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Casey Haggerty

Individualized Education Plan

Name: John Smith


Student ID: 2523484
Date of Birth:3/22/2002
District of Residence/ LEA (Local Education Agency): Indian Creek School District
Parents: James and Jane Smith
Address: 1235 University BLVD. Winterville, OH 43952

Future Vision
Mr. and Mrs. Smith first and foremost desire John to be happy. They would like to give him
every opportunity available to acquire the schooling and training necessary to pursue his career
dreams. John would like to obtain a job working with computers. More specifically, he enjoys
building computers and would like to find a in that line of work. John may be interested in
attending higher education upon his high school graduation, but he has also considered
immediately entering the workforce. Therefore, it is important to his parents that in his
immediate future, John is provided with the tools he needs in order to make these future plans
available to him.

Individual Interests
John is a very bright individual who is passionate about computer programing and software.
John spends his free time reading and studying books about computer building. John is
interested in the computer building and working with hardware software. He is interested in
learning more about digital game design and modeling software. He dreams of founding his
own company like Microsoft or Apple and inventing the first phone made entirely out of glass.

Transition Plan
1. Strengths: John reflects that his biggest strength and interests are related to computer
technologies. He currently takes classes that involve video game design and his free
time is spent researching and sharpening his knowledge of computers.
2. Student/Parent Transitions goals: John is interested in attending the Jefferson County
Vocational School (JVS) to participate in the Computer Network Technologies program.
John is open to the idea of attending higher education to pursue an associates or
bachelor’s degree, but, he is also aware of jobs that he could obtain with his training and
education from the JVS.
3. Transition Services:
To transition post-graduation, John would need help in the areas of independent living
and money management.
Post-secondary education/training- After his 16th birthday, John will enroll at the JVS in
the Computer Network Technologies Program.
Employment- To make use of his training, John will pursue a career in computer
manufacturing.
Independent Living/ Community Participation- John would be able to live and support
himself independent from his family. Additionally, he will have the means to travel to
work and to engage in leisure activities.

Goal #1 (Executive Functioning Skill)


Present Level of Performance:
When given an executive functioning survey, John identified organization as one of the areas he
struggles with the most. He said that he often forgets the materials that he needs for each class.
He does not have a system to help him remember what he needs to bring or have done for his
classes. His tutor observed this in the classroom as well. John was prepared with a pen or pencil
for 30% of tutoring sessions.

Goal Statement: Across classroom environments, John will bring to each class a pen/pencil,
notebook and other necessary class materials for five out of five school days with 80% accuracy
to be measured with a checklist by the end of this IEP.

Specially Designed Instruction: Visual cue cards will be placed in John’s locker, backpack and
home to help him remember what materials he needs for each class. John will meet with his
homeroom teacher and his teacher will help John organize his materials in his backpack so he
can find them easily. His teacher will also model for John how to use and reference the visual
cue card when packing his bag with materials for class.

How will progress be assessed?


John’s teachers will explicitly express their expectations for what materials should be brought
each class. They will continue to reinforce John whenever he brings the correct materials to
class. John’s teachers will observe his readiness each day by using a checklist. The teachers will
update John’s cue cards any time something extra needs to be brought into class.

Goal #2 (Executive Functioning Skill)


Present Level of Performance:
On an executive functioning questionnaire, John reflected that he feels that his backpack and
notebooks are often disorganized. His teachers also notice that he does not seem to have an
organizational system for his paper and classroom materials. 80% of the time during 9 weekly
checks, John’s tutor observed that John’s materials were unorganized in his backpack and his
papers were not stored in a folder.

Goal Statement: At school, John will keep his papers organized in a folder and his
textbooks/notebooks organized in his backpack/locker 80% of the time. This will be observed by
his homeroom teacher in 4 out of 5 weekly checks by the end of this IEP.
Specially Designed Instruction: John will meet with a teacher to help him create an
organizational plan for his papers, backpack and locker. John will receive verbal reminders
when receiving a new paper/assignment that it goes directly into his folder. The prompt will be
faded as John becomes used to the routine. All folders and notebooks will be labeled for each
class.

How will progress be assessed?


