Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 12

Ch 5 Electric Motors 

 
Part 1 Motor Principles 
 

1. State the operating principle of a generator. (P. 97) 
Answer: To convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. 
2.  What name is given to the device that drives a generator. (P. 98) 
Answer: Prime mover. 
3. Explain the essential differences between construction of an AC and a DC generator. (P. 98) 
Answer:   Commutator and brushes (DC) vs Slip rings (on AC) 
4. What is the basic purpose of an electric motor? 
5. According to power requirements, in what ways are motors classified? (P. 100) 
Answer: AC & DC motors   
6. In what direction are the lines of flux of a magnet assumed to travel?  (P 97) 
Answer: From the north pole to the south pole. 
7. How does electricity produce magnetism? (P 99, Fig 5‐7) 
Answer:  Anytime current flows through a conductor a magnetic field is created around the conductor. 
 
8. Why is the motor stator coil constructed with an iron core? (P 97) 
Answer: The iron core presents less resistance to the lines of flux than the air, thereby causing the field 
strength to increase. 
9. How is the polarity of the poles of a given coil reversed? (P 98) 
Answer: By reversing the direction of the current flow through the coil. 
10. In general, what causes an electric motor to rotate?  
Answer: An electric motor rotates as the result of the interaction of two magnetic fields. 
11. In what direction will a current‐carrying conductor, placed in and at right angles to a magnetic field? 
(p 99) 
Answer: At right angles to the field. 
12. Applying the right‐hand motor rule to given current carrying conductor placed in a magnetic field 
indicates movement in the downward direction. What could be done to reverse the direction in which 
conductor moves? (P 99, Figure 5‐8) 
Answer: Reverse the direction of the current flow through the conductor.  
13. What two main criteria are used to classify motors? 
Answer: The type of power used (AC or DC) and the motor’s principle of operation. 
 

Part 2. Direct Current Motors 
1. Give two reasons why DC motors are seldom the first motor of choice for some applications. (P 
101) 
Answer:  
(1) All electrical utility systems deliver alternating current and  
(2) maintenance of DC motors is significant compared to that of AC motor designs.  
2.  What special types of processes may warrant the use of a DC motor? (P 101) 
Answer: Processes where a wide range of precise torque and speed control is required to match the 
needs of the application. 
3. Explain the function of the commutator in the operation of a DC motor. (P 102) 

Answer: The commutator can be regarded as a switch that maintains the proper direction of current in 
the armature coils to produce constant unidirectional torque.  

4. a) How is the direction of rotation of permanent‐magnet (PM) motor changed? (P 103) 

b) How is the speed of a PM motor controlled? (P 103) 

Answer:  

a) By reversing the polarity of the voltage applied to the armature.      

    b) By varying the value of the voltage applied to the armature. 

5.  Summarize the torque and the speed characteristics of a DC series motor. (P 103‐104) 

Answer: The motor  develops a very high staring torque so it is ideal for starting very heavy mechanical 
loads. The speed varies widely between no load and rated load. 

6.  Why should a DC series motor may not be operated without some sort of load couple to it? (P 104: 
Caution:….) 

Answer: The speed of the motor can increase to the point of damaging the motor. 

7.  In what way is the shunt field winding of a shunt motor different from that of the series field winding 
of a series motor? (P. 104) 
Answer: The series field winding is constructed of a few turns of heavy‐gauge wire and has a very low 
resistance value. The shunt field winding is constructed with many turns of much finer gauge wire and 
has a significantly higher resistance value. 

8. Compare the starting torque and load versus speed characteristics of the series motor to those of 
shunt wound motor. (P 104) 

Answer: The staring torque of the shunt wound motor is much lower than that of the series motor. 
Unlike the series motor speed which varies greatly under different load conditions, the speed of the 
shunt motor is almost the same at no‐load as it is at full‐load. 

9.  How are the series and shunt field windings of the compound‐wound DC motor connected relative to 
the armature? (P 105) 

Answer: The series field in connected in series with the armature and the shunt field is connected in 
parallel with the armature.  

10. In what way is a cumulative‐compound motor connected? (P 105) 

Answer: So that under load the series field flux and shunt field act in the same direction to strengthen 
the total field flux.  

