Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 66

CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

Training is a learning experience in that it seeks a relatively permanent change in an


individual that will improve the activity to perform on the job. It involves the changing of skills,
knowledge, attitudes or behaviour. It may mean changing what employees know, how they work,
their attitudes toward their work, or their interaction with their coworkers or supervisor.

Training increases the knowledge and skills of an employee for doing a particular job.
The main output of training is learning. Training offers & inculcates new habits, refined skills &
useful knowledge during the training that helps him improve performance. Training is a learning
experience that is planned & carried out by the organization to enable more skilled task
behaviour by the trainee. Training provides the ability to detect & correct error. Training
provides skills & abilities that may lie called on the future to satisfy the organization’s human
resource needs.

1.2 The Company Profile

1.2.1 about the company

VK Polymers was established during the year 1983 and has been expanding with a wide area of
10000sq.ft, with various kind of machineries and well built infrastructure. We have eight
different major sections in our area.

Mission:

 To achieve our objectives in an environment of honesty towards our esteemed customers,


suppliers, employees and society at large.

 To create a value for quality with quantity, in the given time frame.
Vision:

 To complete ISO certification by 2014.

 To become a top company to provide a one stop solution for all plastic and moulds
requirement in the market.

 Be a complete Manufacturing plant which will be dedicated to serve the Automobile &
Electrical Industries.

M
KOTHANDAN
(PROPREITOR
)
K NARESH SUDARSHAN
KUMAR SARANGAPANI
(GENERAL (MARKETING /
MANAGER) ACCOUNT )
Producti Packagin
Tool Account
on g&
Engineer ant
Engineer Dispatch

Operators  Operators & Helpers Packers 


5nos  15nos 25nos
Our Products

 Pharmaceutical, Cosmetics and fertilizers containers


 Caps for mineral water bottle ,oil packing and medicines
 All kinds of injection & Blow molded Products
 Plastic Injection moulds for All kind of commercial & Engineering products

CONCEPT

1.1 Evaluating the training effectiveness

Any training implemented in an organization effort must be cost effective. That is,
the benefits gained by such programme must outweigh the costs associated with providing the
learning experience. Only by analyzing such programs can effectiveness be determined. It is not
enough to merely assume that any training an organization offers is effective, develop
substantive data to determine whether our training effort is achieving its goals- that is, if it’s
correcting the deficiencies in skills, knowledge, or attitudes that were assessed as needing
attention.

Training must be evaluated in terms of how much the participation learned, how
well they are using their new skills on the job (did their behaviour charge?), & whether the
training program achieved its desired results.

1.1.2. Performance – based evaluation measures

Post – Training Performance Method:

Evaluating training programs based on how well employed can perform their
jobs after they have received the training.

Pre- Post- Training Performance Method:


Evaluating training programs based the difference in performance before &
after one receives training.

Pre- Post Training Performance with control group Method:

Evaluating training by comparing pre- post training results with individuals who
did not receive the training.

1.1.3 Need for Employee Training

Training is necessary for improving the quality of work of employees. There


are some other factors, giving rise to the need for training.

 Effective performance
 Production of quality goods & services
 Fast changing technique
 To keep pace with the development of technology
 Change of profession.

1.1.4 Importance of Training

Training is the corner – stone of sound management, for its makes employees more
effective & productive.

There is an ever present need for training men so that new & changed techniques
may lie taken advantage & improvements effected in the old methods, which are usefully
inefficient.

Training is a practical & vital necessity because, it enables employees to develop &
rise within the organization, & increase their market value, earning power & job security.
Training is a widely accepted problem solving device.
CHAPTER 2

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

2.1 Objectives of the Study

Primary Objectives

 To analyze the effectiveness of the existing training programmes in the company.


 To find out the opinions & suggestions of the trainees regarding the contents, trainers
& training facilities in the company.

Secondary Objectives

 To identify the extent of participation & alertness of employees during the training
programmes.
 To find out the Improvement in their skills and knowledge after attending the training
programme.

