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Consider the “Wall-of-Death”: Which diagram correctly shows the

forces on the rider?


Fictitious force: “centrifugal
Centripetal force:
a real force. force” – in the rider’s frame

L17  F  10/4/14  a*er  lecture   1  


Consider the “Wall-of-Death”

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What are the three forces A, B, & C?

A

A)


A - gravity


B - centrifugal force


C - friction

B B)


A – friction


B – normal force of the wall


C – gravity

C)


A - centripetal force


B – normal force of the wall


C – friction

C D)


A – friction


B – centrifugal force


C - gravity

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Assignments


You should have:



•  Read Ch. 5 of Wolfson and Prof. Dubson’s notes. Begun Ch. 6.

For next week:



•  Read Ch. 6 of Wolfson and Prof. Dubson’s notes.

•  Do CAPA 6.

•  Do written HW 6 (available on the course web site and D2L) in which you
begin to analyze the Megawoosh video using data supplied by the
Mythbusters in their episode “Waterslide Wipeout”.

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Dynamics: Newton’s Laws of Motion

Applications:

(1)  Sliding Blocks.
(2) Contact Forces.



(3) Suspended Bodies.
(4) Circular Motion.

(5) Friction.

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Object moving in a circle with a constant speed
v = v = constant

v
 1.  Special case of accelerated motion.

a
2.  Acceleration toward the center:

r
 v2
aR = centripetal
acceleration
r
r  
4. Apply NII:
3.  Net force toward the center:

mv 2 mv 2
Fnet = = ∑ FR Fnet = maR = centripetal
force
r r
centripetal force = sum of forces in the radial direction

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A ball of mass m is twirled on a string in a vertical circle of radius
r in the presence of gravity with a constant speed v.

Wrote down NII at the top and the bottom of the ball’s orbit:


v Top Top Bottom

T2

T1
+x

a
m
m

a

r

T1
mg mg
+x
T2

v2 v2
 Fnet = ma = m Fnet = ma = m
Bottom v r r
= T1 + mg = T2 − mg

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Hint: CAPA 6, #5:

+y mv 2
= ( Fnet )x = T sin θ
θ
T x : max =
R
+x y : may = 0 = ( Fnet )y = T cosθ − mg
Tsinθ
2
v
a=
R
mg

L17  F  10/4/14  a*er  lecture   9  


Dynamics: Newton’s Laws of Motion

Applications:

(1)  Sliding Blocks.
(2) Contact Forces.



(3) Suspended Bodies.
(4) Circular Motion.

(5) Friction.

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•  Very useful – imagine walking
Friction

without it.

•  Caused by microscopic

roughness.

•  Empirical observation:

Magnitude of the force of friction
f between two surfaces is
proportional to the normal force –
not the area of contact.




f = μN



•  Friction

opposes motion.

•  Static
friction is different than



and usually greater

than

k
inetic (or sliding) friction.







μS > μK

L17  F  10/4/14  a*er  lecture  
11  
•  Very useful – imagine walking
Friction

without it.

•  Caused by microscopic

roughness.

•  Empirical observation:

Magnitude of the force of friction
f between two surfaces is
proportional to the normal force –
not the area of contact.




f = μN



•  Friction

opposes motion.

•  Static
friction is different than



and usually greater

than

k
inetic (or sliding) friction.







μS > μK

L17  F  10/4/14  a*er  lecture  
12  
+y
Prof. Mike Nerdly pulls on the
+x
rope and moves toward the right on 
a skateboard as shown. His speed v v
is constant.

The force of friction of the floor on
the wheels ….?
f

A)  Points in the x-direction and is
positive.

B)  Points in the x-direction and is Friction opposes motion.
negative.

C)  Points in the y-direction and is
positive.

D)  Points in the y-direction and is
positivel

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+y
Prof. Mike Nerdly pulls on the
+x
rope and moves toward the right on 
a skateboard as shown. His speed v v
is constant.
N

What is the relation between the T

magnitude of the tension T in the f

rope and the magnitude of the
force of friction f of the floor on Fg = mg

the wheels?

A)  T = f
x: 0 = max = T - f

B)  T > f

T = f

C) T < f

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+y
Prof. Mike Nerdly pulls on the
+x
rope and moves toward the right on 
a skateboard as shown. His speed v v
is constant.
N

The floor has a coefficient of T=f

kinetic friction of μK. What is the f

tension T in the rope?

A)  T = mg
Fg = mg

B)  T =-mg


T = f = μK N = μK mg

C) T =μK

D)  T=μK mg

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Example 1. A block of mass m is being pushed across a rough
horizontal table. A constant velocity v is maintained with an
external force Fext. What is μK?

How many forces are operating here? (Consider both vertical


and horizontal forces.)

(A) 1

(B) 2

(C) 3

(D) 4

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Example 1. A block of mass m is being pushed across a rough
horizontal table. A constant velocity v is maintained with an
external force Fext. What is μK?

y: 0 = may = N − mg → N= mg
Fext
x: 0 = max = Fext − f = Fext − µ K N = Fext − µ K mg → µK =
mg

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An object with mass M is resting on a
fmax = µSN = µSMg rough table whose coefficients of static
and kinetic friction are μS and μK,
M
respectively.

Which of the following is a necessary
condition to start the object in motion?

For motion to begin:
m
mg > μSMg




A) M > m

Weight of mass m
B) M < m

mg
must be greater than
the maximum
C) mg > μK Mg

resistive force applied
D) Mg > μS mg

by static friction.


E) mg > μs Mg

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+y
A car of mass m is moving in the
positive x-direction. The driver
+x slams on the brakes and the tires
skid on the ground. The direction
of the frictional force between the
tires and the road is backwards. Its
magnitude is f = μkN where μk is
the kinetic friction coefficient.



Fnet = ma = -f =-μKmg
The magnitude of the acceleration
a = -μKg
of the car is given by



|a| = μKg
A)  μA


it make sense that the B)  μKmg

Does
acceleration of the skidding car is C)  μKg



indepdent of its mass?
D)  μSmg


E)  μSg

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