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HMI hardware and software:

What you need to know


Speakers:
Anthony Smith, Daniel Miller, and Mark T. Hoske

Sponsored by:
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RCEP Quality Assurance Statement

Control Engineering has met the standards and requirements


of the Registered Continuing Education Program. Credit
earned on completion of this program will be reported to
RCEP at RCEP.net. A certificate of completion will be issued
to each participant. As such, it does not include content that
may be deemed or construed to be an approval or
endorsement by RCEP.
RCEP Course Description & Learning Objectives
Experts explain how advances in human-machine interface (HMI) hardware and
software make HMI implementation (as a window into controls, operations, and
enterprise) easier. A wide variety of features and functions can make selection a
challenge. How much of what is needed? CFE Media research will be cited. A RCEP
Professional Development Hour (PDH) is available.

Learning objectives:

1. Review HMI hardware features needed for what applications


2. Learn criteria for whats needed and whats not for HMI hardware
3. Identify key HMI hardware and software trends from Control Engineering research
4. Review software features needed for what applications
5. Learn criteria for whats needed and whats not for HMI software.
Now a word from our sponsors
Speakers, moderator:
Anthony Smith, director of engineering for Industrial Automated
Systems, with the system integrator since 2007, previously
provided technical support for a major automation company
distributor. At IAS he uses extensive experience in the original
equipment manufacturer and systems integration segments,
with leadership and management in all facets of project
execution.

Daniel Miller, associate controls engineer, Patti Engineering,


is designing HMI controls for a project with multiple HMIs of
various vintages. He teaches control systems classes and circuit
design at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
(IUPUI).

Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE


Media LLC, moderator
Anthony Smith
Industrial Automated Systems
HMI webcast learning objectives

Review software features needed for what


applications
Learn criteria for whats needed and
whats not for HMI software.
HMI Software Features
Executable Application File
File is saved in an executable format, which can be
deployed across multiple platforms.
Offers flexibility for downloading to the traditional
stand alone HMI or downloading to a open platform
computer.
Security
User groups and security levels to restrict operator
access to specific displays.
Advanced security offers the ability to authenticate
users through network domain controllers. This
authentication allows for remote tracking of user
logins and logouts.
HMI Software Features (cont.)
Data Logging
Offers the ability to perform local data logging.
Most data log models can be exported to a .CSV file for
viewing in spreadsheet format.
Can be used as a pen object for recalling previous logged
history on trend screens.
Trend Options
Offers the ability to hide pens when not needed for
viewing.
Scroll back for viewing historical data logged tag values.
Go to scrolling for viewing process data values at a given
time and date.
HMI Software Features (cont.)
Screen Libraries
Pre-developed screens to drag and drop into displays
offering rapid high quality display development.
Qualifies the display to a given company or customer
standard.
Pre-assigned display object tags instantly linking all
display objects to pre-determined PAC/PLC objects/tags.
Object Libraries
Pre-developed objects to drag and drop into displays.
Commonly linked to object tags in a PAC to save
programming time and lessen the chance for errors.
Offer Built-in animations.
HMI Software Features (cont.)
Alarming
Global alarming monitors and displays alarms from
multiple sources.
Identifiers allow for the creation of context-sensitive
behavior tied to the alarm being viewed by the
operator. These identifiers can be alarms, PDFs or
videos.
Recipe Management
Pre-developed screens to drag and drop into
displays.
Linked objects to assist in recipe selection,
downloading and confirmation that all recipe data was
transferred to the PAC/PLC.
HMI Software Features (cont.)
All In One Solutions
PLC/HMI all in one units offer seamless integration
between both the HMI and the PLC.
One software package allows for programming both
the PLC and the HMI in the same environment.
Project Management Development Software
Common environment for programming the PAC/PLC
and development of HMI application.
Allows for sharing of common tag database between
the PAC/PLC program and HMI application.
Common area for archiving programs and
applications, as well as, management of multiple
projects.
HMI Software Features (cont.)
PDF Viewer
Embedded PDF viewers used for viewing
operator SOPs, maintenance information,
drawings, and product related users manuals.
Multiple Language Support
Language modules for application development in
multiple languages.
Extended object properties support run-time
language switching which can simplify
management of multi-language HMI applications.
Criteria for whats needed and whats not
OEM equipment
Unit Machine Non
Process
Security: Local only All In One Solutions
Security: Domain Project Management
Data Logging Development Software
Trending PDF Viewer
Screen Libraries Multiple Language
Object Libraries Support
Recipe Management
Alarming
Criteria for whats needed and whats not
OEM equipment
Unit Machine Process
Security: Local only All In One Solutions
Security: Domain Project Management
Data Logging Development Software
(External or local PDF Viewer
only)
Multiple Language
Trending Support
Screen Libraries Recipe Management
Object Libraries Alarming
Criteria for whats needed and whats not
Custom equipment
Unit Machine Non
Process
Security: Local only All In One Solutions
Security: Domain
Project Management
Data Logging
Development Software
Trending
Screen Libraries PDF Viewer
Object Libraries Multiple Language Support
Recipe Management
Alarming
Note: Selections could
change depending on
customer requirements.
Criteria for whats needed and whats not
Custom equipment
Unit Machine Process
All In One Solutions
Security: Local only
Project Management
Security: Domain
Development Software
Data Logging (External
or local only) PDF Viewer
Trending Multiple Language Support
Screen Libraries Recipe Management: Could
be part of Batch
Object Libraries
Alarming