2.2 Limitations of the Study

 Some of the respondents were unwillingness to answer the questions.


 Some of the respondents were afraid to give true information in some cases.
 There may be bias on the part of employees while answering to the questions.

2.3 Scope of the Study

The main aim of the study is to find out the effectiveness of training programme
conducted at VK POLYMERS, focuses on finding out the efficiency of employees after the
programme & also to find out the opinion of the trainees towards the programme, trainer,
contents & organization.

The present study seeks to find out training validity ( whether the trainees have
learnt during training ) & transfer validity ( whether what has been learnt is translated to enhance
performance in the organization)

2.4 Research Methodology

Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It


may be understand as a science of studying how research is done scientifically.

2.4.1 Research

Research is an organized, systematic, data based, critical, scientific, inquiry or


investigation into a specific problem, undertaken with the purpose of finding answers or
solutions to it.

2.4.2 Research Design

The research design of this study is descriptive research. The descriptive research
studies are those studies which are concerned with describing the characteristics of a particular
individual, or of a group. The studies concerned with specific predictions, with narration of facts
& characteristics concerning individual, group or situation are all examples of descriptive
research studies.
2.4.3 Sampling Design

The population (universe) of this study is 1330. The sample size is 200 (ie) 15% of the
population. Since the population from which a sample is to be drawn does not constitute a
homogeneous group, stratified sampling technique is applied.

2.4.4 Data Collection Method


Primary Data

The primary data are those which are collected afresh & for the first time, & thus
happen to be original in character. The primary data’s are collected through surveys.

Secondary Data

The secondary data’s are those which have already been collected by someone else
& which have already been passed through the statistical process. The secondary data’s are
collected through the company records, books, journals & magazines.

2.4.5 Research Plan

Data source: Primary Data & Secondary Data.


Research approach: Survey
Research Instrument: Questionnaire
Method of contact: Personal
Sample size: 200 respondents
Type of question: Closed Type
2.4.6 Research Technique

The researcher has used the following items to test the hypothesis

Statistical Tools

1. Simple Percentage Analysis.


2. Chi-Square (2) Analysis.
CHAPTER-3

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Wexley and Baldwin (1986) Criticized The traditional training and development for its lack
of accountability. The lack of accountability and rigorous evaluation may be attributable in part
to an unfounded belief that “training and development is good for the employees and the
organization; so let there be training budget and training programmes”. This target-based (e.g., a
specific number of employees to be trained during a given year) or budget-driven (influenced by
the availability of time, energy, and resources) training and development efforts will ultimately
lead to the result that “training is only a paid perquisite or free time for the employees devoid of
daily stressors and distraction of the workplace on the one hand, and a wasteful expenditure for
the management on the other”.
Mumford (1988) Observes that prior to participating in any training and development
experience, participants implicitly ask themselves a variety of questions: Do I believe this
training and development will help me or my subordinates? Are there risks for me if I perform
poorly? How does this experience relate to my job performance? Not surprisingly, the yield from
training and development initiatives will be maximized when employees perceive that desirable
outcomes (or avoidance of undesirable outcomes) are attained as a result of their full
commitment to a training and development programme.

Girder et. al (1990) Conducted a study to determine which training evaluation method were
perceived to be the most effective by training professionals, and which methods were most
frequently used. For this purpose they selected members of American Society for Training &
Development (ASTD). The finding of the study suggested:
 Integrate T&D into the strategic plan of the firm.
 Provide necessary resources to evaluate the training activity effectiveness.
Bramely (1992) Believes that behavior change is introduced through training evaluation
presents a, three part approach:
 Evaluation of training as a process.
 Evaluation of changes in knowledge, skills, attitudes and levels of effectiveness
 Various approaches to evaluation such as interviews, surveys, various method of behavior and
testing
.

Sackett and Mullen, (1993) Suggested a broader perspective on a variety of aspects of training
process. The purpose of evaluation is to help organizations make decision about future training
activities, and provide tools needed to assess the type of evaluation possible in a given situation,
to conduct the most informative evaluation possible given the constraints of the situation, and to
communicate to organizational decision makers both the strengths and the limitations of
whatever evaluation data is obtained.

