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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS, HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM STUDIES

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT & INFORMATION SYSTEM

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT, IR & OHS

MGT504 12 Credit Points Project Management Essentials, Planning & Control Trimester 1 2012

UNIT COORDINATOR: TBA


CONTRIBUTING LECTURERS: TBA
TUTORS: N/A

LECTURES: TBA (on FNU Homepage)


LABS: TBA (in class in week 1)

CONSULTATION TIME: Walk-in: TBA (in class in week1)


Or through appointment with the Dept secretary

PREREQUISITE: Form 7 Pass or Foundation or Equivalent

E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on


Moodle and Class share. Students are required to check
their emails regularly for communication from the lecturer.
Check the announcements on the Moodle or/and class share.

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS:

Contact Hours 72
Lectures 48
Tutorials (using labs) 24
Labs/Workshops
Field Trip(s) -
Self Directed Learning (during term) hours 36
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) hours 24
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) hours 48
Total Learning Hours 180

1
1.0 Welcome

I welcome you to this Unit and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting. This unit
describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to manage a
straightforward project or a section of a larger project.
This unit addresses the management of projects including the development of a project plan,
administering and monitoring the project, finalising the project and reviewing the project to
identify lessons learnt for application to future projects.

2.0 Unit Description

This course is designed to teach students the basic principles of good project management.
Students will learn how to identify and schedule project resources, create project fow charts,
and produce critical path planning and evaluation reports. Important issues of staff selection
and team management are also covered. These learning objectives are reinforced by a course
project that allows the student to apply the principles and use the tools they learned.
The course aims to adds to students skill set by teaching the methods, tools and techniques
that are used in planning, monitoring and controlling projects. The appropriate educational
techniques are used to provide the participant with simple, logical approaches to the effective
and efficient management of projects.

3. 0 Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

1. Apply the skills and confidence to use a practical project planning technique.
2. Determine if a project can truly be delivered on time, within budget and with limited
resources.
3. Assess project trade-offs and set atainable goals with clients, managers and project
team members.
4. Design and record actual project progress and then use the project baseline to spot and
manage variance.
5. Analyze how to frame your questions when analyzing the project plan to spot hidden
variances.
6. Examine the importance of project schedules and good project time management
7. Assess the project cost management processes.

4.0 Unit Content and Reading References


Topic 1: INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 8

Learning Outcome:

Student should be able to apply the skills and confidence to use a practical project planning
technique.

2
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

1.1 Understand the growing need for beter project management.


1.2 Describe what project management is and discuss key elements of the project
management framework
1.3 Discuss how project management relates to other disciplines
1.4 Understand the history of project management
1.5 Describe the project management profession, including recent trends in project
management research, certification.

Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Text 1: Chapter 1

1. Adams, John R., Principles of Project Management. 1996. Project Management Institute
Publications, Sylva, NC. ISBN 1-880410-30-3 (pbk).

2. Archibald, Russell D., Managing High-Technology Programs and Projects. 1992. John
Wiley & Sons, Inc., ISBN: 0-471-51327-X

3. Badawy, Michael K., Developing Managerial Skills in Engineers , and Scientists,


Succeeding as a Technical Manager. 1995. Van Nostrand Reinhold, ISBN: 0-442-01861-4..
4. Badiru, Adedeji B., P. Simin Pulat, Comprehensive Project Management, Integrating
Optimization Models, Management Principles, and Computers. 1995. Prentice Hall, Inc.,
ISBN: 0-13-030925-7

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 20 slides x 3 1 hr Reading book chapter 3 hrs
mins 30 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs
mins

Total Self Directed Learning = 8 Hours

Topic 2: THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CONTEXT

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 12


Learning Outcome:

3
Students shall be able to determine if a project can truly be delivered on time, within budget
and with limited resources.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

