Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 12

4/17/2008

Lecture 20
OUTLINE
• Review of MOSFET Amplifiers
• MOSFET Cascode Stage
• MOSFET Current Mirror

• Reading: Chapter 9

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 1 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

Review: MOSFET Amplifier Design
• A MOSFET amplifier circuit should be designed to
1. ensure that the MOSFET operates in the saturation region, 
2 allow the desired level of DC current to flow, and
2. the desired level of DC current to flow and
3. couple to a small‐signal input source and to an output “load”.
Æ Proper “DC biasing” is required!
(DC analysis using large‐signal MOSFET model)

• Key amplifier parameters:  
(AC analysis using small‐signal MOSFET model)
(AC analysis using small‐signal MOSFET model)
– Voltage gain Av ≡ vout/vin
– Input resistance Rin ≡ resistance seen between the input node 
and ground (with output terminal floating)
– Output resistance Rout ≡ resistance seen between the output 
node and ground (with input terminal grounded)
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 2 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 1
4/17/2008

MOSFET Models
• The large‐signal model is used to determine the DC 
operating point (VGS, VDS, ID) of the MOSFET.

• The small‐signal model is used to determine how the 
output responds to an input signal
output responds to an input signal.

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 3 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

Comparison of Amplifier Topologies
Common Source Common Gate Source Follower
• Large Av < 0 • Large Av > 0 • 0 < Av ≤ 1
‐ degraded by RS ‐degraded by RS
• Large Rin
• Large Rin • Small Rin – determined by 
‐ decreased by RS biasing circuitry
– determined by biasing 
circuitry • Rout ≅ RD • Small Rout 
‐ decreased by RS
• Rout ≅ RD • ro decreases Av & Rout
but impedance seen
but impedance seen • ro decreases A
decreases Av & 
&
• ro decreases A
d v & R
& out
looking into the drain  Rout
but impedance seen
can be “boosted” by 
looking into the drain
source degeneration
can be “boosted” by 
source degeneration

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 4 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 2
4/17/2008

Common Source Stage

λ =0
R1 || R2 − RD
Av = ⋅
RG + R1 || R2 1 + R
λ≠0
S
gm
Rin = R1 || R2
Rout = R D Rout ≅ RD (rO + g m rO RS )
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 5 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

Common Gate Stage

λ =0

RS || (1/ gm )
Av = ⋅ gm RD
RS || (1/ gm ) + RG
1
Rin ≈ RS λ≠0
gm

Rout = R D Rout ≅ RD (rO + g m rO RS )


EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 6 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 3
4/17/2008

Source Follower

λ =0 λ≠0

RS rO || RS
Av = Av =
1 1
+ RS + rO || RS
gm gm
Rin = RG Rin = R G
1 1
Rout = || RS Rout = || ro || RS
gm gm
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 7 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

CS Stage Example 1
• M1 is the amplifying device; M2 and M3 serve as the load.
Equivalent circuit for small-signal analysis,
showing resistances connected to the drain

⎛ 1 ⎞
Av = − g m1 ⎜⎜ || rO3 || rO 2 || rO1 ⎟⎟
⎝ g m3 ⎠
1
Rout = || rO3 || rO 2 || rO1
g m3
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 8 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 4
4/17/2008

CS Stage Example 2
• M1 is the amplifying device; M3 serves as a source (degeneration) 
resistance; M2 serves as the load.  
E i l t circuit
Equivalent i it for
f small-signal
ll i l analysis
l i

λ1 = 0

rO2
Av = −
1 1
+ || rO3
gm1 gm3

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 9 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

CS Stage vs. CG Stage
• With the input signal applied at different locations, these circuits 
behave differently, although they are identical in other aspects.
Common source amplifier Common gate amplifier

λ1 ≠ 0

λ2 = 0

rO1
Av = −gm1{[(1+ gm2rO2 )RS + rO2 ] || rO1} Av =
1
+ RS
gm2
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 10 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 5
4/17/2008

Composite Stage Example 1
• By replacing M1 and the current source with a Thevenin 
equivalent circuit, and recognizing the right side as a CG stage, 
the voltage gain can be easily obtained. 
g g y

λ1 = 0 λ2 = 0
RD
Av =
1 1
+
g m 2 g m1
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 11 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

