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2016

Huawei Technologies Co.,Ltd. Avinash Saini- NTD

[NCELL LTE DESIGN V1.0]

Document is about to demonstrate basic guideline for LTE Design

Contents

LTE Introduction

4

  • 1.1 Network Topology

....................................................................................................................................

4

  • 1.2 Transmission Security .............................................................................................................................

5

  • 1.3 Radio Data Planning Principles

6

  • 1.3.1 Network Naming Rules .......................................................................................................................

6

  • 1.3.2 Planning Principles

Cell

6

  • 1.3.3 ID Planning

Cell

.................................................................................................................................

7

  • 1.3.4 Power Dimensioning

Cell

7

  • 1.3.5 Physical Cell Identifier Planning

8

  • 1.3.6 Root Sequence Index Planning

8

  • 1.3.7 Neighbour Cell Planning

.....................................................................................................................

9

  • 1.3.8 Tracking Area Planning for LTE introduction ...................................................................................

10

  • 1.4 Interoperability with GSM/UMTS

11

  • 1.4.1 General Strategy

................................................................................................................................

11

  • 1.4.2 Idle Mode Strategy

............................................................................................................................

11

  • 1.4.3 Connected Mode Strategy

13

  • 1.5 Optional Feature Deployment

..................................................................................................................

15

  • 1.5.1 Automatic Neighbor Relation

15

  • 1.5.2 .......................................................................................................................................

CS Fallback

15

  • 1.5.3 ..............................................................................................................................................

S1-Flex

17

  • 1.5.4 Fast Return to LTE after Call Release

18

  • 1.5.5 X2 Interface introduction

19

  • 1.6 MBTS

19

  • 1.6.1 3900 Series Base Station Introduction

19

  • 1.6.2 MBTS Configurations

20

  • 1.7 Base Station Connectivity Design

21

  • 1.8 Technology and O&M isolation

...............................................................................................................

22

  • 1.9 IP Quality of Service ..............................................................................................................................

23

1.10 IPec Design Principle & Rule(Wireless Perspective)-

24

1.10.1 Data flow protection

24

24

  • 1.10.3 SeGW Planning

25

  • 1.10.4 ACL planning for the encrypted data flew

25

1.11

Hardware Installation &

26

LTE Introduction

1.1 Network Topology

The high level network architecture solution for the LTE network introduction is shown below. Initially the network will be deployed without X2 interface (inter eNodeB handover will be performed over S1 interface) and with Security Gateway.

Figure 1 Initial LTE Network topology without SEGW

LTE Introduction 1.1 Network Topology The high level network architecture solution for the LTE network introduction

The network should be evolved in the future so that X2 interface will be finally available - by utilizing Layer3 connectivity at the Access network. To enhance transmission security, the

Security Gateway is planned to be introduced. It is suggested that SeGW is deployed at the edge of Core Layer.

Figure 2 Target LTE Network topology

Security Gateway is planned to be introduced. It is suggested that SeGW is deployed at the

1.2 Transmission Security

The LTE network can be deployed without SeGW in the initial phase. In the future, it is suggested that the SeGW is deployed at the edge of IP core layer, in the same equipment room with the backhaul equipment. The recommended backup solution is to use two SeGW implementing IPSec tunnel Hot Backup. This solution provides excellent scalability between the SeGWs and it is transparent to the base station, simplifying the configuration. In other words, there is no requirement for additional VLAN or IP provisioning, since the standby SeGW will take over the existing IP Sec tunnels(Standby SeGW is optional to NCELL).

The evolution could be performed with Pre-Shared-Key solution without the usage of Digital Certificates. The O&M data should be protected by SSL to ensure security covering the needs for all modes (GUL). The SSL connection is applied between eNodeB and U2000 & it is without IPSEC.

1.3 Radio Data Planning Principles

  • 1.3.1 Network Naming Rules

The NE names must be free of special characters (including '<', '>', '!', '?', and '^'), two and above blanks, and two and above %. Ensure that each eNodeB name is unique on the network.

  • 1.3.2 Cell Planning Principles

The Network will be deployed with 2x5 MHz MIMO cells with the following central frequency:

1832 MHz (DL EARFCN=1470). The bandwidth of the LTE cell directly relates to the maximum number of Resource Blocks (RBs) available and supported throughput.

