Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 26

LAHORE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN UNIVERSITY

Business Plan
HOPE LINK

JIYA ALI 0102-BBA2014-06

BBA 6th Semester

Ma’am Seemab Qaisar


ACKNOWLEGMENT

Praise and thanks to ALLAH Almighty, the one testing us all at all times and making decisions
about what we don’t know and can’t know.

The report submitted today is a result of collective efforts. There are innumerous helping hands
behind who have guided on our way. Writing this report appeared to be a good experience for us.
It added a lot to our knowledge. This report is one of our memorable experiences in our student
life.

Though words are inadequate in offering thanks to our teacher but we owe our profound
gratitude to MA’AM SEEMAB QAISAR for stimulating our creative abilities by assigning this
project to us and for her able guidance and useful suggestions, which helped us in completing
our project in time. Whatever we have learnt from her and this project report has put indelible
impression on our minds and it is our conviction that this learning experience will always be a
source of help in our practical life and professional career.

Business Plan Page 2


Table of content

Chapter PARTICULARS Page no.


no.

Acknowledgment

1. Introduction of business plan


1.1. Definition
1.2. Typical structure for a business plan
1.3. Cost overruns and revenue shortfalls
1.4. Legal and liabilities issues
1.4.1. Disclosure requirements
1.4.2. Limitations on audience and contents
1.5.Uses
1.6.Not for profit business
2. Executive summary

3. Organization summary
3.1. Mission
3.2. Objectives
3.3. Start-up summary
3.4. Legal entity
4. Services

5. Market analysis
5.1 Market segmentation
5.1.1. Service graphics
5.1.2. Service demographics
5.1.3. Service psychographic
5.1.4. Service behaviors
5.2- Target market segmentation strategy
6. Strategy and implementation
6.1Marketing strategy
6.2. Fundraising strategy
6.3. Funding forecast

Business Plan Page 3


6.3.1Food collection
6.3.2. Fill the bucket
6.3.3. Food rescue express
6.3.4. Gleaning
6.3.5. Youth farm
7. Management summary
7.1. Personnel plan
8. Financial plan
8.1. Important assumptions
8.2. Projected surplus and deficits
8.3. Projected cash flow
8.4. Projected balance sheet

Business Plan Page 4


CHAPTER NO.1
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS PLAN

1.1- DEFINITION:
A business plan is a formal statement of business goals, reasons they are attainable, and plans
for reaching them. It may also contain background information about the organization or team
attempting to reach those goals.

Business plans may be internally or externally focused. Externally focused plans target goals that
are important to external stakeholders, particularly financial stakeholders. External stake-holders
of non-profits include donors and the clients of the non-profit's services internally focused
business plans target intermediate goals required to reach the external goals. They may cover the
development of a new product, a new service, a new IT system, a restructuring of finance, the
refurbishing of a factory or a restructuring of the organization.

Operational plans describe the goals of an internal organization, working group or department.
Project plans, sometimes known as project frameworks, describe the goals of a particular project.
They may also address the project's place within the organization's larger strategic goals

1.2- TYPICAL STRUCTURE FOR A BUSINESS PLAN:


There are following typical elements of a business plan:

1. cover page and table of contents


2. executive summary
3. mission statement
4. business description
5. business environment analysis
6. SWOT analysis
7. industry background
8. competitor analysis
9. market analysis
10. marketing plan
11. operations plan
12. management summary
13. financial plan

14. attachments and milestones

Business Plan Page 5


1.3- COST OVERRUNS AND REVENUE SHORTFALLS:

A cost overrun, also known as a cost increase, underrated or budget overrun, involves
unexpected costs incurred in excess of budgeted amounts due to an underestimation of the
actual cost during budgeting.

A shortfall is the amount by which a financial obligation or liability exceeds the amount of cash
that is available. A shortfall can be temporary in nature, arising out of a unique set of
circumstances, or it can be persistent, in which case it may indicate poor financial management
practice.

Shortfall risk can be mitigated using efficient hedging strategies, which aim to offer protection
from adverse price movements.

Cost and revenue estimates are central to any business plan for deciding the viability of the
planned venture. But costs are often underestimated and revenues overestimated resulting in later
cost overruns, revenue shortfalls, and possibly non-viability. During the dot-com bubble 1997-
2001 this was a problem for many technology start-ups. Reference class forecasting has been
developed to reduce the risks of cost overruns and revenue shortfalls and thus generate more
accurate business plans.