Composite Stage Example 2
• This example shows that by probing different nodes in a circuit, 
different output signals can be obtained.
• Vout1 is a result of M1 1 acting as a source follower, whereas V
g , out2
is a result of M1 acting as a CS stage with degeneration.
1
|| rO2
vout1 gm2
=
vin 1 1
+ || rO2
gm1 gm2

λ1 = 0 1
|| rO3 || rO4
vout2 g m3
=−
vin 1 1
+ || rO2
gm1 gm2
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 12 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 6
4/17/2008

NMOS Cascode Stage

Rout = (1 + g m1rO1 )rO 2 + rO1


Rout ≈ g m1rO1rO 2
• Unlike a BJT cascode, the output impedance is not limited by β.
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 13 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

PMOS Cascode Stage

Rout = (1 + g m1rO1 )rO 2 + rO1


Rout ≈ g m1rO1rO 2
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 14 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 7
4/17/2008

Short‐Circuit Transconductance
• The short‐circuit transconductance is a measure of the 
strength of a circuit in converting an input voltage signal into 
an output current signal:
p g

iout
Gm ≡
vin vout = 0

• The voltage gain of a linear circuit is Av = −Gm Rout


(Rout is the output resistance of the circuit)
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 15 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

Transconductance Example

Gm = g m1
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 16 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 8
4/17/2008

MOS Cascode Amplifier

Av = −Gm Rout
Av ≈ − g m1 [(1 + g m 2 rO 2 )rO1 + rO 2 ]
Av ≈ − g m1rO1 g m 2 rO 2

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 17 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

PMOS Cascode Current Source as Load
• A large load impedance can be achieved by using a PMOS 
cascode current source.

RoN ≈ g m 2 rO 2 rO 1
RoP ≈ g m 3 rO 3 rO 4
Rout = RoN || RoP

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 18 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 9
4/17/2008

MOS Current Mirror
• The motivation behind a current mirror is to duplicate a 
(scaled version of the) “golden current” to other locations.
Current mirror concept Generation of required VGS Current Mirror Circuitry

⎛W ⎞ ⎛W ⎞
I REF = μnCox ⎜ ⎟ (VX − VTH )
1
μ nCox ⎜ ⎟ (VX − VTH )2
1
I copy1 =
2

2 ⎝ L ⎠ REF 2 ⎝ L ⎠1

VX =
2 I REF
μ nCox (W / L )1
+ VTH 1
I copy1 =
(W / L )1 I REF
(W / L )REF
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 19 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

MOS Current Mirror – NOT!
• This is not a current mirror, because the relationship between 
VX and IREF is not clearly defined.

• The only way to clearly define VX with IREF is to use a diode‐
connected MOS since it provides square‐law I‐V relationship. 
EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 20 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 10
4/17/2008

Example:  Current Scaling 
• MOS current mirrors can be used to scale IREF up or down 
– I1 = 0.2mA; I2 = 0.5mA

λ = 0:

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 21 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

Impact of Channel‐Length Modulation
μ nCox ⎜ ⎟ (VX − VTH )2 [1 + λ (VDS1 − VD , sat )]
1 ⎛W ⎞
I copy1 =
λ≠0 2 ⎝ L ⎠1
⎛W ⎞
= μ nCox ⎜ ⎟ (VX − VTH ) [1 + λ (VDS 1 − VGS + VTH )]
1 2

2 ⎝ ⎠1
L

I REF = μnCox ⎜ ⎟ (VX − VTH ) [1 + λ (VGS − VD,sat )]


1 ⎛W ⎞ 2

2 ⎝ ⎠ REF
L
⎛W ⎞
= μnCox ⎜ ⎟ (VX − VTH ) [1 + λVTH ]
1 2

2 ⎝ ⎠ REF
L

I copy1 =
(W / L )1 I REF
1 + λ (VDS1 − VGS + VTH )
=
(W / L )1 I ⎛⎜1 + λ (VDS1 − VGS ) ⎞⎟
(W / L )REF 1 + λVTH (W / L )REF REF ⎜⎝ 1 + λVTH ⎟⎠

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 22 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 11
4/17/2008

CMOS Current Mirror

EE105 Spring 2008 Lecture 20, Slide 23 Prof. Wu, UC Berkeley

EE105 Fall 2007 12