Table 1 Mapping between cell bandwidth, number of available RBs and cell throughput

Cell Bandwidth (MHz)

1.4

3

5

 
  • 10 15

20

Maximum Number of Available RBs

6

15

25

 
  • 50 75

100

Cell throughput in Layer1 (Mbps)

8.8

22.1

36.7

73.4

110.1

150.8

The following tables illustrate the theoretical supported throughput per UE category:

Table 2 Theoretical Maximum throughput per UE category

UE Category

Max DL/UL Throughput (Mbps)

Cat1

10/5

Cat2

50/25

Cat3

100/50

Cat4

150/50

Cat5

300/75

The expected throughputs for 2x2 MIMO modes are summarized in the following table. Table 3 Expected throughputs for LTE 2x 2 MIMO modes

Bandwidth

UE category

DL Max L1

DL Max TCP

DL Practical

UL Max L1

UL Max TCP

UL Practical

10MHz

Cat3

73

70

67

 
  • 25 21

23

 

10MHz

Cat4

73

70

67

 
  • 25 21

23

 

20MHz

Cat3

102

98

93

 
  • 51 46

48

 

20MHz

Cat4

151

145

137

 
  • 51 46

48

 

* “Practical” is in TCP layer with 5% BLER and 100% Scheduling

  • 1.3.3 Cell ID Planning

Different from a WCDMA cell ID, the LTE Cell ID consists of 20-bit eNodeB ID and 8-bit Cell ID, which ensures that the LTE cell ID is unique in the entire network. If the PLMN (MCC + MNC) is used, the LTE cell ID is unique worldwide. The eNodeB ID in LTE network will start from 1 and increment for each eNodeB. The Local Cell ID will start in each site from 1 and increment according to the sectors number. Therefore the Cell ID configuration principle can be same as PCI to be an unique value in same e-NodeB.

  • 1.3.4 Cell Power Dimensioning

In LTE the cell max output power is not directly configurable but is mainly related to the following parameters:

PDSCH Reference Signal (RS) power – ie “Pilot” power

Number of available resource blocks (RBs) in the cell bandwidth.

Table 4 LTE Cell Power Dimensioning

 

Total Output power (watt)

Reference Power (pilot)

5 MHz

10 MHz

20 MHz

dBm

  • 15.2 2x5

 

2x10

2x20

dBm

  • 18.2 2x10

 

2x20

2x40

dBm

  • 21.2 2x20

 

2x40

-

We recommend deploying LTE network with 18.2 dBm RS setting, since it is the common baseline covering the UE/Base Station link budget.

1.3.5

Physical Cell Identifier Planning

In LTE system, the physical cell identifier (PCI) is used to differentiate radio signals of different cells. That is, the PCI is unique in the coverage of cells. Cell IDs are grouped in the cell search procedure. The ID of a cell group is determined through the SSCH, and then a specific cell ID is determined through the PSCH. The function of PCIs in the LTE system is similar to that of scrambling codes in the WCDMA system. PCI planning also aims to ensure the reuse distance. The PCI ranges from 0 to 503. For PCI planning, in addition to distance re-use consideration, 3GPP protocols require that the value of Modulo PCI/3 should be 0, 1, or 2 in each eNodeB.

  • 1.3.6 Root Sequence Index Planning

The Root Sequence Index is involved in Random Access of the UE on the PRACH channel and different cells should have different sequences to increase the probability of successful UE initial access. There are total of 838 (0-837) sequences available. Depending on the Cell Radius, the number of required sequences per cell is listed below:

Table 5 Root Sequence Index planning

1.3.5 Physical Cell Identifier Planning In LTE system, the physical cell identifier (PCI) is used to

If we assume the suggested default Cell Radius of ~10km, then 6 Root Sequences are

required per cell. Therefore we can configure different cells as follows: 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 …

etc

The RSI + preamble are a kind of signature for each cell (not related to timeslot). The timing relation is only regarding the number of configuration index (6 for 9,7Km). So by configuring the same RSI in multiple neighbour cells, the same preambles will be transmitted by UE

and detected by multiple cells. This introduces “false” preamble responses by these

different cells and thus unnecessary PDCCH and PUSCH resources to be reserved, before the UE reject/neglects cell’s responses. If this happens then only a minor impact in KPI degradation should be expected, since the UE directs the call only in one cell and only the resource of other cells is wasted.

1.3.7 Neighbour Cell Planning

The method of planning LTE neighboring cells is similar to that of planning GSM/WCDMA system. When an eNodeB cell is configured as neighboring cells of other eNodeBs, external cells must be added first, which is similar to the scenario where inter-BSC neighboring cells are configured on the BSC. That is, neighboring cells can be configured only after the corresponding cell information is added. After initial neighbor relations configured and the number of UEs increasing, some neighboring relations may be missing. In this case, Automatic Neighbor Relation (ANR) can be used to detect missing neighboring cells and add neighbor relations. In general, the LTE frequency is enough for initial networking. Neighbors need to be defined in 2G order for the LTE frequency to be transmitted in the SIB. In 3G the per-UMTS-Cell definition of LTE frequency is enough. Normal definition of neighboring cells is suggested though in order to avoid any UE incompatibility, and to facilitate future mobility features. The following capacities and limitations apply when configuring neighboring relations:

LTE->3G->LTE

LTE->3G: A maximum of 128 neighboring relations with UTRAN cells can be configured for each E-UTRAN cell. However we recommend configuring only 32 neighbors, since Huawei production limitation is larger than restriction from 3GPP. 3G->LTE: A UMTS cell can be configured with 32 neighboring LTE cells at most.

  • The co-sector UMTS cell should be configured with Blind Handover ON so as to facilitate UEs that do not support measurements. This switch will not be used by UEs that support measurements.

  • It is suggested that

all the

UMTS

cells

in

LTE

area will be configured with the LTE

frequency, so as to facilitate the reselection even from cells that are not included in

neighboring

relations

LTE->2G->LTE

LTE->2G: A maximum of 64 neighboring relations with GERAN cells can be configured for each E-UTRAN cell

2G->LTE: Each GSM cell can be configured with a maximum of 64 neighboring LTE

cells and all the neighboring LTE frequencies.

cells of a

GSM cell

operate

on

a maximum

of 8

  • The co-sector GSM cell should be configured with Blind Handover ON so as to facilitate UEs that do not support measurements. This switch will not be used by UEs that support measurements.

  • It is suggested that all the GSM cells in LTE area will be configured with an LTE neighbor, so as to facilitate the reselection even from cells that are not included in neighboring relations.

1.3.8 Tracking Area Planning for LTE introduction

Similar to the location area and routing area in 2G/3G networks, the tracking area (TA) is used for paging. TA planning aims to reduce location update signaling caused by location changes in the LTE system. General recommendations regarding the TA planning are:

  • - The TA should not be too large, considering the limitations by the EPC (for example, how many eNodeBs each TA supports in the EPC).

  • - When the suburban area and urban area are covered discontinuously, an independent TA is used for the suburban area.

  • - A TA should be planned for a continuous geographical area to prevent segmental networking of eNodeBs in each TA.

  • - The paging area cannot be located in different MMEs.

  • - The mountain or river in the planned area can be used as the border of a TA to reduce the overlapping depth of different cells in two TAs. In this way, fewer location updates are performed on the edge of a TA.

  • - The LAC planning in the existing 2G/3G networks can serve as a reference for planning TAs.

1.4 Interoperability with GSM/UMTS

  • 1.4.1 General Strategy

Since UMTS can support better PS service than GSM, it is preferred enabling the inter- operation with it in priority compared to GSM for data services but the reverse will be used for voice services due to continuous GSM coverage. For fast-deployment and clear network architecture, only one layer of each target RAT will be selected at the initial phase.

LTE to GSM/UMTS:

The HANDOVER MODE selection for LTE handover to other RATs is suggested based on Redirection (RRC release and connect to target RAT). For CS Fallback, both blind and measurement-based redirections will be supported, based on the UE capability. For CS Fallback, the UMTS will be the first priority target RAT and GSM the second. With Fast Return to LTE feature, the user experience will have minimal impact.

GSM/UMTS to LTE

At the initial network deployment, only Reselection in idle mode will be supported for moving to LTE system from GSM or UMTS.

LTE State Transition

The LTE network mainly supports two states which are RRC Connected or RRC Idle. In order to preserve smart-phone battery, it is suggested that the timer for transiting into idle mode is 5 sec. The paging DRX cycle for receiving paging messages is recommended to be 128 radio frames. But if the EPC specifies a DRX period for a UE, the UE compares this period with the value of this parameter and uses the smaller one as its DRX period. If the EPC does not specify a DRX period, the UE uses the value of this parameter.

  • 1.4.2 Idle Mode Strategy

In

Idle

mode

the

UE

is suggested

to

camp

on

LTE

network

in priority compared to

GSM/UMTS networks. The UE should reselect to UE reselect to U2100-F1 and G900 or

DCS1800 when moving out of LTE coverage. The following priorities are suggested to be configured for the different RATs.

Figure 3 LTE Idle Mode Strategy

DCS1800 when moving out of LTE coverage. The following priorities are suggested to be configured for
DCS1800 when moving out of LTE coverage. The following priorities are suggested to be configured for

U900 is just for reference as no U900 exist in network at this moment

Reselection from UMTS and GSM to LTE: (Priority based)

UE will always measure LTE signal when camping on UMTS and GSM. Only Signal Strength measurements can be performed but not Signal Quality. Therefore the criteria will be only based on RSRP. On UMTS the UEs in Idle and Cell_PCH states can reselect to LTE, but not in Cell_FACH.

Reselection from LTE to U2100-F1: (Coverage based)

The current reselection implementation according to 3GPP standards cannot separate enabling Signal Quality measurements from LTE or towards UMTS. To avoid ping-pong effects when measuring LTE RSRQ, the measurements only based on RSRP will be used.

Reselection from LTE to GSM (900 or 1800 MHz): (Coverage based)

All neighbors of the defined neighboring ARFCNs will be measured. If not found and when out of LTE coverage, normal cell selection will be initiated.

1.4.3 Connected Mode Strategy

The suggested connected mode strategy for LTE network for PS Service and Voice service is:

PS service: When UE moves out of LTE coverage, UE will RRC redirect to U2100-F1 when measured U2100-F1 coverage, otherwise handover to GSM by Blind redirection*.

Voice: The UE will CS Fallback to U2100-F1 when measured U2100-F1 coverage, otherwise CS Fallback to GSM by Blind redirection*. If Data Service is on-going during Voice call, the PS service will resume after handover to UMTS. If the handover is towards GSM, the PS service will suspend and resume after call release. As described in later chapter, with Fast Return after call release, the time for re-selecting back to LTE can be minimized.

*Currently there few or none no commercial UE supporting GERAN measurement in LTE Connected mode, so UE can handover to GSM by Blind Redirection .

Figure 4 LTE Connected Mode Strategy

PS service handover (RRC redirection) to UMTS preferred over GSM  UEs that do not support

PS service handover (RRC redirection) to UMTS preferred over GSM

  • UEs that do not support simultaneous measurements of Signal Quality and Strength may not perform any measurements thus re-direction will not work and service drop will increase (as described in 3GPP TS36.331 only Release 10 UEs and newer can support simultaneous RSCP-ECNO measurements). For this reason, only RSRP criterion will be applied in the initial deployment.

  • In case the redirection fails and the UE cannot find any frequency, it can search for the same band, the same technology and then the whole band until it can find a signal. So the redirection will first fail (service will be interrupted) and then start to search for other frequencies/bands/technologies.

Voice:

  • If the UE does not support measurements then a Blind Handover to target GERAN or UMTS frequency will be performed.

  • UEs of Release 10 support measurements of both Ec/No and RSCP during CSFB whereas previous releases do not.

  • If the UE supports measurements but does not report measurement report till timer timeout (4s), it will CSFB to GSM by blind redirection

  • The eNodeB’s participation in the procedure of CSFB is finalized upon direction of the UE to the target RAT. Different UEs may have different implementation in this case in case of failure.

1.5 Optional Feature Deployment

  • 1.5.1 Automatic Neighbor Relation

The LOFD-002001 Automatic Neighbor Relation (ANR) and LOFD-002002 Inter-RAT ANR features are self-optimization functions. They automatically maintain the integrity and effectiveness of Neighbor Cell Lists (NCLs) to increase handover success rates. In addition, ANR does not require manual intervention, which simplifies network planning and optimization. ANR can automatically detect missing neighboring cells, PCI collisions, and abnormal neighboring cell coverage and analyzes neighbor relations. ANR is classified into intra-RAT ANR and inter-RAT ANR.

Intra-RAT ANR is recommended to be deployed on top of the manually configured neighboring relations, especially considering the following aspects:

  • Drive tests are to be conducted when neighbor relations have not yet been planned in an early phase of LTE network construction.

  • Cell coverage changes during network optimization, which may result in changes in neighbor relations.

  • Cells or eNodeBs are added or removed during network capacity expansion.

Inter-RAT ANR is not suggested to be deployed initially, since it is not currently commonly deployed especially considering the lack of Inter-RAT measurement capability of several UEs. Therefore the Inter-RAT mobility will be based on the configured neighboring relations.

  • 1.5.2 CS Fallback

When a UE under LTE coverage attempts to access CS services, CSFB enables the UE to fall back to a CS network. CSFB is essentially a session setup procedure. That is, UEs fall back to the CS networks before CS voice sessions are set up. The UEs are always located in the CS networks during the voice sessions. The CSFB feature is applicable in scenarios

where the LTE network overlaps a 2G or 3G CS network and supports voice and SMS services (both mobile-originated and mobile-terminated).

The relevant eRAN features are LOFD-001033 CS Fallback to UTRAN and LOFD-001034 CS Fallback to GERAN. The GSM network must be configured with features GBFD- 511313 CSFB and GBFD-511301 Cell Reselection Between GSM and LTE, whereas GBFD-511312 Fast LTE Reselection at 2G CS Call Release is recommended also. The UTRAN feature WRFD-020126 Mobility Between UMTS and LTE Phase 1 is required.

The voice service fallback procedure consists of the following phases:

  • - Triggering phase: The eNodeB receives a CS Fallback Indicator from the MME. If the eNodeB supports blind handovers to an inter-RAT system; it performs a blind handover without delivering the measurement configuration to the UE. Otherwise, the eNodeB delivers the measurement configuration to the UE. Compared with measurement-based handovers, blind handovers can reduce the access delay but have an impact on the handover success rate.

  • - Measurement phase: The eNodeB delivers the inter-RAT measurement configuration, and the UE performs inter-RAT measurements accordingly.

  • - Decision phase: The eNodeB checks the measurement results and generates a list of candidate cells.

  • - Execution phase: The eNodeB executes CSFB to enable the UE to initiate the voice call in the target cell.

The ongoing PS services of the UE might be handed over to the target cell or suspended in the source cell. The action to take depends on the PS handover and PS service capabilities of the target network. If the target network supports PS handovers, the eNodeB performs a PS handover to the target network. Otherwise, the eNodeB suspends the PS services in the source cell.

The paging response is received from the target RAT. The typical times for CSFB (till alerting) are as below. By adding an additional 4 sec for the failure of measuring UMTS signal, an adjustment of paging period in Core Network to ~15sec should be adequate.

Fallback to UMTS: ~6 sec or ~7 sec (if MSC proxy is used) Fallback to GSM: ~9 sec or ~11 sec (if MSC proxy is used)

The target BSC/RNC will select the relevant MSC server according to the NRI value in the TMSI allocated to the user.

1.5.3 S1-Flex

S1-Flex (LOFD-001018 S1-flex feature in eRAN) on an LTE/SAE network is a feature that enables one E-UTRAN NodeB (eNodeB) to set up S1-MME connections to multiple MMEs, which form a resource pool known as an MME pool. When a piece of user equipment (UE) accesses the network through an eNodeB, the eNodeB selects a serving MME for the UE and sets up a dedicated S1-MME connection.

MME selection within an MME pool is based on the load condition, with the intention to achieve load rebalancing among the MMEs in the MME pool, effectively using the processing capability of the EPC. MMEs have difference processing capabilities, and they inform eNodeBs of their respective processing capabilities during the process of S1 interface setup. MME selection is based on the relative capacities of the MMEs and the number of dedicated S1 connections that are already set up between MMEs and eNodeBs. The probability of an MME being selected is directly proportional to the relative capacity of the MME and inversely proportional to the number of dedicated S1 connections that are already set up between the MME and the eNodeBs.

The eRAN selects a suitable EPC node for the initial NAS message using the NNSF and routes the initial NAS message to the EPC node.

  • - If the initial NAS message carries the NRI of the CN node, the message will be routed to the CN node identified by the NRI.

  • - If the initial NAS message does not carry the NRI, the NNSF selects a suitable CN node based on the load of the CN node and routes the message to the node.

  • - After a UE attaches to a CN node in a pool, the UE is always connected to the CN before the UE leaves out of the MME pool (except overload scenarios).

Figure 5 NNSF procedure for selecting MME

1.5.4 Fast Return to LTE after Call Release The UMTS-to-LTE Fast Return feature (WRFD-140226 UMTS-to-LTE Fast

1.5.4 Fast Return to LTE after Call Release

The UMTS-to-LTE Fast Return feature (WRFD-140226 UMTS-to-LTE Fast Return) enables a UE that moves from an LTE cell to a UMTS cell through CSFB to quickly return to the LTE network after the call is terminated. This feature works as follows:

The RNC first determines that a UMTS/LTE UE is a CSFB UE when the UE meets either of the following conditions:

  • - The UE moves from an LTE cell to a UMTS cell through a PS handover. The RELOCATION REQUEST message contains a "cause" information element (IE) whose value is "CS Fallback triggered (268)" or a "CSFB Information" IE whose value is "CSFB" or "CSFB High Priority".

  • - The UE complies with 3GPP Release 9.4.0 or later. The first service that the UE processes after moving from an LTE cell to a UMTS cell is a CS service. After the UE finishes its CS service in the UMTS cell, the RNC includes the information about the neighboring LTE cells whose frequencies have higher absolute priorities than the frequency of the UMTS cell in an RRC CONNECTION RELEASE message. Upon receiving the message, the UE selects a target cell based on the information and attempts to camp on this cell.

In accordance, with the GSM-to-LTE Fast Return feature (GBFD-511312 Fast LTE Reselection at 2G CS Call Release) the BSC sends the Channel Release message after an MS terminates a call in a GSM cell. The message carries the "cell selection indicator after

release of all TCH and SDCCH" information element (IE), which contains the frequency information about neighboring LTE cells. Based on the frequency information, the MS reselects the specified LTE cell. This accelerates cell reselection. Only 1 LTE cell in each GSM cell neighboring list can be configured with this feature, so the co-sector cell is selected (but applies to all since it is based on LTE frequency).

1.5.5 X2 Interface introduction

The X2 interface provides the following functions :

Intra LTE-Access-System Mobility Support for UE in LTE_ACTIVE

Load Management

Inter-cell Interference Coordination

General X2 management and error handling functions

Trace functions

In general the X2 interface can assist in reducing the signalling load towards MME and reduce the handover delay. Since Voice service will be served via CS fallback and no VoLTE no mobility for CS will occur within LTE system. Thus the X2 can be deployed in later stage with VoLTE introduction.

1.6 MBTS

1.6.1 3900 Series Base Station Introduction

The target network will be a multimode network having GSM in the 900MHz and 1800MHz bands, UMTS in 2100MHz band and introduction of LTE and UMTS 900MHz.

The 3900 series Multi-mode base station will be utilized in network. The MBTS mainly consists of the BBU3900 (BBU for short), RF modules (either RFU-as in standard local RF unit layout, or the distributed RRU type), and the antenna system. The MBTS can work in dual mode such as GU, GL, or UL or in triple mode GUL.

Table 6 3900 Base station family overviews

Macro BTS

Distributed BTS

Macro BTS Distributed BTS BTS3900L DBS3900 (Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RFU (Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RRU
Macro BTS Distributed BTS BTS3900L DBS3900 (Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RFU (Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RRU
Macro BTS Distributed BTS BTS3900L DBS3900 (Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RFU (Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RRU

BTS3900L

DBS3900

(Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RFU

(Multi-mode indoor/outdoor) BBU3900 + RRU

1.6.2 MBTS Configurations

The BBU3900 can support GSM, UMTS and LTE triple mode concurrently; the figure below demonstrates the board configuration of BBU box for the two major scenarios for the network describing sites with GSM and UMTS functionality and sites with triple mode, GSM, UMTS and LTE. Notably, single transmission board, UMPT, is providing the co transmission functionality. The Baseband boards to be deployed in network along with their capacity figures are summarized in the following table.

Table 7 Specification of BBU baseband boards

Cards

System

Description

Specification (max. HW capability)

UMPTb

GUL

Universal Main Processing & Transmission Unit

4 E1/T1, 1 FE/GE electrical port, 1 FE/GE optical port; UL+DL throughput: 1.5Gbps

UBBPd6

GUL

Universal Baseband Processing Unit

Cells 12, UL CE 1024, DL CE 1024

1.7 Base Station Connectivity Design

The 3900 Series Multi-Mode

base station

to

be

used

in network

will utilize

the

co-

transmission solution using one GE port to provide connectivity for all interfaces: Abis, Iub,

S1, X2. In addition, the MBTS provides unified Single O&M channel modes.

with U2000

for

all

Figure 6 MBTS networking overview

1.7 Base Station Connectivity Design The 3900 Series Multi-Mode base station to be used in network

The co-transmission port transmits and receives the data for all modes of this base station. In this case, the co-transmission port centrally schedules and manages the data for all modes. The Bandwidth Sharing of Multimode Base Station provides differentiated services (DiffServ) for different service types based on transmission priorities. Transmission priorities include the DiffServ Code Point (DSCP), virtual local area network (VLAN) priority, and queue priority. In other words, Transmission differentiation prioritizes bandwidth use. High- priority users take precedence over low-priority users, and real-time services take precedence over non-real-time services.

Huawei proposed various networking solutions to and following the requirements and special needs of the transport network the MBTS interconnection solution has been decided to be isolation of technology and O&M via different VLANs. The following paragraph introduce the solution in more detail.

1.8 Technology and O&M isolation

In this scenario, four VLANs are used to connect the Base Station to the transport network. In this way O&M channel and different Radio Technology channels can be isolated in Layer2 level.

Figure 7 MBTS connectivity with Technology and O&M isolation

1.8 Technology and O&M isolation In this scenario, four VLANs are used to connect the Base

The picture is for reference purpose

Although not mandatory, For LTE we suggest different CP and UP IP since MME and SGW may follow different transmission paths.

This solution requires more complicated configuration and has higer IP addressing expense

In case of SeGW deployment, IP Sec deployment could be independent for each RAT. O&M channels can also be secured by IPSec but it is suggested to using SSL encryption for setting up the O&M Channel with U2000 instead

Figure 8 MBTS connectivity with Technology and O&M isolation (over IPSEC)

GBTS Backbone MBSC Backhaul M2000 GSM&UMTS Service VPN NodeB DCN OM VPN FireWall eNodeB LTE Service
GBTS
Backbone
MBSC
Backhaul
M2000
GSM&UMTS Service VPN
NodeB
DCN
OM VPN
FireWall
eNodeB
LTE Service VPN
Untrust Zone
Trust Zone
IPsec Tunnel
SSL Tunnel
aGW
SeGW
OM Link
Service Link

The following IP planning is required in this scenario:

             

Destination

Dev IP/Logical IP

IP Mask

IP Type

ETH IP

IP MASK

GATEWAY

VLAN

IP

LTE_CP_IP

/32

4G

   

Next

 

MME IP

LTE_UP_IP

/32

Service

If_IP4

/29

Hope IP

VLAN ID

SGW IP

MP_IP

   

IPCLK_IP

 

As per Existing 3G/2G Ntework

1.9 IP Quality of Service

The service priority design of the transport layer should be based on the strategy for prioritization between different service types and/or different technologies. The proposed mapping for QoS is listed in the following table, for all technologies and service types, covering the requirement for having different prioritization of different service types.

IP QoS design for Iub, Abis and S1 interfaces

     

Number of

     

Priority

Max BW

Min BW

Queues on

VLAN

System

Interface

Service Type

the

Transmission

Priority

per

Queue

per

Queue

Network=3

LTE

S1

QCI2

34

4

   

LTE

S1

QCI3

34

4

50Mbps

14Mbps

LTE

S1

QCI4

34

4

LTE

S1

QCI5

46

5

4Mbps

4Mbps

LTE

S1

QCI6

18

2

   

LTE

S1

QCI7

18

2

LTE

S1

QCI8

18

2

150Mbps

75Mbps

LTE

S1

QCI9

18

2

LTE

S1

SCTP

48

5

4Mbps

4Mbps

O&M

OM

OM Low (FTP file transfer)

18

2

4Mbps

4Mbps

O&M

OM

OM High (MML Commands)

46

5

64Kbps

64Kbps

Normally DSCP 46 for signaling is recommended but keep Highest priority of DSCP 48 for signaling(same as 2G/3G Network).

1.10 IPec Design Principle & Rule(Wireless Perspective)-

existing network is 2G and 3G. This year they will start LTE expansion based on the 2G and 3G network In order to enhance the network safety, will adopt the IP sec+S1 flex structure.This document will introduce the Key point for the MME flex and IP sec, including structure, data planning, configuration command.

There are two IPSEC methods for the LTE: PKI and PSK.

For PSK:

After encrypting a message with a PSK, the sending party sends the encrypted message to the receiving party. The receiving party decrypts the message with the same PSK. If the message is decrypted successfully, the authentication is successful. When PSK authentication is used, communicating peers must use the same PSK. Users can predefine the PSK by using a Universal Serial Bus (USB) flash drive on a base station.

For PKI:

This method enables communicating peers to authenticate each other based on digital certificates. Certificates are difficult to counterfeit and are managed with a complete mechanism. For example, certificates have validity periods and can be revoked. Therefore, certificates are more reliable than PSKs. A public key infrastructure (PKI) system manages digital certificates for network equipment.

  • 1.10.1 Data flow protection

    • 4G traffic will go through the Ipsec tunnel

    • The OM for the LTE will not pass Ipsec.

    • All the 3G service will not go through the IP sec

When the status of IPsec SAs is normal, SeGWs can publish the base station's downlink routing information to the secure network. When the status of IPsec SAs is abnormal, SeGWs can send the base station's downlink routing revocation information to the secure

network. The secure network can learn the base station's downlink routing information sent by SeGWs.

  • 1.10.2 Data planning for the IP sec

For each LTE site, we need three IP address. The Function is as bellow:

IP list

Funtion

Remark

IP1

LTE physical IP

Communicate with IP sec(SeGW)

   
 

IP3

LTE DEV IP for S1

Communicate with MME

 
 

LTE DEV IP for the X2/S1

Communicate

with

SGW

and

Other

 

IP2

UP

eNodeB

1.10.3

SeGW Planning

 
 

Parameter

Value

Remark

 
 

AUTHMETH

PRE-SHARED-KEY

Indicate use the PSK AUTH method

 

PEERNAME

ike

The active SeGW name. Same with SeGW side

   

The

slave

SeGW

 

PEERNAME

ikeSlave

name,Same with SeGW side

   

Configure

on

the

slave

 

REDUNDANCYFLAG

SLAVE

Segw.

Same

with

SeGW

 

side

   

LTE

PHY

IP1

for

 

Local IP

IP1

communicate with Ipsec

1.10.4

ACL planning for the encrypted data flew

 

But doing this configuration, The eNodeB and SeGW can know with data flow will pass through IPsec tunnel. According to requirement: Only LTE X2(optional) and S1 CP/UP will go through IPsec. OM and 3g/2G will not. So we must configure the access rule to realize it

Parameter

Value

Remark

ACLRULE ID

3001

 

SIP

IP2

DEV IP for the S1 service

SIP

IP3

DEV IP for the S1,X2 service

DIP

0.0.0.0

Means the data flew from the dedicated source IP Will be encrypted to the Tunnel

ACTION

Permit

Means the data flew from the dedicated source IP Will be encrypted to the Tunnel

1.11 Hardware Installation & Change

Huawei has delivered One UBBPd6 hardware for Babseband Resources of LTE 1800 & Transmission mode is Co-Transmission & Co-MPT for GUL mode. As per current Hardware configuration, UBBPD3 is for GSM1800 and UBBPD2 is for U2100 & GSM900.

1.11 Hardware Installation & Change Huawei has delivered One UBBPd6 hardware for Babseband Resources of LTE

Option -1

To avoid major change in configuration, We will replace UBBPD3(slot 2) with UBBPD6 and reinstall UBBPD3 in Slot 1. After changing Hardware installation, OMC engineer will change BBP working mode for

UBBPd6- Slot 2 from UO to GL mode for GSM & LTE 1800 Mhz than reset Hardware.

MOD BBP

In next step, OMC engineer will configure resource group for UO from UBBPD3 & Slot 1 in UO mode by using below command.

MOD BASEBANDEQM

After Finish BBU part, Configure IP & do rest of configuration for LTE site preparation in batches.

Option -2

Install UBBPd6 in slot 1 & configure baseband EQM for LTE from slot 1-UBBPD6 by using below commands.

ADD

BASEBANDEQM:BASEBANDEQMID=1,BASEBANDEQMTYPE=ULDL,UMTSDEM

MODE=NULL,SN1=1;

ADD

EUCELLSECTOREQM:LOCALCELLID=0,SECTOREQMID=9,REFERENCESIGNAL

PWR=182,BASEBANDEQMID=1;

ADD CELL:LOCALCELLID=0,CELLNAME="LTE

TEST",FREQBAND=3,ULEARFCNCFGIND=NOT_CFG,DLEARFCN=1470,ULBAND

WIDTH=CELL_BW_N25,DLBANDWIDTH=CELL_BW_N25,CELLID=232,PHYCEL

LID=232,FDDTDDIND=CELL_FDD,ROOTSEQUENCEIDX=6,CUSTOMIZEDBAND

WIDTHCFGIND=NOT_CFG,EMERGENCYAREAIDCFGIND=NOT_CFG,UEPOWER MAXCFGIND=NOT_CFG,MULTIRRUCELLFLAG=BOOLEAN_FALSE,TXRXMODE

=2T2R;

SR no (GTAC reference)- SR 6205485