2.1 Understand the systems view of project management and how it applies to
information technology projects.
2.2 Analyse a formal organization using the structural, human resources, political, and
symbolic organizational frames.
2.3 Explain the diferences among functional, matrix, and project organizational
structures.
2.4 Explain why stakeholder management and top management commitment are
critical for a projects success.
2.5 Understand the concept, development, implementation, and close-out phases of
the project life cycle.
2.6 Distinguish between project development and product development
2.7 Discuss the unique atributes and diverse nature of information technology projects.
2.8 List the skills and atributes of a good project manager in general and in the
information technology field.
Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Text 1: Chapter
3. Bradford, Lawrence J., Claire Raines, Twenty-Something, Managing & Motivating Today's
New Work Force. 1992. Master Media Limited, ISBN: 0-942361-35-0

4. Bradford, Robert W., J. Peter Duncan, Brian Tarcy. Simplified Strategic Planning.
Worchester, Massachusets: Chandler House Press, 2000.
5. Brickner, William H., Donald M. Cope, The Planning Process. 1977. Winthrop Publishers,
Inc., ISBN: 0-87626-672-2
6. Buchholtz, Steve and Thomas Roth, Creating the High-Performance Team , 1987. John
Wiley & Sons, NY. ISBN 0-471-85674-6.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 40 slides x 3 2 hr Reading book chapter 3 hrs
mins 30 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 60 hrs/12 5 hrs

Total Self Directed Learning = 12 Hours

Topic 3: THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROCESS GROUPS: A CASE STUDY


Lecture Hrs:4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 8
Learning Outcome:

4
Student shall be able to communicate project trade-offs clearly and to set atainable goals with
clients, managers and project team members.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

3.1 Describe the five project management process groups, the typical level of
activity for each, and the interactions among them
3.2 Understand how the project management process groups relate to the project
management knowledge areas
3.3 Discuss how organizations develop information technology project management
methodologies to meet their needs
3.4 Review a case study of an organization applying the project management process
groups to manage an information technology project
3.5 Understand the contribution that effective project initiation, project planning,
project execution, project control, and project closing makes to project success

Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Text 1: Chapter
3. Burt, David N., Donald W. Dobler, Stephen L. Starling. World Class Supply Management:
The Key to Supply Chain Management, Sixth Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003.
4. Byham, William C., Zapp! The Lightning of Empowerment. 1988. Fawcet Columbine,
ISBN: 0-449-90705-8. Byrne, Brendan, Alan Mullaly, Brian Rothery, The Art of Systems
Analysis. 1971. Prentice Hall, ISBN: 0-13-048751-1Campbell, Bonita J., Understanding
Information Systems, Foundations for Control. 1977. Winthrop Publishers, Inc., ISBN: 0-
87626-889-0.
5. Cleland, David I (Editor)., Field Guide to Project Management. 1998. Van Nostrand
Reinhold Inc., ISBN:0-442-02345-6.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 20 slides x 3 1 hr Reading book chapter 2 hrs
mins 20 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs

Research 20hrs/10 2 hrs


Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 8 Hours

Topic 4: PROJECT INTEGRATION MANAGEMENT


Lecture Hrs:4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 8
Learning Outcome:

5
Students shall be able to design and record actual project progress and then use the project
baseline to spot and manage variance.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

4.1 Describe an overall framework for project integration management as it relates


to the other project management knowledge areas and the project life cycle
4.2Describe project plan development, including project plan content, using
guidelines and templates for developing plans, and performing a stakeholder
analysis to help manage relationships
4.3 Explain project plan execution, its relationship to project planning, the factors
related to successful results, and tools and techniques to assist in project plan
execution
4.4 Understand the integrated change control process, planning for and managing
changes on information technology projects, and developing and using a change
control system
4.5 Describe how software can assist in project integration management

Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Text 1: Chapter
3. Cleland, David I and William R. King., Project Management Handbook. 1988. Van
Nostrand Reinhold Inc. ISBN: 0-442-22114-2
4. Cleland, David I. Project Management, Strategic Design and Implementation. 1994.
McGraw-Hill Inc., ISBN: 0-07-011351-3Covey, Stephen R. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective
People. 1990. Fireside, Simon & Schuster Inc., ISBN: 0-671-66398-4.