Note: Selections could


change depending on
customer requirements.
Criteria for whats needed and whats not
Custom equipment
Process Line Control
(Tier 1)
Security: Local only All In One Solutions
Security: Domain Project Management
Development Software
Data Logging (local
PDF Viewer
only)
Multiple Language Support
Trending
Recipe Management: Could
Screen Libraries be part of Batch
Object Libraries Alarming
Conclusion
Most HMIs on the market today have
some advanced software features that
allow flexibility for networking, global
alarming, and advanced security. Cost vs
application plays a big part in how you
select which of these features to apply to
your project.
Industrial Automated Systems Inc.
www.ias-nc.com
Control Engineering HMI research
Objective: This study was conducted by Control Engineering to acquire information related to the
buying and specifying habits of automation engineering professionals for human-machine interface
(HMI) software and hardware.

Sample:The sample was selected from qualified subscribers of Control Engineering products with
valid e-mail addresses who are involved in the purchase or specification of control systems, including
HMIs, PLCs, PACs, DCSs, and single-loop or PC-based controllers.

Method: Subscribers were sent an e-mail asking them to participate in this study. The e-mail included
a URL linked to the questionnaire. Qualifying questions limited survey respondents to those who are
involved in specifying, recommending, and/or buying HMI software and hardware.

Data collected: April 14 through April 29, 2017


Number of respondents: 332, margin of error: +/- 5.4% at a 95% confidence level
Incentive: Survey participants were offered the opportunity to enter a drawing for one Visa gift
card valued at $100.00.
Key findings from HMI report
The 2017 HMI Software & Hardware Study unveiled several key findings regarding what end users
expect and how they purchase or specify human-machine interface (HMI) software and hardware:
1. Usage of HMI software, hardware: HMI software or hardware is most commonly used for
continuous manufacturing (25%), discrete and continuous manufacturing (22%), or continuous
and batch manufacturing purposes (17%).
2. Justifications: The top situations in which end users purchase new HMI software and/or
hardware are an automation upgrade (28%), a new installation (20%), and an
operations/engineering upgrade (11%).
3. Annual spend: Over the past 12 months, the average respondents company was estimated to
have been spent $127,000 on HMI software and hardware; and an average of $123,000 is
expected to be spent in the next year on these products.
4. Operating systems: Microsoft Windows 7 (60%) and Microsoft Windows 10 (37%) are the
most commonly used operating systems by respondents HMI software.
5. Cybersecurity: Sixty-one percent of respondents reported that their companies restrict access
to HMIs in an effort to protect these devices; 57% have increased password protection
procedures.
6. Mobility: One-third of respondents use human factors or ergonometric considerations in regard
to their HMI, and 25% use a mobile industrial HMI device.
23

HMI software analytics-related features


At least two-thirds of respondents HMI software includes alarm
summaries/alarming features, data acquisition capabilities, and trending
functions.
Alarm summaries, alarming 90%

Data acquisition capabilities 72%

Trending 67%

Historian functionality 60%

Report capabilities 51%

Data analysis capabilities 28%

Data presorting capabilities 14%

Other 3%

Q: What analytics-related features do you have in your HMI software? (n=332)


24

Is purchase bound to existing standards?


