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American Revolution/ New Government

11th Grade
AZ/US History

Abbye Lopez

SED480

2/5/2017
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline

Stage I Goals

Unit Overview:
The topic of this unit is the American Revolution. In an AZ/US history course the
American Revolution is an important topic for students to comprehend because it key
terms and events are what formed the country we live in today. The purpose of this unit if
for the 10th grade student to have a respect/understanding for why they are able to live the
lives they do in the present day. The students need to have this knowledge of their
government in order to know their duties and responsibilities as a citizen in this country.
It is important for students to receive this content also because it helps them relate the
past to the present. With this lesson I am able to have them feel what life was like before
the new national government and then see how these changes affect their every day life.
This unit has several activities planned such as a mock trial, creating their own
bill of right, and also writing first person journals. The students will be doing history in
this unit and not consuming history. There will also be a number of social studies
themes performed throughout my lessons on the structure of national government. The
students will have a new understanding of culture and well and people, places and
environments. This is shown through the students learning the importance of the people
who had an impact on government. The main themes they will receive from this lesson
are power, authority, and governance. I say this because the major take away from this
American Revolution unit is for them to see why there needed to be a change of
government and what it took for us to get where we are today.
In this unit and with these activities I will be addressing Historys Habits of
Mind. A habit of mind that will be conducted during the study of the American
Revolution is that the students will be recognizing the importance of individuals who
made a difference in history. They will be learning who contributed to the new form of
government and why. Through the Bill of Rights activity the students will not only
experience how difficult it is please an entire group of people but they will also be
prepared to live with uncertainties and exasperating and realizing that not all problems
can be solved. After this unit students will not be left with doubt about the reason they are
learning this material. They will be able to understand the significance of the past to their
own lives both private and public.

Enduring Understanding:
This unit will provide the students with knowledge of the events and decisions that took
place during the American Revolution in order to understand democracy as well as their
rights and responsibilities as a citizen in the United States.

Essential Question:
How actions taken during the American Revolution helped form todays national
government of the United States?
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
Sub-questions:
1. How did the Iroquois confederation influence the Albany Plan of Union?
2. What were the pros and cons of the Articles of Confederation?
3. What was the Constitutional Convention?
4. What rights do you have as a citizen in the U.S.
5. What difference did George Washington make?
6. Who is Alexander Hamilton and what were his political views?
7. What role did Thomas Jefferson play in the American Revolution
8. What three branches of government are still around today?

Key Concepts:
1. Legislative branch: the part of the U.S. government that created laws.
2. Articles of Confederation: the first written constitution of the United States formed on
November 15, 1777
3. Constitution: a body of fundamental principles or established precedents according to
which state or other organization is acknowledged to be governed.
4. Bill of Rights: the first ten amendments to the US Constitution, ratified in 1791 and
guaranteeing such rights as freedoms of speech, assembly, and worship.
5. Iroquois Confederation: otherwise known as Five Nations; was an alliance of five, later
six, American Indian tribes.
6. Parliament: the highest legislature in the UK. (British Government)
7. Democracy: a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible
members of a state, typically through elected representatives.
8. Patriot: a person who vigorously supports their country and is prepared to defend it
against enemies or detractors.
9. Liberty: the state of being free within society from oppressive restrictions imposed by
authority on ones way of life, behavior, or political views.
10. Executive branch: the branch of federal and state government that is broadly
responsible for implementing, supporting, and enforcing the laws made by the legislative
branch and interpreted by the judicial branch.
11. Declaration of Independence: the formal statement written by Thomas Jefferson
declaring the freedom of the thirteen American colonies from Great Britain.
12. Judicial branch: is the part of the U.S. government that interprets the law and
administers justice.

Addition People and Events:


1. George Washington: the first president of the United States, and the commanding
general of the American army during the Revolutionary War. The best known Founding
Father. Also known as the Father if the country.
2. Alexander Hamilton: United States statesman, writer on government, and leader of the
Federalists; as the first Secretary of the Treasury he establish a federal bank.
3. John Marshall: the fourth chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1801 and largely
responsible for establishing the Supreme Courts role in federal government.
4. Thomas Jefferson: one of the Founding Fathers, played a role in drafting the
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
Declaration of Independence. Was elected the third president of the U.S.
5. Marbury v. Madison: was a landmark Supreme Court case in which the Court formed
the basis for the exercise of judicial review under Article III of the Constitution.
6. Samuel Adams: was a political leader and a signer of the Declaration of Independence,
also helped form the Sons of Liberty.

Standards:
Arizona Standards for Social Studies:
Strand 1: American History Concept 4: Revolution and New Nation
PO 4. Analyze how the new national government was created:
a. Albany Plan of Union influenced by the Iroquois Confederation
b. Articles of Confederation
c. Constitutional Convention
d. Struggles over ratification of the Constitution
e. Creation of the Bill of Rights
PO 5. Examine the significance of the following in the formation of a new nation:
a. Presidency of George Washington
b. Economic policies of Alexander Hamilton
c. Creation of political parties under Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton
d. The establishment of the Supreme Court as a co-equal third branch of
government under John Marshall with cases such as Marbury v. Madison

AZ College & Career Readiness Standards:


6th-12th Grade: Arizonas Reading Standards -Literacy in History/Social Studies
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course
of the text. (9-10.RH.3)
6 - 12 Grade: Arizonas Writing Standards- Literacy in History/Social Studies
TH TH

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,


rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience. (9-10.WHST.5)

Objectives:
1. The students will participate in a discussion to elaborate on how the Iroquois leaders
influenced the Albany Plan of Union in order to understand the influence behind the
original idea of what is now the governmental system of the United States.
2. The students will evaluate a copy of the Articles of Confederation and write a
summary of their findings in order to acknowledge the differences between the first
constitution of the U.S. and the constitution we live by today.
3. The students will write down the causes and effects of the Constitutional Convention
in order to analyze why the Articles of Confederation needed to be amended.
4. The students will assemble a prezi presentation in groups to analyze the Federalists
point of view and the Anti-Federalists in order to acquire a comprehension of diverse
cultures and shared humanity and see the struggles of ratification of the constitution.
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
5. The students will create a classroom rough draft set of the Bill of Rights in order to
evaluate and perceive past events and issues as people experience them at the time, to
develop historical empathy as opposed to present-mindedness.
6. The students will hand in an evaluation paragraph on the pros and cons of their
classroom Bill of Rights in order to prepare to live with uncertainties and exasperating,
even perilous, unfinished business, realizing that not all problems have solutions.
7. The students will use a graphic organizer to compare what changed during George
Washingtons presidency to the current president in order to remember specific facts
about George Washington and that the needs of a society change through history.
8. The students will use a 3,2,1 exercise to remember details about Alexander Hamilton
in order to have understand the significance of the past to their own lives, both private
and public, and to society.
9. The students will participate in a discussion about the similarities and differences of
Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson in order to comprehend the aspects of both
that apply to today's function of government.
10. The students will write a Journal entry during the American Revolution pretending to
be George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshal, or
Samuel Adams in order to understand the importance of individuals who have made a
difference in history, and the significance of personal character for both good and ill.
11. The students will participate in a kahoot exercise to help remember the three branches
of government in order to understand that no individual or group has too much control.
12. The students will perform a mock trial of the Marbury v. Madison case in order
evaluate the functions of the Supreme Court and grasp the complexity of historical
causation.