5. Covey, Stephen R., Principle-Centered Leadership. 1992. Fireside, Simon & Schuster
Inc., ISBN: 0-671-74910-2.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 20 slides x 3 1 hr Reading book chapter 1 hr
mins 10 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs
Study journal articles 5 pp x 12 2 hrs
mins
Research 20hrs/10 2 hrs
Assignment/Project

Total Self Directed Learning = 8 Hours

Topic 5: PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT

Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 9

6
Learning Outcome:

Students shall be able to analyze how to frame your questions when analyzing the project plan
to spot hidden variances

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

5.1 Understand the elements that make good project scope management important
5.2 Describe the strategic planning process, apply different project selection methods,
such as a net present value analysis, a weighted scoring model, and a balanced
scorecard, and understand the importance of creating a project charter
5.3 Explain the scope planning process and contents of a scope statement
5.4 Discuss the scope definition process and construct a work breakdown structure using
the analogy, top-down, botom-up, and mind mapping approaches
5.5 Understand the importance of scope verification and scope change control to avoid
scope creep on information technology projects
5.6 Describe how software can assist in project scope management

Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Text 1: Chapter
6. Burt, David N., Donald W. Dobler, Stephen L. Starling. World Class Supply Management:
The Key to Supply Chain Management, Sixth Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003.
7. Byham, William C., Zapp! The Lightning of Empowerment. 1988. Fawcet Columbine,
ISBN: 0-449-90705-8. Byrne, Brendan, Alan Mullaly, Brian Rothery, The Art of Systems
Analysis. 1971. Prentice Hall, ISBN: 0-13-048751-1Campbell, Bonita J., Understanding
Information Systems, Foundations for Control. 1977. Winthrop Publishers, Inc., ISBN: 0-
87626-889-0.
3. Cleland, David I (Editor)., Field Guide to Project Management. 1998. Van Nostrand
Reinhold Inc., ISBN:0-442-02345-6

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 20 slides x 3 1 hr Reading book chapter 1 hrs
mins 10 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 60 hrs/12 5 hrs

Total Self Directed Learning = 9 Hours

Topic 6: PROJECT TIME MANAGEMENT


Lecture Hrs: 4 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 15
Learning Outcome:

Students shall be able to describe the importance of project schedules and good project time

7
management

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

6.1 Define activities as the basis for developing project schedules


6.2 Describe how project managers use network diagrams and dependencies to assist in
activity sequencing
6.3 Explain how various tools and techniques help project managers perform activity
duration estimating and schedule development
6.4 Use a Gantt chart for schedule planning and tracking schedule information
6.5 Understand and use critical path analysis
6.6 Describe how to use several techniques for shortening project schedules
6.7 Explain the basic concepts behind critical chain scheduling and Program Evaluation
and Review Technique (PERT)
6.8 Discuss how reality checks and people issues are involved in controlling and managing
changes to the project schedule
6.9 Describe how software can assist in project time management

Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Davidson-Schaefer, Susan, The Motivation Process. 1977. Winthrop Publishing, Inc.,
ISBN: 0-87626-583-2. de Bono, Edward. Six Thinking Hats. New York: Back Bay Books,
1999.
3. Donaldson, Michael C. and Donaldson, Mimi, Negotiating for Dummies, 1996. IDG
BOOKS, Foster City, CA. ISBN: 1-56884-867-6. Donnahoe, Alan S., What Every Manager
Should Know About Financial Analysis. 1990. Fireside, Simon & Schuster Inc., Rockefeller
Center, ISBN: 0-671-61098-8..
4. Drucker, Peter F., Managing in a Time of Great Change, 1995. Truman Tally Books/Plume,
New York. ISBN 0-452-27837-6 (pbk.).
5. Ends, Earl J., Curtis W. Page, Organizational Team Building. 1977. Winthrop Publishers,
Inc., ISBN: 0-87626-627-8.
SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 40 slides x 3 2 hr Reading book chapter 3 hrs
mins 30 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 60 hrs/12 5 hrs