John will meet for a weekly check-in with his homeroom teacher. The homeroom teacher will
also observe John throughout the week to see his use of the organization system.

Goal #3 Literacy/Pre-Reading
Present Level of Performance:
During intervention, John was taught the pre-reading strategy of a KWL chart. This was used to
help John prepare and think critically about the article before actually reading the text. It was
evident that John had trouble previewing an article and asking questions of what he wanted to
learn by reading the work. On two KWL probes presented, John was able to make pre-reading
predictions by completing a KWL chart with 50% accuracy.

Goal Statement: Before reading, John will be able to make pre-reading predictions by previewing
a text with 80% accuracy on 5 reading assignments within 10 weeks to be measured by KWL
work samples by the end of this IEP.

Standard: Ohio Learning Standards for High School


RL. 9-10. 10 By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas,
and poems, at the high end of the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and
proficiently, building background knowledge and activating prior knowledge in order to make
personal, historical, and cultural connections that deepen understanding of complex text.

Specially Designed Instruction: John will be given extra time for completing reading
assignments, as well as 2 hours of one-on-one reading intervention including teacher modeling
and direct instruction of pre-reading strategies per week.
How will progress be assessed?
John’s teacher will collect work samples for a portfolio and make weekly observations.

Goal #4 Literacy/During Reading


Present Level of Performance:
John currently receives all reading/writing instruction in a 10th grade general education English
classroom. He receives accommodations to support his learning. More specifically, he receives
addition time for tests and assignments. Per his disability, John needs extra time to process
directions and assignments.
In October 2017, John was administered a 3-minute reading assessment initially at a 2nd grade
level and then additionally at a 7th grade level. He consistently read 135 wcpm during both
assessments with no errors. This is below the 8th grade benchmark of 151 wcpm for oral reading
rate. He read with a consistent pace and smoothness. However, his voice lacked expression and
intonation. His reading was very monotone. He showed good comprehension of the passages and
was able to retell the premise of the story. However, when given higher or grade level reading
passages, John struggles to be able to retell the main idea of the text.

During intervention, John learned the during reading strategy of Say Something. John struggled
with forming an opinion of the topic he was reading about and he had trouble understanding the
opinion being presented by the article. Additionally, John received instruction on the retelling
strategy. On two opportunities presented after an independent reading passage, John was able to
retell the story with 60% accuracy as measured by a rubric.

Goal Statement: After an independent reading passage, John will be able to retell the story with
90% accuracy as measured by a rubric on 4 out of 5 consecutive weekly probes by the end of this
IEP.

Standard: Ohio Learning Standards for High School


RL.9-10.2 Analyze literary text development.
1. Determine a theme of a text and analyze in detail its development over
the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and
refined by specific details.
2. Provide an objective summary of the text that includes the theme and
relevant story elements.

Specially Designed Instruction: John will be given extra time for completing reading
assignments, as well as 2 hours of one-on-one reading intervention including teacher modeling
and direct instruction of during reading strategies per week.

How will progress be assessed?


John will be given a weekly reading probe and after will be asked to perform a retelling of the
passage to show his comprehension of the text. As measured by a rubric (see appendix)

Goal #5 Literacy/Vocabulary
Present Level of Performance: Currently, when John approaches a word that he does not know,
he does not have the skills to use the text to infer the meaning of that word. In a passage of 500
words, John did not know the meaning of 7 words. Of those words, John was able to identify the
meaning of the words using gist clues with 14% accuracy.

Goal Statement: When given a text, John will demonstrate word skills by using gist clues with
50% accuracy on 3/5 opportunities presented as evidence by student work by the end of this IEP
Standard: Ohio Learning Standards for High School
L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in
word meanings.

1. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role
in the text.
2. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

Specially Designed Instruction: The student will receive explicit small-group instruction on how
to use gist clues when reading text. The instruction will be modeled and the strategy will be
practiced together with an instructor. A cue card will be placed on his desk to remind him of the
steps to using gist clues to infer meaning of words in texts.

How will progress be assessed?


The process will be informally assessed through student work in class and within small group
instruction. Throughout the small group instruction process, a word assessment will be
administered to exam John’s comprehension of this skill.