1.4- LEGAL AND LIABILITY ISSUES:


There are many legal and liability issues regarding a business plan. The two major issues are
given as follows:

1.4.1- DISCLOURE REQUIREMENTS:

An externally targeted business plan should list all legal concerns and financial liabilities that
might negatively affect investors. Depending on the amount of funds being raised and the
audience to whom the plan is presented, failure to do this may have severe legal consequences.

1.4.2- LIMITATIONS ON AUDIENCE AND CONTENT:

Non disclosure agreements (NDAs) with third parties, non-compete agreements, conflicts of
interest, privacy concerns, and the protection of one's trade secrets may severely limit the
audience to which one might show the business plan. Alternatively, they may require each party
receiving the business plan to sign a contract accepting special clauses and conditions.

This situation is complicated by the fact that many venture capitalists will refuse to sign an NDA
before looking at a business plan, lest it put them in the untenable position of looking at two
independently developed look-alike business plans, both claiming originality. In such situations

Business Plan Page 6


one may need to develop two versions of the business plan: a stripped down plan that can be
used to develop a relationship and a detail plan that is only shown when investors have sufficient
interest and trust to sign an NDA.

1.5- USES:
There are following uses of business plan:

Education:

 Business plans are used in some primary and secondary programs to teach economic
principles.
 Wikiversity has a Lunar Boom Town project where students of all ages can collaborate
with designing and revising business models and practice evaluating them to learn
practical business planning techniques and methodology
Fundraising:

Fundraising is the primary purpose for many business plans, since they are related to the inherent
probable success/failure of the company risk.

 Angel investors:

An angel investors also known as a business angel, informal investor, angel funder, private
investor, or seed investor is an affluent individual who provides capital for a business start-
up, usually in exchange for convertible debt or ownership equity.

 Business loans:
A business loan is a loan specifically intended for business purposes. As with all loans, it
involves the creation of a debt, which will be repaid with added interest.

 Grants:

Grants are non-repayable funds or products disbursed by one party , often a government
department, corporation, foundation or trust, to a recipient, often a nonprofit entity,
educational institution, business or an individual. In order to receive a grant, some form of
"Grant Writing" often referred to as either a proposal or an application is required.

 Startup company funding:

A startup company is an entrepreneurial venture which is typically a newly emerged, fast-


growing business that aims to meet a marketplace need by developing or offering an
innovative product, process or service.

Business Plan Page 7


 Venture capital:

Venture capital (VC) is a type of private equity, a form of financing that is provided by firms
or funds to small, early-stage, emerging firms that are deemed to have high growth potential,
or which have demonstrated high growth.

INTERNAL USE :

 Management by objectives (MBO) is a process of agreeing upon objectives (as can be


detailed within business plans) within an organization so that management and employees
agree to the objectives and understand what they are in the organization.
 Strategic planning is an organization's process of defining its strategy, or direction, and
making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy, including its capital and
people. Business plans can help decision makers see how specific projects relate to the
organization's strategic plan.
 Total quality management (TQM) is a business management strategy aimed at embedding
awareness of quality in all organizational processes. TQM has been widely used in
manufacturing, education, call centers, government, and service industries, as well as NASA
space and science programs.

1.6. NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANIZATION:


The business goals may be defined both for non-profit or for-profit organizations. For-profit
business plans typically focus on financial goals, such as profit or creation of wealth. Non-profit,
as well as government agency business plans tend to focus on the "organizational mission" which
is the basis for their governmental status or their non-profit, tax-exempt status, respectively—
although non-profits may also focus on optimizing revenue.
The primary difference between profit and non-profit organizations is that "for-profit"
organizations look to maximize wealth versus non-profit organizations, which look to provide a
greater good to society. In non-profit organizations, creative tensions may develop in the effort to
balance mission with "margin" (or revenue).

Business Plan Page 8


CHAPTER NO. 2
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Hope link is a tax-exempt not-for-profit food bank that will serve Pakistan County. Hope link's
goal is to alleviate hunger in Pakistan by soliciting, collecting, growing and packaging food for
distribution through a network of service agencies and programs that serve our target population
groups. Our services include food box programs, emergency food programs, and a youth farm
that provides opportunities for self-sufficiency activities for "at risk" youth. Hope link receives
support from the county, charitable organizations and corporate sponsorship.