Kraiger et. al (1993) Proposed cognitive, skill-based and affective learning outcomes (relevant
to training) and recommended potential evaluation measures. They integrated theory and
research from a number of diverse disciplines and have provided a multidimensional perspective
to learning outcomes and advanced the theory of training evaluation by providing a conceptually
based scheme of learning constructs, measurement foci, and measurement techniques.
Lawis and Thornhill (1994) examined the relationship between training evaluation,
organizational objectives, and organizational culture. Explicit recognition of organizational
objectives linked to an integrated approach to training evaluation will certainly improve the
effectiveness of evaluation.
Mann and Robertson (1996) Conducted a study in Europe to answer the question ‘What
should training evaluations evaluate?’ they selected 29 subjects (10 female and 19 male) from a
three-day training seminar for European nationals run in Geneva. The results showed that the
trainees did learn from the training sessions and, although they did not retain all they learned,
they did know more one month after training than they did before training. They recommended
that an effective way for practitioners to evaluate training is to measure self-efficacy regarding
the trained tasks, immediately after training.
Saxena (1997) cited a study conducted by American society of training and development
(ASTD) on the practice of evaluation. It was reported that the actual practice of evaluation did
not often follow the strict recommendations of evaluation literature.
Saxena (1997,a) cited a study conducted by American society of training and development
(ASTD) on the practice of evaluation. It was reported that the actual practice of evaluation did
not often follow the strict recommendations of evaluation literature. This was largely explained
by the fact that many training practitioners had not found the literature’s advice applicable or
useful for their organization. Most of the training managers who participated in ASTD’s research
effort believed that there was value in a concerted effort to increase the practice of employee
training evaluation.
Saxena (1997, b.) Undertook a study on the role of evaluation of training in designing training
programmes in institutions of government, private, public and banking sectors. A total of 100
training and development programme participants were selected randomly by the investigator.
They represented the four clusters: (1) Government training institutions, (2) HRD centers of
private sectors, (3) HRD centers of public sectors, and (4) Training institution of banks. Data
were collected by administering the questionnaires. In addition, structured and unstructured
interviews were conducted by the investigator with both the top managers of training institution
and the trainees. It was found that:

1. The institution and HRD centers defined the scope of training evaluation from trainee’s
development level to the organizational effectiveness level;
2. The training institution were very clear about the purpose of evaluating the training
programs;
3. ‘lack of adequate evaluation methodology’; ‘lack of expertise’ and ‘fear of exposure to
weaknesses’ were cited as the constraints for obtaining and collecting evaluation data;
4. ‘overall impact on the performance of organisations’; ‘change in skills and attitudes of
trainees’; and ‘quality of subject matter in courses’ were cited as the most important
indicators of course effectiveness;
5. Training institutions concentrated their evaluation efforts mostly on reaction and learning
levels; and training institutions and HRD centers were found to have plans to improve the
courses by effective evaluation procedures.

Campbell (1998) suggested evaluation can provide a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment
to the personnel associated with a course or programme. Everyone needs feedback on how they
are doing, and evidence that training is worthwhile is a source of pride. Apart from this,
evaluations are necessary to assure optimum training relevance, effectiveness, and cost
efficiency.

Mayfield,(2011) suggested that training effectiveness is a good predictor of employee training


This association suggests that when employee have been trained in a training program ,the
training effectiveness is likely to be followed by job behavior(Pelham,2009).previous studies
also suggest that demographic variables such as age, degree held, and experience were related to
impact in some studies(Divins, Johnson and Sutherland,2004).The focus of previous work has
been on the relationships between training effectiveness and employees’
CHAPTER 4

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

3.1 Simple Percentage Analysis

Table 3.1.1

Age Group of the Respondents

Age Group No. of Respondents % of Respondents

< 20 yrs 6 3

21-30 yrs 69 34.5

31-40 yrs 37 18.5

41-50 yrs 52 26

> 50 yrs 36 18

Total 200 100

Source: Primary data

Inference

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 62.5% of respondents fall under the age
group of above 30 years, 37.5% of respondents fall under the age group of below 30 years.
Chart 3.1.1

Age Group of the Respondents

40
34.5%
35
% of Respondents

30
26%
25

20 18.5% 18%

15

10

5 3%

0
10-20 21-30 31-40 41-50 51-100

Age Group
Table 3.1.2

Gender of the Respondents

Gender No. of Respondents % of Respondents

Female 200 100

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 100% of respondents are male.

Chart 3.1.2

Gender of the Respondents

Female

100%
Table 3.1.3

Marital Status of the Respondents

Marital status No. of Respondents % of Respondents

Married 156 78

Unmarried 44 22

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents,78% of respondents are married and 22%
of respondents are unmarried.

Chart 3.1.3

Marital Status of the Respondents

Un Married
22%

Married
78%
Table 3.1.4

Income of the Respondents

Income No. of Respondents % of Respondents

<5000 25 12.5%

5000-10,000 136 68

10,001-20,000 36 18

> 20,000 3 1.5

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 19.5% of respondents fall under the
income group of above 10,000 and 80.5% of respondents fall under the income group of below
10,000.
Chart 3.1.4

Income of the respondents

80
68%
70
% of Respondents

60
50
40
30
18%
20 12.5%
10 1.5%
0
0-5000 5000-10000 10001-20000 20001-25000

Income
Table 3.1.5

Service of the Respondents

Service No. of Respondents % of Respondents

< 10 yrs 78 39

10-20 yrs 31 15.5

21-30 yrs 77 38.5

>30 yrs 14 7

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 45.5% of respondents fall under the
experience of above 20yrs and 54.5% of respondents fall under the experience of below 20 yrs.
Chart 3.1.5

Service of the respondents

45
39% 38.5%
40
% of Respondents

35
30
25
20
15.5%
15
10 7%
5
0
0-10yrs 10-20yrs 21-30yrs 31-40 yrs

Experience
Table 3.1.6

Superior Identifies the Appropriate Training Needs:

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

Yes 184 92

No 16 8

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 92% of respondents are agreed that the
superior identifies the appropriate training needs and 8% of respondents are not agreed with the
superior identifies the appropriate training needs of the employees.

Chart 3.1.6

Superior Identifies the Appropriate


Training Needs

Not Agreed
8%

Agreed
92%
Table 3.1.7

Trainers Interaction with the Trainees

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

Highly Satisfied 53 26.5%

Satisfied 137 68.5%

Neutral 8 4

Dissatisfied 1 0.5%

Highly Dissatisfied 1 0.5%

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents,68.5% of respondents are satisfied with
the trainers interaction with the trainees and 26.5% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
trainers interaction with the trainees.
Chart 3.1.7

Trainers Interaction with the trainees

80
68.5%
70
% of Respondents

60
50
40
30 26.5%

20
10 4%
0.5% 0.5%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.8

Trainers way of Delivery

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 39 19.5

S 140 70

N 19 9.5

D 2 1

HD 0 0

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 70% of respondents are satisfied with the
trainers way of delivery and 19.5% of respondents are highly satisfied with the trainers way of
delivery.
Chart 3.1.8

Trainers way of Delivery

80
70%
70
% of Respondents

60
50
40
30
19.5%
20
9.5%
10
1% 0
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.9

Relationship between trainers and trainees

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 72 36

S 104 52

N 21 10.5

D 2 1

HD 1 0.5

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 52% of respondents are satisfied with the
relationship between trainers and trainees and 36% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
relationship between trainers and trainees.
Chart 3.1.9

Relationship between Trainers & Trainees

60
52%
50
% of Respondents

40 36%

30

20

10.5%
10
1% 0%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.10

Duration of Training Programme

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 30 15

S 142 71

N 19 9.5

D 6 3

HD 3 1.5

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 71% of respondents are satisfied with the
duration of training programme and 15% of respondents are highly satisfied with the duration of
the training programme.
Chart 3.1.10

Duration of Training Programme

80
71%
70

60
% of Respondents

50

40

30

20 15%
9.5%
10
3% 1.5%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.11

Training centre Infrastructure

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 82 41

S 100 50

N 17 8.5

D 1 0.5

HD 0 0

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 50% of respondents are satisfied with the
training centre infrastructure and 41% of respondents are highly satisfied with the training centre
infrastructure.
Chart 3.1.11

Training Centre Infrastructure

60
50%
50
% of Respondents

40

30

20

8.5%
10
41%
0.5% 0%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.12

Organization of the Training programme

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 49 24.5

S 132 66

N 17 8.5

D 2 1

HD 0 0

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 66% of respondents are satisfied with the
organization of the training programme and 24.5% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
organization of the training programme.
Chart 3.1.12

Oraganization of the training programme

70 66%

60
% of Respondents

50

40

30 24.5%
20
8.5%
10
1% 0%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.13

Sequence of the Training programme

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 39 19.5

S 134 67

N 26 13

D 1 0.5

HD 0 0

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 67% of respondents are satisfied with the
sequence of the training programme and 19.5% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
sequence of the training programme.
Chart 3.1.13

Sequence of the training programme

80

70 67%
% of Respondents

60

50

40

30
19.5%
20
13%
10
0.5% 0%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.14

Improvement of Self-Confidence

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

113
HS 56.5
80
S 40
6
N 3
0
D 0
1
HD 0.5

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 56.5% of respondents are satisfied with
the improvement of self-confidence and 40% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
improvement of self-confidence.
Chart 3.1.14

Improvement of self-confidence

60 56.5%

50
% of Respondents

40%
40

30

20

10
3%
0% 0.5%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.15

Development of Communication Skill

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

111
HS 55.5
82
S 41
6
N 3
0
D 0
1
HD 0.5

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 55.5% of respondents are satisfied with
the development of communication skill and 41% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
development of communication skill.
Chart 3.1.15

Development of communication skill

60 55.5%

50
% of Respondents

41%
40

30

20

10
3%
0% 0.5%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.16

Commitment of Training Programme Towards Expectation

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 24 12

S 140 70

N 30 15

D 3 1.5

HD 3 1.5

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 70% of respondents are satisfied with the
commitment of training programme towards expectation and 12% of respondents are highly
satisfied with the commitment of training programme towards expectation of employees
Chart 3.1.16

Commitment of training programme Towards


Expectation

80
70%
70
% of Respondents

60

50

40

30

20 15%
12%
10
1.5% 1.5%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.17

Development of Skill in the Particular Area

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 33 16.5

S 128 64

N 34 17

D 5 2.5

HD 0 0

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 64% of respondents are satisfied with the
development of skill in the particular area and 16.5% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
development of skill in the particular area.
Chart 3.1.17

Development of skill in the particular area

70 64%
60
% of Respondents

50

40

30

20 16.5% 17%

10
2.5%
0%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.18

Evaluation of the Training Programme

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 39 19.5

S 123 61.5

N 36 18

D 2 1

HD 0 0

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 61.5% of respondents are satisfied with
the evaluation of the training programme and 19.5% of respondents are highly satisfied with the
evaluation of the training programme.
Chart 3.1.18

Evaluation of the training programme

70
61.5%
60
% of Respondents

50

40

30
19.5% 18%
20

10
1% 0%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
Table 3.1.19

Co-operation of the Superiors, Peers and Sub-Ordinates

Opinion No. of Respondents % of Respondents

HS 102 51

S 82 41

N 12 6

D 2 1

HD 2 1

Total 200 100

Source: Primary Data

Inference:

The above table shows out of 200 respondents, 51% of respondents are highly satisfied
with co-operation of the superiors, peers and sub-ordinates and 41% of respondents are satisfied
with co-operation of the superiors, peers and sub-ordinates.
Chart 3.1.19

Co-operation of the superiors, peers & sub-ordinates

60
51%
50
% of Respondents

41%
40

30

20

10 6%
1% 1%
0
HS S N D HD

Opinion
3.2 Chi-Square Analysis

3.2.1 Age Vs Relationship between the trainers and trainees

Age Relationship between the trainers and trainees

HS S N D HD Total

< 20 5 0 0 1 0 6

21 - 30 27 34 7 1 0 69

31 - 40 11 22 4 0 0 37

41 - 50 19 26 6 0 1 52

> 50 10 22 4 0 0 36

Total 72 104 21 2 1 200

Step 1: Statement of Hypothesis

H0: Age & Relationship between the trainers & trainees are

independent.

H1: Age & Relationship between the trainers & trainees are dependent.

Step 2: Find Expected Frequency

Expected Frequency = RTxCT

n
Step 3: Calculate 2 statistics

2=((fo-fe)2)

fe

2=28.91

Step 4: Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c- 1)

= 4x4=16

Fix 10% level of significance

Step 5: Table value = 23.5

Inference: Since the calculated value (28.91) is greater than the table value (23.5), H0 is
rejected. H1 is accepted (ie) Age & Relationship between the trainers and trainees are
dependent.
3.2.2 Age Vs Service

Service
Age
< 10 10-20 21-30 > 30 Total

< 20 6 0 0 0 6

21-30 57 7 4 1 69

31-40 14 17 6 0 37

41-50 0 6 44 2 52

> 50 1 1 23 11 36

Total 78 31 77 14 200

H0: Age and service are independent.

H1: Age and service are dependent,

Expected Frequency = RTxCT

2 = (fo-fe) 2)

fe

2 = 196.70

Degrees of freedom = 4x3= 12

Fix 10% level of significance

Table value= 18.5


Inference: Since the calculated value (196.70) is greater than the table value (18.5). H0 is
rejected. H1 is accepted (ie) Age and service are dependent.

3.2.3 Designation Vs Expectation level

Expectation Level
Designation
HS S N D HD Total

Staff 9 46 8 0 0 63

Worker 12 77 20 3 3 115

Executive 3 17 2 0 0 22

Total 22 140 30 3 3 200

H0: Designation and Expectation level are independent.

H1: Designation and Expectation level are dependent.

Expected frequency fe = RT X CT

2 = (fo-fe) 2)

fe

2 = 5.86

Degrees of freedom = (r-1)(c-1)

=2x4=8

Fix 10% level of significance

Table value = 13.4


Inference: Since the calculated value (5.86) is less than the table value (13.4). H0 is accepted.

(i.e) Designation and expectation level are independent.

3.2.4 This table shows that the Relation between the Trainer and Level of Satisfaction

Level of Satisfaction
Trainer
HS S N D HD Total

1.Interaction with the trainees 53 137 8 1 1 200

2.Trainers way of delivery 39 140 19 2 0 200

3.Subject knowledge of the trainers 54 121 24 1 0 200

4.Relationship between the trainers & 72 104 21 2 1 200


trainees

5. Ability to clear doubts & queries 86 94 16 3 1 200

Total 304 596 88 9 3 1000

H0: There is no relationship between the trainer and level of satisfaction.

H1: There is relationship between the trainer and level of satisfaction.

Expected Frequency = RTxCT


n

2 = (fo-fe) 2)

fe

2 = 47.73

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1)

= 4 x 4 = 16

Fix 10% level of significance

Table value = 23.5

Inference: Since the calculated value (47.3) is greater than the table value(23.5). H0 is rejected.
H1 is accepted (ie) There is relationship between the trainer and level of satisfaction.

.
3.2.5 This table shows that the relation between the Training Process & Level of
Satisfaction.

Level of Satisfaction
Training process
HS S N D HD Total

30 142 19 6 3 200
1.Duration of training programme

32 126 36 4 2 200
2.Training given before
implementing any change

3.Training centre Infrastructure 82 100 17 1 0 200

4.Organization of the training 49 132 17 2 0 200


Programme

5.Sequence of the training 39 134 26 1 0 200


programme

6.Freedom to ask questions or doubts


108 77 12 0 2 200

Total 340 711 127 15 7 1200

H0 There is no relationship between the training process & level of satisfaction.

H1: There is relationship between the training process & level of satisfaction.

Expected Frequency = RTxCT

2 = (fo-fe) 2)
fe

2 = 147.24

Degrees of freedom = 5 x 4 = 20

Fix 10% level of significance.

Table value = 28.4

Inference: Since the calculated value(147.24) is greater than the table value (28.4). H0 is
rejected, H1 is accepted. (ie) There is relationship between the training process & level of
satisfaction.
3.2.6 This table shows that the relation between the Training Effectiveness & Level of
Satisfaction.

Level of Satisfaction
Training Effectiveness
HS S N D HD Total

113 80 6 0 1 200
1.Improvement of self-confidence

111 82 6 0 1 200
2.Development of communication skill

24 140 30 3 3 200
3.Commitment of training programme

24 111 52 13 0 200
4.Availability of course material

33 128 34 5 0 200
5.Development of skill in the particular area

6.Evaluation of the training programme


39 123 36 2 0 200

7.Co-operation of the superiors, peers &


102 82 12 2 2 200
sub-ordinates

8.Field visit during training programme


35 71 63 21 10 200

Total 481 817 239 46 17 1600

H0: There is no relationship between the training effectiveness & level of satisfaction
H1: There is relationship between the training effectiveness & level of satisfaction.

Expected Frequency = RTxCT

2 = (fo-fe) 2)

fe

2 = 448.39

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) =7 x4 =28

Fix 10 % level of significance

Table value = 37.9

Inference: Since the calculated value (448.39) is greater than the table value (37.9). H0 is
rejected. H1 is accepted. (ie) There is relationship between the training effectiveness & level of
satisfaction.
CHAPTER-5

FINDINGS

Among 200 employees,

 62.5% of employees are above the age of 30 years.


 100% of employees are male.
 78% of employees are married.
 18.5% of employees are graduate.
 68% of employees are between the monthly income of
5000-10,000
 39% of employees are under the service of less than 10 years.
 36.5% of employees are attending the training programmes between 5-10 times.
 92% of employees are satisfied that the superior identifies the appropriate training
needs.
 70% of employees were satisfied with the following factors.
 Trainer’s way of delivery
 Duration of training programme
 Commitment of training programme towards expectation.
 More than 60% of employees were satisfied with the following factors.
 Trainers interaction with the trainees.
 Subject knowledge of the trainers.
 Training given before implementing any change.
 Organization of the training programme
 Sequence of the training programme
 Development of skill in the particular area.
 Evaluation of the training programme
 More than 50% of employees were satisfied with the following factors.
 Relationship between the trainers& trainees.
 Training centre Infrastructure.
 Availability of course material
 More than 50% of employees were highly satisfied with the following factors
 Freedom to ask questions & doubts.
 Improvement of self-confidence.
 Development of communication skill.
 Co-operation of the superiors, peers, &sub-ordinates.

Chi-Square Results:

 Age & Relationship between the trainers & trainees are dependents.
 Age& Improvements of self-confidence after attending the training programme are
independent.
 Age & service are dependent
 Designation & Expectation level are independent.
 There is relationship between the trainers & level of satisfaction.
 There is relationship between the training process & level of satisfaction.
 There is relationship between the training effectiveness & level of satisfaction.
SUGGESTIONS

Only 35.5% of employees have been satisfied with the field visit, so the
organization can provide more field visits during the training programme.

Improvement need in the availability of training materials.

More training programmes can be conducted. The organization has to verify


whether all employees are attending all the training programmes conducted.

The organization can also give more importance to the good relationship prevailing
between trainers & trainees.

For the respondents who are not having any improvements in their job, special
coaching & understudy can be given for them.

The training programmes conducted can be more practical.


CONCLUSION

In order to improve the efficiency of employees in his present job & prepare
himself for a higher level job, the effective training programmes are necessary. It is also needed
to learn the company’s policies, new technologies, changing environments.