11. Compare the torque and speed characteristics of a compound motor with those of the series and 
shunt motor. (P105) 

Answer: The speed of the compound motor varies a little more than that of shunt motors, but not as 
much as series motors. Compound‐type DC motors have a fairly large starting torque — much more 
than shunt motors, but less than series motors. 

12. How can the direction of rotation of a wound DC motor be changed? (P 106) 

Answer: Change the direction of the current flow through the armature or field windings – but not both 
at the same time. 

13. Explain how counter EMF is produced in a DC motor. (P 107) 
Answer: As the armature rotates its coils cut the magnetic field of the stator and induce a voltage or 
EMF in these coils. 

 
14. A 5 hp, 230V DC motor has an armature resistance of 0.1 Ω and a full‐load armature current of 20A. 
Determine (a) the value of the armature current on starting, (b) the value of the counter EMF with full‐
load voltage applied. (P 108, Example 5‐1) 

Answer:  

a) 2300 – amperes => Va/Ra = Ia = 230/0.1 = 2300A 

      b) 228‐volts => CEMF = V‐terminal – (IA * RA) = 230 – 20*0.1 = 228 V 

IA = (VMTR – CEMF)/RA 

15.   

a) What is motor armature reaction? 

b) State three effects that armature reaction has on the operation of a DC motor. 

Answer: 

a) Distortion and wakening of the main field flux by the magnetic field produced by current flow through 
the armature conductors 

     b)  Shifting of the neutral plane in a direction opposite to the direction of rotation of the armature            
Reduction in motor torque due to the weakening of the magnetic field Arcing at the brushes due to 
voltage being induced in the coils undergoing commutation 

 16. Explain how interpole minimize the effects of armature reaction. 

Answer: The magnetic field generated by the interpoles is designed to be equal to and opposite that 
produced by the armature reaction for all values of load current and improves commutation.   

 17. a) A motor rated for 1750 rpm at no load has a 4 percent speed regulation. Calculate the speed of 
the motor with full load applied. a) In what way does a DC motor’s armature resistance affect its speed 
regulation? (P 109, Example 5‐2) 

Answer: 

a) 1682‐rpm  
4% = (No‐load speed – Full‐load speed)/ Full‐load speed 
0.04 = (1750 – Nf)/Nf => 0.04 Nf = 1750 – Nf => 1.04 Nf = 1750 
Nf = 1750/1.04 = 1682 rpm 

       b) The speed regulation of a direct current motor is proportional to the armature resistance, thus DC 
motors that have a very low armature resistance will have a better speed regulation. 

18.  a) How is the base speed of a DC motor defined? (P 109) 

b) How is the speed of a DC motor controlled below based speed? 

c) How is the speed of a DC motor controlled above based speed? 

Answer: 

a) Base speed is an indication of how fast the motor will run with rated armature voltage and rated load 
amps at rated field current 

       b) By controlling the armature voltage 

       c) By controlling the field current 

19. With armature voltage control of a DC shunt motor, what is the effect on the rated torque and 
horsepower when the armature voltage is increased? (P 110, Figure 5‐30, 5‐31) 

Answer: The torque remains the same while the HP varies.  

20. With the field current control of a shunt DC motor, what is the effect on the rated torque and 
horsepower when the armature voltage is increased.  

Answer: The torque varies while the HP remains the same. 

21. Field loss protection must be provided for DC motor. Why? 
Answer: If a DC motor suffers a loss of field excitation current while operating, the motor will 
immediately begin to accelerate to the top speed, which the loading will allow. 

22. List several control functions found on a DC motor drive that would not normally be provided by a 
traditional DC magnetic motor starter. 
Answer: Precise control the speed, torque, acceleration, deceleration and direction of rotation of 
motors. Additionally, many motor drive units are capable of high‐speed communication with PLCs and 
other industrial controllers. 
 
 

Part 3. Three‐Phase Alternating Current Motors 
1. A rotating magnetic field is the key to the operation of AC motors. Give a brief explanation of its 
principle of operation. (p112) 

Answer: A magnetic field in the stator is made to rotate electrically around and around in a circle. 
Another magnetic field in the rotor is made to follow the rotation of this field pattern by being attracted 
and repelled by the stator field. 