For 60% of respondents, the purchase of HMI/SCADA software or
hardware is not bound to existing purchase agreements or company
standards. Dont know
6%

Bound to existing
agreements or Not restricted
standards 60%
34%

Q: Is a purchase of HMI/SCADA software or hardware bound to existing purchase agreement or company standards, or can you be open to new vendors? (n=332)
Daniel Miller, Patti Engineering
HMI webcast learning objectives
Review HMI hardware features needed for
what applications
Learn criteria for whats needed and
whats not for HMI hardware
Identify key HMI trends from Control
Engineering research
What is an HMI?
HMI stands for Human Machine Interface
Used as a way someone such as an
operator can interact with the machine
Features often include touch screen,
buttons, and images
HMIs are common throughout
manufacturing
Evolution of the HMI
1950s HMIs started out with feeding punch cards
into a machine.
Command lines where the next step. Typing
commands straight to the computer was a way
more efficient method.
1960s and 1970s brought the invention of the GUI.
GUI, which is the Graphical User Interface is what
we have today. Allows the user to interact with the
computer or machine through various ways
including symbols, buttons, and pointing devices
among other things.
Uses for HMIs
Start/Stop the machine
Putting the machine in auto mode or manual
mode
Manually move the machine (This is done in
manual mode)
Observe information from the machine
Checking status of the inputs and outputs
Observing the status of the machine such as
faults
Changing the way the machine behaves
Types of businesses using HMIs
(Control Engineering research is cited in the next slides)
30

Uses for HMI software or hardware


The top uses for HMI software or hardware by respondents are continuous manufacturing (25% primary,
18% secondary) and discrete/continuous manufacturing (22% primary, 21% secondary).

Primary use Secondary use

25%

22% 21%

18% 18%
17% 17%
15%
14%
12%
11% 10%

Discrete Continuous Discrete and Batch Continuous Other


manufacturing manufacturing continuous manufacturing and batch
Q: What are your primary and secondary uses for HMI software or hardware? (n=332)
31

HMI software communications


The top communications features included in respondents HMI software are Ethernet, EtherNet/IP
(60%); Ethernet, Modbus TCP (46%); drivers included (44%); and database communications (43%).

Ethernet, EtherNet/IP 60% FTP server/web server 18%


Ethernet, Modbus TCP 46% Microsoft .NET 16%
Drivers included 44% Microsoft ActiveX 14%
Database communications 43% Field Device Integration 9%
Drivers to existing devices or
equipment 39% Ethernet, EtherCAT 9%
Data logging export to USB
drive 34%
Ethernet, Etherlink 8%
OPC UA 28%
Multiple language support 7%
Browser-based operation 26% (Unicode)
Electronic Device Description Language 5%
Ethernet, Profinet 25% (EDDL)
Ethernet, BACnet 5%
Email messaging 23%
JSON / jQuery / REST 4%
Sensor communications 22%
Wireless 21% Ethernet, SERCOS 3%

Ethernet, UDP 21% MQTT messaging protocol 3%


Gateway functions 19% Ethernet, CC-Link IE 3%
Integration with various
19% Other communications 5%
networks

Q: What communications features do you have in your HMI software? (n=332)


32

HMI hardware communications


Seventy-eight percent of respondents HMI hardware features Ethernet and Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) capabilities.

Ethernet, TCP/IP 78%


Ethernet port (10/100/1000 Base-T) 50%
Serial connections (RS-232/422/485) 48%
Multiple USB ports 41%
SD memory card slot 31%
2 Ethernet ports (10/100/1000 Base-T) 25%
VGA, and DVI-I input ports 25%
HDMI port 23%
Gigabit LAN 21%
Multiple I/O ports 20%
Wireless capability 16%
3+ Ethernet ports (10/100/1000 Base-T) 15%
Integrated I/O 15%
DVD 12%
Other hardware communications 3%

Q: What communications capabilities do you have in your HMI hardware? (n=332)


33

HMI hardware design or environment


The top design or environment capabilities with respondents HMI software include an industrial temp-
erature range (39%), engineering-design-software integration (35%), and a solid-state hard drive (34%).