This study reveals the employees opinions regarding the training programmes in
VK Polymers, Chennai. From the findings drawn from this study, we clearly came to k now
“92% of respondent’s get satisfied that the superior identifies the appropriate training needs”.
The commitment of training programme towards expectation of respondents are excellent.

The improvements are needed in some cases such as field visits, availability of
training materials, good relationship between the trainers & trainees.

Some suggestions are given based on the findings. It is sure if the management
implements the given suggestions, the performance of the employees will be gained.
BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Aswathappa k., Second edition (1999), Human Resource and personnel Management, Tata
McGraw – Hill publiship company Limited, New Delhi, pp.215.
2. Biswajeet Pattanayak (2002), Human Resource Management, Prentice - Hall of India private
Limited, New Delhi, pp. 156 – 157
3. David A. Decenzo and Stephen P. Robbins., Seventh Edition (2003), Human Resource
Management, John wiley & Sons, New Delhi,
pp.215-219.
4. Kevin Ford J.(1997), Improving Training Effectivenees in work Organizations, Mahwah,
NJ.Publication,pp. 364-365
5. Kothari C.R., Second Edition (2003), Research Methodology, Wishwa Prakashan (New age
International (p) Limited, Publishers), pp.74-78,
104-107.
6. Kurt Kraiger(1991), Measuring knowledge organization for assessing learning during
training, pp.3.
7. Richard I.Levin and David S.Rubin., Seventh Edition (2002), Statistics for Management,
Prentice-Hall of India private Limited, New Delhi,
pp.568 -580.
APPENDIX

A STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT


PROGRAMME IN VK POLYMERS,

CHENNAI

QUESTIONNAIRE

I. Personal Information
1. Name :

2. Age : < 30 years□ , 30 to 40 years □,

41 to 50 years □, > 50 years□.

3. Gender : Male □, Female □

4. Marital Status : Married □, Unmarried □

II. Educational Qualification


5. Technical : X □, XII □, ITI □, Diploma □, Engineering Graduate
□, Post Graduate □.

6. Non – technical : Under Graduate □, Graduate □,

Post Graduate□.

7. Designation : Staff □, Worker □, Executive □.

8. Income : < 5000□, 5000 – 10,000 □,

10,001–20,000 □, > 20,000 □.

9. Year of Service : < 5 years □, 5 – 10 years □,

11 – 20 years □, > 20 years □.

10. How many Training Programmes are you attended in this


Organization?

A. < 5 □, B. 5 – 10 □, C. 11 – 15 □, D. 16 – 20 □, E. > 20 □.

11. Whether the superior identifies the Training needs within the

appropriate time?

A. Yes □, B. No □.

Abbreviations :

HS - Highly Satisfied

S - Satisfied

N - Neutral

D - Dissatisfied

HD - Highly Dissatisfied

III. Trainer HS S N D HD
12. Interaction with the trainees □ □ □ □ □

13. Trainers way of delivery □ □ □ □ □

14. Subject knowledge of the □ □ □ □ □

trainers

15. Relationship between the □ □ □ □ □

trainers and trainees.

16. Ability to clear □ □ □ □ □

doubts and queries.

IV. Training Process


17. Duration of training □ □ □ □ □
programme

18. Training given before □ □ □ □ □

implementing any change

19. Training centre Infrastructure □ □ □ □ □

20. Organization of the training □ □ □ □ □

programme

21. Sequence of the training □ □ □ □ □

programme

22. Freedom to ask □ □ □ □ □

questions & doubts

V. Effectiveness of Training Programme


23. Improvement of □ □ □ □ □

self - confidence

24. Development of □ □ □ □ □

communication skill

25. Commitment of training □ □ □ □ □

programme towards expectation

26. Availability of course material □ □ □ □ □

27. Development of skill □ □ □ □ □

in the particular area

28. Evaluation of the □ □ □ □ □

training programme.

29. Co - operation of the □ □ □ □ □

superiors, peers and


sub-ordinates

30. Field visit during □ □ □ □ □

training programme

31. Give your suggestions, if any