2. Compare synchronous speed and actual speed of an AC motor.  (P 113) 

Answer: The "synchronous speed" of an AC motor is the speed of the stator's magnetic field rotation 
while "actual speed" is the speed at which the shaft rotates. 

3. Calculate the synchronous speed of a six‐pole AC motor operated from a standard voltage source. 

Answer: 1200‐rpm  

Ns = 120*f/poles = 120*60/6 = 1200 rpm 

4. Why is the induction motor so named? (p 114) 

Answer: Because no external voltage is applied to its rotor. The AC current in the stator induces a 
voltage across an air gap and into the rotor winding to produce rotor current and associated magnetic 
field. 

5. Outline the operating principle of three‐phase squirrel‐cage induction motor. (p 114‐115) 

Answer: The rotor is constructed using a number of short‐circuited bars. When voltage is applied to the 
stator winding, a rotating magnetic field is established that causes current flow in the rotor bars. These 
rotor currents establish their own magnetic field, which interacts with the stator magnetic field to 
produce a torque. 

6. Explain what effect rotor resistance has on the operation of a squirrel‐cage induction motor. (p 115) 

Answer: A high resistance rotor develops a high starting torque at low starting current. A low resistance 
rotor develops low slip and high efficiency at full load.    

7. How is the direction of rotation of a squirrel‐cage motor reserved? (P. 116, Figure 5‐40) 
Answer: By interchanging any two of the three main power lines to the motor.  

8. If, while a three‐phase induction motor is operating, power to one phase of its squirrel cage is lost, 
what will happen? 

Answer: The motor will continue to run but the current drawn from the remaining two lines will almost 
double, and the motor will overheat. 

9. Define the term slip as it applies to an induction motor. (P 116, equation = (Ns – Nact)/Ns 

Answer: Slip refers to the difference between the speed of the rotating magnetic field and the rotor. 

10. Calculate the percent slip of an induction motor having a synchronous speed of 3600 rpm and a 
rated actual speed of 3435 rpm. 

Answer: 4.58% = (3600‐3435)/3600 x 100 

11. What effect does loading have on the power factor of an AC motor? (P. 116) 

Answer: The power factor increases as the load on the motor increases. 

12. What is the typical value of the locked‐rotor motor current? 

Answer: Up to 6 times the full‐load current. 

13. How is the speed of an induction motor determined? 

Answer: By the number of poles and the frequency of the power supply. 

Ns = 120*f/Poles 

14. Explain the difference between multispeed consequent pole and separate winding induction motors. 

Answer: Consequent pole motors have their stator windings arranged so that the number of poles can 
be changed by reversing some of the coil currents. With separate winding motors a separate winding is 
installed in the motor for each desired speed. 

15. A wound‐rotor induction is normally started with full external resistance in the rotor circuit that is 
gradually reduced to zero. How does this affect starting torque and current? (X) 

Answer: This results in a very high starting torque from zero speed to full speed at a relatively low 
starting current.   

16. How is the direction of rotation of wound‐rotor induction motor changed? 

Answer: By interchanging any two stator voltage supply leads. 

17. When a wound‐rotor motor is used as an adjustable‐speed drive, rather than only for starting 
purposes, what must the duty cycle of the rotor resistors be rated for?) 

Answer: Continuous rather than starting duty only. 

18. State two advantages of using three‐phase synchronous motor drives in an industrial plant.  

Answer: They can provide large horsepower motors with very stable rotating speeds. They can be used 
to improve the power factor of 3‐phase systems. 

Part 4. Single‐phase Alternating Current Motors 
1. What is the major difference between the starting requirements for a three‐phase and a single‐
phase induction motor? (P 121) 
Answer: A 3‐phase induction motor sets up a rotating magnetic field that can start the motor, whereas a 
single‐phase motor needs an auxiliary means of starting. 
 
2. a) Outline the starting sequence for a split‐phase induction motor. (P 122) 
b) How is its direction of rotation reserved? 
Answer: 
a) When AC line voltage is applied the current in the starting winding leads the current in the running 
winding, causing a rotating field, which starts the motor. When the rotor gains sufficient speed to           
continue turning, using only the running winding field, centrifugal force operates the switch contacts, 
and opens the starting winding circuit. 
      b) By reversing the leads to the start or run windings, but not to both. 
 
3. Dual‐voltage split‐phase motors have leads that allow external connection for different line voltages. 
How are the start and run windings connected for high and low line voltages? (P 123, Figure 5‐52) 
Answer: When the motor is operated at low voltage, the two run windings and the start winding are all 
connected in parallel. For high voltage operation, the two run windings connect in series and the start 
winding is connected in parallel with one of the run windings. 
 
4. What is the main advantage of capacitor motors over split‐phase types? (P 123, Figure 5‐53) 
Answer: Greater starting torque.  
 
5. Name the three types of capacitor motor designs. (P 123‐124) 
Answer: Capacitor‐start motor, permanent‐capacitor motor, and capacitor‐start/capacitor‐run motor.  
 
6. Explain how the shaded‐pole motor is started.  (P 125) 
Answer: Starting is by means of a design that uses a continuous copper loop around a small portion of 
each motor pole. Currents in this copper loop delay the phase of the magnetic flux in that part of the 
pole enough to provide a rotating field.  
 
7. What type of DC motor is constructed like a universal motor? (P. 126) 
Answer: Series‐type DC motor.  
 

Part 5. AC Motor Drives 
1. List the three basic section of an AC variable frequency drive controller and state the function of 
each section. (P 127) 
Answer: 
Converter – It rectifies the incoming 3‐phase AC power and converts it  
                            to DC. 
      DC Filter ‐  Provides a smooth, rectified DC voltage. 
      Inverter – Switches the DC on and off so rapidly that the motor receives 
                      a pulsating DC that appears similar to AC. The DC switching 
                      rate is controlled to vary the frequency of the simulated AC  
                      that is applied to the motor.  
2. An induction motor rated for 230V at 60 Hz is to be operated by a VFD. When the frequency is 
reduced to 20Hz, to what value must the voltage be reduced in order to maintain the ratio of volts 
per hertz? (P 127) 
Answer: 76.6 volts    
V/Hz = 230/60 = 3.83 = Vx/20 => Vx = 3.83 * 20 = 76.6 Volts 
3.  How does an AC drive vary the speed of an induction motor? 
Answer: By varying the voltage and frequency applied to the motor. 
4. Inverter or vector duty AC induction motors are the types most often specified for use with variable 
frequency drive. Why? (P 128) 
Answer: Because they are constructed with high temperature insulating materials that can withstand 
higher voltage spikes and operating temperatures. 
 
Part 6. Motor Selection 
1. What two factors determine the mechanical horsepower output of a motor (P 130) 
Answer: Torque and speed. 
2. Explain what each of the following motor current ratings represents: (a) full‐load amperes; (b) 
locked‐rotor current;  (c) service factor amperes. (P 130) 

Answer: 

(a) The amount of the motor can be expected to draw under full load (torque) conditions.  

      (b) The amount of current the motor can be expected to draw under starting conditions when full 
voltage is applied.  
       (c) The amount of current the motor will draw when it is subjected to a percentage of overload 
equal to the service factor on the nameplate of the motor. 
 
3. What does the code letter on the nameplate of a motor designate? (P 130) 
Answer: NEMA code letters are assigned to motors for calculating the locked rotor current in amperes 
based upon the kilovolt‐amperes per horsepower per nameplate horsepower.   
 
4. What NEMA design‐type motor would be selected for driving a pump that requires a high starting 
torque at low starting current? (P 131) 
Answer: Design B. 
   
5. List four‐types of motor losses that affect the efficiency of a motor. (P 131) 
Answer: Core losses, copper losses, mechanical losses, stray losses. 
6. What motor specification defines the physical dimensions of a motor? (P 131) 
Answer: Frame size. 
7. An imported machine motor rated for 50Hz is operated at 60 Hz. What effect, if any, will this have on 
the speed of the motor? Why? (P 132) 
Answer: The speed will increase because the speed of the rotating magnetic field increases. 
 
8. Would it be normally acceptable to replace a motor rated for NEMA A insulation with one rated for 
NEMA F insulation? Why? 
Answer: Yes, because the NEMA F insulation is rated for a higher temperature than the NEMA A.  
 
9. Explain the basic load requirements for the following types of motor loads: (a) constant torque; (b) 
constant horsepower; (c) variable torque (P 132) 
Answer: 
(a) Loads that require constant torque throughout the speed range.  
(b) Loads that require high torque at low speeds and low torque at high speeds.  
(c)  Loads that require low torque at low speed, and increasing values of torque as the speed is 
increased. 
10. Explain what each of the following motor temperature ratings represents: (a) ambient temperature; 
(b) temperature rise; (c) hot‐spot temperature allowance (P 133) 
Answer: (a) Ambient temperature is the maximum safe room temperature surrounding the motor if it 
going to be operated continuously at full load.  
      (b) Temperature Rise is the amount of temperature change that can be expected within the winding 
of the motor from non‐operating (cool condition) to its temperature at full load continuous operating            
condition.  
     (c) A hot‐spot allowance is made for the difference between the measured temperature of the 
winding and the actual temperature of the hottest spot within the winding.  
11. What does the duty cycle rating of a motor refer to? (P 133) 
Answer: The duty cycle refers to the length of time a motor is expected to operate under full load. 
12. List the four types of torque associated with the operation of a motor. (P 133‐134) 
Answer: Locked rotor torque, pull‐up torque, breakdown torque, full load torque. 
13. What determines the type of motor enclosure selected for a particular application? (P 134) 
Answer: The environment in which the motor has to operate. 
14. What type of motor enclosure would be best suited for extremely wet, dirty, or dusty areas? (P 134) 
Answer: Totally enclosed fan cooled. 
15. Determine the equivalent NEMA horsepower rating for an 11 kW‐rated metric motor. 
Answer: 15 HP 
11kW/746 W/hp => 14.74 hp => 15 hp;  11kW/0.746 kW/hp > 14.74 hp 
 
 
Part 7. Motor Installation 
1. List three popular types of motor mountings.( P 136, Fig. 5‐74) 
Answer: Rigid base, resilient base, NEMA C face mount. 
2.  A motor with a 3‐inch drive pulley operating at a speed of 3600 rpm is belt‐coupled to an equipment 
pulley 8 inches in diameter. Calculate the speed of the drive load.(P 137 equation, Example 5‐5) 
Answer: 1350‐rpm 
Use equation on page 137: 
Motor rpm/Equipment rpm = Equipment pulley diameter/Motor pulley diameter 
3600/N = 8/3 => N = 3600x3/8 = 1350 rpm 
  
3. List four basic types of bearing and give a typical application for each (P 138‐139) 
Answer: 
     Sleeve bearings –  smaller light duty motors 
      Ball bearings – medium size heavy load motors  
      Roller bearings – large motors with belted loads  
      Thrust bearing – vertical mounted motors 
4. How can a motor be damaged by over‐lubricating a ball bearing? (P 138) 
Answer: Excessive lubricant can find its way inside the motor where it collects dirt and causes insulation 
deterioration.  
5. Which NEC article deals specifically with requirements for electric motors? (P 139) 
Answer: Art. 430 
6.  Why is it desirable to ground the motor shaft in addition to the frame? (P 140, Fig 5‐75) 
Answer: It prevents bearing damage by dissipating shaft currents to ground. 
 
7. In what ways can undersized wiring between the motor and power source affect the operation of a 
motor? (P 140) 
Answer: Can limit stating abilities and cause overheating of the motor. 
8. What negative effects can unbalanced three‐phase line voltage have on the operation of a motor? (P 
140‐141, Example 5‐7) 

Answer: It may cause unbalanced currents resulting in overheating of the motor’s stator windings and 
rotor bars, shorter insulation life, and wasted energy in the form of heat. 

9. In what type of application is it advisable to use manual‐reset built‐in thermal protectors? 9P 141, Fig 
5‐81) 

Answer: Where unexpected restarting would be hazardous. 

 
Part 8. Motor Maintenance and Trouble Shooting