73 Michell (w) _ _ _ _ _ _____ 135
28 Spielmann (w) ------- 60
58 Thomas (w) __________ 112
61 Reti (w) ----- --------116
57 Yates (w) ------------110
70 Yates (w) ------------131
76 Yates (w) -----------139

SCOTCH GAME -------- - - - - - - - - - - - - - 67 Mieses (w) -----------126


71 Mieses (w) ----------133

SICILIAN DEFENSE ------- - - - - - -- - - - - 50 Euwe (w) ------------ 98


48 Reti (W) ------ - - - - - - - 95
INDEX OF OPPONENTS

Page Page
Alapin ----- - -- - ------- - 37,
- - 69 Lasker, Dr. -- ------ -- -- - ----
- - 52

Alekhine, Dr. -- --- -- -- -- - 72, 113 Lowenfisch - --- - - ---- --- -- - -- 70

Belitzmann -- - - - - -- -- -- -----
- - 87 }larco - - - - - - - - -- - -- -- -- -- - - -- 99

Bogoljubow -------- ------117, 180 Maroczy -- - - -- ----- - -- - -- 97, 101

Canal ------------------- -173, 177 Marshall _________ ____ 41, 43, 82

Capablanca ---- --- - - - - ---- -- -- 65 Mattison ---------------------171

Carls --------------- ---------130 M ichel, Dr. -------------------143

Cohn, E. ----- --- -- - - -- -- - --- - 48 }lichell ---------------------135

Dus-Chotomlrski -- ---- - -- --
- - - 24 Mleses --------50, 126, 133, 159, 161

Duras -------------16, 35, 59, 67, 81 Nimzowitch ------------------165

Euwe, Dr. ----- - ---- - - - --- ---- 98 Regedzinsky - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 89

Factor - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - 85 Reti --------------95, 116, 147, 166

Flohr ------------------------175 Rotlewi - - -- - ----- ---- --- - ---- 23

Forgacs - -
- - - -- - - -- -- ---- - ---- 57 Salwe ________ 17, 26, 27, 30, 32, 45

Gottesduner -- - - -- ---- - - - - -- - - 87 Samisch ------- ----------- --134

Grunfeld _ _ _ _ _____________ 125, 151 Schlechter ________ 47, 75, 76, 90, 92

v. Holzhausen ----------------158 Speyer - - -- - -- --- - - - --- -- --- -- 54

Hromadka --------------------122 Spielmann __ 40, 60, 78, 115, 129, 145

Janowski ------- - -- -- -- -- 13, 139 Takacs -----------------------156

Johner, P. -- - - -- - -- ---- - - 19, 154 Tarrasch, Dr. ____ 79, 94, 103, 109,

Jrashdan ---------------------182 120, 124, 163

Jrmoch -----------------------142 Tartakower, Dr. _____ 137, 162, 168

188
Page Page
Teichmann ----------- 21, 36, 104 VVolf, II. ---------------------106

Thomas ---------------------112 Yates ___ _ _ _ _ _ no, 131, 139, 148, 153

Vidmar, Dr. ----------38, 56, 179 Znosko-Borowsk.i ------------- 63


RUBINSTEIN'S TOURNAMENT and MATCH RECORD

Tournaments
Date Tournament Prize
1904 Kiev, National ___________ 5th
1905 Barmen Hauptturnier ______ 1st (Tied with Duras)
1906 St. Petersburg ____________ 2nd (Salwe 1st)
Lodz ----------------------1st
Ostend, Masters' --------- 3rd ( Tied with Burn)
1907 Ostend, Masters' __________ lst (Tied with Bernstein)
Karlsbad, Masters' ________ 1st
Lodz, Russian Nat'l _______ 1st
1908 Vienna, Masters' __________ 4th (Behind Duras, Maroczy and
Schlechter)
Prague, Masters' _________ 4th (Behind Duras, Schlechter and
Vidmar)
Lodz, Russian Nat'l ------- 2nd
Lodz, 3 Masters' __________ 1st (Marshall 2nd, Salwe 3rd)
1909 St. Petersburg, Masters' __ 1st ( Tied with Dr. Lasker)
1910 Warsaw _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ 2nd ( Flamberg 1st)
Warsaw, 2nd Tourney _____ 1st
1911 San Sebastian, Masters' ___ 2nd ( Tied with Vidmar ; Capablanca 1st)
Karlsbad, Masters' ________ 2nd (Tied with Schlechter ; Teichmann
1st)
1912 San Sebastian, Masters' ___ 1st
Pistyan, Masters'-------- ___ 1st
Breslau, Masters' _ _ _ _ _ _____ 1st (Tied with Duras)
Warsaw ------------------1st
Vilna, Russian Nat'l _______ 1st
1914 St. Petersburg _____________ None
1918 Berlin, 4 Masters' _________ 4th (Vidmar 1st, Schlechter 2nd, Mieses
3rd)
Berlin, 2nd Four Masters' __ 2nd (Lasker 1st, Schlechter & Tarrasch)
1920 Stockholm, 4 Masters' _____ 2nd (Spielmann 1st; Bogoljubow & Ret!)
Rotterdam, 4 Masters' _____ 1st (Speyer, Van Gelder and Factor)
Goteborg, Masters' -------- 2nd (Reti 1st)
Goteborg, 2nd Tourney ____ 2nd (Bogoljubow 1st)
Goteborg ------------------1st

190
Date Tournament Prize
1921 The Hague, Masters' ___ _ _ 3rd ( after Alekhine and Tartakower)
1922 Triberg, 4 Masters' ________ 1st (Spielmann, Bogoljubow & Seles-
niew)
London, Masters' __________ 4th (after Capablanca, Alekhine and
Vidmar)
Teplitz-Schonau, Masters' __ 5th (after Reti, Spielmann, Grunfeld
and Tartakower)
Vienna, Masters' __________ 1st
Hastings, 6 Masters' ------- 2nd (Alekhine 1st ; Bogoljubow, Tho
mas, Tarrasch and Yates)
1923 Karlsbad, Masters' ------ none

Mahrlsch-Ostrau, Masters' __ none

1924 Meran, Masters' ___________ 3rd ( after Grunfeld and Spielmann)

1925 Baden-Baden, Masters' ----- 2nd (Alekhine 1st)

Marlenbad, Masters' _______ 1st ( Tied with Nimzowltch)

Breslau, Masters' _ _ _ _____ 3rd ( after Bogoljubow and Nimzowitch)

Moscow, Masters' __________ none

1926 Semmerlng, Masters' ------ 6th ( Tied with Tarrasch)

Dresden, Masters' _________ 3rd ( after Nlmzowltch and Alekhlne)

Hanover, Masters' ______ _ _ 2nd ( Nimzowltch 1st)

Budapest, Masters' -------- 3rd (Tied with Kmoch, after Grunfeld


and Monticelll)

Berlin, Masters' ----------- 2nd ( Bogoljubow 1st)

1927 Lodz ---------------------1st

1928 Kissingen, Masters' -------- 3rd (Tied with Euwe, after Bogoljubow
and Capablanca)

Berlin, Masters' ----------- none

1929 Karlsbad, Masters' _____ 4th (after Nimzowitch, Capablanca and


Spielmann)

Budapest, Masters' -------- 2nd (Capablanca 1st)

Rohitsch-Sauerbrunn,
Masters' -------------- 1st

1930 San Remo, Masters' _______ 3rd ( after Alekhlne and Nimzowltch)

Scarborough ______________ 3rd ( after Colle and Maroczy)

1932 The Hague, 4 Masters' _____ none (Won by Landau)

191
Matches
Won Loet Drawn
1903 v. Salwe - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------ - - - - - - - -- 5 5 0
v. Salwe (2nd) --------------------------5 3 2
1908 v. Teichmann -----------------------------3 2 1
v. Marshall ------------------------------3 2 3
1909 v. Mieses 5
- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 2
1918 v. Schlechter -----------------------------2 1 3
1920 v. Bogoljubow ---------------------------5 4 3
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