Our client base is low-income people, mainly families, who need emergency help to put food on
the table. Nearly half of those served by the program are children. Helping Hand operates a
warehouse facility where we store donated or rescued food for distribution. The program
actively solicits food from local food growers, retailers, wholesalers, and processors. In addition,
Hope link collect food donations from restaurants for immediate distribution to service
programs.

It is estimated that the number of children who need services from Hope link will increase during
the next five years. Pakistan is growing and a number of new families are entering the area to
look for employment. A number of programs exist to help transition these new families into the
county. Hope link is an important resource to these programs because we can respond quickly
with the one of the most important resources these families need “Food”.

Our services improve the ability of families to care for children and achieve goals of self-
sufficiency. Hope link's services, now, are a small investment in comparison to cost of ignoring
the problem of hunger in the county and the influence it has on a number of health and crime
issues.

Business Plan Page 9


The highlights about funding, gross profit and net profit can be shown in the graph:

HIGHLIGHTS
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
Funding 408,360 548,296 592,181
Gross surplus 360,630 494,496 532,481
Net surplus 47,730 53,800 59,700

600000

500000

400000
Funding
300000 Gross Surplus
Net Surplus
200000

100000

0
YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3

Business Plan Page 10


CHAPTER NO. 3
ORGANIZATION SUMMARY

Hope link is a food bank serving Pakistan. The program's focus is to identify and utilize
resources for food in the county in order to eliminate hunger among low-income individuals and
families in the area.
The program performs the following:
1. Solicits and distributes food to community programs.
2. Operates a youth farm program for "at-risk" young people.

3.1- MISSION:
The mission of Hope link is to alleviate hunger in Pakistan by soliciting, collecting, growing, and
packaging food for distribution through a network of agencies and programs, as well as provide
opportunities for self sufficiency. Our services include food box programs, emergency shelters,
congregate meal sites, residential treatment services, and children's programs.

3.2- OBJECTIVES:

This new initiative is designed to create a food bank that will serve pakistan. Our objectives are:
 Establish donation network of local growers, retailers, wholesalers, and processors in
Johnson County.
 Establish youth farm that will employ "at risk" youth.

Business Plan Page 11


 Collect over four million pounds of food the first year of operation. Increase collection
amount by 25% each year.
 Effectively distribute the food to low-income families that make up over 25-30% of
Pakistan’s population.
 Acquire $200,000 of start-up funding through corporate, private charities and government
financial support.

 Raise an additional $100,000 in fundraising activity.

3.3- START-UP SUMMARY:


Hope link's start-up cost is $200,000. A significant portion of the cost is donated trucks and
collection vehicles for food, as well as a storage facility. The remainder is the expenses normally
associated with opening an office. The assumptions are shown in the following table and chart.

START-UP FUNDING

Total funding required 200,000


Total assets 76,000
Total liabilities 0
Total investment: 200,000
Corporate sponsorship 100,000
Government 50,000
Private trust 50,000
Additional funding 0

START-UP EXPENSES
legal 700
stationary 500
Brouchers 800
Food collection supplies 10,000
insurance 1,000
rent 1,000
Truck and vehicles 50,000

Business Plan Page 12


Warehouse equipment 40,000
Harvesting / farm equipment 20,000
Total start-up expenses 124000

start-up requirements

200000
180000
160000
140000
120000
100000 start-up requirements

80000
60000
40000
20000
0
Expenses Assets Investment

3.4- LEGAL ENTITY:


Hope link is a non-profit corporation.

Business Plan Page 13


CHAPTER NO. 4
SERVICES

Approximately 25% of Pakistan residents qualify for assistance from Hope link. Low-income
people, mostly families, who need emergency help to put food on the table, will be helped by this
new program. Nearly half of the people we serve are children and nearly one-fifth are senior
citizens. In the families we serve, there is at least one working person.

Hope link collects food at its centralized facility in the city of Islamabad and distributes the food
to nonprofit social service agencies and programs in the county. The majority of the food we
distribute is in the form of emergency boxes. Individuals or families can receive up to 15 boxes a
year. Each box contains a 3-5 day supply of high-quality food. The remaining resources are
dedicated to providing food to residential treatment facilities, dinner programs, youth service
centers, foster homes, children's program and more.

Business Plan Page 14


Chapter no. 5
MARKET ANALYSIS

The population base for Pakistan is 193,200,000,000. Approximately up to 25-30% of the


county's population can be characterized as low-income. This represents 57,960,000,000
residents that are potentially in need of services from Hope link.
This group can be broken down into three segments:
 Seniors;(15,649,200,000)
 Individual Adults; (16,228,800,000)
 Children; (26,082,000,000).

Children represent 45% of the county residents in need of Hope link services. The program has
identified children and their families as it primary target customers. It is projected that the
number of low-income children will increase in Pakistan by 20% over the next four years. By
2021, children will represent 52% of Hope link's client base. With effective intervention, the
debilitation effects of hunger can be eliminated. Consequently, the families will be better able to
be successfully providing for its children.

Market Analysis

Seniors
Individual Adults
Children

Business Plan Page 15


5.1- MARKET SEGMENTATION:

5.1.1-Service Geographic
Helping Hand serves the Johnson County area with a total population in excess of 600,000
people. Over 50% of the county's population lives in Monroe. The remaining bulk of county's
population resides in Lewisville, Drain, Fremont, and Larkspurs.

5.1.2-Service Demographics
It is estimated that 20% of the county's residents are low-income. Of the county's 120,000 low
income residents, 25% are seniors, 30% are individual adults, and 45% are children. Family
groupings represent over 64% of low income residents in Johnson County. Over 90% of these
families have at least one family member working full-time. This is why children and their
families are the focus of the program.
5.1.3- Service Psychographics
One of the most typical profiles of families interested in this type of program can be described by
the following:
 At least one parent/guardian works full-time.
 The average family size is five, with three or four children.
 The family has made contact with one or more social service agency or program in the last
12 months.
 The families are most receptive to receiving food assistance through social service programs
that are working with the families in other concerns.
5.1.4- Service Behaviors
HOPE LINK has established that the most effective method to distribute food is through the
network of existing social service programs and agencies serving the target population groups.
There are 25 programs and agencies that provide services to low-income seniors, adults and
children. On average, clients visit one or more of these programs or agencies on a weekly basis.
In addition, these programs have an excellent volunteer base that can be mobilized to distribute
food.

Business Plan Page 16


5.2- TARGET MARKET SEGMENT STRATEGY:

The primary target population group for Hope link Hand is children (from birth to 16 years of
age) and their families. This group has been identified as the fastest growing segment of the
population that needs food bank services. The impact of food assistance is most critical during
the first five years of a child's life. Children ages birth to five years of age represent 50% of the
children served by the program.

Business Plan Page 17


Chapter # 6
Strategy and implementation

Hope link will focus on establishing an effective collection network with local growers, retailers,
wholesalers, and processors. Another primary goal will be the creation of a youth farm that will
employ "at risk" youth. The program will also start a fundraising campaign with area retail
markets, banks and credit unions in order to raise an additional $100,000.
Hope link will advertise its services to the target populations groups through the agencies that
serve these groups on a daily basis.

6.1 MARKETING STRATEGY:


Hope links marketing program will focus on increasing its visibility in the community.
Participating food retail stores will carry information about Hope link and how stores like this
one are helping the community. Award plaques will be distributed to stores each year and the
program will find additional methods to raise the profile of stores that assist the program.
Program brochures will be distributed by local social service programs and agencies that serve
the target population groups. In addition, these programs and agencies will serve as advocates of
using Hope link in response to the need for emergency food.

6.2- Fundraising strategy:


Hope link will immediately start a Fall Fundraising campaign that will focus on using the local
banks and credit unions to collect donations to fight hunger. Hope link will place donation bins
in participating banks and credit union. In addition, customers in local retail food stores can
donate money to Hope link at the checkout stand.

Business Plan Page 18


6.3-Funding forecast:
Hope link monthly revenues for the 2017-2018 calendar year will fluctuate based on the
seasons. During fall the program will have its major fundraiser. The summer months are
anticipated to be weak food collection months.
The following are Hope link’s fundraising and food collection programs:

6.3.1-Food Collection (FC):


Participating retailers, wholesalers, and processors will donate food stuffs. These contributors
will contribute donations of a monthly basis
.
6.3.2- Fill the Bucket (FTB):
Each Fall, Hope link will run a fundraiser through local banks and credit union. Small containers
that will look like the larger Hope link food bins will sit at the counter of each teller.

6.3.3- Food Rescue Express (FRE):


Hope link will collect donated food from local restaurants to be immediately distributed to
programs in the area that will in turn distribute the food to their clients.

6.3.4-Gleaning:
Harvest leftovers and unsold produce from farmers' fields will be collected by Hope link. Every
year thousands of pounds of fresh fruit and vegetables are left to rot or get tilled under the field.
Gleaning reduces waste while feeding people. Hope link actually recruits gleaning crews from
the local support program.
6.3.5- Youth Farm (YF)
The youth farm utilizes kids in diversion program or local program serving "at risk" kids to
provide a learning environment that turn these kids life around. The produce is sold by the youth
farm crew members at an on-site produce stand. All proceeds are used to support Hope link
programs.

FUNDING FORECAST
FUNDING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3
FC $171,770 $188,947 $207,842
FTB $130,000 $143,000 $157,300
FRE $34,590 $38,049 $41,854
Gleaning $30,000 $33,000 $36,300
CD $24,000 $26,400 $29,040
C/CPE $0 $100,000 $100,000
YF $18,000 $18,900 $19,845

Business Plan Page 19


COST OF FUNDING
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
FC $19,355 $21,000 $23,400
FTB $6,647 $7,300 $8,100
FRE $3,331 $5,200 $5,800
$4,800 $5,400 $6,000
Gleaning
CD $4,627 $5,100 $5,600
YF $8,970 $9,800 $10,800
Subtotal Cost of Funding $47,730 $53,800 $59,700

600000

500000 YF
C/CPF
400000
CD
GLEANING
300000
FRE
200000 FTB
FC
100000

0
year 1 year 2 year 3

Business Plan Page 20


CHAPTER NO. 7
MANAGEMENT SUMMARY

Hope link’s management team consist of a board of directors and an executive director. The
program will consist of five service coordinators.

7.1 PERSONNEL PLAN:

The following table summarizes the program's personnel expenditures for the first three years.
The staff will consist of five coordinators:
 Volunteer coordinator;
 Food solicitation coordinator;
 Distribution coordinator;
 Warehouse coordinator;
 Youth farm coordinator.

PERSONNEL PLAN
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
Volunteer Coordinator $21,600 $21,600 $21,600
Food Solicitation Coordinator $21,600 $21,600 $21,600
Distribution Coordinator $21,600 $21,600 $21,600
Warehouse Coordinator $21,600 $21,600 $21,600
Youth Farm Coordinator $21,600 $21,600 $21,600
Executive Director $24,000 $24,000 $24,000
Total Payroll $132,000 $132,000 $132,000
T0TAL PEOPLE 6 6 6

Business Plan Page 21


CHAPTER NO. 8
FINANCIAL PLAN

HOPE LINK is funded from a variety of sources, public and private. We anticipate that funding
will increase by 15% over the next three years. The executive director and the board of directors
will be responsible for reviewing the program expenditures and making adjustment to assure the
program solvency.
8.1-IMPORTANT ASSUMPTIONS:
The financial plan depends on important assumptions, most of which are shown in the following
table.
The key underlying assumptions are:
 We assume a slow-growth economy, without major recession.
 We assume population growth in the county that will contribute to additional low-income
clients.
 We assume, of course, that there are no unforeseen changes in funding availability.
 We assume a continued need for emergency food services in the country.

GENERAL ASSUMPTIONS
YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3
Plan Month 1 2 3
Current Interest Rate 10.00% 10.00% 10.00%
Long-term Interest Rate 10.00% 10.00% 10.00%
Tax Rate 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
Other 0 0 0

Business Plan Page 22


8.2- PROJECTED SURPLUS AND DEFICIT:

HOPE LINK's Projected Surplus and Deficit is shown on the following table.