Research 20hrs/10 2 hrs Group discussions 1 hr


Assignment/Project

Total Self Directed Learning = 15 Hours

Topic 7: PROJECT COST MANAGEMENT


Lecture Hrs: 5 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 11
Learning Outcome:

8
Students shall be able to understand project cost management processes.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

7.1 Understand the importance of good project cost management


7.2 Explain basic project cost management principles, concepts, and terms
7.3 Describe how resource planning relates directly to project cost management
7.4 Explain cost estimating using definitive, budgetary, and rough order of magnitude
(ROM) estimates
7.5 Understand the processes involved in cost budgeting and preparing a cost estimate
for an information technology project
7.6 Understand the benefits of earned value management and project portfolio
management to assist in cost control
7.7 Describe how software can assist in project cost management

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Text : Chapter
3. Davidson-Schaefer, Susan, The Motivation Process. 1977. Winthrop Publishing, Inc.,
ISBN: 0-87626-583-2. de Bono, Edward. Six Thinking Hats. New York: Back Bay Books,
1999.
4. Donaldson, Michael C. and Donaldson, Mimi, Negotiating for Dummies, 1996. IDG
BOOKS, Foster City, CA. ISBN: 1-56884-867-6..
5. Donnahoe, Alan S., What Every Manager Should Know About Financial Analysis. 1990.
Fireside, Simon & Schuster Inc., Rockefeller Center, ISBN: 0-671-61098-8. Drucker, Peter
F., Managing in a Time of Great Change, 1995. Truman Tally Books/Plume, New York.
ISBN 0-452-27837-6 (pbk.).
6. Ends, Earl J., Curtis W. Page, Organizational Team Building. 1977. Winthrop Publishers,
Inc., ISBN: 0-87626-627-8.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 20 slides x 3 1 hr Reading book chapter 1 hrs
mins 10 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 60 hrs/12 5 hrs

Research 20hrs/10 2 hrs Group discussions


Assignment/Project

Total Self Directed Learning = 11 Hours

Topic 8: PROJECT QUALITY MANAGEMENT

9
Lecture Hrs: 8 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 17
Learning Outcome:

Students shall be able to

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

8.1 Understand the importance of project quality management for information


technology products and services
8.2 Define project quality management and understand how quality relates to various
aspects of information technology projects
8.3 Describe quality planning and its relationship to project scope management
8.4 Discuss the importance of quality assurance
8.5 List the three outputs of the quality control process
8.6 Understand the tools and techniques for quality control, such as Pareto analysis,
statistical sampling, Six Sigma, quality control charts, and testing
8.7 Describe important concepts related to Six Sigma and how it helps organizations
improve quality and reduce costs
8.8 Summarize the contributions of noteworthy quality experts to modern quality
management
8.9 Understand how the Malcolm Baldrige Award and ISO 9000 standard promote quality
in project management
8.10 Describe how leadership, cost, organizational influences, and maturity models
relate to improving quality in information technology projects
8.11 Discuss how software can assist in project quality management

Reading Resource Materials


1. Lecture Notes
2. Davidson-Schaefer, Susan, The Motivation Process. 1977. Winthrop Publishing, Inc.,
ISBN: 0-87626-583-2. de Bono, Edward. Six Thinking Hats. New York: Back Bay Books,
1999.
3. Donaldson, Michael C. and Donaldson, Mimi, Negotiating for Dummies, 1996. IDG
BOOKS, Foster City, CA. ISBN: 1-56884-867-6..
4. Donnahoe, Alan S., What Every Manager Should Know About Financial Analysis. 1990.
Fireside, Simon & Schuster Inc., Rockefeller Center, ISBN: 0-671-61098-8. Drucker, Peter
F., Managing in a Time of Great Change, 1995. Truman Tally Books/Plume, New York.
ISBN 0-452-27837-6 (pbk.).
5. Ends, Earl J., Curtis W. Page, Organizational Team Building. 1977. Winthrop Publishers,
Inc., ISBN: 0-87626-627-8.