Temperature range, industrial 39%


Engineering-design-software integration 35%
Hard drive: solid state 34%
No fan 33%
Emergency stop button, integrated 29%
Keypad integrated 27%
Rugged enclosure/washdown/other specifics 27%
High-vibration and shock design 26%
Expansion slots 23%
Hazardous location capabilities 21%
Keypad separate 20%
Integrated buttons/indicators 19%
Standard replacement dimensions 18%
Stainless steel bezel 316/1.440l 14%
Temperature range, extended 14%
Hard drive: rotating media 14%
Other design or environment feature 2%

Q: What design or environment capabilities do you have with your HMI hardware? (n=332)
34

Mobility or mounting features


One-third of respondents use human factors or ergonometric considerations in regards to their HMI, and
25% use a mobile industrial HMI device.

Human factors or ergonometric


33%
considerations

Mobile industrial HMI 25%

Enclosure around a commercial tablet 21%

VESA mounting standard interface compliant 21%

Industrial tablets or handhelds 20%

Other 4%

Q: What mobility or mounting features do you utilize? (n=332)


35

Buying/specifying integrated HMI software, hardware


Forty-seven percent of respondents generally buy or specify HMI software separately from HMI
hardware. HMI is typically purchased from a local distributor (59%) or directly from a vendor (39%).

Buying or specifying Purchasing HMI


HMI software and HMI
hardware From a local
59%
distributor
Integrate
d Direct from the
18% 39%
HMI vendor
Usually From a
integrate 17%
systems integrator
d
Mostly 35% From the machine
separatel 16%
builder or OEM
y
21% From an
Separatel 11%
on-line distributor
y
26%
Other 2%

Q: How do you buy or specify HMI software and HMI hardware? (n=332); Q: Who do you purchase your HMI from? (n=332)
36

Justifying new HMI investment


The top reasons for justifying the purchase or specification of new HMI software and/or hardware are an
automation upgrade (28%), new installation (20%), or operations/engineering upgrade (11%).

Automation upgrade 28%


New installation 20%
Operations/engineering upgrade 11%
Operator: ease of use or efficiency 7%
Enterprise upgrade 5%
Enhance information or systems integration 5%
Overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) 5%
Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) 3%
Safety program 3%
Increase production 3%
Cybersecurity risk is less 2%
Helps fulfill regulatory requirements 2%
Training becomes easier 1%
Industrie 4.0 <1%
Other key performance indicator 2%
Other 3%

Q: What justification do you use for new HMI software and/or hardware? (n=332)
37

HMI cybersecurity measures


More than half of respondents indicated that access has been restricted to HMIs
and password protection procedures have increased in an effort to better
address HMI cybersecurity.

Restrict access to HMIs 61%

Increased password protection procedures 57%

Restrict physical access to HMI area 38%

Reviewed network access points


29%
for vulnerabilities

Performed a cybersecurity assessment 18%

Required personnel with access


14%
to take cybersecurity training
Offered personnel with access
5%
to take cybersecurity training

Other 3%

Q: Which HMI cybersecurity measures are in place? (n=332)


Patti Engineering
http://pattiengineering.com
Control Engineering
learning opportunities
Research www.controleng.com/ce-research

Want more CEUs?


- Webcasts www.controleng.com/webcasts
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http://cfeedu.cfemedia.com/catalog
Speakers, moderator:
Anthony Smith, director of engineering for Industrial
Automated Systems, has extensive experience in the original
equipment manufacturer and systems integration segments,
with leadership and management in all facets of project
execution.
www.ias-nc.com

Daniel Miller, associate controls engineer, Patti


Engineering, is designing HMI controls for a project with
multiple HMIs of various vintages;. He teaches control systems
classes and circuit design at Indiana University-Purdue
University Indianapolis (IUPUI).
http://pattiengineering.com/

Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE


Media LLC, moderator
www.controleng.com/webcasts
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Archive:
Within 7 days, an archive with Q&A will be posted
We will send an email to registered attendees with hyperlink
Can also access from www.controleng.com home page
HMI hardware and software:
What you need to know
Speakers:
Anthony Smith, Daniel Miller, and Mark T. Hoske

Sponsored by: