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CEFR-aligned curriculum framework, syllabus and scheme of work roll out workshops

Master Trainer Cascade Notes

August October 2017


Notes to Master Trainers
The following changes have been made to the materials since you had your training in July.
The notes now address you, the Master Trainers, rather than Cambridge English trainers.
Handout numbers have been added to the slides to make cross-referencing easier. In a few cases they may not be tied with a slide
and are only referenced in the cascade notes.
The notes have been proofread again and the content has been slightly modified. The main changes are listed here:
o D1.S2.6: progression across primary has been amended to accurately reflect the CEFR levels in the curriculum. The
cascade notes have also been amended.
o The lesson stages now match what is in the lesson plan template from the Ministry (pre-lesson, lesson development and
post lesson).
o All answer keys to activities in the handouts have been checked, corrected and added where they were missing.
o Some slides have been moved to other sessions or days to improve the flow of the content and make it more straight
forward. They are too many to list here. Please ensure you use the latest version and check through the materials BEFORE
you begin cascading training.
o Day 5, session 1 have been replaced with activities that are more straight forward and beneficial to the teachers. The notes
and slides have been amended and there are now two handouts. The main activity is for the participants to review their
learning by Day 5 and produce posters to represent the main points which were covered in the training.

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Aims

The aims of the workshops are that all participants:

1. enhance their understanding of developing English language skills according to the CEFR
2. develop an understanding of how to use new CEFR-aligned curriculum frameworks, syllabuses and schemes of work and relevant
textbooks
3. prepare several lesson plans and write learning objectives based on the learning standards where appropriate
4. develop an understanding of how to plan for a sequence of lessons and plan progression in the short and long terms
5. develop an understanding of how to monitor and track pupils progression
6. develop an understanding of how to develop teaching materials that are aligned to the target CEFR level
7. develop an understanding of how to differentiate pupils performance and respond to pupils language development needs
8. develop an understanding of how to deliver effective feedback to pupils
9. develop an understanding of how to promote positive, pupil-centred learning environment

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Workshops overview

Day 1

Session title Timing Session objectives

Understanding foreign/second language 90 Understand foreign / second language development in the Malaysian classroom
development within the CEFR context minutes CEFR: approaches and principles- how CEFR supports teaching and learning

The CEFR-aligned curriculum framework 90 Understand how Content and Learning Standards are related to the CEFR
minutes Explain progression from preschool/primary to primary/secondary and onto the
next grade
Discuss progression across one content standard across primary grades
Review the Content and Learning Standards glossary (in Scheme of Work)
Understand the purpose of the various documents: Curriculum, Syllabus,
Scheme of Work and Scheme of Work overview
Developing listening and speaking skills 90 To help teachers develop further awareness of CEFR and its relevance when
consistent with CEFR-aligned curriculum minutes working with listening and speaking skills
framework for the relevant grades To focus on listening and speaking skills in the primary sector
To develop awareness of key factors when integrating listening and speaking
skills.
Developing reading and writing skills 90 To help teachers develop further awareness of CEFR and its relevance when
consistent with CEFR-aligned curriculum minutes working with reading and writing skills
framework for the relevant grades To focus on reading and writing skills in the primary sector
To develop awareness of key factors when integrating reading and writing skills

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Day 2

Session title Timing Session objectives

Planning objective and pupil-centred 90 Understand how to use the schemes of work for planning lessons
textbook-based lessons minutes Create learning objectives derived from learning standards

Planning learning in engaging Language 90 Understand the Language Arts (LA) Learning Standards and how they translate
Arts lessons minutes into classroom practice
Identify age-appropriate text and activity types for LA lessons
Understand the principles of planning an LA lesson
Plan an LA lesson
Tracking pupil language development 90 Understand the principles of tracking learning progress
and progression minutes Consider ways in which pupils progress can be monitored and recorded
Understand the need for continual planning in response to assessment in the
short, medium and long terms.

Planning for pupil-centred non-textbook- 90 Understand the requirements and challenges for planning non-textbook aligned
based lessons minutes lessons
Create learning objectives derived from learning standards and detail outlined in
the Scheme of Work
Identify how to cater for pupils needs as identified in textbook lessons
Planning the learning outline in non-textbook based lessons

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Day 3

Session title Timing Session objectives

Differentiation strategies and supporting 90 Understand how different learning needs and abilities lead to different
pupil-centred teaching lessons minutes performance and progress
Support pupils with faster progress rate to further develop and enjoy learning
Facilitate learning and development opportunities for pupils with slower
progress rate
Foster a positive, pupil-led and active learning environment
Reflecting on differentiation strategies in 90 Understand the guidelines on differentiation in the Scheme of Work
the Scheme of Work lessons minutes Apply strategies for differentiation in lessons planned in Day 2
Evaluate differentiation strategies in their lesson plans and draft alternative
content if necessary

Lessons Planning Workshop 90 Understand the principles behind planning a sequence of lessons
minutes Understand how to develop language across the four skills in a sequence of
lessons
Practice planning a sequence of lessons (one 5-lesson cycle)
Identifying and adapting learning 90 Understand how and when to adapt or supplement the textbook
materials minutes Consider different types of adaptation
Understand where to source lesson materials
Link learning objectives derived from learning standards and detail outlined in
the Scheme of Work to adapted or supplement materials

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Day 4

Session title Timing Session objectives

Designing materials for pupil-centred 90 Understand the principles of materials design within the Malaysia context
learning minutes Apply the principles of materials design to create age-appropriate materials for
a sequence of lessons
Discuss recycling and sustaining learning materials

Evaluating and reflecting on lesson plans 90 Create a simple checklist to ensure all aspects of active and inclusive lesson
developed on Day 3 minutes planning are present in their own lesson plans
Evaluate whether the activities and resources in each lesson plan meet the
stated learning objectives and suggest alternative content
Evaluate whether the activities are inclusive and support both high achieving
pupils and those requiring further support
Evaluate whether the sequence of lessons demonstrates building on previous
learning and suggest alternative content
Delivering effective individualised 90 Evaluate the pupils achievement of intended learning
feedback minutes Provide positive, friendly and age-appropriate feedback as part teaching and
learning routine
Provide constructive learning-centred feedback tuned to individual needs

Working with pupils in the classroom 90 Develop strategies for setting up classroom activities
minutes Consider different classroom interaction patterns
Discuss common classroom management problems in the Malaysia context
Develop a repertoire of strategies for behaviour management

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Day 5

Session title Timing Session objectives

Addressing challenging language skills 90 Review key points from all training sessions
and learning standards minutes Communicate key messages

Planning micro-teaching sessions 90 Organise planning and responsibilities during the micro-sessions
minutes Prepare teaching activities for the micro-sessions
Rehearse before delivery
Micro-teaching and feedback 120 Deliver the activity
minutes Give and receive feedback

Plenary discussion and post-course 30 Reflect on the role of the trainer in a micro-teaching session
survey minutes Discuss their plans for delivering the sessions
Complete post-workshops survey

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Materials and Equipment
1. Master Trainer Notes (trainer only)
2. Copies of participants handouts and slides, one copy per participant

3. Relevant sections from the curriculum frameworks (sections produced by Cambridge English)

4. Syllabus
5. schemes of work

6. Textbook
7. White A4 paper

8. A small selection of storybooks / big books

9. One computer with internet access (trainer only)

10. One set of speakers per training room


11. One projector per training room (or similar facility)

12. Flip chart paper


13. Sellotape or blue tack

14. Marker pens (different colours)


15. Sticky notes (post-its)
16. Scissors (three per room)

17. Glue (three per room)


18. Pens (or participants can bring their own)

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Delivery
The material is intended to be used as a workshop rather than a presentation. Some trainer-talking time is unavoidable, but aim for
maximum audience participation.

General note for all slides and handouts:


If you foresee any difficulties because some of your trainees may have low levels of English, please be prepared to support your groups in
a variety of ways. Here are some suggestions:

Use the common L1 (Bahasa) as needed.


For activities, create groups with mixed English language ability. Encourage stronger members of the group to explain what weaker
members may not fully understand.
Do the activity together at the beginning.
Do the first few questions together.
Go through the handouts for things that are not clear.
Provide simple definitions to difficult vocabulary.
Split the activity up and ask different groups to do different parts of the activity.

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Day 1

Session 1: Understanding foreign/second language development within the CEFR context

Materials: Stationery, flip chart paper, projector/laptops, handouts

Useful vocabulary:
Elicit: to get information from others based on their answers or reactions.
Constraints: obstacles.

Overview for Session 1


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
0 Introduction slide 2
1-4 Understand foreign / second language development in the Malaysian classroom 1 20
21-22 CEFR: approaches and principles - how CEFR supports teaching and learning 2 68
90 minutes
Slide 0 Welcome participants to the training. Explain that we will be 2
looking at aspects of teaching and learning and best practice
considering how planning can help us manage the curriculum, use of textbooks and materials
in a pupil-centred context
try out using the Schemes of Work and planning documents
thinking about how to support teachers in cascade training
Slide 1 Introduce yourself briefly giving a few facts (your work background and something a bit more 18
personal, e.g. an interesting hobby).
Put participants into pairs.
Ask them to tell each other three things about themselves and encourage them to move
beyond their name and place they live to something more personal.
Let them speak for 6 minutes.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Put each pair with another pair to create a group of 4. Ask them to introduce their colleague
to the other two people.
Allow them to talk for another 10 minutes.
Complete with a quick round up eliciting information for a few people.
Slide 2-3 Show the objectives for todays session and run through them briefly. Highlight that we will be 2
discussing everything with the Malaysian context in mind.
Explain to the participants that there is a lot of new information and documentation to take on
board. They should not expect to fully understand everything straight away. The purpose of the
training is to help them with the changes, and by the end of the training, they should have a
much clearer idea about the new CEFR-aligned curriculum and how it impacts on their
classroom practice on a day-to-day basis.
Slide 4 Put participants into groups of 3 or 4. 12
Ask them to look at the discussion points on the board and tell them they have 10 minutes to
discuss each issue. Emphasise there are no right or wrong answers this is just a chance for
them to reflect on their context.
Monitor to pick up any issues or a sense of their beliefs and approaches.
End the discussion and pull out a few brief points on a flipchart paper but avoid getting into
discussion or commenting at this point.
Slide 5 Clarify that a lot of what happens in a classroom is based around the instinct and skill of the 5
teacher and it is important to respect that. However, a framework or structure that allows people
to communicate about teaching and learning at national and local level is key.
Ask them to read the information about CEFR on the slide and to pick out the key phrases
that explain its focus.
Give them a minute to read then ask them to discuss their key points with a partner.
Elicit their ideas very briefly.

Note: participants familiarity with CEFR may vary from not heard of it to confident. Ensure that
everyone can follow the discussion and support those who need further explanation.
7 and 8 Point out the key ideas are 12
CEFR as a central point of reference
That it is an international system based on interactive approaches

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
That it is international (and not just European but used worldwide and for other languages
too)
Give participants Handout 1 and ask them to work in pairs and try to complete the gaps. Give D1.S1.1
them approximately 5 minutes. Elicit back some ideas briefly and answer any questions, then
show the next slide, which contains the answers.
Ensure participants understand reception, production, interaction and mediation and ask them to
give examples from their teaching experience.
Key: on next slide.
Ask participants in their pairs to try to define action-oriented approach in a few words and then
comment on each others definitions. Give them two to three minutes.
Slide 9 Ask the participants to work with their partner again and come up with 2-3 ways that CEFR can 4
be used in the Malaysian context.
Allow 3 minutes then elicit back some ideas.
Slide 10 Run through the ways it is utilised. 2
Slide 11- Highlight the CEFR key features: 2
12 It is a way of describing language performance at 6 levels
It covers 4 skills and the language elements embed within these
There are global descriptors (which describe language level in general) and skills-specific
descriptors which allow us to develop learning standards for each level
Slide 13 Clarify that having CEFR and using it to set learning standards is a little like having a map for a 1
journey, which is important for teaching and learning.
Slide 14 if we dont have a sense of purpose an end destination we cant make good decisions
about the road to take or we dont know where we are.
Slide 15 So it provides us with a clear sense of direction and signposts allowing us to check in and 1
demonstrate how far we are on our learning journey.
Slide 16- Briefly summarise the benefits- run through the points and summarise by saying both teachers 1
17 and pupils have a shared sense of direction and way of identifying what is happening.
Slide 18 Ask participants how they think CEFR then impacts in day to day teaching and learning. Why is it 5
important? Elicit ideas.
Slide 19 Say that ultimately it helps inform the information for lesson plans and show them they have D1.S1.2 10
the lesson planning template as handout 2.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Ask them to look at the lesson planning document and decide the kind of information that
goes into each section.
Elicit back some ideas but dont go into detail as they make suggestions.
Clarify that we will be looking at how to use this effectively over the rest of the workshop and
they will be using it to write their own plans so they understand how it functions in detail.
Ask them to work in pairs briefly again. Tell them to decide how they think the lesson planning
documents are linked back to CEFR. Elicit their ideas.
Slide 20 Show the diagram outlining how the documents fit together. Highlight in principle how CEFR 4
underpins all the activity in teaching and learning but it is a descriptive document.
It outlines an approach to pupil-centred learning
The descriptors in the CEFR framework which include can do statements- allows us to
understand what kind of communicative competencies pupils have and what they can or
should be able to do at different levels. These are called learning standards in the new
curriculum framework.
These can be used to develop the syllabuses which are a year-by-year description of the
themes and topics, grammar, vocabulary and structures used in any year.
and the Schemes of Work are also aligned to those levels and age groups and reflect the
learning standards and syllabuses. They can be used to develop individual lesson plans
based on suggested activities or activities in the textbook.
Slide 21 Summarise by going through the points on the slide briefly 3
Slide 22 Round up by reiterating that all these areas will be considered during the course and over the 4
next few days they will develop a deeper and practical understanding of what they need to know.
Ask the participants to speak in small groups of 3 and tell each other one thing they hope
to have gained by the end of the course. Give them 2-3 minutes.
Elicit back their ideas and make notes to refer to during the course (and go back to on
Day 5). Dont be drawn into answering the questions at that point in time. Tell them you
will deal with the issues during the programme.
No slide Finish the session by highlighting any housekeeping issues e.g. timekeeping/ expectations about 2
mobile phones/ showing a list of breaks and times of sessions.

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Day 1

Session 2: The CEFR-Aligned Curriculum Framework


Materials: Stationery, schemes of work, SoW overview (if available), syllabus, curriculum framework

Overview for Session 2


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-5 Understand how Content and Learning Standards are related to the CEFR 35 minutes
6 Explain progression from preschool/primary to primary/secondary and onto the next grade 5 minutes
7-18 Discuss progression across one content standard across grades 15 minutes
19-21 Review the Content and Learning Standards glossary (in Scheme of Work) 1&2 30 minutes

22-24 Understand the purpose of the various documents: Curriculum, Syllabus, Scheme of Work and 3 5
Scheme of Work overview
90 minutes
1 Welcome participants back after the break. 1
Explain that in this section of the session, youre going to look at these four main questions.
2-3 Divide participants into groups of 5 and give them copies of the curriculum framework (1 per 7
table) and give them two minutes to go through the document and try to answer the questions
on the slides. Do not give more than two minutes for this.
Check participants answers and give them the correct answers:
What are Content Standards?
They are the broad area of focus within each skill (L/S/R/W + Language Arts)
What are Learning Standards?
These are the more detailed and observable skills within the area defined by each Content
Standard.
They are the detailed targets for the end of the year, similar to Can Do statements within the
various Content Standard areas.
How are they organised?
By skill, then by content standard (including detail of the focus of the content standard) and then
by learning standard.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
There are graded LS for each CS at each primary level (Year 1-6), so the content areas are
common for the whole of primary, but most learning standards develop pupils skills from Year 1
to 6. Occasionally, some stop after Year 1 or 2, e.g. pre-writing skills and early literacy skills.
They are numbered see next slide
4 They are numbered in the curriculum and in the schemes of work in the following way: 2
Animated Each skill has a number (see slide), as does Language Arts, so 1 5
slide [click]
Then the individual content standard is identified by a number, so 1.1 means the first CS in
Listening and 3.4 is the fourth CS in Reading.
[click]
Most CS have more than one aspect, so have several LS. Each one is numbered.
[click]
For example, see slide, also, for example: 4.2.1 = Writing, CS 2, LS1

5 The curriculum comes from the CEFR. The CEFR level descriptors have been used to define 2
and write the CS and the LS. Its organisation by skill is the same as CEFR, with the addition of
Language Arts, specifically for the Malaysian context. The focus is on developing language for
communication within these four skills, rather than grammar specifically. Grammar is an
important part of language, however, and is incorporated in the skills focus. It is not taught
explicitly at primary level, as is appropriate for young primary pupils learning language. The LA
Content and Learning Standards are also based on CEFR descriptors but less directly. Note
that grammar is not specified in the curriculum. Grammar is viewed as being part of
communication.
6 The primary curriculum framework leads pupils from CEFR working towardsA1 level (pre A1) to 2
CEFR A2 Mid level.
Note that the table shows the target on the top row and the starting point on the bottom row.
Note that this is for most pupils some will attain higher than this, whereas some will not reach
these levels, as is normal within any group of young pupils.
Note too that Secondary Year 1 reviews Year 6 level (A2 Mid), although the content is different.
This is in order to ensure that pupils at secondary level are at the required to begin developing
their English language skills towards B1 high.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
7 Next youre going to look briefly at each skill: 3

1. Listening
The Primary Listening Content Standards focus on pupils ability to recognise individual sounds,
to understand meaning, and to use strategies to help their listening. The Learning Standards
move from pupils being able to understand globally (the general message) to being able to
understand details.
The order in which the Content and Learning standards appear does not reflect a chronological
sequence of classroom learning which starts with 1.1.1 and finishes with 1.3.1. Pupils need to develop
these skills simultaneously over the school year, and so will learn from opportunities to practise different
listening skills in varied sequences in their English lessons.
8 Show the example, highlight the different elements: Content Standard, Focus and 6x Learning 2
Standards (well look at how they progress later in this session)
9 2. Speaking 3
The Primary Speaking Content Standards focus on the pupils ability to communicate to others,
their ability to use strategies when interacting with others, and their ability to communicate alone
to a group. We have called interacting with others Spoken Interaction, and speaking alone to a
group Spoken Production. Most learning standards focus on spoken interaction, as we think that
this is a pupils main need in Primary School.
The order in which the Content and Learning Standards appear does not reflect a chronological
sequence of classroom learning which starts with 2.1.1 and finishes with 2.3.1. Pupils need to
develop these skills simultaneously over the school year, and so will learn from opportunities to
practise different speaking skills in varied sequences in their English lessons in the same way
as the other skills.

10 Run through the example quickly same organisation as Listening example 2

11 3. Reading 3
The Primary Reading Content Standards focus on pupils ability to learn to read (3.1), to
understand meaning (3.2), and to read independently for enjoyment (3.3). Some Year 1 Primary
pupils will be preliterate, and some not. We have therefore included separate learning to read

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Learning Standards for these pupils. Learning Standards for understanding meaning move from
pupils being able to understand globally to being able to understand details
Preliterate pupils need to learn to read before they can focus on other Learning Standards.
However, the order in which the other Content and Learning Standards appear does not reflect
a chronological sequence of classroom learning which starts with 3.1.1 and finishes with 3.3.1.
Pupils need to develop these skills simultaneously over the school year, and so will learn from
opportunities to practise different reading skills in varied sequences in their English lessons.
Note that text types are listed in the syllabus, not in the curriculum
12 Run through the example as before. 2
13 4. Writing 3
The Primary Writing Content Standards focus on pupils ability to learn to write (4.1), to
communicate meaning (4.2), and to use appropriate mechanical features of writing (4.3). Some
Year 1 Primary School pupils will be preliterate, and some not. We have therefore included
separate learning to write Learning Standards for these pupils. Learning Standards for
communicating meaning move from pupils being able to communicate information, to describing
people and things, to being able to organise what they write.
Preliterate pupils need to learn to write before they can focus on other learning standards. However, the
order in which the other Content and Learning Standards appear does not reflect a chronological
sequence of classroom learning which starts with 4.1.1 and finishes with 4.3.3. Pupils need to develop
these skills simultaneously over the school year, and so will learn from chances to practise different
writing skills in varied sequences in their English lessons.
14 Run through the example as before 2
Note that this example is one showing how the LS specifies writing skills development for pupils
learning to write
15 5. Language Arts 3
The Primary Language Arts Content Standards focus on pupils ability to enjoy and appreciate
different text types, to express a personal response to texts, and to respond imaginatively to
texts.
The order in which the Content and Learning Standards appear does not reflect a chronological
sequence of classroom learning which starts with 5.1.1 and finishes with 5.3.1. Pupils need to
develop Language Arts skills simultaneously over the school year, and so will learn from

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
opportunities to practise different Language Arts skills in varied sequences in their English
lessons.
16 Run through example as before 2
17-18 In this section well look at how pupils skills develop within the CS across the 6 years of 5
primary.
There are some basic principles that underlie this progression:
Range: Limited Wide this relates mostly to vocabulary, structures and phonemes. It
goes from being a narrow range (not many) to a wide range (more and of different types)
Frequency: Low High this relates to how much people use the language in
everyday life. It goes from being high frequency (people or children use a lot) to less
frequent (but not low frequency)
Support: With None this is the help and support pupils need. They move from
needing support to not needing it
Complexity: Simple Complex This relates to structures and vocabulary, going from
single words to phrases to full sentences, from simple sentences to more complex
Cognitive challenge: Age appropriate Note that Higher Order Thinking skills are
developed from Year 1. The level of challenge within those skills develops as pupils get
older.
Length: Shorter Longer this is related to the length of texts read, heard, spoken or
written, as well as the length of sentences (from one word to multi words)

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
19 Note that before we move on, we will look at the glossary, as this explains some of the 10
Animated language in the curriculum.
slide Note that there is a glossary for each Year 1 and Year 2. It is found at the beginning of the
Scheme of Work.
[click]
Task Participants find the glossary in the scheme of work for their year group.
Have at least one Year 1 and at least one Year 2 teacher sit together. They should compare the
glossaries to see what is different. As they do this, encourage them to read the definitions
carefully and to put their questions on the post-it notes (sticky notes).
Make sure participants can access the relevant scheme of work and distribute sticky notes.
Ask participants to put any notes on the board.
Conduct feedback and answer questions participants have on their sticky notes within the time
available.
20 Work through the example. 5
Note colour coding for development of different features:
red support
pink complexity
blue: length
green length/complexity
21 Ask participants to look at the two sets of LS on handout 1. They should identify the order they D1.S2.1&2 25
come in, that is which one is for which year. Allow 4-5 minutes for this, then feed back.

Part 1: (handout 1) 10 minutes


Answer key:
Set 1: A / C / E / B / D / F
Set 2: D / E / B / A / F / C

Part 2 (handout 2) 15 minutes


There are some more complex examples these will need more discussion about how these
are graded.
Answer key:

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Set 3: C / A / D / B / E / F
Set 4: E / C / B / D / A / F

Finish by asking if participants found any sets of LS in the curriculum framework that they found
unusual. If necessary, draw their attention to some examples of LS that do not continue across
the six years and explain (e.g. 3.1 and 4.1)
22-23 Documentation: D1.S2.3 5
Explain you will outline the documents that teachers will use when delivering the new curriculum
1. Curriculum this outlines the Content and Learning Standards. It is the direct link to the
CEFR. Teachers dont really need to access this document, as it is more organisational than
practical.
2. Syllabus this document explains the treatment of Topics & Themes, vocabulary, HOTs,
phonics, text types and progress within CEFR for each year level. It also includes the Scope &
Sequence, which is like a map of what the pupils will learn in each unit. It gives the topics &
themes, vocabulary and grammar and then lists the vocabulary alphabetically and by category.
3. Scheme of Work. This is the document teachers will use on a daily basis. The beginning of
the SoW talks about how to use the documents. Then there is the glossary, differentiation
strategies which we will look at in this training -, it talks about tracking and assessing progress
and gives 12 suggestions for both pre-lesson and post lesson tasks. The Scheme of work itself
provides varying levels of detail for teachers to work with while they are planning. We will look at
all these areas of the Scheme of Work in more detail during this week of training.
4. Scheme of work overview this document gives an overview in a table of the materials,
skills, content and learning standards and cross curricular elements for each lesson.
24 Review objectives 1

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Day 1

Session 3: Developing listening and speaking skills consistent with CEFR-aligned curriculum framework for the relevant grades

Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Useful vocabulary:
Demand: level of difficulty and effort invested to cope.
Plenary: end of session
L1: first language

Overview for Session 3


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-8 Recognise developmental needs and challenges to listening and speaking skills within Malaysia 1,2,3 45 minutes
context
8-14 Discuss the development of listening skills according to pupils age and CEFR level 4,5 45
minutes
90 minutes
1 Welcome participants back from lunch. Introduce session content with slide. 1
2 Participants discuss questions about 4/5 minutes in pairs or small groups. Do open class 6
feedback and point out the following:
A learning-centred approach to language teaching and learning focuses on the pupils being
able to use their knowledge of the language to communicate for real purposes.
If talk or speaking is focused on a real language exchange the pupils also need to be able to
listen so they can understand the message other people are trying to convey.
3 Ask participants to tell you three things they know about CEFR that they feel is useful for other D1.S3.1 8
participants to know - related to listening and speaking skills but accept any comments.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Distribute Handout 1. Participants then identify the levels. Tell them not to spend too much time
on the descriptors and just give their immediate reactions.
Answers to handout:
Descriptions relate to A1, A2, and B1.
Ask participants to underline how a pupil increases their ability e.g. Listening: A1 pupils are able
to understand simple, standard speech which is very A2 They can understand clear, slow,
standard speech. B1 They are able to understand the main points of clear standard speech.
4&5 Show 3 slide and elicit the level primary pupils in their curriculum need to achieve as they D1.S3.2 12
progress from Year 1 to Year 2, (by the end of Primary Year 1 will have reached low A1 and by
the end of Year 2 pupils will have mid A1).

Elicit demands and challenges for pupils when working with listening and speaking skills at these
levels. Ask volunteers to come up to the board to write some ideas.

Participants do Handout 2 individually then discuss their answers in small groups. When finished,
show slide 4 with answers and go through or expand on each one when necessary.
No slide Ask participants to take out their course books (Superminds 1) and find two listening tasks, two D1.S3.3 8
speaking tasks (controlled) and two speaking tasks (fluency). Ask them to write each one down
in the corresponding columns in Handout 3 then compare their ideas with their partner then add
one of their own ideas in each column.
6-8 Quickly go through the three slides as feedback and expansion on their ideas. 10
Add:
One way of providing support is through integrating controlled practice with drills (drills
are repetitive practice of a word or a structure).
Drills provide pupils with intensive practice in hearing and saying particular words or
phrases. They can help pupils get their tongues around difficult sounds or help them
imitate intonation that may be different from that of their first language and provide a safe
environment for pupils to experiment with producing the language. This can also help to
build confidence especially among pupils who are not risk-takers. Other advantages of
using drills are:

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a. They help pupils notice the correct form or pronunciation.
b. They provide an opportunity for pupils to get immediate feedback on their accuracy.
c. They help memorisation of common language patterns and language chunks.
d. They are useful for auditory pupils (especially when using drills for pronunciation work such as
intonation or sounds).
Discuss fluency based activities identify how these differ from controlled tasks in that
pupils have less scaffolding and more chance to work on fluency features- so may often
be followed by delayed error correction. Again emphasise that the tasks/activities work for
all levels if managed correctly but that they should decide which would work best with
primary pupils.
9 Ask participants what their favourite speaking or listening activity is and why. Tell them to write it 10
down then explain it to their partner; ask them to also say why it is their favourite activity.
Do feedback on a couple of their activities in open class.
If time allows, get volunteers to show the rest of the group how their activity works and how the
pupils react to it and what they gain from it.
Show slide and ask participants what they think the questions refer to (elements of a good
activity).
Now invite participants to think about their favourite activity and decide if it contains all the
elements which make up a successful activity.
Do plenary feedback.
10-11 Explain that they are going to do two practical activities, one for speaking and the other for D1.S3.4 & 15
listening. Do the first practical example with the participants in class by showing the slide and 5
asking participants to discuss the questions then the second activity which focuses on listening
by showing the slide and explaining what they have to do.
They will need Handout 4 for the listening activity. Make sure they fold the handout so in their
pairs each can only see the corresponding picture. Sit the pupils back to back in pairs and ask
them to take turns telling each other what they can see. Tell them to listen to each others
descriptions and remember any differences. Stop them after a few minutes then get them to
retell what differences they heard.

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When both are completed get participants to analyse each one against the criteria and then
discuss their decisions in plenary using Handout 5.
12 Write the following on the board pre lesson /lesson delivery /post lesson activities and ask D1.S3.6 10
participants to describe what they are if necessary explain their use e.g. pre activity could be to
create interest or find out what pupils know, during refer to what a teacher decides to do with a
speaking listening task i.e. the activities the pupils do and post could be extending a listening into
discussing the theme from the listening in a speaking task.
Ask participants to complete Handout 6 individually then compare in groups. Do plenary
feedback.
Finally ask them how different the lesson would have been without the pre and post tasks i.e.
possibly no interest from pupils, lost opportunity for further practice of a skill, etc.

Do feedback by showing the slide and going through each question:


Suggested answers:
1. Main: To provide listening practice through a real listening text. (CLS1.2.3)
Complementary: To encourage speaking through talking about the theme. (CLS 2.1)
2. They encourage pupils to talk about theme, motivate them to say what they already know
about it and extend to a communicative speaking task/s.
3. By using an authentic listening task (teacher talking about a real experience) about a
familiar topic and through extending the theme to pupils talking about their own interests.
The listening focus is extended through first gist then moving onto specific detail.
13 Invite participants to reflect on the question, first in groups then in plenary to finalise the session. 8
Encourage them to write some explicit reasons i.e. a list of criteria to develop listening and
speaking skills so feedback is more practical and provides the participants with some clear
objectives.
i.e. Provide challenge for stronger pupils through using post activities.
Making sure the pupils actually get to the fluency practice stage. (including a stage in plan to
incorporate this)
14 Summarise the main points of the session and clarify any queries. 2

Page 25 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 1

Session 4: Developing reading and writing skills consistent with CEFR-aligned curriculum framework

Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Overview for Session 1


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-6 Recognise developmental needs and challenges to reading and writing skills within Malaysia 1 30 minutes
context
7-14 Discuss the development of reading skills according to pupils age and CEFR level 2, 3,4, 5, 60 minutes
90 minutes
1 Explain that the session will look at both skills and how classroom practice needs to align them to 2
the CEFR and that they will look at practical ways to do this.
2 Show the text to participants and ask them read the information then complete the gaps with an 5
appropriate word (age, transfer, help, vocabulary) then compare with a partner.
Elicit ideas and if they need conformation of appropriate words provide the answers.
Invite participants to comment on these skills in a Malaysian context e.g. Do their pupils enjoy
reading and writing? What kind of activities do pupils need to improve? How often do they get a
chance to do creative writing or use authentic text?
3 Show slide and ask which relate to primary learners and highlight that many of the points on the 5
list are sophisticated skills they will not be capable of e.g. inference or referring back and forth so
its important to provide support and help them integrate the necessary skills in a step by step
approach especially as one of the important aspects is to encourage reading and motivate
pupils to experiment and gradually build up their ability to deal with text.
4 Highlight these factors which are especially relevant for early primary pupils. Elicit any other 4
points the participants think are also relevant, especially to their teaching context.

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5 Elicit ways we can motivate pupils to want to read and write more then go through the points on 4
the slide. Highlight that they are to promote a culture which encourages pupils to enjoy reading,
share their views on what they have read and develop the ability to compare texts and express
opinions about them.
Ask them to think about a lesson they gave which focused on reading or writing and note down
the times they used any of the strategies above to motivate their pupils to read or write. Do brief
plenary feedback.
6 Participants discuss the questions in pairs or small groups then get volunteers to answer in open D1.S4.1 10
class, encourage discussion from participants as you do this to find out their views on these
areas about questions 1-3. Then focus on question 4 and transfer their ideas onto the board.
Distribute Handout 2. Divide the participants into pairs, ask them to fold the handout and each
one reads either A or B. When ready, they then share the information then compare their ideas
from the board and what their pupils can do.
If necessary discuss the fact that A1 does not require very sophisticated tasks and in many
cases their pupils do have a higher level of writing and reading skills (but also point out that this
could be at the cost of speaking and listening as in many instances lessons in a Malaysian
context tend to focus more of R and W).
7 Show slide and elicit an example from each category to check their understanding of each one. 3
8 Show slide to set up the task. Distribute Handout 2. Participants read the comments then add D1.S4.2 10
their own paragraph. Invite them to share in groups of four.
When finished ask them to underline example of activities, purposes and strategies from the
descriptions, including their own. Invite them to show and share.
Do feedback by getting volunteers to write some examples of each category on the board.
9 Show slide to set up the task. Ask them to look back again at the teacher comments in Handout D1.S4.3 5
2 and state which of the comments from teachers were examples of pre lesson, lesson delivery
and post lesson activities participants then discuss the question. Do plenary feedback on their
opinions.
Distribute Handout 3 and ask them to match the strategies to the correct section.

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Monitor closely then do brief feedback.
10 Set up the context by showing slide then distribute Handout 4. Participants do A and B. Do D1.S4.4 5
feedback by getting a volunteer to name activity types in A and another to state the correct order
of B.
A gap fill, copying, dictation, free writing
B - answers could be varied but a logical sequence would be:
Brainstorm theme
Vocabulary consolidation
Reading
Writing model
Writing
Feedback
11 Show slide to set up the task. Participants work in small groups to think of five tips. Monitor 5
closely to see what they come up with or provide suggestions if they do not come up with any
ideas. Invite groups to compare.
12 Compare their ideas with the ones on the slide. If time allows, use this opportunity to feed in 2
ideas on how to incorporate the tips into the class e.g. Tip one - brainstorming vocabulary, doing
short quizzes to focus on vocabulary and stimulate/motivate learners.
13 Ask participants to read the story swap activity then clarify any areas they are not clear about. D1.S4.5 15
Be sure they understand the task clearly before beginning.
An alternative could be to actually do the Story Swap activity with the participants before they
begin working with Handout 5.
Distribute Handout 5 and ask pairs or small groups to transfer the ideas onto the plan, ask them
to include a pre lesson, lesson delivery and post lesson task.
Comment that they can use the idea above or one of their own to map out a plan. Monitor closely
and if time allows, get some to present theirs to the rest of the group or discuss the answers
together.

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14 Explain they are going to see some questions teachers ask themselves when dealing with these 10
skills.
Ask small groups to think of answers to the questions using reading/writing tasks with pupils and
if time allows they could make a poster for the wall to display their ideas.

Suggested answers are below:


1 I dont know how to begin encouraging reading and writing with my new Primary Year 1 class.
Get your pupils writing words first such as name labels or labels for the furniture in class and
display examples of short text on the walls, if possible from pupils in previous classes at the
same level.

2 When should I give them the questions for a reading text?


Before they read so they have a reason to read and you can check their understanding of the
questions.

3 Can I ask my pupils to read aloud?


Its better you do it so they can hear written text (i.e. teacher reads) and as a good model for
pronunciation.

4 How can I help them improve their writing?


Give them a model to work from and help them notice language.

6 What kind of other writing activities can I do to improve accuracy?


You can use gap-fillers, dictations and copying tasks.

7 How can I exploit text further?


Use a text to integrate some writing about the theme or as an opportunity to integrate other skills,
for example a short speaking task about the theme/ as a listening you read the text with five
mistakes and they have to listen and say what the mistakes are.

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8 How can I focus on communicative reading and writing?
Create your own text about real people.

9 How can I help my pupils improve in their creative writing practice?


Get them to do a draft first and give them some feedback.

15 Invite participants to reflect the first day of their workshop. What have they learned and how they 5
envisage they will deliver the workshops to the teachers.

Page 30 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 2

Session 1: Planning objective and pupil-centred textbook-based lessons


Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Overview for Session 1


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-9 Understand how to use the schemes of work for lesson planning 1&2 40 minutes
10-16 Create learning objectives derived from learning standards 50 minutes
16-18
90 minutes
1 Outline session objectives. Talk about the kinds of task participants will do 1
2 Tell participants the session will begin with a discussion. 6
Assign small groups of participants (3-4 people) to discuss the questions Why do teachers need
to plan lessons? They should come up with three reasons.
Give them 5 minutes to discuss.
3 Stop participants after 5 minutes and conduct feedback as a whole group. 5
Get some ideas from the participants and comment on these as you note them on the board.
Run through the ideas on the slides, adding information to what the participants have already
given you, as appropriate.
- To provide a clear purpose for a lesson: When we teach with objectives, we are planning for
learning, there is a clear purpose to the lesson, which we know and the pupils can also
understand. Our objectives will come from the Learning Standards given in the Schemes of
Work. By following the Learning Standards, we can be sure that the lesson fits within the
syllabus.
- To develop pupils understanding across a lesson: When we plan the content and activities in a
lesson, we plan them so that pupils can build an understanding of the language or skill we want
them to develop. We start at the beginning and add to their understanding as the lesson
progresses. Timing is also important here, as we need to ensure we get to the main stage of the
lesson that will help us achieve the learning objectives.

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- To anticipate problems and plan solutions. When we plan, we can think in advance about what
pupils might find challenging or easy, what might interest them and other classroom
management concerns we have. Then we can plan solutions to these problems, perhaps by
being ready to change an activity or language focus. We will look later in the course at
differentiation, which is related to this.
- To ensure everything is prepared: We need to make sure we are ready for the lesson, that we
have everything we need, such as any worksheets, resources like pens, pencils, scissors,
perhaps access to computers.
- For classroom management: Related to the previous point, if we are well organised, then the
class can run smoothly, the pace that is the speed of the lesson can be right and we can
make sure everything is timely.
- To ensure progression over time: Planning a series of lessons, planning for a term and planning
for a year are also important so that pupils learning progresses according to the syllabus and
within the CEFR-aligned curriculum. Well talk more about this during the course.
4-5 Tell participants you are going to look at samples from the Scheme of Work and the Lesson Plan D2.S1.1 12
template provided by the Ministry of education to see how the two work together to support
teachers in their lesson planning.
Give out Handout 1 (Scheme of work sample) and ask participants to have a look at it. They can
talk briefly to the person next to them if they wish. Ask for any particular comments, but remind
participants that we will look at how teachers can use this document to plan lessons, with the
scheme of work document to hand.
Content and Learning Standards these come from the National curriculum document, as we
saw yesterday. In each lesson, there is a main and a complementary standard. Lessons have a
main objective and a complementary objective, which is a little less than the main one. We will
look at objectives later in this session.
Learning Outline: In this column, you will find reference to the Teachers Book in a textbook-
based lesson, and some suggestions for activities in other lessons. For Year 1, these are more
fully developed than for Year 2. There are three main parts to each lesson, the Pre-Lesson, main
lesson and post-lesson. For the pre-lesson and post-lesson parts, the Scheme of Work provides
12 sample tasks that teachers can choose from. Often a suggestion is given, or they are

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integrated into the teachers notes in the textbook, or the teacher can develop their own to suit
their pupils needs.

Materials/Resources: Superminds is the name of the textbook. Level 1 is used in both Years 1
and 2. Any other materials or resources a lesson needs are either described in the teachers
book (for a textbook-based lesson) or in the Scheme of Work, where a lesson outline is provided.

Give a short explanation why Year 1 SoW is more extensive than Year 2 (to help teachers
engage with the new curriculum, support pupils development from the first year in primary, can
be used as an example for Year 2 to create lessons, etc.)
Continue on to the next slide

6 Cross curricular element: This comes from the Ministry of Education and is specified in the D2.S1.1 3
Scheme of Work. The teacher can add a cross curricular element to a lesson they plan, but
should not change the ones that are given.
Differentiation Strategies: These are strategies we plan to support different pupils learning in
our classes. We will be looking at Differentiation in Day 3, tomorrow.
Teachers notes/Remarks: Teachers can use this column to make comments on things to
remember for the lesson, points to keep in mind for longer term planning or some comments that
they can use when giving feedback on the Scheme of Work, for example.
7 Give out Handout 2 (lesson plan template) D2.S1.1& 7
Ask participants to look at the Lesson Plan Template together with the Scheme of Work sample. 2
They should discuss the questions give 2 or 3 minutes for this task, then they feed back.
8 Go through the answers with the participants. D2.S1.1& 2
Note: Activities are found in the Teachers Book for textbook-based lessons. For non-textbook 2
lessons, activities are given in the Scheme of Work in Year 1 and some suggestions are given in
Year 2. Selected Language Arts lessons also give a detailed lesson outline, while others might
give suggestions or ideas, but the teacher needs to plan the lesson.
9 Explain that you will now look at learning objectives. First, quickly get some ideas from 3
Animated participants about their understanding of learning objective.
[Click] go through the three points and explain if necessary

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10 Show participants the example learning objective. Ask them to tell you if it is 3
clear/achievable/observable/measurable. The answer should be yes to these questions,
although they may have good suggestions for improvement.
If necessary, point out that we will talk about making them more measurable (in relation to, for
example, specific numbers e.g. write 2 or 3 sentences) tomorrow when we look at differentiation.
As with CEFR Can do statements, these are more general in this respect.
Note that this learning objective has been created for Year 1, Lesson 71. It is a complementary
objective (i.e. it comes from a Complementary Learning Standard)
11 Show participants the example learning objective. Ask them to talk to the person next to them 4
about this objective give a few minutes for this.
Note that this could generate discussion, which needs monitoring. Note points and feed back on
in the in the next step

12 Feed back: 5
Clear? No not enough detail; what support? What information and details? What kind of
phrases and sentences?
Achievable Yes, although perhaps this is difficult to say because it isnt clear.
Observable & Measurable No, not really. The word understand is best avoided because we
cant really see or measure this clearly, even if we think the pupils do understand. We will need
to take specific steps to do that and these need to be included in the learning objective.

Note that this is not in fact a learning objective, it is a Learning Standard.

13 Explain that participants will look at Lesson 71, where these Learning Standards come from. D2.S1.3 5
Give out Handout 3 and ask participants to look at the Complementary Learning Standard.
Elicit ideas for what information is needed to write the learning objective using the Scheme of
Work.
Note that this is a non-textbook lesson. We will return to these later on, this is just used here as
an example for this task.

Note:

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- the common phrase by the end of the lesson, which makes the objective time-bound
- will have said use of future here, also the verb say to show if it is written or spoken
- what their and others favourite toys are this is what they will say. You could also add
the language structure or vocabulary here

Details used in SoW to write objective:


- Language/grammar focus
- Learning Standard
- Learning Outline

14 Ask participants to look at the scheme of Work example and to write the main learning objective D2.S1.3 & 15
in pairs. Allow 7-8 minutes for this. 4
Feed back on participants ideas and lead a short group discussion. Explain that they will get
more practice at this later in this session.
15 Tell participants they are going to now look in more detail at a lesson plan for Year 2 before D2.S1.2 & 10
practising planning lessons for themselves. 5
Give out Handout 5 (Elements of a lesson plan). Ask participants to look at p.59 of Superminds SM p.59
1, Teachers and Pupils book & at handout 2 (Lesson Plan template). (Teachers
Book and
Participants look at the elements on handout 5 (A-N) and decide which section of the lesson plan textbook)
they belong in. They can write their answers on the lesson plan template (H/O2) best in pencil
so they can reuse the template later.

Ask participants to spend a few minutes comparing the lesson plan to the SoW and Superminds
1 Teachers book in particular)
Feed back. Answers:

Subject: M
Year: K
Duration: C
Theme: N

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Topic: E
Focus Skill: F
Content standard: H
Learning Standard: B
Learning Objectives: I
Cross curricular elements: A
Pre-lesson: G
Lesson development: L
Post lesson: J
Teachers reflection: D

Points to note about sample lesson plan:


- Note that the plan broadly follows the guidelines in the teachers book
- Some adaptations have been made to better suit the teachers own class
- Pupils control much of the language, it is pupil-centred
- Miming is included as a way for pupils to show their understanding

16 Summarise the main points covered in the session: 2


- Using schemes of work and lesson plan templates: we thought about the importance of
lesson planning; we looked at the different elements of the lesson plan to see which are
provided in the scheme of work and which teachers need to work on themselves
- Learning objectives: we reviewed the basics of writing good learning objectives; we
looked at the relationship between learning standards and learning objectives; we worked
on some examples of learning objectives
- Lesson planning workshop: we analysed a textbook-based lesson plan; we practised
planning a textbook-based lesson for Year 2.

Page 36 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 2

Session 2: Planning Learning in engaging Language Arts lessons

Materials Stationery, poster/flip chart paper & pens for each group and all curriculum documents

Useful vocabulary: Learning objective: an objective derived from a learning standard and can be achieved during the lesson.

Overview for Session 2


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
2-7 Understand the Language Arts (LA) learning standards with reference to needs of Year 1 and 2 1 20 minutes
pupils
8-10 Identify age-appropriate text and activity types for LA lessons 2,3 15 minutes
12-15 Understand the principles of planning an LA lesson 4 25 minutes
16 - 17 Plan an LA lesson 5a&b, 6 30 minutes
90 minutes
1-2 Explain the session objectives. In groups, participants discuss what they understand by 6
Language arts allow 3-4 minutes for this.
3 Show the slide. Feed back and show the explanation given in the curriculum. Note the words in 2
bold for emphasis
4 Remind participants that each content has a descriptor, which explains the focus of that D2.S2.1 5
standard.
Hand out1 - Participants match the Content Standards for Language Arts to their focus areas.
Note that there are two focus areas for 5.1.
5-6 Feed back and show answers on the slide. 5
Go through the LA Content and Learning Standards, emphasising text types and highlighted
words on the slide.
Note that the interpretation of these Standards allows for pupil-made texts, some material from
the textbook.

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7 Elicit a list of text types from participants (NB many have been given already). Show the slide 3
and write any more suitable ideas on the board.
Accept any suggestions that fit into LA. Note that poems dont appear until Year 3
Note that simple action songs appear in Year 1, and simple songs appear in Year 2
8 Show participants the broad activity types identified in the curriculum. D2.S2.2 12
Put participants into groups according to the year they teach (2 or 3 Year 1 teachers together, 2
or 3 Year 2 teachers together). Give groups 6-7 minutes to brainstorm some activities of up to
four of the types that are suitable for their age group. They should write these on poster
paper/flipchart paper so that they can be posted on the walls. These are useful ideas to have
access to later in the day and week when planning lessons,
Feed back within year groups or as a whole group.
9 Before showing Slide 10, introduce the idea that in a similar way to a skills lesson, there are pre- 5
lesson, lesson development and post lesson stages to a LA lesson, which centres around a text
as the basis of the main task. Ask participants what they think the purpose of each of these
stages is.
Then through the points on the slides. These should largely be a review of yesterdays sessions
on skills teaching.
10 Participants should read the questionnaire on handout 3 and decide for themselves whether they D2.S2.3 10
agree, disagree or feel neutral (i.e. dont really agree or disagree). Allow 5-6 minutes for this
step.
When they have finished, they should compare their answers with the person or people around
them (groups of 2-4) and discuss any areas of interest.
11-12 Conduct whole group feedback and discussion to include the following points on each question: 10
Choosing texts:
- LA lessons allow exposure to language in different text types, often this is authentic or
original language. There will be some language and vocabulary that pupils do not know
in these texts. In these texts we need to decide if the language/vocabulary is key to the
understanding of the text overall. If it is, then we should consider pre-teaching it or
explaining it as we work on the text (e.g. using pictures in a story). If it isnt key, then we
dont need to. It is a useful skill to try to understand the overall meaning of something
when we dont know all the words, and in fact young pupils are already very skilled in this

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in their first language more so than adults, usually. However, if there is too much new
language or vocabulary, or the concepts in the text are above the level of your pupils,
then it is best not to use that text and to find something more suitable. Generally-
speaking, texts for native-speaking young pupils can often suitable because of their
conceptual content and simplified language, but they do need to be reviewed and could
perhaps be simplified adapted if the language is too high.
- A key point is whether you feel comfortable reading the text. There are many videos and
animations available online, and these can be used from time to time as a replacement
for you. This will let pupils hear different people speaking English. You should avoid
using these too often as it makes it difficult to engage the pupils in the story by asking
questions and having personal interaction with them.
- We can choose texts within our topic and theme where possible, but its not absolutely
necessary. The most important is that it is interesting and relevant to the pupils. Some
texts may be from or about English-speaking or other cultures, but English-language
texts from or about more familiar cultures will also be suitable.