Stage II Assessments

Overview of Assessments:
The goals for this units assessments are for the teacher to be able to see that the
students are reaching the enduring understanding and essential questions. After this unit
and the following assessments the students will have the knowledge of events and
decisions that took place during the American Revolution in order to understand
democracy as well as their rights and responsibilities as a citizen in the United States.
This understanding will be assessed through exit tickets, discussions, quizzes, and role
play activities. These will provide the students with differentiation of ways to expressing
their understandings of the content. After all the assessments are completed the goal is for
each students to be able to answer the question of how actions taken during the American
Revolution helped form today's national government of the United States.
These assessments will hit each of the three Dimension of Social Studies or
History. The first dimension the students will succeed in is the knowledge dimension.
This means that they will be able to identify, define, and describe important concepts,
facts, and details. This is the first step that the students will have to meet by doing the exit
tickets. The second dimension that students will master with these assessments will be
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
reasoning. With this dimension students will be able to make the facts meaningful and
bring about the deeper understanding of the subject. This is when the class will be having
their own interpretation, analysis, and synthesis of the knowledge they were taught. They
will be asked to discover relationships among facts and generalizations, values and
opinions, and practice solving problems. With these assessments the students will
activate their critical thinking and reasoning skills. The last dimension that these
assessments will have the students accomplish is communication. The goal of all the
assessments is to have the students reach this aspect of history. This is when the
classroom will be doing discussion. The students will be sparking the ideas of
conversation. The Performance assessments that are provided below are a perfect way for
the students to reach this dimension for this Unit. The main goal for the American
Revolution unit is for the students to fully succeed in all three dimensions of their
historical literacy.

Diagnostic and Formative Assessments:


Objective 1: For the first objective of the lesson the students will be participating in a
classroom discussion. This discussion will go over how the Iroquois leaders influenced
the Albany Plan of Union in order to understand the influence behind the original idea of
what is now the governmental system of the United States. The students will be
identifying the similarities between the two and why the Plan of Union included those
aspects.
Objective 2: To have an understanding of the Articles of Confederation, the students will
be completing an exit ticket. This exit ticket will be asking the students to write two facts
about the Articles of Confederation, two facts of the Constitution of the United Stated,
and then two facts that are the same between the two documents.
Objective 3: The students will take part in a discussion. The teacher will start the
discussion by asking the question of what caused the Constitutional Convention. This
will show that the students understand why the Articles of Confederation needed to be
changed and why we now have the Constitution.
Objective 4: To meet this objective, the students will be handing in an exit ticket towards
the end of class. They will need to write down two facts about federalists and then also
two facts about anti federalist. The teacher will ask this so that they can see that the
students have the knowledge of the main differences between the two.
Objective 5: In order for the students create a classroom rough draft set of the Bill of
Rights in order to evaluate and perceive past events and issues as people experience them
at the time, to develop historical empathy as opposed to present-mindedness, the teacher
will go around the room and have every student announce the 2 rights they feel most
important to include in their Bill of Rights. By doing this the students will have to see
the importance of prioritizing and understanding of the past by doing it themselves.
Objective 6: In order for the students to have an even deeper understanding of how the
people of this time were going through while creating this country's Bill of Rights, they
will be writing down both the pros and cons of their set of Bill of Rights. By doing this
they will have to think about what could go wrong with their rules as well as what can go
right. It will make the students analyze the situations and make a clear statement to the
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
teacher that the students understand the process of the finalized Bill of Rights.
Objective 7: To have the students discuss the changes George Washington made during
his presidency they will have an open discussion for the last 10 minutes of class. They
will be discussing the social changes that he had taken part in. They will be able to have
their own opinions on what changes had the most impact on society today. This way they
can make the connection between past and present and also be knowledgeable of George
Washington's presidency.
Objective 8:The students will use a 3,2,1 exercise to remember details about Alexander
Hamilton in order to have understand the significance of the past to their own lives, both
private and public, and to society. This will be used as an exit ticket. The students will
write 3 things they learned about Alexander Hamilton, 2 things they already knew about
him and 1 question they might still have about the lesson. The teacher will collect these at
the end of the day and be able to respond to the students questions by the next class
period for better understanding.
Objective 9:The students will participate in a discussion about the similarities and
differences of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson in order to comprehend the
aspects of both that apply to today's function of government. The class will be split into
two groups, Alexander Hamilton is one and the other will be Thomas Jefferson. The will
be acting as the side they have chosen and have educated arguments on why ones views
are better than the others. This is so that the students are open to discussion and get to
form their own opinions on the viewpoints.
Objective 10: As an exit ticket for this objective the students will be asked to pick what
person of the following is the most important to today's society and why. Their options
will be George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshal, or
Samuel Adams. This will also be the same person they write as in their journal entry.
Objective 11: At the end of this class period students will be taking a short quiz. It will
ask them to define the three branches of government. This is so that the teacher as well as
the students can see that they can identify the three branches and understand their
functions in today's government.
Objective 12: After the students have completed the mock trial of the Marbury v.
Madison case in order to evaluate the functions of the Supreme Court and grasp the
complexity of historical causation, they will be completing their last exit ticket of the
lesson. This exit ticket will activate their critical thinking. The question that they will
have to answer will be what do you think the world would be like today if there were no
Marbury v. Madison case? This question has no wrong answer. It is to get them thinking
outside of the box while it also triggers their understanding of what this case did for the
Court systems.
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
Summative Assessments:
Objective 1: Who would govern along with the President-General in the new colonial
government established by the Albany Plan of Union?
A. The Vice-President
B. The Supreme Court
C. The Secretary of State
D. The Grand Council
Objective 2: Which of the following is NOT TRUE about the United States under the
Articles of Confederation?
A.There was no President and only one house of Congress.
B.All states were considered equal to each other, meaning that each state had
only one vote in Congress.
C.The federal government was weak and had no power to enforce laws.
D.Federal judges were the only citizens who could choose the President
Objective 3: Which statement presents factual proof that the United States was NOT
acting like a single, unified country under the Articles of Confederation?
A.Each state wanted a different President.
B.Each state created its own army and printed its own currency (i.e. money).
C.Virginia and Maryland outlawed merchants and visitors from other colonies.
D.Each state sent representatives to the Constitutional Convention in
Philadelphia (1787).

