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NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF TRUJILLO

Foreign Language Department

LESSON PLAN DESIGN

LESSON TITTLE: "Past Events

TRAINER: Angulo Montoya, Eduardo

TRAINEE:
Veloz Caballero, Tracy Geraldine

YEAR: V

TRUJILLO PER
2017

0
Presentation... 2
LESSON PLAN
I. General information.. 3
II. Learning Achievement ... 4
III. Learning strategies 5
IV. Learning development . 6
V. Chart values .. 8
VI. Evaluation .. 9
VII. Observation guide 10
VIII. Specific bibliography.. 11

IX.

X. Appendix
Appendix 1 12
Appendix 2 13
Appendix 3 14

THEORETICAL SUPPORT
I.
1. Thematic aspects . 16
2. Psychological Support.. 19
3. Pedagogical Support. 21
4. Didactic Support. 22
5. Techniques 26
6. Teaching Aids. 26
7. Evaluation 28
II. DISCUSSION .. 28
III.CONCLUSIONES 29
IV. BIBLIOGRAPHY.. 30

1
PRESENTATION

At present time, the use of English is very important. It is common to see many people
learning English for specific purposes such as communication, business, politics, science,
entertainment, internet and diplomacy. That is why the need for fluency in English
language has increased.
The following lesson plan PAST EVENTS has been written for second grade C
students of Antonio Torrez Araujo. This lesson plan aims to satisfy the need of young
students of English, trying to offer an easy and interesting way of learning English and
using it in their lives. In other words, the goal is to help students, for explain how they
can tell a describing yesterday weather and feeling using the verb to be (was / were) past
simple.
In order to accomplish this, I have considered the use of Communicative Language
Teaching Method, as an alternative to give the best atmosphere of teaching- learning for
second year students.
The techniques and the materials have been chosen, bearing in mind the method
selected.

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LEARNING SESSION DESIGN

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

1. Educational Institution

1.1 School: I.E. N80002 ANTONIO


TORREZ ARAUJO
1.2 Subject: English
1.3 Grade: 2
1.4 Class: C
1.5 School teacher: Chvez Carmona, Mara Esther

2. Lesson plan
2.1. Lesson topic: Past Events
2.2 Didactic Support: Communicative approach
2.3 Date and time: Thursday, June 15th 2017
9:15am 10:00am

2.4 Class duration: 45 minutes

3. References

3.1 Trainer: Angulo Montoya, Eduardo


3.2 Trainee: Veloz Caballero, Tracy Geraldine

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II. LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT:

CAPACITIES:

2.1 AREA CAPACITIES: 2.2 SPECIFIC CAPACITIES:

Text comprehension Identify general and specific


information about the past events.

Oral production Ask and give information about


past events.

Text production Ask and answer questions about


past events.

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II. LEARNING STRATEGIES

SPECIFIC CONTENTS
CAPACITIES TECHNIQUES
COMMUNICATIVE LINGUISTIC

FUNCTION GRAMMAR
Talking about past
events. Past simple:
Talking about the Showing
- To be (was / were)
weather pictures
- Affirmative forms
Identify general and Talking about the
specific information places.
about past events. Exchanging
information about
Questions and
theirs feelings.
answers

NOTION
VOCABULARY
Following
Cold sick
instructions
Hot tired
Rainy sad
Ask and give Sunny angry
information about past Weather, Feelings and Cloudy was
events. Places. Windy were Individual
Happy work

TOPIC PRONUNCIATION

Cold /kold/ Class


Hot /ht/ participation
Describing Past Events
Rainy /re.ni/
Sunny /sn.i/
Ask and answer
questions about past Cloudy /kla.di/
events. Windy /wndi/
Happy / hpi /
Sick / sk/
Tired / tard /
Sad / sd /
Angry/ gri/
Was /wz/
Were /wr/

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III. LEARNING DEVELOPMENT

MOMENTS LEARNING ACTIVITIES T


MOTIVATION FOR THE TEACHER FOR THE STUDENT ASSESSMENT RESOURCE I
THE TEACHER: S M
E
Checks the correct
1. GREETING

Praises the Ss with encouraging Greets the class Greet the teacher. answer. Te
word Asks for the date and Say the date. Checks previous acher's
Shows a good sense of humor writes it on the boar Pay attention to the knowledge. voice 3
with a laught. Previous knowledge. teacher Watches body B
INTRODUCTION

