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Lesson 1: Who is Trainer and/or Assessor?

Trainee’s Entry Requirements


It is expected that you will be a Trainer and/or Assessor as you finish this course, Trainers Methodology I (TM I).

What is a TVET Trainer?

TVET Trainer is a professional who enables a learner or a group of learners to develop competencies to performing a particular trade or technical
work. Towards this end, a TVET Trainer may assume various roles such as training facilitator, competency assessor, training designer, developer or
training supervisor 1.
What is a Trainer / Assessor?

From the Training Regulation, a Trainer is a person who enables group of learners to develop competencies toward performing a particular trade or
technical work while an Assessor is an individual accredited and authorized to evaluate or assess competencies of a candidate applying for
certification or any one of the purpose of assessment.

Trainer/Assessor is at least NC II holder and who has achieved all the required units of competency identified in the Trainers Methodology Level I (TM
Level I) under the PTTQF. He is also a holder of National TVET Trainer Certificate Level I (NTTC I) 2. A Trainer is an Assessor; an Assessor is a
Trainer 3.
To qualify for this course, a candidate or trainee must satisfy the following requirements:

 Graduate of baccalaureate degree or equivalent in training or experience along the field of Technical Vocational Education and Training
 Certified at the same or higher NC Level in the qualification that will be handled (for technical trainers)
 Able to communicate orally and in writing
 Physically fit and mentally healthy
 Proficient in quantitative and qualitative analysis
 Proficient in verbal reasoning

Lesson 2: Competencies of a Trainer and/or Assessor


Objective
At the end of the session, you should be able to:

 Determine the skills and knowledge that a trainer or assessor should have
 Explain required skills as a trainer and or assessor

Introduction
As you progress through this lesson, you should keep in mind the skills and knowledge required to become a competent trainer. Remember that
awareness of your skills and capabilities will help you make informed choices.

Basic and Core Competencies


Listed are the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required of Trainers Methodology (TM) Level I 1:
Basic Competencies (or skills and knowledge that everyone needs for work):

 Lead workplace Communication


 Apply math and science principles in technical training
 Apply environmental principles and advocate conservation
 Utilize IT applications in technical training
 Lead small teams
 Apply work ethics, values and quality principles
 Work effectively in vocational education and training
 Foster and promote a learning culture
 Ensure a healthy and safe learning environment
 Maintain and enhance professional practice
 Develop and promote appreciation for cost-benefits of technical training
 Develop and promote global understanding of labor market

Core Competencies (or specific skills and knowledge needed in TM1):

 Plan training sessions


 Facilitate learning sessions
 Supervise work-based learning
 Conduct competency assessment
 Maintain training facilities
 Utilize electronic media in facilitating training

 Congratulations - end of lesson reached


 Well done!
 You have completed 100% of the lesson

Lesson 3: Competency-Based Training (CBT)


Objectives
At the end of the session, you should be able to:

 Define commonly used Competency-Based Training terminologies


 Explain ten principles of Competency-Based Training
 Differentiate traditional education with Competency-Based Training

Introduction
Getting the idea on structure and principles embedded in training is important before designing a session plan. Do you know how to teach a Technical-
Vocational Education and Training (TVET) program? That will be the focus of today’s lesson.

The framework in teaching skill-based lesson is called Competency Based Training (or CBT). It focuses on skills development that is why its
approach differs from the traditional education.

In traditional education, the teacher controls the environment (or called teacher-centered approach); while in CBT, the learners control and manipulate
the tools and equipments with the guide of a teacher (also known as student-centered approach).

In addition to that, learners are not compared among each other, instead their skills are compared against the norms or standard set by the industry.
The training is also self-paced; an example of this is when the trainer allows the students to study the materials & practice the skill on their own. Lastly,
the focus of CBT is on the outcome or the end product.

The need to understand commonly used terminologies is important before starting this courseware. Comprehending these terminologies will empower
you to understand easily the next lessons.

 Knowledge is the cognitive representation of ideas, events, activities or tasks derived from practical or professional experience as well as from
formal instruction or study, e.g. memory, understanding, analysis 1.

 Skill refers to the acquired and practiced ability to carry out a task or job 2.

 Competency, as used in TESDA, is a) the application of knowledge, skills and attitude required to complete a work activities to the standard
expected in the workplace 3; or b) the possession and application of knowledge, skills and attitudes to the standard of performance required in the
workplace 4.