Objective 4: While the U.S. Constitution was being created, two groups developed that
engaged in serious arguments over the type of power that the new federal government
should have. These two groups were known as Federalists and Antifederalists.

What problem did Anti-Federalists have with the Constitution?


A.They felt that the central government had been given too much power.
B.They felt that too many rights were guaranteed to individual citizens.
C.They felt that the nation should once again use the Articles of Confederation to
organize government.

Objective 5:The Bill of Rights was established and added to the United States
Constitution in 1791. What was the purpose of the Bill of Rights?
A.to specify which powers the government had and could use against citizens
B.to identify the specific rights citizens possessed that the government could
never infringe upon
C.to clarify the rights that citizens possessed and how they could be used to exert
more influence over government
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
Objective 6: What is an amendment?
A.a description of a section in the U.S. Constitution
B.an explanation added in the footnotes of the U.S. Constitution
C.a side note included in the U.S. Constitution
D.a change or addition to the U.S. Constitution

Objective 7: In his Farewell Address, George Washington urged the American people to
A. Limit a president to two terms in office
B. Value and maintain a sense of national unity
C. Create a defensive alliance with European countries
D.Establish more effective political parties

Objective 8: Who was Hamilton's major political opponent in New York in the 1780s?
A. Thomas Jefferson
B. John Adams
C. George Clinton
D. James Monroe

Objective 9: In 1803 Thomas Jefferson made one of his most important contributions as
president when he
A. Wrote the Declaration of Independence
B. Became the leader of the Democratic-Republican Party Founded the University of
Virginia
C. Purchased the Louisiana Territory from France

Objective 10: A basic idea stated by Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of


Independence is that
A. The power to govern a nation comes from the people
B. People should always follow their government
C. America must have a constitutional convention
D. Slavery must end in America

Objective 11: The President of the United States is the head of what branch of the federal
government?
A. legislative
B. executive
C. judicial
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
Objective 12: Under our system of checks and balance, the Supreme Court can limit the
power of both the Congress and the President by...
A. Impeaching public officials
B. Vetoing a law
C. Making appointments
D. Declaring a law unconstitutional

Performance Assessments:
In the American Revolution unit, there are going to be several different authentic
assessments. Throughout the beginning, middle and end of this unit the students will be
asked to either do a project, write a letter, or some form of role-play. The first
performance assessment the students will have a mini group project. In this project the
students will assemble a prezi presentation in groups to analyze the Federalists point of
view and the Anti-Federalists in order to acquire a comprehension of diverse cultures and
shared humanity and see the struggles of ratification of the constitution. This had them
working in teams and also presenting their knowledge in front of their peers. The second
assessment for the teacher to determine the students performance will be when they get
to create their classroom set of the Bill of Rights. This is when they are going to work as
a class to come up with 4 classroom rules, otherwise knows as their classroom rights.
This activity gets students to gain empathy for the fathers of our country and the
difficulties they had to overcome to create the 10 commandments for the United States,
which also goes ties in with the enduring understanding. The next activity for this unit
will be when the students are asked to write a journal. The students will write a Journal
entry during the American Revolution pretending to be George Washington, Alexander
Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshal, or Samuel Adams in order to understand the
importance of individuals who have made a difference in history, and the significance of
personal character for both good and ill. With this activity the teacher will be able to
identify that the students understand not only the events that were taking place but the
people in the events as well. The students get to see life from a real person of the time
and step in their shoes to express how they might have been feeling during this crucial
time in America's past. The last authentic assessment that the students will partake in will
be their mock trial. The students will perform a mock trial of the Marbury v. Madison
case in order evaluate the functions of the Supreme Court and grasp the complexity of
historical causation. With these assessments, the students will have a better knowledge of
the enduring understanding. The goal is that after these assessments the students will not
only have the knowledge of these events and people but to have an understanding or
feelings of them. These will also be a good way for the teacher to physically see the
students have this understanding.

GRASPS: (Supreme Court assignment)


Goal: The goal for the Performance assessment is for the students to act out the real life
court case of Marbury v. Madison in order evaluate the functions of the Supreme Court
and grasp the complexity of historical causation.

Role: Each student will have a role to play. They will get their choice of either the judge,
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defendant, prosecutor, jury, bailiff, etc. It will be their job to do prior research of the case
and the role they have chosen. They will act out the entire case as the role they have
selected. It is important for the students to choose their own role because then they are
getting to incorporate their own opinions into their work.

Audience: The audience for this performance assessment will be the teacher.

Situation: It depends on what role the student has selected to play. Some groups will be
large and some could be as small as one person. The goal will be accomplished when the
students have completed the court case and have an understanding of the process of the
outcome and the effect it had on the nation.

Performance: The students will be acting out the real life court case. They will have
scripts and research that they came up with themselves based on their knowledge of the
case. Each student will have to speak at least once. They will have to pretend that they
are the role they selected and are not allowed to break character through the assessment.
The will be using facts from the case and from history to be proving their points.

Standards: Each student will be graded on the same scale. They will be receiving points
for participation as well as content. They will be graded on how prepared they were for
the mock trial as well as how well they portrayed their information. Students will have to
make factual opinions that can be proven with historical evidence. They will also have to
stay true to the roles they have chosen. If the student makes a comment/fact that may not
portray their specific role or side they might be docked points. It is important that the
students are not only understanding the case itself but as well as the function of a
courthouse.

Stage III Learning Activities

Unit Calendar:

DAY TOPIC UNIT ACTIVITIES ASSESSMENTS


OBJECTIVE

Day 1 Albany Plan of 1 Answering a Class Discussion,


Union series of Warm up questions
questions on the and Interesting facts
join or die sheet
picture,
Observing an
excerpt of the
Albany of Union
Plan, and then a
class discussion
connecting
influenced by
Iroquois Leaders
on the forming
of the new
government.
Day 2 Articles of 2 Analyzing a They will show
Confederation copy of the what they have
& Constitution Articles of processed from the
Convention Confederation lesson by
and also a cope completing a
of the summary of the
Constitution. discussion. They
Compare the two will need to write
documents and about each
decide with document
discussion the individually
aspects the (Articles of
needed to be Confederation and
changed on the U.S. Constitution)
A.C. Class and explain what
Discussion of each one means.
their opinions Then they will need
and thoughts. to write about the
affect A.C. had on
the constitution.
Day 3 Articles of 3 Review of the Through the role
Confederation day before to play activity and
& spark ideas, role with the exit ticket
Constitutional play, exit ticket to summarize the
Convention days lesson will
allow the teacher to
see the students
understanding of the
objectives.
Day 4 Federalist & 4 Hook, get up and Class Discussion
Anti Federalist move activity
regarding their
opinions, mini
lecture.
Day 5 Bill of Rights 5&6 Bell work, Bellwork,
Grabber, Discussion, Quiz,
Discussion, Closure, and
Classroom rules, Homework
Quiz with
kahoot,
Homework
Day 6 Bill of Rights 5&6 Bell work, Bellwork,
Grabber, Discussion, Quiz,
Discussion, Closure, and
Classroom rules, Homework
Quiz with
kahoot,
Homework
Day 7 George 7 Warm up to Class Discussion,
Washington identify Mini Project
responsibilities
of president,
Group activity of
researching
accomplishments
of George
Washington,
Mini project to
represent their
findings.
Day 8 Alexander 8&9 3,2,1 activity to 3,2,1 activity,
Hamilton & get their ideas classroom
Thomas flowing, discussion, Primary
Jefferson listening to an source homework
alexander
Hamilton song to
get the students
hooked, reading
2 different
primary sources,
having a class
discussion about
the two opposite
ideas of
government,
Choosing their
own primary
course to
evaluate for
homework,
making
connections
between theories
and todays
government.
Day 9 Important 10 Warm the Kahoot, First person
People students up with Letter
a kahoot game,
the students
choose an
important person
from history who
made an impact
on the new
government,
research about
their person, first
person letter
about
background,
theories, and
opinion on
todays
government.
Day 10 Three 11 Analyzing Individually 5 facts,
Branches of documents about As a group 10 facts,
Government 3 branches, in groups of three 30
Getting into facts, class
groups regarding discussion, and
what branch they Kahoot
read about,
Getting into
groups of 3, one
from each
branch, Class
discussion,
Kahoot
Day 11 Marbury vs. 12 Article III Questions about
Madison questions, Article III,
Marbury vs, Questions regard the
Madison Marbury vs.
Questions Madison case, roles
of the court,
Reasearch
Day 12 Marbury vs. 12 Mock Trial Mock Trial,
Madison Participation
Day 13 Unite Test 1-12 Game Participation in the
Review Game and how they
are answering the
questions. The
teacher will be able
to see what she
needs to give some
last minute
information on.
Day 14 Unit Test 1-12 Test Unit Exam

Catalog of Lessons:

Day 1- Albany of Union


Unit Objective: The students will participate in a discussion to elaborate on how the
Iroquois leaders influenced the Albany Plan of Union in order to understand the influence
behind the original idea of what is now the governmental system of the United States.
Length: 55 min
Activities:
When the students walk into the classroom, they will grab a copy of Join or
Die by Ben Franklin. As a warm up they will answer a series of questions to
answer on a piece of paper. what do you think the snake represents?, What do
the letters stand for?, Why is the snake cut into pieces?, What does Join or
Die stand for?
After a few minutes the teacher will call out for volunteers to share some of their
answers.
The students will now get into small groups of 2-3. Once students have found
their group the teacher will hand out an excerpt of The Albany Plan of Union. We
will read this out load together while students underline or highlight sentences
they find to be interesting.
After reading the document, the students will have a few minutes to discuss
amongst their groups. During this time the students will be sharing their
interesting facts and discussing how they feel about Franklins plan.
Before sharing their ideas with the class, the teacher will give them some
information in regards to the Iroquois leaders. While the students are having their
discussions with their groups the teacher will be writing on the board qualities of
different Iroquois leaders.
Once the students have discussed their opinion of the Albany Plan of Union, they
will turn their attention to the board. This is when the class discussion will begin.
The teacher will ask the students to take a look at the board and open up the class
discussion with asking the question of Do any of these qualities seem to be the
same as some of the interesting facts you wrote down about the Albany Plan of
Union? This will then start the conversation to get students to see the connection
between the Iroquois leaders and the ideas Ben Franklin presented in the Albany
Plan.
Assessment: The assessments from this lesson are first the papers that the students
used during their warm up. They will also be turning in their sheet of paper describing
their interesting facts of the Albany Plan of Union. During the discussion the teacher will
be listening for the key concepts and making sure students understand the influence
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Iroquois leaders had on the forming of a new government.

Day 2- Articles of Confederation & Constitutional Convention


Unit Objective:
- The students will evaluate a copy of the Articles of Confederation and write a summary
of their findings in order to acknowledge the differences between the first constitution of
the U.S. and the constitution we live by today.
Length: 55 min

Teacher: Abbye Lopez Subject: AZ/US History Date 3/12/17


After this lesson, the students will have the knowledge of the similarities and differences between
Know the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution. They will also have an
understanding of the importance these document have on their day to day lives in this country.
They will show what they have processed from the lesson by completing a summary of the
discussion. They will need to write about each document individually (Articles of Confederation and
Show
U.S. Constitution) and explain what each one means. Then they will need to write about the affect
A.C. had on the constitution.
Level of Thinking Analyze and Evaluate

How did the Articles of Confederation impact the United States Constitution that we as citizens live
Essential Question by today?

The students will evaluate a copy of the Articles of Confederation and write a summary of their
findings in order to acknowledge the differences between the first constitution of the U.S. and the
constitution we live by today.

Arizona Standards for Social Studies:


Strand 1: American History Concept 4: Revolution and New Nation
Lesson Objective PO 4. Analyze how the new national government was created:
a. Albany Plan of Union influenced by the Iroquois Confederation
b. Articles of Confederation
c. Constitutional Convention
d. Struggles over ratification of the Constitution
e. Creation of the Bill of Rights

As students are walking into the classroom they will be picking up a copy of the Articles of
Confederation and a copy of the U.S. Constitution off of the back table. As they take their seat they
will be asked to analyze the two documents. They will be writing down bullet point facts from each
Agenda that they feel are important. Once they have at least three facts down we will begin the activity. This
activity will be based off the students opinion and be in the form of a discussion. The teacher will
start the conversation and be facilitating it by asking necessary questions to begin the students
thinking. The questions will lead the students to begin an open discussion. The purpose of this
discussion is to get the students to express their opinion on the two documents as well as
understand their basic rights as a member of this country and how they gained these rights. They
will be talking about aspects of the Articles of Confederation first. They can say what they do or do
not like about what it says and also how they think it affected the society. The can discuss how they
might have changed it or what they recommend would better the document and beliefs it expresses.
When the conversation among the students dies down the teacher will then bring up the
Constitution. The students should be discussion the same topics they did for the first document.
The can start referring to the A.C. when the talk about the Constitutions as well. The teacher will
spark their thinking to lean towards more of what changed between the two documents. What the
students believe are the pros and cons. They will discuss how the changed from one document to
the other affected their lives today by talking about how life would have been without the
Constitution. The discussion should come to a close when the teacher sees that the students have
answered the essential question. After the discussion process the students will then participate in
an exit ticket for their closure.

L ENGAGE: How will I focus, prepare and engage students for the lessons objective? Differentiation
e
s As the teacher it is important to make sure the students are prepared for a discussion Learning Style
s such like this. To prepare them, the teacher will be providing them with a copy of both
o documents. This way the have the knowledge before the discussion begins. I will Learning
n focus and engage the students by letting them discuss their own opinions on the Modalities:
documents. They will be able to talk to their peers in a comfortable environment, which Visual
C makes them want to be engaged in the conversation. With the bell work already Auditory
y asking them how they feel and to write down any aspects that they feel are important Tactile
c will focus their minds on the idea of how these document affect them. Kinesthetic
l
e Multiple
3 EXPLORE: In what ways will my learners attempt to explain or do what I have outlined? Intelligences:
How will I monitor and coach their performance? Linguistic
In order to make sure the discussion stays on the right bath to hit the objective and Logical/Mat
essential question, the teacher will be inspiring the discussion by asking questions like hematical
How did the Articles of Confederation make you feel?, What do you think life would be Spatial
like if this is what we lived by?, What do you think is good or bad in regards to these Musical
ideas? The teacher's job will be to coach the students to the answer instead of giving Bodily-
them the answer. When students are getting on the right track you inspire them by saying Kinesthetic
excellent point and things related to that. The goal is for the students to dig deeper into Interperson
the meanings on their own and in their own way with as little help from the teacher as al
possible. When students begin to lean away from the essential question the teacher will Intraperson
then ask more specific questions about the relations between the two documents and the al
affects the A.C. had on the Constitution to make sure the students get the main points of
the lesson.
Specific
EXPLAIN: How will I convey the knowledge and/or skills of the lesson? What will my Accommodati
students be doing to process this information? ons and
In order for the students to process this information they will be taking note during the Modifications:
discussion too. Whenever a fellow students makes a valid point that the teacher praises Copy of the
and acknowledged the students will be writing down. The will need to be writing the facts notes
and not the opinions. This is something the teacher will need to inform the students of Visual aids
before the lesson. It is very important when doing a discussion that is opinion based and Graphic
ran by the students, the students know to only be taking notes of the facts students organizer
present and not their personal opinions. Each student will need to at least speak two Other:
different times throughout the discussion as participation points. The teacher should keep
track of this so that they can see who understands the information and who is not. It is the
teacher job to pop into the discussion when necessary to add any additional information
that is important for the students to know about the topic. Another way for the students to
process the information is to have the teacher summarize the major and correct points the
students made after the discussion. When the discussion comes to an end is when the
teacher should then close it down with knowledge and fact.

EXTEND: In what ways will my different learners attempt the objective on their own? How
will I gauge mastery?
There are a few ways for my different learning to attempt the objective on their own. They
will be attempting the objective in three different areas. The first is when they are
completing the bell work as they are asked to write down the facts from each document.
The second is when they are discussion with their peers the differences between the two
and how they make them feel and the last is when the are doing the closure and
answering the question of how the Articles of Confederation is different and or affected the
Constitution. There are three different areas for the students of different learning styles to
reach the objective of the lesson. Just like there are different ways for the students to
reach the objective there are also different ways for the teacher to see mastery. One way
is clear in their exit ticket. The teacher will be able to clearly look at the exit ticket and see
the students write out their understandings of both documents individually and the affects/
differences they have in a summary format. The other way the teacher can see mastery is
by paying attention to the discussion and taking notes on what students said what. It is
important for the teacher to keep track of who speaks and who is making good points so
that it is easier to see who is understanding and reaching the objective and who might
need assistance getting there.
EVALUATE: How will I have students summarize what theyve learned? How will I
reinforce the objectives importance and its link to past and future learning? Will they have
homework?
For students to summarize what they discussed in the lesson will be done with the exit
ticket. We will also talk about the exit ticket before they have to actually write it. This will
happen just incase some kids didn't quit get the discussion with their classmates. They will
summarize each document individually as well as how one impacted the other. It is
important for them to see that aspect because it relates the past to the life they live today.
The U.S. Constitution is a document that they obey every day of their lives so they need to
know the background behind it and how these changes between the documents shaped
their everyday life. To fully see this importance the will be asked during the discussion to
imagine life without the constitution in order to really understand how it affects them. After
this lesson the students will not have homework.
CLOSING: closing remarks, summary of what learned, announcements, reminders. HW: none
To have an understanding of the Articles of Confederation, the students will be completing
an exit ticket. This exit ticket will be asking the students to write two sentences about the
Articles of Confederation, two sentences of the Constitution of the United Stated, and then
two sentences talking about how the Articles of Confederation impacted the Constitution.

Assessment:

Day 3- Articles of Confederation & Constitutional Convention


Unit Objective:
- The students will write down the causes and effects of the Constitutional Convention in
order to analyze why the Articles of Confederation needed to be amended.
Length: 55 min
Activities:
Assessment:

Day 4- Federalist & Ant-Federalists


Unit Objective: The students will assemble a prezi presentation in groups to analyze the
Federalists point of view and the Anti-Federalists in order to acquire a comprehension of
diverse cultures and shared humanity and see the struggles of ratification of the
constitution.
Length: 55 min
Activities:
Assessment:

Day 5 and 6- Bill of Rights


Unit Objective:
-The students will create a classroom rough draft set of the Bill of Rights in order to
evaluate and perceive past events and issues as people experience them at the time, to
develop historical empathy as opposed to present-mindedness.
-The students will hand in an evaluation paragraph on the pros and cons of their
classroom Bill of Rights in order to prepare to live with uncertainties and exasperating,
even perilous, unfinished business, realizing that not all problems have solutions.
Length: 55 min
Activities:
Secondary Integrated Lesson Plan
Bill of Rights
Abbye Lopez

AZ/US History

Grade 11
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
February 3, 2017

Lesson Length: 90 min

State Standards: PO 4. Analyze how the new national government was created:
a. Albany Plan of Union influenced by the Iroquois Confederation
b. Articles of Confederation
c. Constitutional Convention
d. Struggles over ratification of the Constitution
e. Creation of the Bill of Rights

AZ College & Career Readiness Standards:


6th-12th Grade: Arizonas Reading Standards -Literacy in History/Social Studies
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course
of the text. (9-10.RH.3)

6TH- 12TH Grade: Arizonas Writing Standards- Literacy in History/Social Studies


Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience. (9-10.WHST.5)

ISTE Standards for Students- Knowledge Constructor


Students build knowledge by actively exploring real-world issues and problems,
developing ideas and theories and pursuing answers and solutions.

Objectives:
1. The students will create a classroom rough draft set of the Bill of Rights in order to
evaluate and perceive past events and issues as people experience them at the time, to
develop historical empathy as opposed to present-mindedness.
2. The students will hand in an evaluation paragraph on the pros and cons of their
classroom Bill of Rights in order to prepare to live with uncertainties and exasperating,
even perilous, unfinished business, realizing that not all problems have solutions.

The Why: The students will further understand the Bill of Rights as they discover the
process of creating such a document. It is important for students to explore past events in
a first person situation. With this lesson they will be able to develop historical empathy
for what the founding fathers of this country had to experience while trying to create
rights that would please and work for a whole nation.