Teaching LA lessons
- The focus in these lessons is on fluency, understanding ad engagement with texts. It is
not really on accuracy. Pupils will naturally want to talk about the texts but do not have
the language to do so in English. It is fine to use L1 in these kinds of lesson, although
take every opportunity to translate into English or encourage an answer in English as well
if possible.
- While you are story-telling, singing a song or saying a chant, have pupils move away
from their desks. They might sit around you or could stand up so they can mime, dance
or move to the music. These are not desk-based lessons. Ask plenty of questions to help
keep their interest, to support and check understanding and to personalise the text. Try to
involve all pupils by getting comments or asking them questions.
- The aim of the LA lessons is for pupils to enjoy the texts. They do not normally need to
memorise or learn the texts, although that can be part of singing a sing. As we discussed,
activities are creative or physical in response to the text, they are not comprehension
questions. Pupils show their understanding of the main points through these activities.

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Show the criteria on the slides and suggest/ask for additions to these.
13 Explain that participants are now going to analyse a LA lesson from the SoW Year 1. Give out D2.S2.4 7
handout 4. There are two pages to this handout.
Ask participants to look at the lesson and to answer the four questions. Give 5-10 minutes for
this task.
14-15 Conduct whole group feedback 2
- Text Primary Colours song
- Builds on topic from textbook p.18-19
- See slide 14 for step aims
- See slide 15 for possible learning objectives
16 Tell participants they will now practise planning a LA lesson from the Scheme of Work. They D2.S2.5a 15
should work with someone who teaches the same year group (Year 1 or Year 2) to plan the &b, 6
lesson together.
They will need handout 5a (for Year 1) or 5b (for Year 2), plus a clean lesson plan template
(handout 6)
Give 10 minutes for this note that participants should try to finish this plan off after the session.
They may need to access the internet to find and check resources.
Feed back quickly on ideas from some groups. Remind participants that they will have time to
revisit these plans. They should also spend time this evening looking for and at resources for this
lesson if they still need to.
17 Summarise the main points of the session: 9
- We looked first at the Content and Learning Standards from the curriculum.
- We identified text types and talked about classroom activities that are suitable for LA
lessons
- We talked about choosing texts and planning our classroom practice for LA lessons
- You looked at a sample LA lesson and analysed the SoW
- You began to plan a LA lesson for your year group
Reflection
Thank participants for their hard work and participation in the session. Explain that after lunch we
will look at monitoring pupils progress before going back to lesson planning this time for non-
textbook lessons, which are largely determined by that progress.

Page 40 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 2

Session 3: Tracking pupil language development and progression

Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents. Note that handouts 1 and 4 will need to be printed and cut up before the session, one
set per group of participants.

Overview for Session 3


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-15 Understand the principles of tracking learning progress 35 minutes
16 -23 Consider how pupils learning progress can be monitored and recorded 30 minutes
24-29 Understand the need for continual planning in response to assessment in the short, medium and 25 minutes
long terms.
90 minutes
1-8 Greet participants after lunch and run through the session objectives. Explain that it will become 5
clear how this session fits into the day on lesson planning.
Tell them that the session will begin with a key word activity. You will show a word on a slide,
and participants should tell their partner what the word means to them. This should be done
quickly, their initial response.
Run through slides 2 to 8, allowing a moment for participants to tell their partner what the word
means to them. Keep the pace fast here, as it is just an introduction to the session.
Comment on anything key that comes up, otherwise explain that the meaning of the words will
become clear in a moment. Remind participants that they can ask if they are not sure after that,
though.
9 Explain you will feed back on that task by outlining some key points. Read the points on the 2
slide.
10 Tell participants they will do a True/ False activity D2.S3.1 10
You will need to cut up one set of True/False statements for each group
Make sure to monitor carefully
11-13 Feed back on discussions using the slides. 12

Page 41 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Animated Key on slides (Click to move to next one):
[Slide 11]
- This happens once a year: False. It is an on-going process. It measures progress not
achievement.
- This should be part of teachers normal classroom practice: True. Teachers should watch
and listen to their pupils all the time, making notes (in their heads or written down or
both)
- This is something we do to measure individuals progress: True. We can see progress
over time for individual pupils. This means we can help support each pupil in their
learning because we know where they are in their progress.
- Teachers can use this information to plan learning: True. Monitoring progress is the first
step in a cycle of teaching and learning as we will see later
[Slide 12]
- Teachers usually do this with an exam: False. An end of year exam may help you see
what the pupils have learned in the year, but it doesnt show individual progress and it
doesnt help teachers plan.
- Teachers cant use this information when they communicate with parents: False. This is
the kind of information that teachers can use to talk to parents about the individual needs
and progress of their child. It supports teachers in their communications with parents
during the year.
- Teachers can use this to pass or fail pupils in Year 1 or 2 English: False. This information
is not about achievement and is not reliable enough for these kinds of important
decisions. It is more for monitoring and planning learning during the year.
- Pupils can use this information to reflect on their learning: True. Pupils in Year 1 and 2
may not have highly developed skills in self-assessment and reflection, but we can use
this information to talk to pupils individually about their progress and help them think
about what they need to do to continue or improve their progress. This helps them begin
to develop these skills to use more later on.
[Slide 13]
- Teachers can use different techniques to record progress: True. We will look at some of
these in this session.

Page 42 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
- Teachers dont need to be organised to monitor progress effectively. False. Teachers
monitor progress all the time informally. However to be truly effective as a tool for
planning learning, it needs to be organised and systematic, as we will see.
- Teachers only need to use test results to monitor progress: False. Teachers should also
monitor pupils in normal classroom activities.
- Teachers can observe pupils and look at their written work to monitor progress: True. We
will look at this later in the session.
14 Explain that we can view learning and teaching as a cyclical process one that runs in a cycle. 3
Show the steps within the cycle. They are jumbled up. Ask participants to re-order them (this can
be done with the whole group)
15 Show the Learning Cycle diagram and show how each step feeds into the next step. 3
Note that as a result of this process, learning moves forwards for each individual pupil at their
own rate.
16 Explain that there are three main types of technique for monitoring and tracking progress. 2
Animated Show the slide and give the definitions for each type.
17 Divide the group into 6 groups. Give each group a type so you have 2 groups working on each D2.S3.2 7
type of technique.
Give out handout 2. Participants read the list of techniques for monitoring progress and tick the
ones they believe are examples of the type you have assignment to them. Allow 5-7 minutes for
this
18-20 Check answers by looking at each one in turn, then reconfirm the answers using slides 18 to 20. 5
Note that there may be a little overlap between some of the categories.
On the Run = 1
Planned = 2
Diagnostic = 3
A= 3 / B=1 / C=1 / D=2 / E=2 / F=1 / G=2 / H=1 / I=2 / J=1 / K=2 / L=3 / M=1 / N=1 / O=2
Discuss which techniques are suitable for Year 1 and 2 the answer is all of them!
21 Tell participants that you are going to look at techniques for recording progress. D2.S3.3a, 15
First, you will give participants a sample of a teachers records. They should look at the sample b, c
and discuss the questions on the slide.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
There are three samples all together/ You will need 6 groups (2 per sample). Change the groups
from earlier activity.
Give groups the handout for their sample only. Give 5 minutes for this activity.
After 5 minutes, mix the groups so that there is at least one participant from each original group
in each new group. Ask participants to report on their discussions and to share the sample.
Monitor and make note of interesting points. Feedback on these at the end of the activity.
Hand out remaining samples, so each participant has all three samples.
Notes:
Example 1 this is a teachers overview plan for a week, plus notes from observation on a daily
basis. The teacher then uses these to re-plan upcoming lessons and would modify their lesson
plan for the upcoming days.
Example 2 This is a teachers report on a diagnostic assessment done at the beginning of a
unit. From this the teacher can decide which language or vocab will need extra attention and
practice, and which doesnt need as much and can be used when devising language examples
or models perhaps.
Example 3 This is a teachers record of results from specific activities in a week. It covers all
four skills. When they put several weeks together, the teacher can look at progress. It helps the
teacher identify which pupils need extra support and which ones need more challenge.
22 Run through the points on the slide, which compare the examples 3
23 Run through the points on the slide, which talk about how records can be used for planning over
time.
24Animate Last, we will look at the changes teachers may make based on results like these. 3
d Show the first part of the slide. Explain that by making changes based on pupils real progress,
as teachers observe and record, they can better ensure pupils chances of meeting the Content
and Learning Standards in the curriculum. As this is in line with the CEFR, this means that the
pupils are more likely to meet the CEFR requirements.
One particular value of non-textbook lessons is that they give teachers the chance to respond to
the information they get from monitoring progress of their pupils. This allows them to better
match the level of their teaching with the abilities of the pupils. We will find out more about this in
the next session.
[click to part 2 of slide]

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Based on the information from your records, there are three main areas that you may want to
change in your teaching and, therefore, their pupils learning: change what you teach, how you
teach and when you teach something
25 Participants will look at some sentences (handout 4, cut up). They should group them according D2.S3.4 10
to the type of change the teacher is making. (cut up)
Have participants work in pairs or small groups for this activity.
NB: You will need to cut up one set of sentences for each group of participants
26-28 Run through the answers with the group 3 mins
29 Show the slide and explain the three time frames. 3
Note:
Although the focus has been largely on planning sequences of lessons, we can use information
about pupils progress to monitor learning over the medium and long term. Through continued
monitoring and changing teaching, we can see how well we are progressing against the
Learning Standards in the curriculum, in order to decide whether we need to review any in
particular.
As the Learning Standards are tied into the CEFR, we can then increase the likelihood of our
pupils reaching the CEFR level by the end of the year.
30 Review session objectives and summarise points made: 9
First we looked at some principles of tracking learning progress, such as it being classroom-
based, systematic, that it allows us to work with pupils on an individual level, it can help
teachers, pupils and parents and so on.
We then thought about how the learning cycle can help us improve learning by monitoring
progress and planning in response to that. We looked at different techniques for doing this and
at different ways of recording information. Last of all, we thought about how to use the
information from this kind of assessment to make changes to teaching and touched on its
implications for medium and long term tracking or progress through the CEFR-aligned
curriculum.
Reflection
Have participants reflect on their learning for the session. This could be done after the session is
finished if there is not enough time.

Page 45 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 2

Session 4: Planning for pupil-centred non-textbook-based lessons


Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Useful vocabulary:
TB: textbook

Overview for Session 4


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-4 Understand the requirements and challenges for planning non-textbook aligned lessons 1 17 minutes
5-7 Create learning objectives derived from learning standards and detail outlined in the Scheme of 2,3 30 minutes
Work
8-9 Identify how to cater for pupils needs as identified in textbook lessons 4 15 minutes
10-14 Planning learning outline in non-textbook based lessons 5, 6 27
90 minutes
1 Welcome participants to the final session of the day. 2
Go through the session objectives and explain that the focus of the session is on planning non-
textbook lessons based on our own pupils needs.
2 Elicit from participants What is a non-textbook-based lesson? D2.S4.1 8
Animated
- The Scheme of Work is organised in blocks of 5 lessons. Mostly, this is a block of 4, one for
each skill plus one language arts lesson. Blocks alternate between lessons based on the
textbook and lessons that the teacher plans and develops for themselves. These are not based
on the textbook.

[click]

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Tell participants they are going to do a gap fill task. Hand our HO 1, ask participants to work
alone first then check their answers with a partner. Participants read the short text and complete
it with a word from the box.
3 Feed back on gap fill. 5
Points to emphasise:
pattern follow L S R W, principles of introducing new language, also for review and
based on monitoring of progress if progress is limited, need to review learning. If strong,
consider enriching, i.e. extending.
Note that all skills lessons have a basic outline for Year 1. In Year 2, the first set of non-
textbook lessons is also planned in this way. For the remainder of the non-textbook
lessons, some suggestions or advice are given, but the lessons are not outlined in detail.
4 Go through slide, which shows the details that are provided in the SoW (and cannot be changed 2
and the details that the teachers will need to plan themselves.
5 Task: Ask participants to look at the sample lessons from the SoW and match them to their main D2.S4.2 12
and complementary learning objectives. (1x Year 1 and 1x Year 2)
Allow 10 minutes for this.
Answer key:
Example 1: Main objective 4 / Complementary Objective 2
Example 2: Main objective 1 / Complementary Objective - 3
6 Ask participants to recall the key features of good learning objectives from Session 1. 3
Animated [click]
Review these as necessary using the slide
Slide 7 Tell participants that they are going to do a task, they will write learning objectives for 2 lessons D2.S4.3 15
one Year 1 and one Year 2. Hand out handout 3. Ask participants to work in pairs or a group of
three. Allow 10 minutes for this task.
Feedback by regrouping and comparing
Slide 8 In the next task, participants will read what some teachers ask about learning objectives and D2.S4.4 10
planning using the Scheme of Work. Participants work in small groups (e.g. 4) to discussion and
say what advice they would give these teachers
9 Feed back on their ideas, then use the slide to focus on questions to ask when planning non- 5
textbook lessons.

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NB:
Teachers cant change SoW (theme, topic, CS, LS, Cross curricular).
Keep focus on language covered in TB, but can review or enrich depending on how pupils did
Think about how pupils work best (pairs, groups etc), the kinds of activity they do well in
include these and also try to develop others
10 Note that teachers will be planning non-TB lessons tomorrow in the workshop. Today we focus 5
on staging lessons and examples.
First look through some staging principles:
- pre-development-post model as in Day 1 session
- review language/vocab before introducing new language/vocab for enrichment.
- We work on oral skills before written
- We should provide models of language before asking pupils to produce it.
- The stir-settle model is where we manage pupils energy and motivation by stirring them up with
a physical, active activity to use up their energy before getting them to calm and settle down.
This will help them to concentrate and focus.
11 In this task, ask participants to put the steps of the lesson outline in order, using the models from D2.S4.5 5
Slide 10 to help them
12 Feed back (answers on slide) and discuss in relation to the models on Slide 10. 5
Note: there is personalisation through the use of pupils own writing; the lesson includes self-
correction; there are active stages of lesson before less active; there is a reasonable balance of
pair and individual work.
13 Ask participants to choose one of two lessons from Y2 SoW (see Handout 6). D2.S4.6 10
They should write learning outline (level of detail depends on the amount of time you have)
When they have finished, they should compare their learning outline with others who have done
same lesson.
Feed back if there isnt any time left, tell participants, we will return to this tomorrow. They can
finish it after the sessions.
14 At the end of the session, thank participants and summarise the objectives of the session. 3
Review, too, the focus of the day and remind participants of the four sessions. There will be an
evening session for participants, and they can return to the work they started today if they wish.

Page 48 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 3

Session 1: Differentiation strategies and supporting pupil-centred teaching lessons


Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Useful vocabulary:

Overview for Session 1


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-6 Understand how different learning needs and abilities lead to different performance and progress 15 minutes
7-26 Support pupils with faster progress rate to further develop and enjoy learning 1 75 minutes

Facilitate learning and development opportunities for pupils with slower progress rate
Foster a positive, pupil-led and active learning environment
90 minutes
1 Welcome participants to Day 3 of the training. 2
Ask them to recall what was covered in days 1 & 2. Explain that in todays sessions, well
continue looking at planning learning and they will have the chance to plan more thoroughly later
today. Go through the session objectives
2 Explain that this session will focus on differentiation. Ask participants what they think 8
differentiation is elicit a few ideas and even definitions if possible. Keep this fairly brief; but
write some key words on the board.
Show the slide and point out any key words from the board that are also on the slide.
Ask participants to work with the person next to them. They should write a definition using as
many of the words as possible.
Monitor as they do this and set any big misconceptions straight
3 Get some feedback from participants, then show the definition on the slide 3. The words from the 2
task are in bold.
4-5 Explain that you are going to give a short presentation on differentiation. 3
Read through the slides and explain any key words, with a focus on those in blue.