The 4 dimensions of competency that describes aspect of work performance are 5:

I. Task Skills – undertaking a specific workplace task


II. Task Management Skills – managing a number of different tasks to complete the entire work activity

III. Contingency Management Skills – responding to problems, irregularities and breakdown in routine when undertaking the work activity

IV. Job/Role Environment Skills – dealing with the responsibilities and expectations of the work environment when undertaking a work activity

 Competency Standard are industry-determined specification of competencies required for effective work performance. They are expressed as
outcomes and they focus on work place activity rather than training or personal attributes, and capture the ability to apply skills in new situations and
changing work organization 6.

 Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is the acknowledgement of an individual’s skills, knowledge and attitudes gained from life and work
experiences outside registered training programs 7.

 Qualification is cluster of units of competency that meets job roles and is significant in the workplace. It is also a certification awarded to a person
on successful completion of a course and/or in recognition of having demonstrated competencies relevant to an industry 7.

It has three components:

o Basic Competency – skills and knowledge that everyone needs for work

o Common Competency – skills and knowledge needed by people working in a particular industry

o Core Competency – specific skills and knowledge needed in a particular area of work-industry sector/occupation/job role

 Competency-Based Training (CBT) is a system by which the student is trained on the basis of demonstrated ability rather than on that of elapsed
time 7.

CBT includes:
o Competency-Based Curriculum (CBC) is the specification for a course or subject (module) which describes all the learning experience a
student or learner undergoes. It specifies outcomes which are consistent with the requirements of the workplace as agreed through industry or
community consultations.8

o Competency-Based Learning Material (CBLM)refers to the print and non-print instructional media used as guide in learning workplace
activities.
1
CEDEFOP 2008, Europe2 RA 7796/TESDA Law3 Procedures Manual on TR Development4 Guidelines on Assessment and Certification under the
Philippine TVET Competency Assessment and Certification System – PTCACS5 CBT Primer6 Training Regulations Framework7 ILO8 Quality
Procedures Manual – CBC Development

Delivery of Competency-Based Training (CBT)


The flow of CBT differs from the traditional education approach. To see the big picture is important before planning a session plan. Below is the CBT
delivery framework:

1. Trainee enters the program. Trainer conducts pre-training assessment to identify learner’s training needs. Orientation of CBT program
on Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and roles of trainer & trainee follows.

2. Trainee selects competency from the identified training needs and receives instruction from the trainer. The trainer administers learning contract or
agreement between him and his trainees, then provides CBLM materials and introduces the use of progress and achievement chart.

3. With the selected competency, the trainee studies the module by doing the following learning activities (in any order): review learning package, view
multimedia materials, use manuals, observe demonstration, practice skills in workshop, and receive assistance and advice.

4. While the trainee practices the skill, the trainer observes and records the performance on the Progress Chart. Student will attempt the task until he
masters the skill with the help of trainer’s immediate and constructive feedback.
5. Once the trainee determines by himself that he is competent to do the skill, he will call the attention of trainer. The trainer will observe and
rate the performance based on the Performance Criteria Checklist and will record the result on the Achievement Chart. If the skill is
satisfactorily performed, he will then select another unit of competency. If the skill is not satisfactorily performed, the trainee will study again
the module.

6. To exit the training program, trainee must satisfactorily perform the skill and must have enough units of competencies (or has completed all
the modules). If the trainee doesn’t have enough units of competencies, he will then select another unit of competency, and repeat the
competency-based training process.

Ten (10) Principles of CBT


ompetency-Based Training delivery anchors in its principles. These ten (10) principles of CBT serves as ground rules for trainers and trainees.
Memorize, apply and promulgate the listed principles below:

 Principle One: The training is based on curriculum (CBC) developed from the competency standards (CS).

 Principle Two: Learning is competency based or modular in structure.

 Principle Three: Training delivery is individualized and self-paced.

 Principle Four: Training is based on work that must be performed.

 Principle Five: Training materials are directly related to the competency standards and the curriculum modules.

 Principle Six: Assessment is based in the collection of evidences of the performance of work to the industry required standard.

 Principle Seven: Training is based both on and off the job components.

 Principle Eight: The system allows Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and or current competencies.

 Principle Nine: Training allows multiple entry and exit in the training program.

 Principle Ten: Approved training programs are nationally accredited. Programs of each institution or training center are registered with UTPRAS
(Unified TVET Program Registration and Accreditation System).

Now it is your turn to refresh memory on how your teacher taught you and compare it on how Competency-Based Training works. How will you teach
skill-based session? Does it have any difference? Will you make that change for the better? Get a paper and take down notes on its differences.