Relevance: This lesson will inform the students on what the Bill or Rights are and how
they are affecting their current every day lives. They will be experiencing the difficulty of
this as they create their own classroom set of Bill of Rights (classroom rules). By doing
this as a class they will begin to understand or appreciate the countries Bill of Rights as
SED 480 Unit Plan Outline
well as their classroom set. This lesson helps make the connection of past to present.
Materials Needed:
1. A copy of the Bill of Rights
2. A short video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYEfLm5dLMQ
3. Pencils or Pens for the students to write their ideas down
4. Marker for me to present their rights ideas on the board for everyone to see
5. Paper for them to write their evaluation summaries on
6. Highlighters
7. Kahoot

Key Vocabulary:
Bill of Rights: the first ten amendments to the US Constitution, ratified in 1791 and
guaranteeing such rights as freedoms of speech, assembly, and worship.
Amendments: a minor change in a document.
James Madison: Madison was a member of the Continental Congress. A leader in the
drafting of the Constitution, he worked tirelessly for its adoption by the states,
contributing several essays to The Federalist Papers. He served as president from 1809 to
1817, after Thomas Jefferson

Bell Work/Do Now: As the students are walking in to class they will be picking up a
copy of the Bill of Rights off the table by the door. The will proceed to their desks and
immediately begin reading over their copy. This reading will remind them of what rights
they have in todays society. They will then use a highlighter to mark what rights they
feel are important and this will get their minds warmed up to eventually decide what
rights would be important for their class. The instructor will then explain the objectives
and purpose of the lesson, which will also be presented on the board, to make sure they
understand why we are going to now create our classroom Bill of Rights.

Anticipatory Set/ Grabber: The instructor will now show a short three and a half minute
video to help further explain the Bill of Rights. The students will be asked to take notes
during the video and will have to provide 5 main facts they learned from this video. They
will be writing their 5 facts on a lined paper in order for them to use as a study tool later
on. This will help students freshen up on any knowledge they may have forgotten or
didnt know about the Bill of Rights.

Instruction:
Once the video from the Anticipatory Set ends, the instructor will ask the whole
class to share some of their 5 facts. Do this so that for students who might have
missed something can now write information down.
The instructor will then lecture further on important background information on the Bill
of Rights such as how the Bill of Rights is the first 10 amendments of the
Constitution. The instructor will inform the students of what year it was created,
and who created the document. Why the Bill of Rights was created. Explain to the
students the process to come up with just 10. Inform them about how the House
approved of 17 amendments, of these 17 the Senate approved 12, then the states
approved of 10 of those 12 and those are now the 10 amendments.
The instructor will then read over the copy of the Bill of Rights that each student
picked up at the beginning of class and further explain what each amendment
means. We will also have a short class discussion regarding their interpretations
of the rights.
The instructor will ask the students to pull out their source of technology and
provide them with the Kahoot password. This kahoot has 8 questions regarding
the information the instructor has just gone over. This helps the teacher see what
the students took from the lesson and if they got the main point necessary for
mastery.
After the Kahoot activity we will now introduce the main lesson of the day. The
instructor will now inform the students that they will be creating their classroom
set of Bill of Rights. As the teacher explains this they will also have to explain
basic rules for the discussion. (one person talks at a time, respect others opinions,
participation).
The teacher will then provide the students with an example of a classroom right
such as cellphones will not be used during class time to spark ideas. (I DO)
Now the discussion will begin. We will start by making a list of the issues that are
occurring in that specific classroom. This will focus the discussion towards
finding witch rights would benefit the class. Students will be allowed to freely
have a discussion about some rights they believe will be helpful for their class.
The instructor will not intrude in any way, the teacher will simply be writing the
ideas they hear on the board for everyone to see and remember.
After the teacher notices that the ideas have stopped flowing, they will now end
the discussion and bring everyones attention to the board. This will remind the
students what they have been discussing and the rights they have brought up that
individuals feel are important.
Now it is time to have them start agreeing. The instructor will group the students
into 4s so that they can now in small groups discuss what rights on the board they
feel will be the best combination for the rest of the year. The instructor will be
walking around to listen in, add guidance and answer questions. The teacher will
also be asking groups to think about why they believe in those rights. On a
graphic organizer, the students will record the rights they have discussed and
write down their reasons why that right would work for their class. Make them
think deeper in regards to the long run result.
The instructor will now ask everyone to return to his or her assigned seat. The
class will now take a vote. The instructor will go around the room and each
individual will have to express the two rights they believe will be the top priority
to the classroom set. After each student has voted the instructor will now count
the tallies and revel what 4 rights received the highest votes. These 4 rights are
now the classroom set of rules. They will go by these for the rest of the year.
The instructor will now explain the new rights and express what they are going to
mean so that everyone has full understanding of the rules. This will also clear up
any miss interpretation between the students and the teacher.
At this time the homework assignment will be introduced. This is when the
students will be asked to write a short paper. We will have a quick discussion in
regards to the process that just took place and make the connections between
today and the process took by our founding fathers. It is meant to have them recall
on the discussions today and remember the process of coming up with the
classroom Bill of Rights. It also will make them think about the pros and cons of
the rights and how they feel about the end results. It is meant to have them
experience how the nation and founding fathers may have been feeling at the time
of the creation of the Constitution.

Differentiation: For students who are identified as gifted they will be given a different
prompt for their homework. They will be asked to write an different paragraph. In this
paragraph they will be asked to compare the U.S. Bill of Rights to the classrooms set. It
will be asking them if there are any similarities to the 10 amendments and the 2 rules they
have come up with for their class. This will trigger their way of thinking outside of the
box. For the students who may need extra assistance, they will be provided a copy of the
bill of rights for them to keep and guided notes for the video. This lesson does not only
contain social studies standards but language arts standards as well. Because all students
have different strengths, there will be several ways to gain credit. They will get points for
their writings, creativity, and participation.

Assessment: After the video and first 15-20 min of instruction, students will be given a
short quiz on kahoot that contains 8 questions regarding the United States Bill of Rights.
Its purpose is for the instructor to see if the students got the main aspects of the creation
of the Bill of Rights before moving on to creating their classroom set. If the students
seem to not understand the content, we will take extra time to go back and review. The
students will need a clear understanding of the Bill of Rights before moving on.

Closure: With a few minutes left in class the instructor will stop the discussion. The
students will now have to agree and finalize the official classroom Bill Of Rights. The
instructor will go around the room and ask every individual the 2 rights they think are the
most important for the class. They will put tally marks by the right/rule as the students
say their opinion. After every student has stated their opinion the 4 rights with the most
rights will now be the classrooms Bill Of Rights.

