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CITY MUSEUM, CHANDIGARH

CASE STUDY

MUSEUM & ART GALLERY
The Government Museum & Art Gallery was designed as a building for the Museum
by Le Corbusier. It came into being on the 6th of May, 1968 with untiring efforts of
Late M.S. Randhawa, the then Chief Commissioner.

Like the City of Chandigarh, the Museum owes its existence to the partition of the
country. The collection of arts objects, paintings, sculpture and decorative arts was
housed in Lahore, the then Capital of Punjab. On 20th April 1948 the division of the
collection took place by which 60% of the objects were retained as were the objects
already re-produced in books and excavated from the sites falling in erstwhile
Punjab. The remaining 40% collection consisting mainly of Gandhara Sculpture and
miniature paintings fell in the East Punjab’s share. Received in 1949, the collection
was first installed in Amritsar and then shifted to Shimla. It was decided in 1960 that
the Museum should have a building of its own in Chandigarh. The plan was
approved in 1962 and the work remained suspended for sometime and finally, the
Museum was constructed and opened to public in May, 1968.

The Museum possesses the largest collection of the world famous Gandhara
Sculptures after Lahore. There is also a well appointed library in the Museum, which
meets the needs of the scholars and students through its stock of 4600 books and
references of arts and allied subjects.

2) Protect the collection from damage. the building is not a museum. Anything that detracts from this is artistic or architectural nonsense and a violation of a museum’s stewardship. If the "public" (young or old) cannot see. That’s it.THE MISSIONS OF A MUSEUM ARE: 1) Collect and exhibit art and historic artifacts for public education and enjoyment.. If items are not preserved. understand and enjoy the exhibits.. the building is not a museum. preserving and presenting our art and heritage. and 3) Do this all as efficiently as possible. . it is an archive. whatever it may be. Without both good presentation and effective preservation. a museum won’t be able to continue. Pure and Simple.

Façade design and treatment 9. sun and wind. Circulation indoor and outdoor 5. Site analysis. parking and landscaping . Water Supply and sewerage disposal 8. Fire Fighting 4. Planning of spaces and form 6. Response to climate. zoning . blocking . shading devices 7. Furniture and display units 10. Electrical 2. Lighting indoor and outdoor 3.CASE STUDY TOPICS 1.

ELECTRICAL .

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can affect a visitor's ability to appreciate artwork because the human eye requires several minutes to adjust to large changes in light levels. a museum lighting designer must satisfy many conflicting design requirements. Sharply contrasting light levels between a bright entry and a dark gallery can be very disturbing. Dramatic variations in light levels from exhibit to exhibit. or from exterior to interior.LIGHTING INDOOR AND OUTDOOR Lighting in museums and art galleries plays a key role in a visitor's ability to perceive and enjoy both the artefacts in a museum and the building in total. In order to develop a successful lighting scheme. and potentially .

LIGHTING INDOOR AND OUTDOOR .

LIGHTING INDOOR AND OUTDOOR .

LIGHTING INDOOR AND OUTDOOR .

LIGHTING INDOOR AND OUTDOOR .

FIRE FIGHTING .

It is generally not good to have a home with a high percentage of circulation space. .CIRCULATION INDOOR AND OUTDOOR Circulation space identifies area of a building that is used for pedestrian travel. and areas in a room that leads to another room. When you visit a building. such as a hallway. your main focus should be the rooms and not the hallway. stair way.

WHAT SHOULD BE KEPT IN MIND WHILE DESIGNING CIRCULATION SPACE ? •Widen corridors beyond the typical 8-9 feet currently in use. This will reduce travel time and also discourage kids from running through the halls. • This can lead to congestion. bumping. and altercations. •Corridors should be able to easily handle two-way traffic. Corridors that expand and contract create bottlenecks. collisions. •Break up corridor lengths. •Keep corridors a consistent width. •Consider rounding or angling corners so there is a sight line to the intersecting corridor. People who walk at a fast pace or turn corners quickly do not see the traffic in the intersecting hallway. . •Blind corners can be a hazard.

CIRCULATION INDOOR AND OUTDOOR .

PLANNING OF SPACES AND FORM .

FAÇADE DESIGN AND TREATMENT .

FURNITURE AND DISPLAY UNITS .

FURNITURE AND DISPLAY UNITS .

FURNITURE AND DISPLAY UNITS .

FURNITURE AND DISPLAY UNITS .

FURNITURE AND DISPLAY UNITS .

SITE ANALYSIS. PARKING AND LANDSCAPING . BLOCKING . ZONING .

THANK YOU .