Goal #6 Literacy/Spelling
Present Level of Performance: John frequents many spelling errors within his writing. On
average, there is one misspelled word per sentence written. Common sight word and high
frequency words are spelled correctly, it is often novel words or specific vocabulary that is
spelled incorrectly. John will often use other words that he knows to substitute for words that he
does not know how to spell. During writing assignments, John will ask for the spelling of certain
words or will use the text to find the spelling of a word. John has reflected that he enjoys writing
on the computer to make use of the “spell check” feature. Currently, in a writing samples of 100
words, John has an average of 5 spelling errors.

Goal Statement: Given a writing assignment, John will spell less than 3 errors per 100 words
written in 3 out of 4 trials as measured by work sample portfolio by the end of this IEP.

Standard: Ohio Learning Standards for High School

L.9-10.6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases,
sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level;
demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or
phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Specially Designed Instruction: John can have access to a word processor and dictionary when
completing writing assignments. In John’s resource class, he will receive one-on-one direct
instruction of multiple spelling strategies and opportunities practice.

How will progress be assessed?


John’s teachers will collect writing samples for a portfolio.

Goal #7 Written Expression


Present Level of Performance: Currently, when asked to respond to a writing prompt, John will
write a 3-5 partial sentence response. John says that he does not like to use planning materials
such as graphic organizers to organize his writing. On 3 out of 5 writing prompts, John said he
did not know what to write or could not think of something to write.

Goal Statement: Given a writing prompt, John will create a 5-8 complete sentence response with
fewer than two errors as measured by a rubric by the end of this IEP.

Standards: Ohio Learning Standards for High School


W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.9-10.4Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Specially Designed Instruction: John will be allowed to utilize the computer and a Word
processor to complete his writing prompt assignments. He will also be given preferential choice
in what writing prompts he would like to complete. John will meet in a tier 2 small group
intervention session 2x per week to target sentence structure using direct instruction and teach
pre-writing strategies such as hamburger, RACE, OREO, and POW-TREE.

How will progress be assessed?


John will complete a practice writing prompt each day and will be formally assessed on the
last day of each week with a rubric. The rubric assesses the writing sample based on the area of
mechanics and grammar ([3] Free from spelling, capitalization and punctuation errors, [2] 1-2
spelling, capitalization and punctuation errors, [1] 3-5 spelling, capitalization and punctuation
errors, [0] 6+ spelling, capitalization and punctuation errors), paragraph structure ([3]
Paragraph include a main idea, 2-3 supporting details, and conclusion statement, [2] paragraph
has a clear main idea, 1-2 supporting details and conclusion statement, [1] paragraph has a clear
main idea, but lack 1+ supporting detail and/or conclusion statement, [0] paragraph does not
have a clear main idea, 1+ supporting detail and conclusion statement), paragraph length ([3] 5-
8 complete sentences, [2] 4-5 sentences, [1] less than 3 sentences, [0] one sentence or less).
Appendix:
Retellings Rubric

Name________________________________ Date__________________

Text______________________________ Scored by______________________

Directions: Use the following checklist to rate the retelling. For each item below, circle a number from 0-
3 in the appropriate column. On this scale, 0 means the retelling didn’t include the item at all, and 3
means the retelling completely and successfully included the item.

Does this retelling

1. Have an introduction that 0 1 2 3


includes the story’ title and setting?
2. Give the characters’ names and explain 0 1 2 3
how the characters are related to one another?
3. Identify the antagonists and protagonists? 0 1 2 3
4. Include the main events? 0 1 2 3
5. Keep the main events in the correct sequence? 0 1 2 3
6. Provide supporting details? 0 1 2 3
7. Make sense? 0 1 2 3
8. Sound organized? 0 1 2 3
9. Discuss the main conflict/ problem in the story? 0 1 2 3
10. Explain how the main conflict/ 0 1 2 3
problem was resolved?
11. Connect the story to another story or 0 1 2 3
to the reader’s life?
12. Include the reader’s personal response 0 1 2 3
to the story?

Total Score:_________

Comments from listener about the retelling:

Suggestions for the next retelling: