Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 3

THE DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT LESSON PLAN

Subject: Citizenship and Identity. Creative Expression. Early Literacy


Date: January 30 2018 Time: 10:00-10:45
Curriculum Connections:
Citizenship and Identity
-Appreciates the unique characteristics, interests, gifts and talents of
others
-Appreciates feelings ideas stories and experiences shared by
others
Creative Expression:
-Explores and expresses ideas, perceptions, feelings and thoughts in a
variety of forms
-Values how personal stories expres what it means to belong
-values and respects significant people in his or her life
Early Literacy:
-Asks questions and makes comments during listening and reading
activities
-Begins to make connections among sounds, letters, words, pictures and
meaning
-Copies scribed words and print text to assist with writing
-Participates in shared listening reading, and viewing experiences
-Talks about and represents the actions of characters portrayed in oral,
print, and other media texts
-Uses drawing to illustrate ideas and information and talk about them

Instructional Objectives:
 Students will engage in the story and learning activity.
 Students will have the opportunity to explore some of the things that make
them unique and appreciate the unique characteristics, interests, gifts and
talents of others
 Students will learn that they can record personal experiences in pictures
and words.
Knowledge:
 Students will understand the word unique and use it correctly when
discussing it with peers and adults
Skill:
 Students will develop fine motor skills by:
o Copying letters
o Drawing with pre-printing shapes
o Colouring in lines and filling in white spaces

Key Questions:
 What is the authors job? What is the illustrators job?
 How do we show pictures with lots of details? What is considered filled in?
 How do we spell the colour names?
 Why are all colors important? Could we complete pictures without some colours?
 Why do we need all the crayon colours? If we were missing a colour what would
you miss drawing?
 What is our special word we have been learning about? Are crayons unique?

Materials:
The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt
Crayon costume
Crayons
Pencils
Erasers
Student Worksheets
Chart Paper with different colour of markers
Preparation:
Photocopy 45 Student Worksheets

Adaptations:
Assist student with writing and composing letters
Give students reminders of the instructions and what to do

Lesson Procedure:
 Ask students to gather at the carpet. Are we sitting next to a friend we can
stay quiet beside? Are we showing all the five rules? What are the 5 rules?
 We will be reading The Day the Crayons Quit. What does the author do? What
does the illustrator do?
 Read the story. Stop throughout for questioning, comments, and confirm
student understanding
 What emotion were the crayons feeling? Why are all colors important? Could we
complete pictures without some colours? Why do we need all the crayon
colours? Is it important for Duncan to listen to the crayons complaints?
 If we were missing a colour what would you miss drawing? What is our special
word we have been learning about? Are crayons unique?
 Show the worksheet to the students! They will have to use pencil to write their
name, the name of the colour and sketch their drawing. They are to think about
what they would miss colouring if there crayons quit! They will write the colour
that they would need to draw that particular picture. Then draw the picture
underneath their sentence!
 Body Break for kids! Get students to follow your movement for a body break!
 Let’s write out colours together. Lets sound out the first letter together. (Go
through every colour and write it out in the colour so students can write it out
independently)
 Ask students to show their drawings to the adults and explain their drawing.
 Handout-name tags and worksheets. Circulate classroom and assist students and
have conversations about their drawings and assist student in writing when
needed.
 Collect student work to glue into their visual journals.

Assessment:
Classroom Observations and Conversations – Anecdotal Notes
Student Crayon Drawing
Student Participation

When students are done they can read through books and they can look for
popcorn words!

Reflection:
How did the students respond? Were they engaged in the lesson? How did they
show their learning?