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6 Use the slides to talk about how to differentiate pupils performance in big classes. 4
7 There are five main ways teachers can differentiate: 2
Task, Support, Success Criteria and Mode.
We can make adjustments to the task itself or we can give pupils different tasks or different
elements within a task.
We can support pupils in different ways so that each pupil can progress within their own level of
potential, whether that is at a higher or lower level or somewhere in between.
We can set out different expectations for different pupils in terms of success criteria and, last of
all, we can allow pupils to learn in different ways so that they can use a preferred mode or
develop one that they do not prefer.
8-9 Well look at each one in turn. 4

Differentiate by task:
Different tasks can be given to different pupils according to their abilities with tasks being varied
in either content (what pupils do), structure (how they do it) or both.
Pupils can be given different roles which reflect their needs in terms of skill, language
proficiency, interests and personality.
This is particularly applicable in larger group work or projects
10 When choosing or creating texts for listening and reading, there are a number of factors that can 5
make it more or less challenging for pupils:
Run through points on the slide
length of text longer shorter
language in text vocabulary, grammar, familiarity, known and new/unknown
sentence length also complexity
distractors irrelevant information to the task
picture support relevant and clear pictures. Pupils need help to use these to support
understanding
language needed for answers what is your task? Do pupils write/speak? Use sentences, single
words? Etc.
11-12 We can differentiate by support: 3
Teachers can provide varying levels and types of support for pupils as they work on tasks.

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One way to do this is to mix pairs/groups so that pupils who need more support will be able to
get input from peers. However weaker pupils might not get to participate much as more able
pupils move speedily to complete tasks.
Support can also focus on reminding/prompting individual pupils how to do things once they are
working in their groups
13 Support can be offered in many ways but perhaps one of the key ones is the teachers ability to D3.S1.1 10
Animated vary their questioning to support pupils to make an active contribution which is empowering
and stay engaged in whole class lesson sequences. This is particularly important in elicitation
and feedback sequences in lessons. There are different kinds of question teachers (and pupils)
use in the classroom in different points of the lesson and for different purposes. Some questions
are cognitively less demanding and others are more demanding i.e. some require higher
thinking skills than others.

In elicitation sequences, for example, when building context, teachers often ask referential
questions e.g. so who comes from a large family? [How many cousins have you got?] display
questions e.g. who remembers how to spell that / and whats the past form? and procedural
questions e.g. where do we write new words? These types of questions, together with
convergent questions, which seek to elicit a simple yes/no answer, e.g. so is that difficult? are
generally the types of questions that we think of as at the less challenging end of the cognitive
difficulty spectrum.

Questions such as concept checking questions e.g. is the speaker sure? divergent questions
e.g. what makes it more difficult? probing questions Johns right, why is the figure higher in the
mornings and hypothetical questions e.g. would you expect a difference between girls and
boys? are the types of questions that we think of as more on the cognitive spectrum and often
require a more linguistically demanding answer.

The teacher who is aware of the need to support all pupils to become involved in answering is
the one who smoothly manages the elicitation process by the effective distribution of questions
that take such factors into account.
[click]

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14 Give out HANDOUT 1. Participants classify the questions on the handout in pairs or groups of
three.
15 Go through answers as a group click for each one 3
Animated Note there is some overlap, e.g. Q8 is a concept check question, but is also a display question.
16 In the classroom environment, different questions serve different purposes so can be used to 5
support pupils learning at different points and in different ways, where questions to check
understanding or focus on language, for example, may help support less proficient pupils, and
the teacher can stretch more proficient pupils language using questions that will make them
search for more. It needs to be remembered, though, that pupils who are less proficient in
English should not be limited to low level questions! All pupils can be stretched within their
potential and thinking skills can be developed through questioning.
See slide for sequences/points of the lesson/purposes of different types of question see if
participants have any alternative purposes for some question types
17-18 We can differentiate by success criteria: (this is in addition to what is in SoW) 5
Teachers need to have in mind different aims for different groups of pupils in engaging with
lesson content. SMART lesson plan templates now cater for this by having success criteria
boxes which are divided into ALL/MOST/SOME boxes. The teacher tries to envisage what
positive lesson outcomes for each group of pupils will look like e.g. All pupils will understand
some of the main points . Most pupils will understand most of the main points Some pupils
will identify all main points and distinguish these clearly from sub-points Teachers that identify
these different success criteria effectively are better able to regulate key factors in lessons such
as timing, pacing and staging of tasks and the planning of on task support and provision of
extension activities. It is essentially about targeting that progress for some pupils may be about
recording information or spelling words accurately in on-task activities whereas progress for
others may rest in trying out new on-task strategies and creating class frameworks where both
can happen.
19 Work through the example with participants. 3
Note these differences:
- some/most/all words
- use them to relate a few things / relate information in response to most prompts / respond
correctly to prompts

Page 52 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
- level of detail (some pupils information about family members as individuals and collectively)
20 Ask participants to find the learning objectives they wrote in yesterdays workshop. They should 10
choose one or two (depending on time available) and try to write three different levels of success
criteria for each.
21-22 We can differentiate by Outcome: 5
There are different ways we can modify the outcome. This is similar to previous success criteria,
but we are look at the activity, what the pupils do or produce.
Go through the points on the slide.
23-24 We can differentiate by mode: 6
Preferred way of learning this is related to pupils different intelligences, the way that they
process information and view the world, and how they learn best. Some pupils like to see things
and prefer to visualise, draw pictures, diagrams etc. or in a musical way. Some pupils are active
and learn when they are manipulating things. Some learn best by talking ideas through,
communicating with others, they may be very sociable and talkative. Others may prefer
to think about things in a logical or mathematical way, they may enjoy problem solving, for
example, and approach a task in a very organised systematic way.
Depending on the group and time available, you could introduce Gardners theory of Multiple
Intelligences. Or ask participants to read more about it (see link on slide). It is best not to talk
about Learning Styles here, as this theory has been largely discredited, although participants
may ask about this.
25 Tell participants you are going to do a small group activity. Put them in 7 groups one for each 10
of Gardners intelligence. Each group should brainstorm ideas for activity types, interaction
patterns, teaching strategies and so on for that type of intelligence.
Allow 6-7 minutes for this.
Note the ideas on the board in categories when participants present them to the group after the
activity.
26 Summarise session objectives.
Note that the next session is also on differentiation, so we will be returning to many of these
points and looking at them with the Malaysian context in mind to see how the new curriculum and
syllabus caters for differentiation

Page 53 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 3

Session 2: Reflecting on differentiation strategies in the Scheme of Work lessons

Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Overview for Session 2


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-6 Understand the guidelines on differentiation in the Scheme of Work 1, 2 40 minutes
7-8 Apply strategies for differentiation in lessons planned in Day 3 35 minutes
9-11 Evaluate differentiation strategies in their lesson plans and draft alternative content if necessary 4 15 minutes
90 minutes
1 Show the session objectives and respond to any questions if any. Sessions on differentiation can 1
be demanding to ensure all participants are following the content and respond to their questions.
2-3 Explain that differentiation is specified in the SoW, and therefore the diverse needs of different 5
contexts, schools and pupils across the country are brought to the attention of the teacher for
planning purposes, so that they can plan their lessons to meet the needs of their own pupils.
7 strategies are described in a section at the beginning of the SoW. We will look at these in a
moment
There is also a section that looks at working with pupils who have pre- and low-level literacy
skills. The aim is to support literacy development of these pupils as they move through the
syllabus so that they too can achieve curricular goals.
Individual lessons that are planned or textbook-based suggest strategies for differentiation in a
column in the lesson details.
4 Participants can use one copy of Handout 1 per group for this activity. D3.S2.1 12
Divide the participants into 7 groups. Each group will take one differentiation strategy.
They should read it and discuss the suggestion. Allow 5 minutes for this.
5 A spokesperson from each group should present to the whole group. 15
Ask participants to listen to each one and then to see how these compare to the five strategies
we talked about in the previous session.

Page 54 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Note:
As compared to the previous session, strategy 7 (feedback) is additional. Success criteria is not
included in SoW strategies this is related to learning objectives, which are to be written by the
teacher.

Participants can find the full section in their copy of the Scheme of Work ask them to look for it
now, they will need to refer to it shortly.
6 Ask participants to read the examples of differentiation from the teachers planning. They should D3.S2.2 10
decide which strategy each one is.

Allow 5-6 minutes for this and then check answers:


1 Strategy 6 : Question
2 Strategy 5 : Needs and preferences
3 Strategy 2 : Support
4 Strategy 1 : Task
5 Strategy 3 Outcome
6 Strategy 4 Time
7 Strategy 7 Feedback

Note that the teachers are planning with individual pupils in mind. They have a clear idea about
the different levels and needs of their pupils from observation and monitoring their progress in
learning through the year. As the year progresses we get more and more information on this and
will be able to better differentiate

Page 55 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
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7 Participants are now going to look at the lessons planned yesterday and to work on D3.S2.3 15
differentiation strategies for these.
First, they will need to create a class profile. (see Handout 3) Normally the teacher would have
the information for this profile from their observations and monitoring of pupils as they work in the
classroom. This information comes from the notes and records the teachers make, as we saw
yesterday. As time progresses, this information becomes richer and more accurate for each
class.
For the purposes of this workshop, participants should think about a class profile so that they can
reflect on and design appropriate differentiation strategies.
Give participants 5-6 minutes to work on their class profiles. Use the questions on the slide to
guide them and offer suggestions. It should be realistic and can be based on a class they have
taught previously.
8 Participants work in pairs of same year group teachers. D3.S2.3 20
They choose one (or two if time) of the lessons we looked at yesterday.
For each lesson, they should select appropriate differentiation strategies for their class and
outline the details (similar to the examples in this lesson) in the box on Handout 3
9 When participants have their differentiation strategies ready, the next step is to evaluate them. D3.S2.4 10
Show slide 9 and read through the criteria for evaluation. Elicit more criteria (in the form of
questions) and put them on the board. Ask participants to add them to their criteria on Handout
4.
10 Put participants in (new) pairs. They exchange their differentiation plans, discuss and evaluate 10
each others plans.
They should also discuss any changes that would be needed to the lesson plan or to the
differentiation plan (or both).
Feed back on key points from the activity, including the effectiveness of the criteria
11 Summarise session objectives. 3

Page 56 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Day 3

Session 3: Lessons Planning Workshop


Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Useful vocabulary:

Overview for Session 3


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-11 Understand the principles behind planning a sequence of lessons 1 26 minutes
Understand how to develop language across the four skills in a sequence of lessons
12-13 Practice planning a sequence of lessons (one 5-lesson cycle) 2 64 minutes
90 minutes
1 Outline session objectives and explain that participants will plan a number of lessons during this 2
session in order to track progression and build or prior learning.
2 Explain what is meant by a sequence of lessons definition on slide 2
Explain how lessons are sequenced in the SoW:
A sequence is 5 lessons (although the LA lesson is not always fully connected in the sequence)
4 skills lessons (of each skill: L / S / R / W) + LA lesson.
Main skill focus is determined by textbook for textbook-based lessons, and is in the pattern L-S-
R-W for lessons without textbook.
3 Ask participants to look at the True/False statements on handout 1. First they should think about D3.S3.1 10
their own responses, then discuss them with their group. Give 10 minutes for this task, allowing
the first 5 for individual responses.
4 Feedback on the discussion and go through answers using the slides (4-9). These are the 2
principles for planning a sequence of lessons statements. Discuss with the group.
Questions 1&2:
- Lessons are not free-standing, they are interconnected in many ways. One way is through
theme and topic, another is through language (grammar or structure) and vocabulary, which will
largely be determined by topic.

Page 57 of 98 3.3_Primary_2017
Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
5 Questions 3 and 4 2
We need to recycle language and vocabulary as well as build on it. We can build on it according
to the needs and proficiency level of our class and individual pupils, introducing new vocabulary
and language form as pupils are ready for it. We can gauge this as we monitor progress. Clearly
as we build language and vocabulary we move from simpler language to more complex
language, easier to learn and remember vocabulary to more challenging, as is suitable for our
pupils.
6 Questions 5-7 2
Activities can be repeated if they are successful, but they dont have to be if they are not. When
pupils repeat activities, they can feel more secure as they know what to do. This lets them focus
more on the language they use. Usually we may repeat an activity for a different language or
vocabulary focus. However if you repeat unsuccessful activities or do some too often, pupils may
get bored of them and this can cause them to lose concentration. We should aim to balance
different interaction patterns so pupils have plenty of opportunity to work in different ways and
with different classmates. We should aim to change groups and pairs across a sequence of
lessons so that pupils can gain experience and learn from different people.
We should balance the skills across a sequence of lessons so that pupils get to see and use new
language in different ways and can develop it for different skill areas. The SoW supports this
through the 5-lesson pattern and through the defining of Learning Standards for each lesson.
While we aim to balance skills as much as possible, the needs of the pupils should be taken into
consideration, and there is no need to try to achieve a completely even balance.
7 Question 8 2
A lesson should be linked directly to the previous one in a sequence, but this doesnt need to be
by repeating the final activity. This might be possible, but the key is to remind pupils of the main
learning of the previous lesson so that it can then be reviewed and enriched in this lesson. So
the initial stages of a lesson will review learning from the previous one. You could also ask pupils
what they remember about the previous lesson at the beginning. This will help them develop
memory skills and to think more about their learning. It could be done in L1, perhaps, and
gradually develop pupils language for talking about their learning over time.

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8 Questions 9 and 10 (more on questions 10 on the next slide) 2
There is flexibility in the Learning Outline. In some lessons, mostly in Year 2, there are
suggestions given. These do not need to be followed. Teachers should plan learning for their
pupils based on their needs. Where non-textbook lessons are outlined (in Year 1 and some of
Year 2), these are also suggestions and the plan can be adapted to the needs of individual
classes. However, it should be noted in both cases that the suggestions made in the Learning
Outlines are intended to work within that sequence of lessons. By modifying them, this may
disrupt the sequencing.
As we said before, teachers need to plan to the Learning Standards and Cross-curricular
elements provided in the Scheme of Work. This supports balance of skills and activities across
not only a sequence of lessons but also across the medium and long term, so that all are
covered appropriately within the syllabus by the end of the year. Any changes that are made to
the Learning Outline need to be made with this in mind.
9 Continue questions 10: 2
Our plans should not be fixed in stone. As we monitor pupils working on activities, assess their
progress and reaction to different activities, we might want and need to change our plans slightly.
Teachers, when reflecting on their lesson, may decide that an activity has been successful or
unsuccessful. They may decide therefore to try it again in a different way to improve it and to
improve pupils learning. This can be done within a sequence of lessons or across a longer time
period.
10 Tell participants that they will now have the chance to plan a sequence of lessons in detail. D3.S3.2 3

Run through task on slides before handing out HANDOUT 2, which can serve as a
reminder/guide.

Note SoW overview lets you see clearly what has been taught before and will comes after this
sequence in relation to textbook content. They should refer to this along with Superminds 1 to
identify areas such as language focus, topic and other recent learning
Note that the first sequence of non-textbook lessons in Year 2 (and the whole of Year 1) have
supplied suggested learning outlines, so participants should look at Lesson 16 onwards when

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selecting a sequence to plan. Depending on time and the needs of your group, they could plan a
sequence containing a lesson participants have already planned during this training.
11 Run through details of task and points to remember D3.S3.2 2
Ask participants to use handout 2 and get out the relevant resources. They should work in pairs
or groups of three, preferably with at least one Year 2 teachers in each pair/group to plan a
series of up to four non-textbook lessons (depending on 4). It is recommended that you ask them
to focus on lessons 16 to 19, as these are early on in the SoW and will therefore be useful for
teachers when they come to teach.
12 Participants work on their lesson planning for the remainder of this session. 55
Monitor and help, provide guidance and refer participants to the points to remember list.
Encourage participants to help each other and provide guidance.
13 Leave about 4 minutes at the end to review the session aims and reflect on the progress. 4
Participants may be quite tired by now as that was quite a demanding session, however they are
likely to have enjoyed it more because it was practical.

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Day 3

Session 4: Identifying and adapting learning materials

Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents

Overview for Session 4


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-7 Understand how and when to adapt or supplement the text book 1 25 minutes
8-15 Consider different types of adaptation 2, 3 38 minutes
16 Understand where to source lesson materials 4 5 minutes
17-18 Link learning objectives derived from learning standards and detail outlined in the Scheme of 5 22 minutes
Work to adapted or supplementary materials
90 minutes
1 Run through session objectives 1
2 Start the main part of the session with the question: What are materials? 2
Different materials:
Textbook Superminds 1 Year 1= Introductory unit to Unit 4; Year 2=Unit 5 to Unit 9
Supplementary materials, e.g. stories, videos, songs, websites, also texts or worksheets from
elsewhere, e.g. the internet, Superminds workbook.
Teacher-made materials, e.g. worksheets and other handouts that the teacher makes.

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3 Ask participants to think and discuss in small groups why teachers need change the materials 5
already available or add to materials. Show the slide after they had a short discussion.
Where something is missing (not all lessons have suggested materials or are aligned to the
textbook)
Where there is too much of something (pupils may not need all available materials so
teachers can be selective)
Where something is not suitable (possibly in relation to culture or level of pupils, etc)
This is usually because it doesnt meet the pupils needs:
language level
literacy level
other individual needs (differentiation)
4 Read quote about selecting and adapting materials and elicit key words to check understanding. 1
5 The process of selection and evaluation the first step is the selection of the materials. It may be 2
the textbook material or it may be other material the teacher finds and would like to use.
Then the teacher needs to evaluate it. This is so they can be sure it is the best possible fit - it
may need to be changed in some way for this best fit. Or it may need to be added to or replaced
completely.
6 In the next task, tell participants, they need to look at their copy of SM1, p115 and the Scheme of 5
Work for Lesson 147 (Year 2)
Ask them to look at the page and talk briefly about whether they feel it is suitable for a Malaysian
Year 2 classroom. Note that this is near the end of the book, so the pupils are coming towards
the end of Year 2 (A1 mid).
Gather feedback and note some comments on the board about the areas they were looking at to
evaluate the material (e.g. the level of the vocabulary, the amount of text, the text length, cultural
appropriacy of topic and images, interest, etc)
Explain how we can make a more principled evaluation by using an evaluation check list.
7 Were going to look at how to evaluate materials for our own teaching situation, our own pupils. D3.S4.1 2
How can we do this?

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The best way is to use checklists this is a list of points (criteria) that you look at and tick or
cross, depending if it matches these criteria. Then we can decide whether to use the material or
not, and if we do use it, what we need to chance or add to it so it is most suitable for the pupils.
Show the list of criteria. Elicit some more ideas before handing out Handout 1. Ask participants to
add to the criteria. For example:
Do the lesson learning standards fit the materials? (They should do!)
Is the vocabulary the right level of difficulty?
Is the text length suitable?
Are the tasks suitable?
Are the instructions clear?
Is there enough support?
Are the topics interesting?
Are the topics culturally appropriate?
Are the pictures culturally appropriate?
Do I have suitable resources available (e.g. a computer, colour pens etc)

Note that the focus of the questions is on my pupils


8 Ask participants to get out the class profile they wrote earlier in the training. 10
They should use this to evaluate EITHER p.115 as before or p.19 (Year 1, Lesson 39).
Allow 10 minutes for this.

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9 Why do we need to adapt materials? Go through the points:
Some of the main reasons for adapting are to:
add real choice
cater for learning styles
adjust the level of the material
include more autonomy for the pupils
develop thinking skills
modernise through the use of technology
make the input more enjoyable
differentiation
change pace/ provide variation
include local context
increase pupil to pupil interaction.
10 What do we need to adapt. There are 4 main areas: 2
content
level
process
language
11 Explain that there are five main ways of adapting materials. 2
add
delete
modify
simplify
re-order
12 Participants will go through a task in Handout 2 and label the adaptation strategies based on D3.S4.2 10
their description. Ask participants work individually at the beginning (5 min) and then they can
share and discuss their findings in pairs/small groups.
Answer key:
1= delete
2= simplify

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3= re-order
4=add
5=modify
13 Give out Handout 3 which includes a list of reminders/tips. D3.S4.3 10
Decide on adaptation of p19 (Year 1, Lesson 39).
Collect feedback from the whole group.
14 For non-textbook lessons, teachers may need to find materials. Suggestions are given in many 2
lessons, especially in Year 1, but the teacher can also want to find material that is more suitable
for their own class.
15-16 Run through slides about different sources of materials. D3.S4.4 5
Then hand out handout 4 some links to suitable materials.
17 In the final task, participants will look for some suitable materials for a lesson from the SoW (Year D3.S4.5 20
2- Lessons 116-119, based on p. 103-105).

Go through ensure that section on the slide and run through points on the handout give put
handout 5.

Questions: Do the materials link with the learning objectives? Why? State the evidence. Use the
criteria developed earlier in the session to check the materials.

Explain that this is an area that participants will revisit on Day 4 when creating their own
materials (session 1).

Allow question and answer and get participants to go around the tables and discuss.

18 At the end of the session, thank participants and summarise the objectives of the session. 1
Review, too, the focus of the day and remind participants of the four sessions.

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Day 4

Session 1: Designing Materials for Pupil-centred Learning


Materials: Stationery, laptop + printer if possible

Useful vocabulary:

Overview for Session 1


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-7 Understand the principles of materials design within the Malaysia context 1 33 minutes
8-10 Apply the principles of materials design to create age-appropriate materials for a sequence of 42 minutes
lessons
11-12 Discuss recycling and sustaining learning materials 15 minutes
90 minutes
0-1 Welcome participants to Day 3 of the training. 1
Ask them to recall what was covered in the last three days. Go through the session objectives.
2 Remind participants of yesterdays session that looked at selecting and adapting materials. 7
When we were evaluating materials, we did this based on our understanding of how materials
should be for our pupils. This means we had in mind various principles. In this session were
going to look at designing materials that is making our own materials.
First, in pairs, participants review their notes and try to write three or four principles of materials
design. Allow 5-6 minutes for this, or less time if participants are not making progress.
3 Show participants the list of areas. Ask them to return to their brainstorming give another 5 5
minutes
No slide Ask participants to join another pair to make a group of four and share their ideas. 5
Divide the board into columns, one for each area.
Ask participants to come and write one principle on the board per group.
No slide Ask participants to match the principles with the statements. D4.S1.1 5
Answer key:
1. It should be differentiated where possible and appropriate C

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2. They should include a range of activity type to suit different pupils A
3. They should make good use of images and colour (if possible) P
4. Pupils should be active in learning A
5. They should develop thinking skills and learning skills A
6. They should be consistent (always the same/very similar) I
7. The topic should be as educational as possible and appropriate C
8. They should include examples I
9. The language and vocabulary practised or presented should match the Scheme of Work - C
10. The materials should be attractive P
11. There should be a limited amount on each page P
12. They should be short and clear, without difficult vocabulary I
4-7 Compare the list on the board and the ideas in the task with those on the slides. Are there 10
additional points to the ones on the handout? Which ones have participants applied in their
previous experience? Which ones are new? Check if there are any questions.
8 Remind participants that teachers sometimes need to make their own materials when: 2
- they want to adapt or supplement the textbook (following evaluation)
- they want to adapt or replace suggestions made in the SoW (following evaluation)
- there are no materials suggested in the SoW.
9 Task going to design materials for: 40

Day 2, Session 2 Language Arts lesson


Day 3, Session 3 Sequence of non-textbook lessons

Note this can be done on paper or on computer then perhaps could be printed out. Depending
on the time and the resources available, you could ask for fully developed materials or
participants could just make drafts or outlines.

Note that the materials are designed for the class that the participants wrote the profile for. If
necessary remind participants to keep differentiation in mind.

Need computer (+printer) if possible OR paper, pens, pencils, rulers, etc.

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10 Ask participants to join with others to show and look at each others materials. They should give 10
peer feedback in the four areas on the slide
11 To save time and resources, its a good idea to keep materials when we can, especially as many 12
teachers teach the same year group more than once. This may not always be possible, but some
points to bear in mind are:
- The materials need to be durable, that is you need to produce them so that they dont get
damaged easily when pupils use them or you store them. Often you can laminate them (put a
plastic covering on them), or use cards instead of paper when you make something.
- Ask pupils not to mark the materials and take care of them when you put them on the wall using
pins etc. Keep them tidy and organised as you use them in the classroom.
- You may have somewhere to keep materials in your classroom, like a cupboard or little
drawers. Or this maybe in the teachers room or at your home. Decide if you want pupils to be
able to access and use them regularly or if you want to keep them carefully and neatly organised
for use next year. Store them safely somewhere appropriate.
You may save materials on your computer. Make sure they are organised into folders and that
you keep a back-up of them.
- Sharing materials is an excellent way to help your colleagues and to be helped by them. It also
lets us get new ideas and see how other teachers work in their classrooms. We can do this by
using shared drives, file sharing sites and so on, or we can do this using physical, printed
materials.
- When we re-use materials either ones we have made or ones another teacher made and
shared we need to think about our own pupils before we use them. Even if they are your
materials you used last year, they may not be suitable for this years class for any number of
reasons perhaps their progression in language is different, or in thinking skills, interactional
skills, so they may be too difficult or not challenging enough; perhaps the materials are not
interesting to these different pupils and so on. Similarly, your class will be different to your
colleagues class of the same year group at the same time. So we need to evaluate these
materials before we reuse them in the same was as we evaluate other materials we use.
12 Reflect on materials design and adaptation. What went well, and what can be done better? 3

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Day 4

Session 2: Evaluating and Reflecting on Lessons Planned in Day 3


Materials Stationery and all curriculum documents

Useful vocabulary:

Overview for Session 2


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-4 Create a simple checklist to ensure all aspects of active and inclusive lesson planning are 1 30 minutes
present in their own lesson plans
5-8 Evaluate whether the activities are inclusive and support both high achieving pupils and those 2 60 minutes
requiring further support
Evaluate whether the activities and resources in each lesson plan meet the stated learning
objectives and suggest alternative content
Evaluate whether the sequence of lessons demonstrates building on previous learning and
suggest alternative content.
90 minutes
1 Outline session objectives 1
2 Check participants understanding of the terms active and inclusive 9
Animated
Active pupils take an active role in their learning. This requires them to participate in activities,
to practise language and skills and, above all, to be engaged in thinking and learning processes.
In this way, pupils build their own understanding, the classroom is pupil- and learning-centred. A
passive pupil, on the other hand, does not participate in the learning process. The focus is on the
teacher teaching and the pupil absorbing, rather than making an effort to learn. The classroom
is teacher-centred.

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inclusive means that all pupils have an opportunity to learn, regardless of their proficiency level,
their learning preferences, their personality, background and other differences they may have.
This is largely achieved through differentiation. With mixed level classes, it is always important to
plan for more and less proficient pupils to ensure that all pupils have the chance to learn, be
active and develop their language skills.

Note that you may want to review the key points related to the CEFR here, with a focus on:
- action-oriented learning
- inclusion
- pupil-centredness
- contextualisation
- purposeful language use in interaction

[click]
Ask participants to brainstorm some questions we can ask ourselves when evaluating our
planning to check whether the plan is inclusive and our pupils will be active. Give participants 3-4
minutes for this, then collect some ideas. Write them on the board. Note: these will be included in
the evaluation checklist to be developed.

Suggestions:
- Are the strategies for differentiation appropriate and realistic? (i.e. will these work in the
classroom?) [inclusive]
- Do the strategies for differentiation allow all pupils to be involved, regardless of their proficiency
level, preferred way of learning, interests and so on? (i.e. are there various strategies?)
[inclusive]
- Is there plenty of opportunity for all pupils to be involved in an activity where they produce
(practice) language? [active]
- Do pupils have the opportunity to think for themselves about the language, their learning or the
content? [active]
- Are there opportunities for development of thinking skills? [active]

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3 Tell participants we will now think about more factors we need to plan when we plan our lessons, D4.S2.1 10
for example, we need to plan for inclusive and active learning, we need to plan timing of the
activities, we need to write clear and relevant learning objectives and so on.
Ask participants to look at handout 1and brainstorm ideas to put on the mind map in pairs or
small groups. Allow 5-6 minutes for this. Feed back on their ideas and build a mind map on the
board.
Suggestions (in addition to the examples on the HANDOUT 1)
- Timing
- learning objectives (clear and derived from Learning Standards)
- cross curricular element
- Development of the language and skills identified in the SoW
- Lesson staging (sequence of activities)
- Pre- and post-lesson tasks
- Materials
- Resources
- Lesson fit into sequence of lessons
- Development of language and skills across sequence of lessons
4 Next, these factors will be turned into questions that become evaluation criteria. D4.S2.2 10
Hand out HANDOUT 2 and ask participants to look at the first two questions. These form the first
two criteria for evaluating lesson plans. Work through an example from the mind map on the
board to show participants how to turn these into questions for evaluation.
Ask participants to work in their pair/small group to write questions in the evaluation grid.

Suggestions (in addition to the examples on the handout 2)


- Is timing realistic?
- Do the learning objectives match the Learning Standards?
- Are the objectives clearly written (are they achievable, measurable, observable)?
- Do the activities and resources in the lesson work towards the learning objectives?
- Is the specified cross curricular element taken into account in the lesson?
- Is there development of the language and skills identified in the SoW in the lesson?
- Is the lesson staged appropriately?

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- Are the pre- and post-lesson tasks suitable?
- Are materials suitable?
- Are all the resources needed identified?
- Does the lesson fit into the sequence of lessons?
- Does the lesson build on previous learning (from other lessons)?
5 Next, participants will evaluate a sequence of lessons developed yesterday. D4.S2.2 30
Depending on your group, they can either evaluate their own sequence of lessons or they can
evaluate a different pair/groups sequence of lessons. It is better for participants to evaluate
another pair/groups as they will be able to gain an insight into someone elses lesson planning
ideas and also see more examples of planned lessons, but if you think this is not appropriate
with your group, then they can evaluate their own.
They will need their plans for the sequence of lessons developed yesterday, their evaluation
sheet (handout 2 + 3 more see handout 3), a copy of the relevant SoW, the relevant SoW
overview & Superminds 1.
Allow plenty of time for this evaluation e.g. 30 minutes
Note that participants should use the evaluation checklist for the evaluation. They should include
as many comments as possible, making sure they are constructive. Where something could be
changed, participants should suggest a change. A separate sheet/note books can be used if
necessary
6 After the evaluation is complete, ask participants to feed back to each other. 20
Part of the feedback should include making suggestions for changes to the lesson plan.
Participants then work on amending their lesson plans accordingly.
7 Feed back on the evaluation process: 8
First ask participants about the kinds of changes they made to their lesson plans. Comment on
these as appropriate.
Next, in small groups, participants discuss the evaluation and what they learned from the
process. This can then be an open discussion.
8 Review session objectives. 2

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Day 4

Session 3: Delivering Effective Individualised Feedback


Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents, stamps or reward stickers

Useful vocabulary:

Overview for Session 3


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-8 Evaluate the pupils achievement of intended learning 1 29 minutes
9-22 Provide positive, friendly and age-appropriate feedback as part teaching and learning routine 2, 3, 4, 5 61 minutes
Provide constructive learning-centred feedback tuned to individual need
90 minutes
1 Welcome participant after lunch and go over the session aims. 1
2 Most teachers evaluate pupils achievement of learning objectives as part of their normal, routine 5
classroom practice. Teachers do this in order to monitor progress against learning objectives
and, therefore, curriculum learning standards, as we saw on Day 2.
They do this in different ways:
- monitoring that is by moving around the classroom to observe pupils
- checking answers we check answers to activities in different ways
- collecting in and checking written work or homework we may collect pupils work so we can
spend time reviewing their achievement
Next, were going to look at each of these in more detail
3 Tell participants they will do an activity where they are asked to read some sentences about D4.S3.1 6
evaluating achievement in these three ways. They should decide which way each sentence is
talking about and write M for Monitoring, CA for checking answers and CW for collecting work.
Ask them to do this individually.
Dont check the answers to these yet. Once participants have finished the activity, ask them to
listen while you talk about the three ways and to check their own answers as you go along.
4 Monitoring: 3

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Monitoring has many benefits that all help pupils achieve the learning objectives, and it can be
done at different points in a lesson for different purposes. For example when pupils start an
activity, the teacher can monitor quickly to check they have all understood what to do and have
been able to begin the activity. If not, teachers can help individuals, or they can stop all the pupils
and re-instruct.
Monitoring also helps the teacher to check progress through an activity, to know which pupils
have finished and should move on to something new, and which pupils will need a little longer or
more support. The teacher can then decide when to finish an activity.
In a pupil-centred classroom, there is often a lot of noise as pupils talk to each other and enjoy
other speaking activities. Noise from this is good noise, but there can also be noise from pupils
who are not working on the task and whose behaviour needs to be checked. By monitoring we
can allow god noise and prevent other noise. Pupils also often concentrate better and speak
more English when they know the teacher can hear them.
As a teacher monitors, they can help individual pupils by giving support, asking questions and
giving constructive feedback. Feedback can be done quietly and can be on an individual basis,
so pupils each get the help they personally need with their language or other areas. They can
see which pupils are progressing well and need more challenge, and which pupils need more
support to reach the learning objectives and learning standards.
5 Checking answers 3

Checking answers is an important stage in any activity so that pupils can gauge their own
progress, recognise and understand their own mistakes. As such, its not just about giving the
pupils the answers or marking their work as correct or incorrect. There are different ways we can
check answers so that pupils can learn to self-assess.

- We may elicit answers with the whole class. This means that we ask the class who can give the
correct answer. Make sure to note the answers on the board, so that you know all pupils are
following this step and know what the answer should be. Its a good idea to ask why something is
wrong/right, if appropriate, as this will help pupils think more deeply about language and their
own language development even if they may not know they are doing this, at this age in
particular.

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- Sometimes we want to involve pupils directly and can nominate them to give an answer. We
can help a pupil with lower proficiency by asking them to give the answer to a question to the
whole class, so a teacher can ask these pupils to tell them a particular answer, making sure that
this is one they have got right (through monitoring, of course). We may want to involve other
pupils for other reasons, perhaps we can nominate shy or quieter pupils who dont often put up
their hands.

- Think-Pair-Share is a model where we ask pupils to work individually first, then to share their
answers with a partner before sharing them with the whole class. This lets pupils develop
confidence as it provides more security even at a young age pupils may be afraid of making
mistakes, getting the wrong answer in front of the class.

- Sometimes, pupils can check each others answers. With younger primary pupils, this will work
well with something that is easy to check and has a clear right or wrong answer. It is good to get
pupils used to peer assessment from a young age. The same is true for pupils checking their
own answers.

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6 Teachers sometimes collect pupils work and take it away to mark. This might be work pupils 3
have done in class or at home. Usually with this age group, there is minimal homework, if at all.
First, well think about the difference between marking, grading and correcting. Questions we will
ask later in this session are about what and how to mark pupils work.
Grading = we give a grade for pupils work, such as A, B or maybe a percentage. This is often a
way to mark older pupils work, as these values might (hopefully) make sense to them, or it can
be found in an end of year report or exam perhaps. So, this is not an appropriate technique for
class and home work.
Correcting = when we mark mistakes and errors on pupils work and change it so that it is
correct. It can be useful for pupils to see the correct form of something, but there is usually very
little chance that pupils will learn a correct form in this way, if they do indeed really look at the
correction.
Marking = It is much more beneficial to have pupils engage with their mistakes and to try to
correct them for themselves. This makes them more active in their learning and, therefore, more
like to remember the correct form. We can do this by marking pupils work, as we will see a bit
later in this session.
We can then return the work to the pupils so that they can try to correct their own mistakes. After
that, we can collect the work back in from them and review it. This will tell us much more about
what a pupil is capable of with the support of a teacher. If we point out a mistake and the pupil
can correct it themselves, then we know that that form is within the pupils understanding. If they
cant, then we know we need to review and reteach for, at least, that pupil.
Other work see next slide
7 We can collect in and evaluate all sorts of other work, by taking photos, recording audio or even 3
videos of pupils, if appropriate. We can have pupils keep their work together in files or develop a
portfolio of their work. We can evaluate classroom displays pupils have made and other arts and
craft products. Lastly, depending on the context, we might be able to have pupils store and
present their work digitally on a class website, file share or simply on the computer in the
classroom.

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Now you are going to check the answers to the task in Handout 1. D4.S3.1 5
First ask participants to check quickly with their partner. Then use eliciting and nominating to
check the answers with the whole group. Make sure to write them on the board.
Key:
1. We can give pupils feedback that is personal to their individual language needs. (M/CW)
2. We can nominate pupils (ask a particular pupil to speak) to give their answers. (CA,
arguably M)
3. We can have pupils share their answers with a partner before sharing with the whole
class. (CA)
4. We need to give the pupils the correct answers. (CA)
5. We can check pupils understand what to do. (M)
6. We can check pupils work in several different ways, such as with photos or recordings.
(CW, arguably M)
7. We can monitor progress of quieter, shier or lower proficiency pupils. (All)
8. We can help and support individual pupils to help them achieve a learning objective or
learning standard. (M, CW)
Accept alternative answers if appropriate.

8 This section starts with a discussion task. Ask participants to spend two minutes with their 6
Animated neighbours thinking of different ways to finish the sentence: Feedback helps pupils to
Conduct feedback and get ideas from participants. Some ideas to include:
Feedback helps pupils to feel more motivated about English.
Feedback helps pupils to improve their language skills.
Feedback helps pupils to understand they can learn from their mistakes.
Feedback helps pupils to understand what is good behaviour (and to then behave well)
Feedback helps pupils to develop the skills they need to be independent.
[cick]
Repeat for: Teachers can give pupils feedback on
Suggested answers:
- their use and development of language

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
- their use and development of skills
- content & ideas
- behaviour

9 Explain that in order for feedback to be helpful in these ways, it is important that it is: 4
Positive we should focus on what pupils do and not what they dont do. We can express
feedback in a positive way, without saying pupils did something badly or wrong. We should also
try to balance feedback, so even if there is little positive to say, we find something positive before
giving feedback on what didnt go so well/could have been a bit better (i.e. not what went badly!).
However, pupils do need to know and understand what they do well as much as what they dont
do well.
Friendly to maintain pupils motivation, their trust in you and their sense of security in the
classroom, we need to be friendly when giving feedback. It can be done with a smile, in a kind
voice and by continually showing that we learn by making mistakes (and getting feedback). This
will encourage pupils to take risks, to try out something new or a bit difficult without fear of
criticism.
Age appropriate We need to think about what young primary pupils can and cant do well at
their age. Young primary pupils often find it difficult to share or to work with a partner, they find
reading and writing difficult and so on we can praise them for doing these things well, and
avoid criticising them for not being successful in something that is challenging developmentally.
Also, the feedback we give should be clear, short and include pictures, like little smiley faces.
Many teachers use stamps or stickers to put on pupils work.
Constructive this kind of feedback will explain the mistake and/or what the pupil can do to
improve. Unconstructive feedback may be where we say simply No, thats wrong. But the pupil
may well ask, What is wrong? How can I make it right? The same is true for praise it is
important to explain what the pupil has done well, too, so that they can continue to do this. As
such, it is important that we avoid saying well done when something is not done well. This is a
common problem and it causes the pupil to think they are doing something right when in fact
they are not, so they will not improve or develop.

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10 Tell participants they are going to see what some teachers say about giving feedback to their D4.S3.2 10
pupils as a normal part of their classroom teaching.
Give Handout 2 and ask participants to read the teachers comments, then look at the three
sentences below each one. They should say if the sentences are True or False.
Give participants 5 minutes to do this individually first, then ask them to share and discuss their
answers with their neighbour. Allow a further 5 minutes for the discussion.

11 Run through the slides as you discuss the answers with the whole group. 2
Teacher 1:
A: F the teacher was telling them they had done well
B: F - We dont always have to give feedback on content, but it is valuable feedback and we
should try to do this as well. The teacher asked pupils to draw a funny monster, so feedback
should be about the monster, it should match the aims of the activity.
C: F - This teacher uses stamps on pupils work that show the pupil how well they have done.
The teacher also gives comments. We can use stickers for this purpose too. It is best to avoid
reward systems in the classroom as this creates unhealthy competition it is more important that
pupils learn to focus on their own strengths and weaknesses, rather than how many stickers they
have compared to their friends. These kinds of rewards can also demotivate lower proficiency
pupils and cause problems with groupings in the classroom.

12 Teacher 2 1
A: True. Note that the teacher didnt criticise the pupils or tell them they hadnt done it well. The
teacher offered constructive feedback instead
B: F (see C)
C: F This teacher is providing constructive feedback. The teacher avoids criticising the pupils
work or saying they havent done it very well. Instead of telling them what to write, the teacher
offers constructive feedback to help them think for themselves about how to improve the poster

13 Teacher 3. 1
A: T

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B: F - This teacher makes sure to give feedback to all pupils, and this includes those with high
and low proficiency levels as well as the majority who are in-between. The feedback is
individualised.
C: T - This teacher is giving feedback on skills in this example.

14 Teacher 4. 2
A: F - The teacher conducted whole class feedback. He/she didnt interrupt pupils while they
were speaking or say who had made the mistake. This way all pupils benefit from the feedback
and the teacher can save time by just giving the feedback once.
B: F - The teacher noted common mistakes those that a lot of pupils made and corrected
those with the whole class. The teacher probably focused on mistakes in the language or vocab
that was the focus of the lesson, too. This can be for any kind of activity, speaking, writing,
reading or listening.
C: T- The teacher observes and takes notes about pupils progress as well as writing down
mistakes they make for feedback afterwards

15 Teacher 5. 2
A: T. However, the teacher first tells pupils when they are not doing something well, then makes
sure to comment when they change that behaviour and begin to do something better.
B: F The teacher offers constructive feedback on pupils behaviour. The teacher doesnt tell
them off or say they are naughty, he or she explains what is wrong with their behaviour and tells
them how to change it.
C: F - This teacher give constructive feedback about behavior, probably as well as about
language and skills.

16 Teacher 6. 1
A: F - The teacher is telling pupils they did something well, better than usual
B: F - The teacher thinks we should only praise pupils when they do something well. This helps
them understand what they do well and to know when they dont do so well without being told.
C: F - The teacher doesnt need to be negative, as pupils know that they get praise when they do
something well.

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17 Teacher 7. 1
A: F The teacher marks the work, but does not correct the mistakes or the pupils. The teacher
shows pupils where the mistakes are and then the pupils correct it for themselves.
B: F The teacher has special pens for marking. You dont need special pens, but it is best to
avoid using a red pen as this is an angry colour, one teachers traditionally use to tell pupils they
are wrong, so it can have a negative impact. Try using green instead if you dont have special
pens.
C: F The teacher focusses on mistakes pupils have made in the language they are currently
learning or have already learned. It is not fair to ask pupils to correct a mistake that they dont
understand because it is more advanced than their level this is known as an error.

18 Teacher 8 1
A: T
B: F - The teacher makes sure the pupil knows what it is they did well. This will help them know
where their strengths are.
C: F- The teacher sometimes uses L1. It is good to use as much English as possible in the
classroom, but many of our pupils are not proficient enough to understand feedback like this. As
it is important for them to understand the feedback, we can use L1 sometimes. Its a good idea to
use English as well and then to translate, maybe, so that they hear the English too.

19 Tell participants they are going to work on a summary of the key points we have made so far. D4.S3.3 14
Animated Give out Handout 3 and ask participants to complete the summary points by putting a word in
each gap. Give 10 minutes for this activity. Participants work in pairs.

If necessary, you can show the participants the words on Slide 22 to help them with this task

Answer key:
1. We can give feedback on pupils language, skills and behavior. We can focus on their
progress and effort, as well as their achievement.
2. Feedback should match the aims of the activity.
3. It is important to give feedback to all (of) our pupils based on their individual efforts.

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4. Teachers should give feedback to pupils about what they do well and about how they can
improve.
5. Feedback should be positive so it motivates pupils and focusses on success, not failure.
6. Constructive feedback can help pupils see where their mistakes were and how they can
fix them so that they can improve.
7. Constructive feedback is also telling pupils exactly what they did well, not just saying
Good! / Well done!
8. It is important to praise pupils when they do something well, but we should avoid saying
well done when something isnt well done.
9. It is a good idea to tell pupils when they are behaving badly and to tell them how they
should be behaving and why. This is better than telling them off or punishing them for bad
behavior.
10. Teachers can give feedback to individuals, pairs, groups and to the whole class.
Note that this stage could be removed and/or set as review after the session.

20 Tell participants they are going to get the chance to practice giving feedback. D4.S3.4 10
In the first of these tasks, participants will look at a pupils answers to a class activity. They
should discuss the feedback theyd give the pupil when theyd give it (in class, while
monitoring, having collected the work in, for example), whether its written or oral feedback, what
kind of comments theyd give and so on
Gather some ideas from participants and discuss them as a whole group, commenting on their
ideas are they positive, friendly, age-appropriate and friendly?
21 In the next practice activity, participants will do a role play of a teacher and pupils in the D4.S3.5 15
Animated classroom. They should work in groups of four or five. In the group, they should first decide who
the teacher is. The other participants are pupils they should decide which number pupil (1-4)
each person will be. Some can be doubled if you have a larger group, some taken out if you
have a smaller group (any one is fine)

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When participants have decided on their roles, give out the handout and ask participants to read
the situation and the roles.
Ask groups to do the role play as instructed.
[click]
After the role play they should discuss the feedback the teacher gave. They can look at handout
3 to see where to focus.
Feed back on key points from this activity as a whole group
22 Review session objectives. 1

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Day 4

Session 4: Working with Pupils in the Classroom

Materials: Stationery and all curriculum documents, set of cards or items (colours/animals/food, etc) prepare 6-8 items in the set, sticky
notes (post-it notes) at least three per small group. Note that Handout 1 needs to be cut up before the session.

Overview for Session 4


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-3 Develop strategies for setting up classroom activities 1, 2 30 minutes
4 Consider different classroom interaction patterns 3 15 minutes
5-9 Discuss common classroom management problems in the Malaysia context 4 45 minutes
Develop a repertoire of strategies for behaviour management
90 minutes
1 Run through session objectives. 1
2 You will need to prepare a set of cut up steps (see handout 1) for each group for this activity. D4.S4.1 12
Make sure to follow this model when setting up this activity: (cut up)
1. Tell participants they are going to do an activity.
2. Tell participants it is a group activity.
3. Tell participants they will have stages written on papers (show them a set), that they will order
according to the steps in setting up a classroom activity. They will have 10 minutes for this.
4. Ask some participants to come to the front and show them what to do.
5. They should model the beginning of the activity by discussing the first step.
6. Thank participants and ask some questions to check understanding:
- will you work in groups or pairs?
- You are going to order the steps. What kinds of steps are they?
- What language are you going to speak?
- How many minutes do you have for this task?
7. Assign small groups (3-4 participants). You can use a new strategy for this, for example by
asking participants to choose a card/item from a set. Use as many items in the set as you need

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so that there are groups of three or four. They then form a group based on the item they chose
(e.g. All the participants who chose cats work together)
8. Hand out the strips to each group. Remind groups they have 10 minutes and tell them to start.
9. Monitor and check they are all on task.
Check the answers as a whole group. Note that you set up the activity using steps in this order. 3
1. Get pupils attention and tell them you are going to do a new activity.
2. Tell pupils what kind of activity they are going to do (e.g. a speaking activity or a group
activity).
3. Give short, clear instructions for the activity.
4. Nominate one or more pupils to help you model the activity.
5. Have pupils model the activity.
6. Ask questions to pupils to check they know what to do.
7. Put pupils in pairs or groups.
8. Remind pupils of the time limit and start the activity.
9. Monitor to make sure all the pupils know what to do.
3 In this next activity, participants will read some advice on setting up activities and say what area D4.S4.2 14
it is about. The areas are on the slide.
Use the basic steps from the previous activity to set up this activity too. Participants work alone
then check answers in pairs and discuss the points. Allow 5-6 minutes for this activity, then
feedback:
1. Never start instructing until you have all pupils full attention. (A, D).
2. Never start an activity until you are sure all pupils know what to do. (E, B) It is easier to check
instructions than to have to stop pupils and reinstruct once you have started.
3. It is better to give instructions before handing out material (A). Pupils will fiddle with materials
and may not pay attention to your instructions. Sometimes, though, they may need to see the
materials in order to understand the instructions.
4. Use closed questions (that require a one-word answer). (B) These are easy to understand and
to answer clearly
5. Always show as well as tell pupils what to do. (A, C) Pupils will understand more from seeing it
done than from listening to verbal instructions

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6. You can use the board, large versions of a worksheet or a copy of the textbook page to do
this. (C)
7. You could ask a more proficient pupil to explain complicated instructions in L1. (B)
8. Involve pupils who might not pay attention by asking them to help instruct, model or answer
questions about instructions. (D, C, B) This keeps them active and involved and not disturbing
others
9. For a more complex activity, break it up and stage instructions. (A) Pupils wont remember
long complicated instructions
10. You can ask pupils to get up and move so they can stand around a group while they model
the activity. (C) Make sure that all pupils can see the demonstration clearly
11. Avoid asking Do you understand? (B) A pupils answer to this question doesnt tell you
anything maybe they say yes they think they understand but they dont; or they just want to
start the activity or want to tell you what they think you want to hear. If they answer no then you
dont know which part of it they dont understand.
12. Nominate more proficient, confident pupils. (B, C)
Ask participants if they have any more tips for setting up activities.
4 Start this section by explaining that we have many different interaction patterns in the language 2
Animated classroom, that is different people talking and working in different ways.
Elicit from participants the meaning of the following:
T= Teacher
P = Pupil
So
P = Individual work
PP = 2 pupils = pair work
Ps = Many pupils = group work
T-P(s) = Teacher is talking to pupil or pupils
P(s)-T = Pupil or pupils talk to the teacher
T-P(s)-T = Teacher and pupil(s) have an interaction/conversation

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4 Ideally in a lesson, there is a balance between the different interaction patterns across the D4.S4.3 13
Animated different activities in the lesson. However there may be a different balance in different skills, for
(cont.) example there may be more P in a writing lesson than a speaking lesson. Ideally, there is a little
of everything in all lessons, with as little T or T-P as possible though so that there is plenty of
active practice and learning and less teacher-talking-time.
[click]
Ask participants to look at the lesson delivery for Year 1, Lesson 24 (Writing 5) on handout 3.
They should read the lesson delivery and identify the interaction pattern at each stage. Note that
this is not always entirely clear cut and there may be some discussion. They may need to look at
the Scheme of Work for this lesson to get a clear picture of the procedure for this lesson.
Feed back:
Pre-lesson: T-P-T
1. PP or Ps
2. P
3. T-P-T
4. PP
5. T, T-P-T (PP)
6. P or PP (NB when we look at balance in this lesson, it seems that this would be best done
individually. It depends on the individual pupils needs in the class, though)
7. PP
8. T-P-T
5 The last section of this session looks at behaviour management in the classroom. 10
First, participants will brainstorm ideas about common problems teachers have with classroom
management in Malaysian Year 1 and 2 classrooms.
Ask participants to work in groups of 3 or 4 to share their ideas. Give out three sticky notes
(Post-it Notes) to each group. They should write one idea on each note.
Allow 6-7 minutes for this task then ask participants to stick the notes on the board. Tell them
youll come back to the ideas a little later.

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6 Next participants will look at some key points to bear in mind when we think about behaviour 2
management. These points will be in ten different areas see slide for 10 areas. You dont need
to explain these in detail now, but may need to explain some vocabulary.
7 Participants will now do an activity. They look at the sentences (on HANDOUT 4) and decide D4.S4.4 20
Animated which area the sentence relates to. There are two versions of the handout, A and B, each has
five different areas and 12 sentences to match. Assign groups evenly as A and B groups and
distribute the appropriate handout.
Give participants 10 minutes for this task.

[click]

After 10 minutes, re-group participants so that new groups have at least one person from a group
A and at least one from Group B. They should show and talk about the sentences and their
answers.
Matching sentences to key word two groups and regroups. Allow a further 10 minutes for this.

Answer key:
Note that some of these could arguably fall into a different/more than one category.

Answers to Set A:
1. Pupils feel confident and safe in the classroom when they know what will happen and what
they need to do. [A Routines]
2. An aggressive teacher will not win the respect of the pupils, they will be afraid and lack
confidence. [D Teacher personality]
3. We can assign roles to pupils, such as handing out materials, collecting in papers, checking to
see who is there. [B Pupil responsibility]
4. Sometimes pupils dont realise they are doing something wrong; they may not have
understood they need to open their book or make a pair, for example. [E Pupils reasons]
5. It is important to report good behaviour to parents, as well as problems. [C Parents & School]

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6. If a pupils behaviour is dangerous or the teacher thinks the pupil may be suffering from a
serious personal or family problem, then the school should become involved. [C Parents &
Schools]
7. An assertive teacher has a presence in the classroom. They are active and more likely to have
pupils attention. [D Teacher personality]
8. Pupils can focus on learning when they dont need to think about procedure. [A Routines]
9. Pupils are likely not to listen to a shy, passive or nervous teacher. A teacher needs to have
confidence in their actions. [D Teacher personality]
10. We can allow all pupils to have a job to do or can have a rota system so that all pupils are
involved, not just well-behaved ones. [B Pupil responsibility]
11. We should always try to find out the cause of misbehaviour before deciding how to deal with
it. [E pupils reasons]
12. When pupils do the same thing at the same point every lesson, or often do similar activities
then it saves time in setting up activities and leaves less room for confusion. [A Routines]

Answers to Set B:
1. We can get and keep pupils interest by planning for lots of short activities that involve pupils
actively in their learning. [B Motivation]
2. Pupils who are punished will start to know themselves as naughty, so they will continue to
behave badly. [C Rewards & Punishment]
3. We can involve pupils in setting up classroom rules at the beginning of the year. These can be
made into a poster and put in the classroom so you can all see them when you need them. [A
Rules and expectations]
4. A teacher needs to be consistent with their expectations and with the way they deal with
different behaviour. [D Teacher action]
5. Positive reinforcement of good behaviour is more effective than negative reinforcement of bad
behaviour. [C Rewards & Punishment]
6. We shouldnt normally take or put a pupil out of the classroom where they do not have a
chance to be involved in learning. [E Inclusion]

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7. The teacher can use their voice to manage pupils, but shouting shows you are angry and only
raises the noise level in the classroom. Speaking extra quietly can be more effective. [D Teacher
action]
8. Pupils need to know how you want them to behave, what they can and cant do. They may
have other teachers who have different expectations, so they need to learn and remember yours.
[A Rules and Expectations]
9. Praise pupils for doing something well and for behaving well. This is often a suitable reward.
[C Rewards and punishment]
10. Being consistent also means we should treat all pupils the same. We need to include all
pupils in our behaviour management and need to be fair. [D Teacher action]
11. When teachers use too many points or rewards, then many pupils will become more
interested in winning than in learning, less proficient pupils become demotivated. [C Rewards
and punishment]
12. A teacher should never react physically to a pupil who is misbehaving. This is not acceptable
and will only create fear and demotivation. [D Teacher Action]

8 Well now return to the discussion of behaviour management in Malaysian classrooms. 10


Return to the sticky notes on the board. Select a number to discuss as a whole group, depending
on the time you have available and how previous discussions have turned out.
You could, perhaps, write the categories on the board and ask the participants to group the post-
it notes into those categories.
9 Summarise session objectives 3

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Day 5

Session 1: Review of training course sessions

Materials marker pens, pens, flip chart paper, projector/laptops, blue tack (to hang flip chart paper on the walls)

Overview for Session 1


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
1-3 Review key points from all training sessions 90
Communicate key messages
90 minutes
1 Go through the session objectives 1
Ask participants if they can remember the focus of each session during the course. Feedback. 2
2 Put participants in groups of 4 or 5. Tell them they are going to produce a poster summarising 5
the main points from the course. Give each group some flipchart paper.
Groups decide how they will design their poster. Encourage them to look through all the 55
materials to identify the main points. Give groups time to produce the posters. Monitor and pick
up on any questions or clarifications needed.
Once the posters are ready, put them on the walls around the room (if possible). 20
Ask one participant from each group to stay with their poster, so that they can explain it.
Other participants circulate around the room, read each others posters and listen to the
explanation.
If there is time, the person who had been explaining the poster should change places with
another participant from their group, so that they can also see all the posters.
Finish the session with some general feedback, picking up on key themes represented and 6
highlighting any key points that have not been included.
3 Remind participants of the session objectives. 1

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Day 5

Session 2: Planning micro-teaching sessions

Materials: Marker pens, pens/pencils, flip chart paper, lesson plans, teaching resources (according to teaching activities),
projector/laptops, blue tack (to hang flip chart paper on the walls)

Overview for Session 2


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Slides 1-4 Organise planning and responsibilities during the micro-sessions 1 20
Slides 5 Prepare teaching activities for the micro-sessions 2 40
Slides 6 Rehearse before delivery 1,2 30
90 minutes
Slide 1 Show the aims of the session. Explain that this session is for planning to deliver a short session 5 minutes
in a classroom environment and that the rest of the participants will act as teachers/pupils during
the demonstration. This will help maximise the benefit for the presenters and emphasises good
practice for the observers to help them think about how teaching practice can be improved or
what pupils have learned from the session or still need.

Make sure to create the link between this practice and the cascade. Explain that, for Master
Trainers, delivering a micro-session will be a demonstration that they can model good teaching
practice to the teachers later during the cascade. It will also be a good experience which will
assist them in evaluating the teachers micro-teaching sessions.
Slide 2, 3 Managing the session: 10 minutes
Split participants into groups of 8 (or 9 for the third group). Ask the participants to move to
different areas of the room where they are going to deliver their sessions. Participants may
have to move the furniture around the room. If space is an issue, ask the participants to be
considerate and speak softly during their presentations and feedback. (2 minutes)
Ask the participants to give their group a name, make a note of the groups names.
Groups may have to change their positions in the room if they have to alternate using the
projector. Ensure they swap quickly.

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Each micro-session is for 12 minutes long, then followed by 2 minutes feedback.
Explain that when one Master Trainer is delivering their micro-session the others will either
act as teachers (3 teachers) or pupils (3 or 4 if the group has 9 participants) and one time-
keeper who could also record the sessions if this was pre-agreed.
Explain that recording the session (using a mobile phone) can be useful for the presenter to
help them see themselves in action and self-evaluate. The recordings will not be collected at
the end of the workshops as they are for the benefit of the presenters and they are optional.
Every participant should have a go at delivering a micro-session. For the bigger group (9
participants), consider co-delivering. It may be useful to group two confident participants or
one confident and one quiet for co-delivering.
Place on the groups tables time cards (A4 sheet of paper with 2 minutes and another with 1
minute) that show the time remaining to alert the presenters that they are nearing the end of
their session. Time keepers must stick to the timings and stop the presenter or the feedback
time if they go over their allocated times.
Remind the participants that by the end of allocated time for delivering the micro-sessions, all
groups will have finished as planned.
Check that all participants have understood and respond to questions if any.
Slide 4 Introduce the evaluation form which the audience will use to give feedback. Discuss the criteria D5.S2+3.1 5 minutes
and explain the difference between giving feedback as a teacher or as a pupil. Allow everyone to
go through the feedback form and answer their questions, if any.
Encourage the participants to use the space or a separate sheet to write if they have further
feedback.
Ask the participants to complete the forms, one form for each presenter. Explain that they need
to decide their role (teacher/pupil) and complete only one section per participant. Tell the
participants to give the evaluation forms to the presenters after all micro-sessions are delivered.
Slide 5 Ask the participants to go through their lesson plans which were developed during the workshops D5.S2.2 40
and select an activity they would like to deliver. Remind everyone that selected activities should
be timed to be 12 minutes long, then followed by 2 minutes feedback.

Planning can be done individually or in pairs. Participants may require to access the internet or
show info on the screen. Arrange for them to share a laptop if available, otherwise it is best to

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choose activities which do not require a laptop/screen. Go round the groups and check if anyone
has any questions or requires materials/support. (35 min)

If any participants finish preparing before the end of 35 minutes, they can start to practise (see
next section).

All activities should have:


A clear learning objective related to a learning standard
Suitable pupil-centred activity
At least one monitoring strategy
Resource(s) (textbook, other)

Make sure the participants complete the checklist at the end of planning (before lesson section).

Ask the participants to agree who will go first and then who is next, etc. It may be useful to write
the names in order so everyone can see how it is organised.
Slide 6 Ask the participants to start practising their plans individually or with other participants. 1,2 30 minutes
Encourage everyone to have a go at practising before their delivery. Participants who finish can
sit during others practice and try to fill out the feedback form (they can use a pencil or a separate
piece of paper but no formal feedback to be given to anyone). If there is time and depending on
the groups dynamics, participants can help each other and give verbal feedback or demonstrate
to each other what they would do differently.
Make sure at the end that before the end of the session that participants tidy up their areas again
will leave their plans and materials where they sit.

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Day 5

Session 3: Micro-teaching and feedback

Materials marker pens, pens, flip chart paper, lesson plans, teaching resources (according to teaching activities), projector/laptops,
blue tack (to hang flip chart paper on the walls)

Overview for Session 3


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Slides 3 Deliver the activity 1 112-117
minutes
Slides 6 Give and receive feedback 1 3-8 minutes
120
minutes
Slide 1 Before the session begins, have the aims of the session displayed on the screen if screen wont 1 112 + 5
and 2 be used. Once the participants settled down after lunch, start the micro-sessions promptly. minutes
contingency
Managing delivery: = 117
Show slide 2. minutes
Spend a few minutes with every group and make some notes as feedback on participants
performance for session 4. Make sure your feedback is varied and reflects positive practices
as well as areas for improvement. This include delivery and any feedback for the audience
and time keeping.
Remind the participants to alternate their roles (i.e. not to only act as pupils/teachers/time
keepers), including the time keepers as they too should practise giving feedback.
Ensure the time keepers are keeping the micro-sessions and feedback according to agreed
timings.
You could include the persons of reference in monitoring the groups. If so, ensure they do not
disrupt the progress and report to you if they spot any issues.
You have 5 minutes contingency added to this session. Make sure you use it to mop up any
remaining activities.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Slide 3 Ask participants to give the evaluation forms to the named participants. Give the participants a 38
minute to go over their forms. Participants will discuss in their groups their evaluation forms and minutes
give each other further details in the next session. (depending
on how
Ask everyone to complete their checklist (after the lesson) and think of what went well. They can much
use the space at the end to write further thoughts. contingency
time is used
You will go on to session 4 without a break. in previous
activity)

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Day 5

Session 4: Plenary discussion and post-course survey

Materials marker pens, pens, flip chart paper, projector, blue tack (to hang flip chart paper on the walls), post course surveys

Overview for Session 4


Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Slides 1-3 Reflect on the role of the trainer in a micro-teaching session 20 minutes
Discuss their plans for delivering the sessions
Slides 4-5 Complete post-workshops survey 10 minutes
30 minutes
Slide 1 Ask the participants to give their immediate reflections on the micro-teaching session in one word 4
if possible. Write their words on flipchart paper. Take a picture of the list before the end of the
training and include the participants thoughts in your trainer report.
Slide 1 Get the participants to explain their feedback to each other within their groups. Make sure 8
everyone gives constructive feedback that aims to support the others.
Slide 2 Remind the participants of the key question: their role as the trainers during the micro-teaching 6
activity.

Ask the participants to list their ideas on flip chart paper and hand it on the wall to show other
groups. You can ask the groups to quickly share with the others their ideas and elicit further
ideas if you need to draw their attention to a key area.

This activity will change in the cascade note to become:


Ask the participants to reflect on the training and think of how they will deliver the new
curriculum. Get the participants to share their ideas and write any good ideas for their records.
Slide 3 Remind the participants that they should complete a trainer report at the end of every workshop 2 minutes
they will deliver. The trainers reports are important for reporting on the progress of the national
roll out and will help feed into future Master Trainers training.

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Slides Session objectives and activities Handouts Timing
Also remind the participants that they should ask the teachers to complete their pre and post
training surveys. Information collected from the teachers surveys is also very important for
reporting on the progress of the cascade training and target future training to focus on areas
which the teachers require more support in.

The cascade training will be observed by MoE observers who will also complete reports to help
support future training needs for the Master Trainers and teachers.
Slide 4-5 All participants should complete the post-workshop training survey. Try to get the participants to 10 minutes
access the survey on available laptops and their phones. Ensure that the majority complete the
survey before they leave.

Thank the participants and wish them good luck in their teaching!

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