Congratulations - end of lesson reached


Well done!
You have completed 100% of the lesson

Lesson 1: Determining Trainee’s Characteristics


Objectives
At the end of the session, you should be able to:

 Identify learners’ characteristics and learning styles for trainees’ profile


 Determine adult learners’ characteristics

Introduction
Competency-Based Training without planning and without determining trainees’ characteristics will lead to an unsuccessful session plan.
It is a must for us teachers to know our students – their characteristics as adult learners, their educational background, and their culture - not only
because we need data for filing purposes, but for us to use these data to analyze and determine their training needs.

Who are our learners? What are the characteristics we need to include in their profile? What type of learners are they? Those are our some highlight
questions you might encounter as you proceed in this lesson.

Understanding Adult Learners


Before we determine trainees’ characteristics, we first need to understand our trainees as adult learners. Our training is learner-centered; hence, it is
essential to know them first.

Our training enables adult learners attain skills for them to land a job. Teaching them requires different teaching approaches and methodologies; thus,
understanding them will surely help in preparing an effective session plan.

Understanding how adults learn will also enable the trainer to think of teaching strategies that focused on adults. This is based on the theory
called Andragogy (Knowles), also known as adult education. The study came up with the characteristics of adult learner, and they are the following:

 Adults are autonomous & self-directed.


 Adults bring life experiences & knowledge to learning experiences.
 Adults are goal-oriented.
 Adults are relevancy-oriented.
 Adults are practical.
 Adults like to be respected.

Here is a best scenario on how to apply this theory: The trainer enters a class consisting of adult learners. They are all different in terms of age,
educational background, gender etc., but they all have one thing in common - they are all adult learners. A trainer, on his conscious state, will then use
strategies to meet the needs of adult learners.

A best example of strategy especially in developing working with teams is the use of Situated Learning Experience (SLE). It would be a very good
application of adult learning principles since they are given specific instruction to achieve and explore solution and course of actions to attain it.

An example is the creation of a tallest tower using limited supply of materials. In this SLE, the goal is to make the highest tower. The devising of
strategies and trying it out—gives adult learners autonomy and direct their own learning, and it also allows the students to bring in their previous
experiences and knowledge. When participants are asked to give their insights on their SLE experience, this allows learners to give respect to their
classmates, as the application of insights becomes practical and self-motivating.

Note that the methods and strategies we construct, consciously and unconsciously, should meet the needs of our adult learners, and will surely make
an effective transfer of learning.

Establishing Trainee’s Characteristics


In completing the trainee’s profile, we need to know the characteristics essential in individualizing the session plan. Below are the essential trainee’s
characteristics the trainer needs to gather:

Characteristics of What does it mean to the plan?


Learners
Language, literacy and These greatly affect the training method you can use, as well
numeracy (LLN) level as activities and task suitable for each session. You should be
prepared for different LLN levels and must have different
resources.
Cultural and language Be aware of different cultural background and language
background abilities. You should take into account inappropriate activities
because of culture and language.
Education and general It is used as one of the basis to gauge learner’s cognitive
knowledge capacity. It can also be of help in deciding what speaking pitch
and rate of voice to use for each session.
Gender It can influence your plan if there are activities that have
demonstration, role play and so on.
Age Age can alter the plan depending on what is being delivered,
how and at what pace.
Learning style Awareness on their learning style could aid on what training
method/s to use. You could classify them as auditory, visual,
kinesthetic, pragmatist, activist, reflector and theorist learners.
Download #1:
Trainee’s Profile Template

How Learners Learn?


A trainer is about to teach a group of students. Then he has collected data for trainee’s characteristics but the problem is he hasn’t assessed the
students learning style to complete the trainee’s profile.

What is learning style? Learning style is one’s own way of learning new information and ideas. It will give us an idea on how a person receive and
transfer information.

Suggested learning styles are VARK Learning Style Model and PART Learning Styles. Feel free to choose between the two in determining trainees’
learning style/s.

 Visual, Auditory, Read/Write and Kinesthetic (VARK) Learning Style Model

Everyone learn differently since we all have preferred way to absorb, comprehend and retain new information.

VARK Learning styles, as proposed by Fleming and Mills (1992), is a model that describes how a person takes-in and gives-out information while
learning. These learning styles are visual (learns best by seeing graphs, charts, and other symbols), auditory (learns best by listening), read/write
(learns best by reading text-based information) and kinesthetic (learns best by doing).

Use VARK Learning Style self-assessment questionnaire as a tool in determining your trainees’ learning style/s. Note that a trainee can have
one or more learning styles.

 PART Learning Styles

Another model is PART Learning Styles. It is developed by Honey & Mumford but the idea originated from Kolb’s Learning Style Model.

The four learning styles are:

o Pragmatists ‘putting theory into practice’ or ’needs to know how to apply the information in real world’ Pragmatist tends to integrate or put
together theory and practice as they perceive information abstractly and process it actively. They always think problems and opportunities as
challenges.

o Activists ‘having an experience’ or ’needs to do’ Activists put together experience and application as they perceive information concretely and
process it actively. They would likely tackle problems by brainstorming. Activists learn by trial and error, & by self-discovery method.

o Reflectors ‘reflecting on it’ or ’needs time to think over information’ Reflectors integrate or put together experience within oneself as they perceive
information concretely and process it reflectively. They learn by listening and sharing ideas.

o Theorists ‘drawing out own conclusion’ or ’needs to know theory behind information’ Theorists put together observations into complex but
logically sound theory as they perceive information abstractly and process it reflectively. They learn by thinking through ideas.

Use PART Learning Styles questionnaire to find out your trainees’ approach in learning.

Congratulations - end of lesson reached


Well done!
You have completed 100% of the lesson

Lesson 2: Pre-Training Assessment and Analysis


Objectives
At the end of the session, you should be able to:

 Describe pre-training assessment and training needs analysis


 Realize the importance of having pre-training assessment before starting the session
 Disengage current competency from the skills required to determine training gap

Introduction
“In differentiated classroom, teachers begin where students are, not the front of a curriculum guide”. – Carol Ann Tomlinson, 1999. As quoted by
Tomlinson, we start our session based on our pre-assessment, not in Competency Based Curriculum. Pre-assessment evaluates trainee’s knowledge,
skills, strengths and weaknesses prior to teaching.

Pre-Training Assessment
Pre-Training Assessment is conducted to recognize current competency (RCC) and recognition of prior learning (RPL). This assessment is done
before the training starts. Listed are reasons why it is needed:

 It allows us to see their mastered competencies.


 It serves as point of reference in assessing our trainees.
 It gives student quick look of future lesson.

Pre-Training Assessment can be done either of the following:

 Learners’ assess themselves using the self-assessment guide


 Trainer assesses learners’ previous experience through portfolio assessment
 Trainer assesses learners’ skills and knowledge through pre-test or diagnostic test

Self-Assessment Guide is a pre-assessment tool to help the candidate and assessor determine what evidence is available, when gaps exist,
including readiness for assessment 1.
Portfolio Assessment refers to the process of determining whether an applicant is competent through evaluation of his or her records of
achievement 2.
You can confirm authenticity of evidence of competency by:

 Calling or asking personally the signatories and confirm the information listed in certificate of award/employment.
 Calling or visiting the workplace where projects are done.

Pre-Test or Diagnostic Test is a type of formative assessment that involves collecting evidence to diagnose or identify a training need or performance
problem. (NVSC Handbook) Prepare the pre-test/diagnostic test according to the guidelines written in the lesson ‘Preparing Assessment Instruments’.

An assessor can use the portfolio assessment and pre-test results as source of evidences and a tool in verifying learner’s current competency and
prior learning. Pre-training assessment and analysis is done prior to actual training program.

1
www.tesda.gov.ph2 TESDA Circular no. 23, s. 2008 – Implementing Guidelines on PTQCS

Determining Training Gap


Determining Training Gap through Training Needs Analysis (TNA)
Under the CBT approach, each learner is assessed to find the gap between the skills they need (as described in the Training Package) and the skills
they already have. The difference between the two is called the training gap.

Skills Required* – Current Skills** = Training Gap = Training Needs

‘Skills Required’ refers to the competencies listed in the competency standards and specified by the industry; On the other hand, ‘Current Skills’
referred to as validated competencies gathered in the pre-training assessment.

A training program is then developed to help the learner acquire the skill deficiency. Therefore,Self-Assessment Guide (SAG) with Training Needs
Analysis (TNA) Tool is an important tool to use in determining training gap.

Congratulations - end of lesson reached


Well done!
You have completed 100% of the lesson

Lesson 1: Understanding the Training Regulations


Objectives
At the end of the session, you should be able to:

 Describe the sections of Training Regulations


 Describe components of Competency Standards
 Explain importance of Competency Standard in planning a training session

Introduction
Now that you have established the training gap of the learner, you are now ready to prepare the session plan. In preparing session plan, it is essential
to understand the structure of Training Regulation.

Training Regulations contains the prescribed minimum program standards. It is developed by experts and practitioners from public or private sector (or
called as Experts Panel) and is promulgated by the TESDA Board after national validation1.

Training Regulation
Training Regulation (TR) is a TESDA promulgated document that serves as basis for which the competency-based curriculum, instructional materials
and competency assessment tools are developed. This document represents specific qualification. How the competencies in this qualification can be
gained, assessed and be given recognition is detailed in this promulgated document 1.
All training institution who wants to offer TVET program are required to register under Unified TVET Program Registration and Accreditation System
(UTPRAS) either With Training Regulation (WTR) or No Training Regulation (NTR) to adhere in competency-based training requirements.

With Training Regulation (WTR) is described as programs that have appropriate promulgated Training Regulations; examples of WTR program are
Computer System Servicing, Food and Beverage Service to name some. No Training Regulations (NTR) refers to the programs that include skills
which are not covered yet by any promulgated Training Regulations; example of NTR program is those of interior designing 2.
It has four sections:

 Section 1 – Definition of Qualification refers to the group of competencies that describes the different functions of the qualification. It enumerates
the job titles of workers who are qualified.

 Section 2 - Competency Standards (CS) gives the specifications of competencies required for effective work performance.

 Section 3 - Training Standard (TS) contains information and requirements in designing training program for certain Qualification. In includes
curriculum design, training delivery; trainee entry requirements; tools equipment and materials; training facilities; trainer’s qualification and
institutional assessment.

 Section 4 – National Assessment & Certification Arrangement describes the policies governing assessment and certification procedure.
Download #4:
Training Regulations

1
TESDA Board Resolution No.2004-13 and Procedures Manual on TR Development2 Omnibus Guidelines on Program Registration under UTPRAS

Training Regulations (TR) – a TESDA-promulgated document that serves as basis for which the competency-based curriculum and instructional
materials and competency assessment tools are developed. This document represents a specific qualification. It defines the competency standards for
a national qualification and how such qualification can be gained, assessed and be given recognition.

Competency Standards
Competency Standard (CS), as used in TESDA, is industry-determined specification of competencies required for effective work performance. They
are expressed as outcomes and they focus on work place activity rather than training or personal attributes and capture the ability to apply skills in new
situations and changing work organization1. Refer to Section 2 of Training Regulations.
Defined below are the components of CS:

 Unit of Competency (or Unit Title) is a component of the competency standards stating a specific key function or role in a particular job or
occupation; it is the smallest component of achievement that can be assessed and certified under the PTQF.

 Unit Descriptor outlines what is done in the workplace. It clarifies scope and intent of unit.

 Elements are the building blocks of a unit of competency. They describe, in outcome terms, the functions that a person performs in the workplace.

 Performance Criteria are evaluative statements that specify what is to be assessed and the required level of performance.

 Required Knowledge (formerly known as Underpinning Knowledge) refers to the competency that involves in applying knowledge to perform work
activities. It includes specific knowledge that is essential to the performance of the competency.

 Required Skills (formerly known as Underpinning Skills) refers to the list of the skills needed to achieve the elements and performance criteria in
the unit of competency. It includes generic and industry specific skills.

 Range of Variables describes the circumstances or context in which the work is to be performed.

 Evidence Guide is a component of the unit of competency that defines or identifies the evidences required to determine the competence of the
individual. It provides information on:

o Critical Aspects of Competency refers to the evidence that is essential for successful performance of the unit of competency.

o Resource Implications refers to the resources needed for the successful performance of the work activity described in the unit of competency. It
includes work environment and conditions, materials, tools and equipment.

o Assessment Method refers to the ways of collecting evidence and when evidence should be collected.

o Context of Assessment refers to the place where assessment is to be conducted or carried out.
1
Descriptions are lifted from Training Regulations Framework

Congratulations - end of lesson reached


Well done!
You have completed 100% of the lesson

Objectives
At the end of the session, you should be able to:

 Determine elements of Course Design and Module of Instruction


 Analyze importance of Module of Instruction in constructing session plan
 Introduction
 What is Competency-Based Curriculum (CBC)?
 A competency-based curriculum is a framework or guide for the subsequent detailed development of competencies, associated
methodologies, training and assessment resources.
 The CBC specifies the outcomes which are consistent with the requirements of the workplace as agreed through the industry or community
consultations.
 CBC can be developed immediately when competency standards exist.
 When competency standards do not exist, curriculum developers need to clearly define the learning outcomes to be attained. The standard
of performance required must be appropriate to industry and occupational needs through the industry/enterprise or specified client group
consultations1.
 1
Information listed are lifted from Training Regulations Framework

Understanding the Course Design


Competency-Based Curriculum consists of Course Design and Module of Instruction. Course Design serves as the blueprint and sets the structure in
delivering the training program, while Module of Instruction serves as the course outline, and is derived from the course design, and contains detailed
information on what and how to teach each unit of competency.

Course Design is based on competency standards set by the industry or recognized industry sector. Learning system is driven by competencies
written to the industry standards1.
The first page includes the following:

 Course Title refers to the name of the program to be offered. It is usually derived from the qualification title of the training regulations or it takes the
qualification title of the training regulations if the program is designed to cover the entire qualification2.
 Nominal Duration refers to the estimated training period usually expressed in hours wherein the learner is expected to complete the whole training
program.
 Course Description refers to the brief statement of scope, coverage and delimitation of the course.
 Entry Requirements refers to the minimum and “must” qualifications of a trainee to a training program that will ensure effective and efficient
training.

The following are listed on its next page:

 Course Structure is a course matrix, and includes details on module title, learning outcomes and nominal hours per unit of competency.
 Unit of Competency is a component of the competency standard stating a specific key function or role in a particular job or occupation serving as a
basis for training an individual to gain specific knowledge, skills and attitude needed to satisfy the special demands or requirements of a particular
situation1.
 Module Title is the name of the module derived from the unit of competency.
 Learning Outcomes are the set of knowledge, skills and/or competencies an individual has acquired and/or is able to demonstrate after completion
of a learning process – either formal, non-formal or informal 3.
 Nominal Hours refers to the estimated training period usually expressed in hours wherein the learner is expected to complete a particular training
module of program 2.

The following are listed on its next page:

 Resource is the part where recommended tools, equipment and materials to be used are listed.
 Assessment Methods refers to the ways of collecting evidence and when evidence should be collected1.
 Course Delivery refers to the classroom teaching methodologies that can be applied for the entire module instruction.
 Trainer’s Qualification refers to the identified minimum experience and competencies the trainer for the course must possess.

READING # 1:
Competency-Based Curriculum
Sample: Comptency Based Curriculum

1
Training Regulations Framework2 Procedures Manual on Program Registration3 Terminology of European Education and Training Policy, Cedefop,
2008

Module of Instruction
Module of Instruction is the description of training requirements for every unit of competency. A unit of competency can make one or more modules
of training. This part of the CBC is used as point of reference in preparing session plan.

The document consists of the following:

 Unit Title is a learning outcome statement which describes the area of competency related to the content of work. (e.g. Maintain Computer
Systems)

 Module Title describes the outcome of unit of competency. Gerund is used as subject. (e.g. Maintaining Computer Systems)

 Module Descriptor refers to the brief statement of scope, coverage and delimitation of the module.

 Nominal Duration refers to the estimated training period wherein the learner is expected to complete a particular training module of program 1.
(Procedures Manual on Program Registration)

 Summary of Learning Outcomes refers to the consolidated statements of desired end result to be attained after each session.

The succeeding pages of Module of Instruction are the following:

 Assessment Criteria is the standards used to guide learning and to assess learner achievement and/or to evaluate and certify competence 2.

 Contents are the topics and activities which make up what is learned by an individual or group of learners during a learning process 3.

 Condition outlines situation and context under which learners will be assessed.

 Methodologies refer to the list of methods to be used in a particular session.

 Assessment Method refers to the technique/s used to gather different types of evidences.
1
Procedures Manual on Program Registration2 SAQA 20133 CEDEFOP 2008

Congratulations - end of lesson reached


Well done!
You have completed 100% of the lesson
7.
8. Once the trainee determines by himself that he is competent to do the skill, he will call the attention of trainer. The trainer will observe and rate the
performance based on the Performance Criteria Checklist and will record the result on the Achievement Chart. If the skill is satisfactorily performed,
he will then select another unit of competency. If the skill is not satisfactorily performed, the trainee will study again the module.

9. To exit the training program, trainee must satisfactorily perform the skill and must have enough units of competencies (or has completed all the
modules). If the trainee doesn’t have enough units of competencies, he will then select another unit of competency, and repeat the competency-
based training process.