Moves around the classroom. language. oard


M
arker

Gives intructions to created a Checks if Ss are


mental image to capture theirs Asks to remember and only Listen the to the teacher interested in the Te
2. INTRODUCING THE
NEW KNOWLEDGE

attention. imagine how was the weather the Answer the teachers activity and motivated acher's
Makes sure Ss know what they previous day. questions to participate. voice 5
are expected to learn. Asks Ss to make gestures of how Pay attention to the Checks if Ss understand
Intonates the instructions giving they felt the day before. teacher the instructions. Pi
excitement or emotion Uses checklist. ctures.

Introduce the topic Describing Pay attention to the Watches body


Praises the Ss with encouraging teacher language. B
Past Events
words. oard
DEVELOPMENT

Listen to the teacher


Maintains eye contact during Ask some questions about how Checks the correct Te 10
Answer the questions
3.DESCRIBING NEW

teacher-student interaction. they were yesterday. answer of the date. acher's


Provides opportunity for Ss to Asks Ss What was the day Checks if Ss understand voice
speak or participate. yesterday? (Appendix 1) the instruction. St
NOWLEDGE

Gives the students some Uses checklist. udents


voice
examples.

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Involves Ss in his/her activity. Give a worksheet to identify the Pay attention to the Checks the correct Teacher' 6
Tells the Ss how well they have weather. (Appendix2) teacher answer of the s voice

4. CONTROL
done. Ask the Ss to recognize some Listen to the teacher weather. Student 6

PRACTICE
Provides opportunity for Ss to vocabulary with some images. Checks if Ss are s voice
Answer the
speak or participate. Give a worksheet to complete the interested in the Work
Shows a good sense of humor. sentences. (Appendix3) questions activity and sheet.
motivated to
participate.
Uses checklist.
Look and listen to Checks if Ss understand
Encourages the students to share Helps students to identify the new what the teacher is the instructions. Teacher
5. FREE PRACTICE

ideas and praises the Ss with vocabulary if they still had doubts. explaining. Checks if Ss are s voice 7
PRACTICE

PRACTICE

encouraging words. Corrects with the whole class the Listen to the interested in the
Provides opportunity for worksheet. instructions. activity and motivated Student
students to earn points. Check students participation. Participate. to participate. s voice
Tells the students how well they Uses checklist.
have done.

Checks if Ss understand Te
Involves Ss in his/her activity. Shows the game: Look and say it! Look and listen to what the instructions. achers
Gives and explains the the teacher is explaining. Checks if Ss are voice 10
6. CLASSROOM
TRANSFER

Provides opportunity for instructions. Listen to the interested in the St


students to earn points. Check students participation instructions. activity and motivated udents
Helps students with the Start to play the game. to participate. voice
vocabulary if they still had doubts. Participate activity. Provides relevant I
feedback on the mages
student's performance.
Uses checklist.
Asks students if they have some Listen to the teacher
7. EXTENSION AND

Praises the Ss with encouraging doubts Ask the teacher about Checks if Ss are Teacher
CONSOLIDATION

words. Thanks students for their their doubts satisfied with the s voice
FAREWELL

Smiles attention and participation. class. 4


Says Good bye. Student
Says Good Bye. s voice

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IV. CHART OF VALUES:

VALUES ATTITUDES

RESPONSIBILITY Show perseverance in their work.


Show interest about the topic
during the whole class.

COOPERATION Work with their partners.

RESPECT Show respect to their classmates'


ideas or opinions.
Respect the rules that the teacher
gives.
Show a positive attitude during
the activities.

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V. EVALUATION

EXPECTED LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT TOOLS


INDICATOR

Ask and give information Says orally a short Voice


about yesterday weather information about
and feelings. yesterday weather Board
and feelings. Pictures
Worksheets
Use the verb to be in
the past simple (was
/ were) properly

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VI. OBSERVATION GUIDE

Lesson topic: Describing Past Events

Indicators Recognize Learn about Talk about


past events past time past events
Students expressions
YES NO YES NO YES NO

1.Alvarez Cruz, Cristina Xiomara


2Aniceto Flores, Sergio
3.Anticona Vela, Victor
4.Asmat Romero, Cesar Daniel
5.Avila Ramirez, Esnayder
6.Bardales Guanilo, Walter Jean Pier
7. Blas Aldave, Imanol
8.Burga Castillo, Ana Greisi
9. Campos Siccha, Yhon
10. Castallano Blas, Mara
11. Chunga Trigozo, Christian Leonardo
12. Garcia Bejarano, Alexis
13.Gavidea Pachamango, Leonardo Gonzalo
14.Gil Pulido, Milagros Estefany
15.Gonzales Ruiz, Edgar Joel
16. Marquina Martinez, Cesar Andre
17.Palacios Salas, Angela
18.Paredes Usua, Rafael Andre
19.Quispe Moreno, Janali
20.Razuri Narro, Diego
21.Rodriguez Lopez, Rosa
22.Samame Gomez, Lucero
23. Torres Rodriguez, Mikhail
24. Vargas Delgado, Kevin Junior

DESCRIPTIVE SCALE
YES Can accomplish the goal for this session

NO Cannot accomplish the goal for this session

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VIII.SPECIFIC BIBLIOGRAPHY:

HARMER, Jeremy. (2007). "How to Teach English". Longman.

OXFORD ADVANCED LEARNER 'S DICTIONARY. (2010). Oxford University


Press.

WEB PAGES:
https://www.tes.com/lessons/rmWveOpn98MJmA/copy-of-was-and-were
www.//lub/how-to-talk-about-the-weather-in-english/
http://www.grammar.cl/Past/To_Be.htm

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12
APPENDIX N1:

What was the day yesterday?

Past Present

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APPENDIX N2

HOW WAS THE WEATHER


YESTERDAY?

IT WAS

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APPENDIX N3

COMPLETE THE SENTENCES WITH WAS OR WERE.

I .HAPPY IT .SUNNY THEY...SICK

HE .TIRED WE.SAD SHEANGRY

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1. THEMATIC ASPECTS

PAST SIMPLE VERB TO BE


(WAS - WERE)

Use the Simple Past of Verb TO BE to express the idea that an action started
and finished at a specific time in the past. Sometimes, the speaker may not
actually mention the specific time, but they do have one specific time in mind.

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The affirmative form:

I, he, she, it was.

you, we, they were.

Examples:

I was in London in 1999.


Pam was in London in 1999, too.
We were together.
She was my girlfriend.

The interrogative form:

Was I, he, she, it?

Were you, we, they?

Examples:

Were you in London last year?


Was Pam with you?
Were you together?

The negative form:

was not.
I, he, she, it
wasn't.

were not.
You, we, they
weren't.

Examples:

I wasn't in Paris in 1999.


Pam wasn't in Paris in 1999.
We weren't in Paris.

Remember:

1. wasn't is the short form of was not. You can say either:

I was not in Paris, or

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I wasn't in Paris.

2. weren't is the short form of were not. You can say either:

we were not in Paris, or


we weren't in Paris.

2. PSYCHOLOGICAL SUPPORT

2.1 CONSTRUCTIVIST THEORY (Bruner, 1915)

Jerome Bruner was one of the most influential constructivists. He was influenced
by Piagets ideas about cognitive development in children. His ideas have been
widely discussed among educators and teachers. Some of Bruner's theoretical
principles focus on these ideas

- Nature of Learning and learning process.

- Instructional scaffolding

- The intellectual development of the learner

Learning
Learning for Bruner is an active process. The learning process includes:

Selection and transformation of information.

Decision-making.

Generating hypotheses.

Making meaning from information and experiences.


Learners are able to construct new knowledge based on their current or past
knowledge. Bruner focuses on the importance of categorization in every aspect
of learning. This is done through the interpretation of information and experiences
by similarities and differences. Focus is on the significance of categorization in
learning. "To perceive is to categorize, to conceptualize is to categorize, to learn
is to form categories, to make decisions is to categorize." Interpreting information
and experiences by similarities and differences is a key concept.

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2.2 THE COGNITIVE THEORY (Hartley, 1998)

In cognitive learning, the individual learns by listening, watching, touching,


reading, or experiencing and then processing and remembering the
information. Cognitive learning enables us to create and transmit a complex
culture that includes symbols, values, beliefs and norms because cognitive
activity is involved in many aspects of human behavior.

James Hartley has usefully drawn out some of the key principles of learning, as
he puts it: 'Learning results from inferences, expectations and making
connections. Instead of acquiring habits, learners acquire plans and
strategies. The principles he identifies are:

Instruction should be well-organized: Well-organized materials are easier to


learn and to remember.

Instruction should be clearly structured: Subject matters are said to have natural
structures and logical relationships between key ideas and concepts to link the parts
together.

The perceptual features of the task are important the way a problem is
displayed is important if learners are to understand it.

Prior knowledge is important Things must fit with what is already known if
it is to be learnt.

Differences between individuals are important as they will affect


learning: Differences in 'cognitive style' or methods of approach influence
learning.

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3. PEDAGOGICAL SUPPORT (Giles, E., Pitre, S., Womack, S. 2003)

Nowadays, the education is oriented by a series of principles that defines and


clarifies its notion.

INDIVIDUALIZATION

Students have needs and abilities that are unique. There are differences in their
speaking, listening, writing, reading activities; differences in the way of thinking;
feeling; etc.

This principle tells that the center of the educational action is the person
who has to adapt himself some interest and procedures. Each person wants the
greatest perfection to develop whatever he wants individually.
The role of the teacher is to observe and to orientate his studies adequately.

SOCIALIZATION
The purpose of Education is to socialize students. When students work in pairs or
small groups and ask each other about their answers, they interact, and at the same
time they learn to communicate in the target language and assimilate knowledge,
experiences, and so on.

THE ACTIVITY

"Learning by doing", students will improve their knowledge of the language


and the world if they are in constant activity. It means in the educational process,
the student must be agent and the actor of his own seaming. The teacher will
provide to the students activities relate to their personal activities. The learning
environment should also be designed to support and motivate the learner's
thinking.

THE MOTIVATION

This aspect is crucial because nobody learns if any reason moves her/him. The
students will feel attracted by the pictures which are from real life, the topic that
is familiar to them, the interesting exercises and everything used in class; not only
because of the entertainment but also because of the participation, the intellectual
challenge, etc.

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4. DIDACTIC SUPPORT

Richard & Rodgers (CLT Communicative Language Teaching)

4.1 COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH

Communicative language teaching makes use of real-life situations that


necessitate communication. The teacher sets up a situation that students are
likely to encounter in real life. The communicative approach can leave students
in suspense as to the outcome of a class exercise, which will vary according to
their reactions and responses. The real-life simulations change from day to day.
Students' motivation to learn comes from their desire to communicate in
meaningful ways about meaningful topics. Classroom activities maximize
opportunities for learners to use target language in a communicative way for
meaningful activities. Emphasis on meaning (messages they are creating or
tasks they are completing) rather that form (correctness of language and
language structure) as in first language acquisition.

Basic Principles for Teachers

- A teacher's main role is a facilitator and monitor rather than leading the class.
In other words, "the guide by the side" and not "the sage on the stage".

- Lessons are usually topic or theme based, with the target grammar "hidden" in
the context e.g. to say some activities in the past.

- Lessons are built round situations/functions practical and authentic in the real
world e.g. asking for information about students' activities in the past.

- Activities set by the teacher have relevance and purpose to real life situations

-students can see the direct benefit of learning. Dialogues are used that Centre
around communicative functions, such as socializing, asking and giving
information about past activities.

- Emphasis on engaging learners in more useful and authentic language rather


than repetitive phrases or grammar patterns.

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- Emphasis on communication and meaning rather than accuracy. Being
understood takes precedence over correct grammar. The fine tuning of grammar
comes later.

Basic Principles for Learners

- Learners are often more motivated with this approach as they have an
interesting what is being communicated, as the lesson is topic or theme based.

- Learners are encouraged to speak and communicate from day one, rather than
just barking out repetitive phrases Learners practice the target language a
number of times, slowly building on accuracy Language is created by the
individual, often through trial and error.

- Learners interact with each other in pairs or groups, to encourage a flow of


language and maximize the percentage of talking time, rather than just teacher
to student and vice versa.

- Unless the focus is on the accuracy stage of the lesson, learners are corrected
at the end of an activity so as not to interrupt their thought process.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH

Although no single methodology has been described for the communicative


approach, several characteristics are summarized as follow.

Communicative approach stimulates 'real life' communicative experiences:

Froese V in his book named as 'Introduction to whole language teaching and


learning' (1991) mentioned this characteristics of communicative approach.
Learners should conduct an interview because they actually need information. In
role playing process, the purpose is to learn how to formulate appropriate
questions. But here, as Froese V noted these activities should not only stimulate
real life experiences but, whenever possible, should actually be real life
experiences.

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The learning task is content-based, theme-based, and project-based or
some combination of the three:

Instruction in listening and speaking, as well as reading and writing, is given within
the context of handling various learning tasks, which involve learners with
language. This learning task is content based according to Early M & Tang M as
described in their book named as Helping ESL students cope with content -based
text (1991), 'theme-based' according to Candling C & Edelhoff C as described in
their book Challenges (1982) and 'project based' according to Fned-Booth D as
described in the book 'Project Work' (1986). Within the context of an interview,
questioning skills can be taught. Students need the opportunity to express
themselves through a variety of experiences and tasks.

Analysis of language is done in specific contexts:

Language drills, recitation and isolation grammar exercises are not the ways to
acquire any language. Analysis of language is done in specific contexts.
Decontextualized language is not used as a basis for skill instruction.

The focus is not upon listening and speaking but upon using language to
communicate and to learn:

As students use language to learn in various subject areas, it becomes necessary


for them to communicate with peers in large and small groups as well as with the
teacher. Collaborative talk can occur between peers in quite an informal way or
in more formal cooperative learning groups.

Listening and speaking skills as vehicles for learning across all subjects'
areas:

Barnes D in his book named as 'Oral language and learning' (1990) described
that listening and speaking become valuable not only as isolated skills or groups
of skills, but as vehicles for learning across all subject areas. Oral communication
should be integrated with other areas of instruction.

4.2 TEACHING READING

Traditionally, the purpose of learning to read in a language has been to have


access to the literature written in that language. In language instruction, reading

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materials have traditionally been chosen from literary texts that represent higher
forms of culture. This approach assumes that students learn to read a language
by studying its vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure, not by actually
reading it. In this approach, tower level learners read only sentences and
paragraphs generated by textbook writers and instructors. The reading of
authentic materials is limited to the works of great authors and reserved for upper
level students who have developed the language skills needed to read them.

Sequences "ESA" in a reading class:

"Engage (Before reading)": This is the point in a teaching sequence where


teachers try to arouse the students interest, thus involving their emotions. The
purpose of a pre-reading task is usually to activate students' prior knowledge.
Activities and materials which frequently engage students include: music,
stimulating pictures, amusing anecdotes, etc. E.g. students will look at the picture
of a person and be asked to guess what their occupation is before they read
about this person. When students are engaged, they learn well than when they
are partly or wholly disengaged.

"Study (During reading)": Study means any stage at which the construction of
language is the main focus. Study activities are those where the students are
asked to focus in on language for (or information) or how it is constructed
Students can study in a variety of different styles: the teacher can explain
grammar: they can study language evidence to discover grammar for
themselves, they can work studying in a reading or vocabulary. Etc.

"Activate (After reading)": This element describes exercises and activities


which are designed to get students using language as and ''communicatively" as
they can. The objective for the students in not to focus on language construction
and or practice specific tits of language (grammar patterns particular vocabulary
Items or functions) but for them to use all and any language which may be
appropriate for a given situation or topic. Thus, activate exercises over students
a chance to try out a real language use with Utile or no restriction a kind of
rehearsal for the real world Typical activate exercises include role-plays,
advertisement design, debates and discussions, story and poem writing,
describes and draw, etc.:

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5. TECHNIQUES

Showing pictures. Pictures are the most useful visual aids available to
the teacher. They can be a good way to engage learners to practice many
aspects of the language.
Authentic material to overcome the typical problem that students can't
transfer what they learn in the classroom to the outside world and to
expose students to natural language in a variety of situations, adherents
of the Communicative Approach advocate the use of authentic language
materials.
Asking questions, it helps the teacher control the class and makes
students pay attention to the whole lesson. It is also a way to give the
learners a chance to show their knowledge.
Giving and following instructions this simple but valuable
communicative activity is used at the moment of working with the
language.
Whole class: there are many occasions when the best type of classroom
organization is a teacher working with the class as a whole group.

6. TEACHING AIDS

Teaching aids are helpful tools for teaching in a classroom or with individual
learners so they can be used to helps students to improve their skills. Illustrate
facts or ideas and relieve anxiety or fears, since many teaching aids are like
games.

Board: For most teachers the most visual aid is the board. Whenever
possible work on the board should encourage students to think and take
actions rather than just to remind them of what they have learned.

The teacher uses the board to stick all the wall charts used during the whole
class. Also, she uses it to explain grammar, the date. Etc.

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Teacher's voice: Teacher's voice is an important teaching aid. One of the
first requirements of good teaching is good voice projection. The teacher
needs to be heard by all the students.
During the whole class the teacher uses her voice to give
instructions, asks questions, helps the students, etc.
Pictures: Many people who use pictures make difficult things easier to
understand. Pictures can also be used as a way of engaging students on
reading.

Teacher can take advantage of pictures because they are the most useful
visual aids available.

Worksheet: Worksheets allow teachers to measure the students' learning.


A worksheet teacher can contain different kind of exercises according to
the content of the lesson.
The teacher presents worksheets according to the topic that allows
the students to develop their skills.
Class Participation: It is used to motivate the students to participate in
class

The teacher uses the class participation to motivate the students to


participate in class.

Sticky tack: A sticky substance which is used for joining things together
permanently.

The teacher uses this substance to stick on the board all the pictures and
cards that she uses in the class.

Body language: Sometimes students can understand what the teacher


means even when they do not know words in English. The key is the mime,
facial expressions and body movements. In this way, students get a
chance more to acquire without understand.

The teacher uses his /her hands, arms, face and any part of the body in
several ways to help the student's communication.

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7. EVALUATION

The Formative Evaluation: is a method of judging the work of students while


they are doing different activities. Formative evaluation focuses on the process,
the teachers evaluate during the whole class, observing who participates,
reproduces their learning by doing the task. The purpose of formative evaluation
is to validate or ensure that the goals are being achieved and to identify the
difficulties of the learning. Formative evaluation focuses on the process.

If there are any difficulties or problems during the lesson, the teacher tries to
guides the students.

The teacher evaluates the process of learning using different techniques and
activities.

II. DISCUSSION

The thematic aspect, in this case the vocabulary given plays an important
role because without it students cannot understand others or express their
own ideas.
It's important to give students a good way to vocabulary to they can
understand past activities of their classmates and express their own past
activities.
The learning process should be intentional, that is, students must
construct meaning from information, experience and their own thoughts
and beliefs.
The classroom environment should be safe so that students can feel
confidence and motivated during the activities and the class time.
The teacher is a good guide, she presents different activities in a way that
students can feel interested and the class can be non-threatening so
students can feel they can do the tasks no matter if they make mistakes.
One of the most important features of the Communicative Approach is to
allow the students to develop their communicative competence.
.The different techniques and teaching aids used by the teacher motivate
students and allow them to communicate in the target language.

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When students feel stimulated, the class becomes active and students
participate in an active way. In this case, I have chosen the different
techniques of Communicative Approach because the learning
achievement of my class is that students are be able to ask and give
information about their past activities.
The teacher intends to practice a formative evaluation during the whole
class
The teacher uses this tool to observe participation and to identify if the
students are accomplishing the goals.

III. CONCLUSION

The Communicative Approach makes possible a communicative competence


among the students who work together; socialize and use the target language
during the class to communicate their ideas, opinions and emotions.

The techniques and teaching aids are useful for maintaining the attention of
students during the class and for making them to participate.

The formative evaluation will allow students and the teacher to be conscious of
the weaknesses and strengthens.

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IV. BIBLIOGRAPHY

DOUGLAS BROWN, H. (2002). Teaching by Principles. An Interactive


Approach to Language Pedagogy. Longman.
HARMER, Jeremy. (2007). "How to Teach English". Longman.
HARTLEY, James.(1998) Learning and Studying. London. 1998
BRUNER, Jerome (1972). Towards a theory of instruction
RICHARD, Jack; ROGERS, T. (2003). Approaches and Methods in
languages teaching. Cambridge University Press.
OXFORD ADVANCED LEARNER 'S DICTIONARY. (2010).Oxford
University Press.
RAYMOND MURPHY. (2004).English Grammar in Use. Cambridge
University Press.

WEB PAGES

http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/simpas-paspro/exercises
http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/english-
spanish/weather/42166
http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplepast.html

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