Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 27

Young children and the visual arts

Dr. Rosemary Richards


• Australian Catholic University
YOUNG CHILDREN AND THE VISUAL ARTS

CHILDREN’S ARTISTIC DEVELOPMENT


• Young children are visually aware and show aesthetic preferences from an
early age.
• Young children’s physical gestures and first scribbles are closely related as
their movements create traces. When a child deliberately makes marks this is
the beginning of their visual arts-making development.

Schirrmacher, R. (2002). Art and creative development for young children (4 ed.). Albany, NY: Delmar Thomson
Learning.
http://www.learningdesig
n.com/Portfolio/DrawDev/
kiddrawing.html
YOUNG CHILDREN AND THE VISUAL ARTS

CHILDREN’S ARTISTIC
DEVELOPMENT
• Young children create scribbles
that they can name after making –
the meaning attributed to their
scribbles is not fixed. Children can
then name a scribble/drawing
before creating it. Their scribbles
gain form and combine to make
complex designs. The first
representational drawings are
often of people, animals and
things based on personal
experience. Other people begin to
recognize the topic of the drawing,
and children become aware that
their drawings can communicate
meanings to other people.

Schirrmacher, R. (2002). Art and creative


development for young children (4 ed.). Albany, NY:
Delmar Thomson Learning.
YOUNG CHILDREN AND THE VISUAL ARTS

CHILDREN’S ARTISTIC
DEVELOPMENT
• Mark-making, such as scribbling, drawing and
painting, are important aspects of most
children’s artistic development and have
received the most research attention.
Theories have developed around children’s’
drawings (see on LEO: Schirrmacher, 2002)
and an understanding of these theories help
teachers to interact sensitively with children.
• However, children do not progress from one
‘stage’ of development to another; so much as
expand certain repertoires of artmaking
approaches as appropriate to their needs and
circumstances.
• Also, children develop across a range of visual
media including three dimensional art forms –
such as box construction, dough, sand, clay,
blocks, etc. as well as becoming increasingly
able to create time-based art electronic,
digital and photographic media. All these
aspects constitute children’s visual arts
experience and contribute to their artistic
development.

Schirrmacher, R. (2002). Art and creative development for young


children (4 ed.). Albany, NY: Delmar Thomson Learning.
Teachers can guide children to
• Move from basic manipulation of arts materials to
expressing meaning through their arts experiences.
• Work with increasingly complex materials and
processes.
• Discuss their own and others’ arts experiences/
artworks.
• Explore each arts form and make some connections
across the arts.
• To tune into the aesthetic qualities of the world
around them.

Adapted from: Wright, S. K. (2003). The arts, young children, and


learning. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
REFLECTIONS ON BEING AN EARLY CHILDHOOD ARTS
EDUCATOR
When viewing the following video clip
consider the following:
• Resources: What resources where
available; how were they grouped and
set out?
• Interpersonal relationships: What
relationships did the children engage in
through their art with children, teachers,
parents and wider arts communities?
• Art media: What art media and
techniques did the children experience?
How were there various arts experiences
thematically linked?
• Art pedagogy and early childhood: What
teaching philosophies and practices did
this early childhood centre and teachers
employ?
• Visual arts and EYLF: how was the
children’s sense of being, belonging and
becoming enhanced through their art
experiences. What clear connections
could you make to the learning outcomes
of EYLF?
THINKING IN THREE
DIMENSIONS
ART AND CHILDREN
AGED FOUR TO SIX
SHARING RESEARCH INSIGHTS INTO
CHILDREN’S AUTHENTIC ART
EXPERIENCES

SOURCE:
Richards, R. D. (2012). Young children's art
experiences: A visual ethnographic study with four
children in their homes, early childhood centre and
schools. (Doctor of philosophy thesis), University of
New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.

Article:
Richards, R. D. (2010). Narratives within narratives: One
young Chinese-Australian boy’s exploration of ideas of
difference, identity, and friendship through his drawings.
Current Narratives, 1(2), 84-103. Retrieved from
http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1014&conte
xt=currentnarratives
LEE’S Personal experiences and the world around Lee motivated
DEVELOPMENT his story-drawing on a single page
OF IDEAS AND
FORMS OF
BOOK MAKING
AND STORY-
DRAWING
LEE’S As Lee became more aware of the connections between
DEVELOPMENT his own story-drawings and world of book, he stapled
OF IDEAS AND several unrelated drawings together to make a book.
FORMS OF
BOOK MAKING
AND STORY-
DRAWING
LEE’S Lee the decided to make a book first and then draw into his book. He
made a book for each of his family members – using images he felt
DEVELOPMENT was most appropriate for each person. Here he is making a music and
OF IDEAS AND game book for his sister.
FORMS OF
BOOK MAKING
AND STORY-
DRAWING
LEE’S Lee’s parents where aware of his growing interest and skill in
creating stories and book and bought him exercise books. This
DEVELOPMENT began another phase of Lee’s story-drawing. I will share one of
OF IDEAS AND these stories.
FORMS OF
BOOK MAKING
AND STORY-
DRAWING
BOB’S FARM, FARMER BOB
MAKING CONNECTIONS: CONNECTING TEACHING, CHILDREN’S
REAL INTERESTS AND EYLF

• What were some of the issues and interests


that Lee shared through his drawings?
• How might teachers acknowledge and
extend these ideas through the arts?
How would you see Lee’s drawing experiences
reflecting the learning outcomes of EYLF?
• Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of
identity:
• Outcome 2: Children are connected with and
contribute to their world:
• Outcome 3: Children have a strong sense of
wellbeing:
• Outcome 4: Children are confident and
involved learners:
• Outcome 5: Children are effective
communicators:
REFERENCES
Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations. (2009). Belonging,
being & becoming: The early years learning framework for Australia. Canberra, ACT:
Commonwealth of Australia Retrieved from
www.deewr.gov.au/EarlyChildhood/Policy_Agenda/Quality/Pages/EarlyYearsLearning
Framework.aspx.

Richards, R. D. (2010). Narratives within narratives: One young Chinese-Australian


boy’s exploration of ideas of difference, identity, and friendship through his drawings.
Current Narratives, 1(2), 84-103. Retrieved from
http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1014&context=currentnarratives

Richards, R. D. (2012). Young children's art experiences: A visual ethnographic study


with four children in their homes, early childhood centre and schools. (Doctor of
Philosophy Ph.D. thesis), University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.

Schirrmacher, R. (2002). Art and creative development for young children (4 ed.).
Albany, NY: Delmar Thomson Learning.

Wright, S. K. (2003). The arts, young children, and learning. Boston: Pearson
Education, Inc.