Independent Practice/ Homework: For homework the students will be asked to write a
short three-paragraph summary. The first paragraph will contain a summary of the
creation process; it will help them make the connection between the past and present.
They will be comparing the original process of the Bill of Rights and the process of the
classroom set for understanding. The second paragraph the students will talk about what
rights, of the end result, they believe will benefit the class and work for the better. The
third paragraph will then be the students evaluating what rights they believe will not be
helpful and not benefit the class. This assignment is meant to have them reflect on what
inputs they had (if any) and also have the understanding that they will have to live with
uncertainties and exasperating, even perilous, unfinished business, realizing that not all
problems have solutions. The students will be graded on their grammar and spelling and
overall comprehension. It will be 15 points meaning 5 points for each paragraph. As long
as they make good points and can provide an example of why a right is a good or bad
thing for the class they will be awarded the points. The students will also be provided
with a rubric that gives them a clear understanding of what they are being asked.

Reflection: The instructor will be reflecting after every class. The instructor will be
learning what is working with the students and the things they will need to change in
order for a better understanding for the following classes. The classroom set of rules can
help the instructor reflect also because it can show if the students learned the importance
of rights. The homework assignment can help the teacher reflect because it will provide
the instructor with the information about if the students understood the process of
creating this document and the connections it has to their everyday life.

Day 7- George Washington


Unit Objective: The students will use a website to research accomplishments during
George Washingtons presidency in order to remember specific facts about the first
president and that the needs of a society change through history.
Length: 55 min
Activities: George Washington the Precedent President
For the warm up there will be a question on the board for the students to answer.
It will ask them what are some responsibilities of the president. We will discuss
these ideas aloud with the entire class,
Gather a list of accomplishments of George Washington in his tenure as the first
President of the United States from your textbook and other sources. The students
will split into groups and use these sources to gain information on the first
president. In their groups they will record some of the accomplishments and
discuss amongst themselves the ones they find important. They will then share
them with the class, Some EDSITEment-reviewed websites are:
POTUS: George Washington, a link from Internet Public Library, featuring a
brief chronology of significant achievements during Washington's two terms.
A slide show of George Washington's Life and Times, designed for middle- and
high-school students, on the Papers of George Washington (especially slides 7-9).
The Washington Presidency: Domestic Affairs and The Washington Presidency:
Foreign Affairs on The American President
The teacher will then Match Washington's accomplishments with your class list of
the powers and responsibilities of the President.
Now have each student write on one page, in large, neat letters, an executive
power or responsibility. Then students should illustrate on another page a
matching event from George Washington's Presidency, including an appropriate
caption.
Assessment: The bell work questions will be a good way for the teacher to see the
students understanding of the responsibility of the President. The discussion will show
that students know how to properly research for information. The mini project will be the
final way for the students to show their understanding of executive powers and George
Washingtons presidency.

Day 8- Alexander Hamilton & Thomas Jefferson


Unit Objective:
-The students will use a 3,2,1 exercise to remember details about Alexander Hamilton in
order to have understand the significance of the past to their own lives, both private and
public, and to society.
-The students will participate in a discussion about the similarities and differences of
Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson by analyzing primary sources in order to
comprehend the aspects of both that apply to today's function of government.
Length: 55 min
Activities: Primary Sources Lesson Plan
To start class off, the teacher will play one of the famous Alexander Hamilton
raps to get the students attention. This will also introduce out topic of the day.
The students will then do a 3,2,1 exercise. They will be writing first only be doing
1 thing they know about him. A select few will be called on to share. At the end
of the lesson they will finish doing 3 facts they learned from today and then 2
questions they still have. They will turn this in on their way out of the door.
The teacher will now hand out a primary source document of Alexander
Hamiltons views. The students will read and evaluate the document and write
down major points. After this the students will then be handed a primary source
document of Thomas Jeffersons views and do the same thing.
https://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/jefferson-and-declaration

http://www.wwnorton.com/college/history/eamerica/media/ch7/resources/docume
nts/federalist.htm

We will then have a group discussion about each persons theories.


Then the students will have the option to choose their own primary source from
either person. They will be asked to write a short paragraph with citations from
their source telling which aspects of the person they chose theories and how they
are aspects of todays government.
Assessment: The classroom discussion will be the first assessment for the teacher
to hear the students opinions and for them to find interesting aspects. They will also be
finishing their 3,2,1 activity that will ne handed in before the class is over. The major
assessment is the homework assignment of their primary source choice and their
summary with stations. These assessments connect theories and what aspects relate to
todays government.

Day 9- Important People


Unit Objective: The students will write a Journal entry during the American Revolution
pretending to be George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, John
Marshal, or Samuel Adams in order to understand the importance of individuals who
have made a difference in history, and the significance of personal character for both
good and ill.
Length: 55 min
Activities:
Start the day with a review of all the important people during the revolution and
the making of a new government. We will do this by a short kahoot game.
After the students got their review they will then be asked to choose a person they
believed to have a major impact on the creation of the new government. This can
be either a good or bad impact, it is up to the student.
After the students have decided what person they think is important to the world
today the teacher will introduce the activity.
They will now do a tiny amount of research on their person. In class they will use
the internet or textbooks to find background information and some of the major
aspects this person contributed to the United States.
After about 15 minutes of research they will now begin the assignment.
The students will be asked to write a 2 page letter pretending to be the person they
chose. The letter will contain information on their background their adult life and
their ideas for the U.S. It will end with a short paragraph about what that person
would think about America today. Remind the students that this is all in first
person. They are supposed to be in the mind of the important person they have
chose. This will either be turned in at the end of class or taken home for
homework. It depends on how the class handles the assignment.
Assessment:

Day 10- Three Branches of Government


Unit Objective: The students will participate in a kahoot exercise to help remember the
three branches of government in order to understand that no individual or group has too
much control.
Length: 55 min
Activities:
To begin class students will pick up a piece of paper from the back table. There
will be three different papers all mixed together in one pile. One for each branch
of government. This way each students gets a different branch but randomly
selected. They will read their paper and collect 5 facts
After each student seems to be done they will get into groups regarding what
paper they picked up. Each branch of government will be paired up with each
other. They will then begin to discuss the reason amongst them.
After the discussion the groups will be asked to narrow their facts to 10 for each
branch. Each member of the group will need to write the 10 facts down.
The students will now get in groups of three, one person from each branch. This is
when the students will share the 10 facts with one another and write them down.
With this activity the students are getting 10 facts about each branch of
government.
Everyone will return to their seats after receiving all their facts. WE will then
have a class discussion so the teacher can see what the students have summarized
about the branches and then go into more detail.
After the short lecture/discussion, the class will participate in a kahoot. The
questions will be in regards to the three branches of government and their
responsibilities.
Assessment: Their 5 facts that they bring to their groups, and the 10 facts from
their group show the students ability to retain information through readings. The 30 facts
show that the students can work together and gain information by only doing a third of
the work. With class discussion the teacher can see what facts the students have learned
and then fill in any holes they find. The last assessment is the kahoot, which is a sort of
mini quiz that shows student understanding.

Day 11 and 12- Marbury vs. Madison


Unit Objective: The students will perform a mock trial of the Marbury v. Madison case in
order evaluate the functions of the Supreme Court and grasp the complexity of historical
causation.
Length: 55 min
Activities:
Activity 1. What does Article III say?
This case is all about the power of the Supreme Court as outlined in the Constitution in
relationship to the other two branches. So what does the Constitution say is the job of the
Supreme Court? Students will read Article III, Section 2 of the Constitution and then,
using the PDF, students will "explain" what they believe to be the job of the Supreme
Court as defined in the Constitution. Leave time for discussion to ensure these questions
are answered:
What is the job of the Supreme Court as described in Article III?
Is there any indication in this section that the Supreme Court has the "right" or
"responsibility" to determine whether laws are constitutionalmeaning whether
they violate or go against what is written in the Constitution?
Is there any reference to the term "judicial review" in the Constitution?
Does Article III establish the limits of the Court's powers?
Activity 2. Marbury v. Madison
Students should read this short background piece about Marbury v. Madison to get an
overview of the details and complexities of the case. The teacher should pose these
questions to students to ensure understanding of the background reading:
What was William Marbury's complaint and how did it arise?
What did Marbury hope to achieve by suing Secretary of State James Madison?
Who "won" the case?
What did this decision say about the role of the Supreme Court? Why is it still relevant to
us today?
Activity 3. Mock Trial
Students will pick roles out of hat. These will ne the roles that take place in a
court case. When the students have received their role they will take time to figure
out their stand on the Marbury vs. Madison case.
This will probably be there day one of this lesson ends. The students will have to
figure out how to portray their role for the mock trial the following day.
This will be difficult for the students so it will be the teachers duty to keep the
mock trial going. The teacher will be facilitating the case and making sure it
flows.
The students will be using their previous knowledge about the case in order to
play their role successfully. They will be graded on participation and using facts
to back up their statements.
Assessment: The questions from day one show the students have a brief
understanding of the importance of the Supreme Court. The mock trial is showing that
the students know the details of the Marbury vs. Madison case in order to hit the main
objective.

Day 13- Unit Test Review


Unit Objective:
Length: 55 min
Activities:
The students will be put into teams
They will have 10 minutes to look at their review packet before we begin the
game.
The teacher will then explain the rules of the game and how it is going to go.
The students will then begin the game
Assessment: How well the students do on the game will be the assessment. The
teacher will be able to see what questions most students had difficulty with and check up
on them after the game.

Day 14- Unit Test


Unit Objective:
Length: 55 min
Activities:
The students will walk into the classroom and go right to their seats. They will
have 5 minutes to get any last minute studying in. The seats will all be far apart
and in rows.
The students will begin the test and have the entire class period to complete it.
If they are done early they can work on other assignment from different classes.
Assessment: Unit Test
Attachments:

Unit test: See Stage 2

Review Game

Day 10-11: Excerpted from Marbury v. Madison:

The authority, therefore, given to the Supreme Court by the act establishing the judicial

courts of the United States to issue writs of mandamus to public officers appears not to be

warranted by the Constitution, and it becomes necessary to inquire whether a jurisdiction

so conferred can be exercised.


The question whether an act repugnant to the Constitution can become the law of the land

is a question deeply interesting to the United States, but, happily, not of an intricacy

proportioned to its interest. It seems only necessary to recognize certain principles,

supposed to have been long and well established, to decide it.

That the people have an original right to establish for their future government such

principles as, in their opinion, shall most conduce to their own happiness is the basis on

which the whole American fabric has been erected. The exercise of this original right is a

very great exertion; nor can it nor ought it to be frequently repeated. The principles,

therefore, so established are deemed fundamental. And as the authority from which they

proceed, is supreme, and can seldom act, they are designed to be permanent.

This original and supreme will organizes the government and assigns to different

departments their respective powers. It may either stop here or establish certain limits not

to be transcended by those departments. The Government of the United States is of the

latter description. The powers of the Legislature are defined and limited; and that those

limits may not be mistaken or forgotten, the Constitution is written. To what purpose are

powers limited, and to what purpose is that limitation committed to writing, if these limits

may at any time be passed by those intended to be restrained? The distinction between a

government with limited and unlimited powers is abolished if those limits do not confine

the persons on whom they are imposed, and if acts prohibited and acts allowed are of

equal obligation. It is a proposition too plain to be contested that the Constitution controls

any legislative act repugnant to it, or that the Legislature may alter the Constitution by an

ordinary act.

Between these alternatives there is no middle ground. The Constitution is either a


superior, paramount law, unchangeable by ordinary means, or it is on a level with

ordinary legislative acts, and, like other acts, is alterable when the legislature shall please

to alter it.

If the former part of the alternative be true, then a legislative act contrary to the

Constitution is not law; if the latter part be true, then written Constitutions are absurd

attempts on the part of the people to limit a power in its own nature illimitable.

Certainly all those who have framed written Constitutions contemplate them as forming

the fundamental and paramount law of the nation, and consequently the theory of every

such government must be that an act of the Legislature repugnant to the Constitution is

void.

This theory is essentially attached to a written Constitution, and is consequently to be

considered by this Court as one of the fundamental principles of our society. It is not,

therefore, to be lost sight of in the further consideration of this subject.

If an act of the Legislature repugnant to the Constitution is void, does it, notwithstanding

its invalidity, bind the Courts and oblige them to give it effect? Or, in other words,

though it be not law, does it constitute a rule as operative as if it was a law? This would

be to overthrow in fact what was established in theory, and would seem, at first view, an

absurdity too gross to be insisted on. It shall, however, receive a more attentive

consideration."
References:

Lesson 3: George Washington: The Precedent President | EDSITEment. (n.d.). Retrieved


April 11, 2017, from https://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/george-washington-
precedent-president#section-16661

John Marshall, Marbury v. Madison, and Judicial Review-How the Court Became
Supreme | EDSITEment. (n.d.). Retrieved April 11, 2017, from
https://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/john-marshall-marbury-v-madison-and-judical-
review-how-court-became-supreme#sect-activities

Review Game Info:. (n.d.). Retrieved April 11, 2017, from


https://www.superteachertools.us/jeopardyx/jeopardy-review-
game.php?gamefile=573250#.WO1NgRiZMzY

[From The Federalist: A Commentary on the Constitution of the United States, Being a
Collection of Essays Written in Support of the Constitution. reprinted from the original
text of Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, edited by Henry Cabot Lodge
(New York: Putnam, 1911), pp. 119-25.]

Government Unit Test. (n.d.). Retrieved April 11, 2017, from


http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=government-unit-test

The Declaration of Independence: Full text. (n.d.). Retrieved April 11, 2017, from
http://www.ushistory.org/DECLARATION/document/