SDL Activities

10
Study lecture notes 40 slides x 3 2 hr Reading book chapter 2 hrs
mins 20 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 60 hrs/12 5 hrs
Study journal articles 10 pp x 12 2 hrs
mins
Research 20hrs/10 2 hrs Group discussions 1 hr
Assignment/Project
Searching internet 1 hr
Total Self Directed Learning = 17 Hours

Topic 9: PROJECT HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


Lecture Hrs: 6 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 11
Learning Outcome:

Students should be able to

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

9.1.1 Explain the importance of good human resource management on projects, especially
on information technology projects
9.1.2 Define project human resource management and understand its processes
9.1.3 Summarize key concepts for managing people by understanding the theories of
Abraham Maslow, Frederick Herzberg, David McClelland, and Douglas McGregor on
motivation, H. J. Thamhain and D. L. Wilemon on influencing workers, and Stephen
Covey on how people and teams can become more efective
9.1.4 Discuss organizational planning and be able to create a project organizational chart,
responsibility assignment matrix, and resource histogram
9.1.5 Understand important issues involved in project staff acquisition and explain the
concepts of resource assignments, resource loading, and resource levelling
9.1.6 Assist in team development with training, team-building activities, and reward
systems
9.1.7 Describe how project management sofware can assist in project human resource
management
Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Text 2: Chapter 9:
5. Fleming, Quentin W., Quentin J. Fleming, Subcontract Project Management & Control--
Progress Payments. 1991. Probus Publishing Co., ISBN: 1-55738-283-2..
6. Fleming, Quentin, and Joel Koppleman, Earned-Value Project Management, (Newtown
Square, Pennsylvania: Project Management Institute).
7. Fogg, C. Davis. Team-Based Strategic Planning: A Complete guide to Structuring,
Facilitating and Implementing the Process. New York: American Management
Association, 1994.
8. Galens Gloria J., Katherine Adams. Effective Group Decisions: Theory and Practice. New
York: McGraw-Hill, 2007.

11
9. Galens Gloria J., Katherine Adams. Effective Group Discussion, Thirteenth Edition. New
York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
3. Goal/QPC, The Team Memory Jogger Joiner Associates, Madison, WI 1995.

SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 20 slides x 3 1 hr Reading book chapter 1 hr
mins 10 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 60 hrs/12 5 hrs

Research 20hrs/10 2 hrs Group discussions


Assignment/Project

Total Self Directed Learning = 11 Hours

Topic 10: PROJECT COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT


Lecture Hrs: 6 Tutorial/Workshop Hrs: 2 SDL Hrs: 12
Learning Outcome:

Students shall be able to.

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA:

1.1 Understand the importance of good communication on projects and describe the
major components of a communications management plan
1.2 Discuss the elements of project communications planning, including information
distribution, performance reporting, and administrative closure
1.3 Discuss various methods for project information distribution and the advantages
and disadvantages of each
1.4 Understand individual communication needs and how to determine the number of
communications channels needed for a project
1.5 Understand how the main outputs of performance reporting help stakeholders
stay informed about project resources
1.6 Recognize how the main outputs of administrative closure are used to formally end
a project
1.7 List various methods for improving project communications, such as managing
conflicts, running effective meetings, using e-mail effectively, and using templates
1.8 Describe how software can enhance project communications

Reading Resource Materials

1. Lecture Notes
2. Text 2:
1. Kemps, Robert R., Humphreys & Associates, Inc, Fundamentals of Project Performance
Measurement. 1992. San Diego Publishing Co., ISBN: 0-912495-21-9. Kepner, Charles H.,