SURPLUS AND DEFICIT


YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3
Funding $408,360 $548,296 $592,181
Direct Cost $47,730 $53,800 $59,700
Other Costs of Funding $0 $0 $0
TOTAL DIRECT COST $47,730 $53,800 $59,700
Gross Surplus $360,630 $494,496 $532,481
Gross Surplus % 88.31% 90.19% 89.92%
Expenses
Payroll $132,000 $132,000 $132,000
Sales and Marketing Costs $0 $0 $0
Depreciation $840 $840 $840
Rent $12,000 $12,000 $12,000
Utilities $2,400 $2,400 $2,400
Insurance $3,600 $3,600 $3,600
Payroll Taxes $19,800 $19,800 $19,800
Food Distribution $195,000 $260,000 $290,000
Total Operating Expenses $365,640 $430,640 $460,640
Surplus Before Interest and Taxes ($5,010) $63,856 $71,841
EBITDA ($4,170) $64,696 $72,681
Interest Expense $0 $0 $0
Taxes Incurred $0 $0 $0
Net Surplus ($5,010) $63,856 $71,841
Net Surplus/Funding -1.23% 11.65% 12.13%

Business Plan Page 23


surplus yearly

80,000

60,000

40,000

20,000

-20,000 year 1
year 2
year 3

8.3- PROJECTED CASH FLOW:


Helping Hand's cash flow is represented as funding dollars and collected food and monetary
donations. The monthly cash flow is shown in the illustration, with one bar representing the cash
flow per month, and the other the monthly cash balance.

PRO FORMA CASH FLOW


YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3
Cash Received
Cash from Operations
Cash Funding $408,360 $548,296 $592,181
SUBTOTAL CASH FROM OPERATIONS $408,360 $548,296 $592,181
Additional Cash Received
Sales Tax, VAT, HST/GST Received $0 $0 $0
New Current Borrowing $0 $0 $0
New Other Liabilities (interest-free) $0 $0 $0
New Long-term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Sales of Other Current Assets $0 $0 $0
Sales of Long-term Assets $0 $0 $0
New Investment Received $0 $0 $0
SUBTOTAL CASH RECEIVED $408,360 $548,296 $592,181
Expenditures
Expenditures from Operations

Business Plan Page 24


Cash Spending $132,000 $132,000 $132,000
Bill Payments $257,132 $354,348 $385,465
SUBTOTAL SPENT ON OPERATIONS $389,132 $486,348 $517,465
Additional Cash Spent
Sales Tax, VAT, HST/GST Paid Out $0 $0 $0
Principal Repayment of Current Borrowing $0 $0 $0
Other Liabilities Principal Repayment $0 $0 $0
Long-term Liabilities Principal Repayment $0 $0 $0
Purchase Other Current Assets $0 $0 $0
Purchase Long-term Assets $0 $0 $0
Dividends $0 $0 $0
SUBTOTAL CASH SPENT $389,132 $486,348 $517,465
Net Cash Flow $19,228 $61,948 $74,716
Cash Balance $88,228 $150,176 $224,892

250000

200000

150000
net cash flow
cash balance
100000

50000

0
year 1 year 2 year 3

Business Plan Page 25


8.4- PROJECTED BALANCE SHEET:

The following table represents the Project Balance Sheet for Helping Hand.

PRO FORMA BALANCE SHEET


YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3
Assets
Current Assets
Cash $88,228 $150,176 $224,892
Inventory $7,386 $8,326 $9,239
Other Current Assets $0 $0 $0
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS $95,614 $158,501 $234,131
Long-term Assets
Long-term Assets $7,000 $7,000 $7,000
Accumulated Depreciation $840 $1,680 $2,520
TOTAL LONG-TERM ASSETS $6,160 $5,320 $4,480
TOTAL ASSETS $101,774 $163,821 $238,611
Liabilities and Capital Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
Current Liabilities
Accounts Payable $30,784 $28,976 $31,924
Current Borrowing $0 $0 $0
Other Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
SUBTOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES $30,784 $28,976 $31,924
Long-term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
TOTAL LIABILITIES $30,784 $28,976 $31,924
Paid-in Capital $200,000 $200,000 $200,000
Accumulated Surplus/Deficit ($124,000) ($129,010) ($65,154)
Surplus/Deficit ($5,010) $63,856 $71,841
TOTAL CAPITAL $70,990 $134,846 $206,686
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL $101,774 $163,821 $238,611
Net Worth $70,990 $134,846 $206,686

Business Plan Page 26