12
Benjamin B. Tregoe, The Rational Manager, A Systematic Approach to Problem Solving
and Decision Making. 1965. McGraw-Hill Book Co., ISBN: 07-034175-3..
2. Kerzner, Harold, Project Management, A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and
Controlling. 1995. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York. ISBN: 0-442-01907-6. A
comprehensive coverage of project management (1152 pagesLang, Douglas W., Critical
Path Analysis. 1970. The English Universities Press Ltd., ISBN: 0-340-11450-9. Basic
techniques, exercises, and problems dealing with PERT/CPA. A short but comprehensive
book which deals exclusively with PERT/CPA..
3. Leavit, Harold J., Louis R. Pondy, Readings in Managerial Psychology. 1968. The
University of Chicago Press, Chicago 60637Lewicki, Roy J., Bruce Barry, David M.
Saunders. Negotiation, Sixth Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.
4. Lewis, James P., Mastering Project Management: Applying Advanced Concepts to
Systems Thinking, Control & Evaluation, and Resource Allocation (New York, McGraw-
Hill: 2008).
5. Lewis, James P., Fundamentals of Project Management . 1995. AMACOM, ISBN: 0-
8144-7835-2.
SDL Activities
Study lecture notes 40 slides x 3 2 hr Reading book chapter 2 hrs
mins 20 pages x 6 mins
Tutorial preparation 2 hrs Prep Mid Term & Final Exam 60 hrs/15 5 hrs
Study journal articles 5 pp x 12 1 hr
mins
Group discussions

Total Self Directed Learning = 12Hours

5.0 Resources

The recommended texts are:


Gray C, Larson Erik; Project Management
Supplementary
Robert Bruner, Applied Mergers and Acquisitions
Enrique Arzac, Valuation for Acquisitions, Buyouts and Restructurings
Donald de Pamphilis, Mergers, Acquisitions and Other Restructuring (Academic Press)
Aswath Damodaran, Damodaran on Valuation
McKinsey Quarterly (on-line subscription

6.0 Assessment

1.1 Grades
(a) The overall mark for the unit depends on performance during the trimester (50%) and
performance in the final examination (50%).

In Class Assessment
Assignment/ PROJECT 30%
Mid Term Exam 15%
Tutorial Exercises and Tutorial Participation 15%

13
Continuous Assessment 60%
FINAL EXAMINATION 40%

(b) In order to pass the unit, that is, to obtain a grade of C or beter, it is necessary to score
at least 40% (ie 20/50) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students
atend all tutorials/labs/workshops.

1.2 Letter Grade Scale


The following grading scales would be used:

Grade Marks
A+ 90-100
A 80-89
B+ 75-79
B 65-74
C+ 60-64
C 50-59
D 40-49
E Below 40
W Withdrawn from Unit
CT Credit Transfer
NV Null & Void for Dishonest practice
I Result withheld/Incomplete assessment
X Continuing course
DNC Did Not Complete
Aeg Aegrotat Pass
PT Pass Terminating

3.0 Programme Regulations and Dissatisfaction with Assessment

The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students
Regulation (UASR). All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office
and familiarize themselves with all academic maters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take
the following steps to get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking
and reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student
may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work
and result will then stand.

14
Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in
the UASR.

1.0 Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulation

Plagiarism and dishonest practices are serious ofences for which ofenders shall be penalized.
Students must read the relevant section of UASR to understand the various types of cases
defined as dishonest practices in academic work and to also know the penalties associated with
these kinds of practices.

9. Final Examination Scripts

9.1. A student may obtain a copy of his/her assessed final exam script(s), and all other
writen materials submited for assessment in a unit, upon application on the
prescribed form and upon the payment of the prescribed administration fee(s).
9.2. A student may view online marking guide for in the final exam paper.
9.3. No access to exam scripts shall be permited afer 12 months of the release of results
for any unit.

10. Reconsideration of Assessment and Unit Grades, and Appeals

10.1. A student may apply for reconsideration of the final (end-point) assessment.
10.2. Applications for reconsideration shall be made only afer a student has viewed his/her
exam script and the marking guide under the provisions of s14 above, and remains
unsatisfied with the results obtained. The application for reconsideration shall specify
the question(s) which he/she is seeking a reconsideration of, and the basis for this.
10.3. Applications for reconsideration shall be made within five days of the result being
released if the student wishes to pursue a course to which the course(s) under
reconsideration is a prerequisite, or 21 days of the date of release of the results
otherwise. Applications need to be made by lodging a duly completed
Reconsideration of Assessment form, together with the necessary fees for the
reconsideration, to the Academic Office, which shall submit the application to the
respective Dean.
10.4. The Dean or the Head of the Academic Section authorized by the Dean to deal with
applications for reconsideration of grades shall cause the reconsideration to be done
expeditiously and independently.
10.5. Reconsideration of unit grades shall comprise
10.5.1.a careful check that the referred to examination question and part-question was
read by the examiner and given an appropriate mark;
10.5.2.a careful remarking of the question(s) being asked for reconsideration;
10.5.3.a careful check that the total examination mark has been accurately transposed
within the proportions (% coursework vs. % final examination) previously
established by the examiner;
10.5.4.a careful computation of all the marks awarded for the coursework; and
10.5.5.a careful check that the coursework mark has been accurately transposed within
the proportions previously established by the examiner.

15
10.6. The application shall be considered and a decision communicated to the Academic
Office within five working days of the receipt of the application for reconsideration
from the Academic Office if the course under reconsideration is a prerequisite to a
course that the student is required to undertake in the term immediately following to
complete his/her Programme, or within ten working days otherwise.
10.7. The outcome of the reconsideration shall be communicated to the student by the
Academic Office within two days of the receipt of the report from the Dean.
10.8. If the student is dissatisfied with the outcome of the application, the student may
apply to the College Academic Appeals Commitee for reconsideration of the
grade/result. Appeals shall be made within five working days of the date of the
notification of the outcome of the application for reconsideration. Applications shall
be made by lodging a duly completed form prescribed for this purpose to the
Academic Office, which then shall be sent by the Academic Office to the College
Appeals Commitee within one working day of its receipt. The Appeals Commitee
shall cause a careful reconsideration of the documents as listed in s15.5 above, as
well as cause to be carried out a careful examination of all or a sample of other
scripts (with such sample determined by a specified process by the Academic Office)
for the unit to ensure consistency of marking and assessment.
10.9. The College Academic Appeals Commitee shall advise the Academic Office of the
outcome of the appeal within five working days from the date of the receipt of the
application from the Academic Office if the course is a prerequisite to a course that
the student would need to do in the term immediately following to complete a
programme or within 15 working days otherwise. The Academic Office shall advise
the student within 24 hours by email or phone.
10.10. A grade may be unchanged, raised or lowered following reconsideration under this
section.
10.11. A student who is dissatisfied with the award of the College Academic Appeals
Commitee may appeal further to the Students Appeals Commitee for
reconsideration of the decision of the College Academic Appeals Commitee. This
appeal must be lodged within two working days from the date of the notification if
the course under reconsideration is a prerequisite to a course that the student is
required to undertake in the term immediately following to complete his/her
Programme or within ten working days otherwise.
10.12. Appeals against the decision of the College Academic Appeals Commitee shall be
made by lodging the prescribed application form [Appeal: Reconsideration of
Assessment] to the Academic Office.
10.13. The Students Appeals Commitee shall advice the Academic Office of the outcome of
the appeal within five working days of the date of the lodgement of the appeal if the
appeal concerns a prerequisite to another unit that the student needs to do in the
term immediately following to complete the programme, or 20 working days
otherwise.
10.14. A student may be given provisional admission into a unit if the unit whose grade is
under reconsideration or is under appeal is a prerequisite. The admission would be
confirmed if the students application succeeds. If the application fails, the student
shall be deregistered from the unit, with no loss of fee paid for the unit.
10.15. Any and all fee paid for reconsideration of a unit grade , including the fees to get a
copy of the script and to view the marking guide, shall be refunded to the candidate,
if, as a result of the reconsideration or appeals, the grade for the unit is raised.

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10.16. The decision of the Students Appeals Commitee shall be final.

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