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DEAR FRIENDS OF AGRICULTURE,

This year, Florida commemorates the 500th anniversary of Juan


Ponce de León's discovery of our state.

After the Europeans landed in Florida in 1513 and established


settlements throughout the peninsula, they introduced many of the
crops that make up Florida’s landscape today. Ponce de León planted citrus trees near St. Augustine and
brought the first cattle to the new land.

Florida’s early settlers faced hardships and at times had just enough to feed themselves. Despite the
challenges that come from severe freezes and limited water supply, Florida's agriculture industry endured and
thrived. The industry's tenacity and strength enables our great state to provide food and fiber for Floridians
and many others throughout the world.

Today, Florida’s 47,500 farms produce nearly 300 different commodities on more than 9 million acres of
land. Florida’s famed agriculture industry employs 2 million people and contributes more than $104 billion to
our state’s economy each year.

2012 was a great year for many commodities grown in Florida. Cucumbers ($67 million), grapefruit ($187
million), oranges ($1.5 billion), snap beans ($167 million), sweet corn ($180 million) and watermelons ($138
million) all reached higher than their 2011 levels.

Find these figures and much more in this special edition of Florida Agriculture by the Numbers. This
publication, produced by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, is a compilation of
useful data, details and information that summarizes Florida’s agricultural impact to our state. Collectively,
these figures demonstrate the impact of Florida agriculture, an industry that feeds and enriches the lives of
millions of people in Florida, the United States and throughout the world.

Sincerely,

ADAM H. PUTNAM
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE

1
ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The acreage, production, and value statistics in this publication are the official State and USDA estimates prepared by the
National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Florida Field Office in cooperation with the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). These estimates are current as of June 2013 and may be revised later in the
year or in the following year, if additional data become available. Any revisions made to these estimates, as well as
estimates made after June 2013, are included in reports posted to the website shown below and available from the NASS
Florida Field Office.

Most of the data used to develop these estimates were provided voluntarily by growers, shippers, and processors and we
sincerely appreciate their public spirited cooperation. The Florida Tomato Committee, the Florida Fruit and Vegetable
Association, Florida Department of Citrus, floriculture and nursery producers, sales agencies, and transportation firms
have provided valuable assistance and data throughout the season. The FDACS Bureau of State Farmers Markets and the
County Agricultural Agents of the University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service were also very helpful in
supplying area and county estimates.

The individuals and organizations who make up the Florida agricultural industry need reliable and accurate estimates of
production to make informed and knowledgeable decisions. Increasing unpredictability of commodity prices and
competition from global markets, make accurate and unbiased estimates even more important. Farmers, agribusinesses,
producers groups, educators, researchers, legislators, and the media all need these estimates to develop sound policies and
to promote Florida agricultural products.

I want to express my sincere gratitude to our dedicated staff of statisticians, support personnel, citrus field staff, and field
and telephone enumerators. They are the ones who have worked hard to collect, review, and summarize these important
data and publish the results.

All NASS reports are available free of charge at:


• www.nass.usda.gov (National reports)
• www.nass.usda.gov/fl (Florida reports)

Jim Ewing
State Statistician, USDA/NASS – Florida Field Office

2
FLORIDA AGRICULTURE BY THE NUMBERS

Florida Agriculture by the Numbers has been published to provide you with reliable, comprehensive information and data
on Florida agriculture. People worldwide use the basics of food, fiber and forestry products daily. Florida’s producers
contribute greatly to the bounty enjoyed in Florida, the United States and beyond. The following pages tell their story of
productivity, innovation and delivery.

This reference book is divided by sections for ease of use. The Agricultural Overview Section provides a general
overview of Florida agriculture. The Agricultural Statistics Section presents comparative performances of major
commodity groups and benchmark economic data. The Groups Directory Section offers contact information for a variety
of agricultural related entities. Both public and private organizations are listed. The Department Contacts Section
identifies the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumers Services’ divisions with contact information.

As is occasionally the case when analyzing agricultural and economic data, numbers in rows or columns do not always
sum exactly. This usually occurs when large numbers are abbreviated or when composite prices are compiled. The
difference in these cases is a rounding margin. The rounding of numbers occurs in these pages when space is a
consideration.

Whether you are using this book to learn more about Florida agriculture, as a reference for contact information or for any
other use, Florida Agriculture by the Numbers will definitely serve as an excellent reference source throughout the year.
Together, these sections provide a valuable insight to Florida agriculture and its impact on Florida’s economy.

We are pleased to present Florida Agriculture by the Numbers. If you need additional information or assistance, please
call the Division of Marketing and Development at (850) 617-7300.

The Editorial Staff


Florida Agriculture by the Numbers

3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
COMMISSIONER’S LETTER ........................................................................................................................................ 1

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ................................................................................................................................................ 2

ABOUT THIS DIRECTORY ........................................................................................................................................... 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................................................................................................................................. 4

FLORIDA AGRICULTURE OVERVIEW ......................................................................................................................... 7

FLORIDA CASH RECEIPTS .......................................................................................................................................... 8


Florida Cash Receipts by Years............................................................................................................................. 10
United States Cash Receipts by Leading States................................................................................................... 11
Florida’s Leading Cash Receipts by Commodity................................................................................................... 13

FARMS AND LAND IN FARMS.................................................................................................................................... 14


Florida Farm Workers................................................................................................................................................... 16
Florida Farm Income, Expenses, and Cash Rents....................................................................................................... 17

CITRUS........................................................................................................................................................................ 20
2011-2012 Season Citrus Highlights..................................................................................................................... 21
Fruit Harvesting Season......................................................................................................................................... 24
Citrus Production by Counties............................................................................................................................... 25
Citrus Acreage by Counties................................................................................................................................... 27
Citrus Trees by Counties........................................................................................................................................ 29
Citrus Trees, Acreage, Yield, Production, Utilization, Season Average On-Tree Price, and Value......................... 32
Oranges.............................................................................................................................................................. 32
Grapefruit........................................................................................................................................................... 34
Tangerines.......................................................................................................................................................... 35
Tangelos, Temples, and Lemons........................................................................................................................ 36
Avocados................................................................................................................................................................ 37

FIELD CROPS.............................................................................................................................................................. 38
2012 Field Crops Highlights................................................................................................................................... 39
Acreage, Yield, Production, and Value 2003-2012................................................................................................. 41
Production, Price, and Value, by Variety................................................................................................................ 44
Pecans............................................................................................................................................................... 44
Acreage, Yield, and Production, by County........................................................................................................... 45
Peanuts............................................................................................................................................................. 45
Cotton, Sugarcane............................................................................................................................................ 46
Usual Planting and Harvesting Dates, Crops and Principal Producing Areas....................................................... 48
District Map............................................................................................................................................................ 49

LIVESTOCK AND PRODUCTS.................................................................................................................................... 50


Livestock Highlights............................................................................................................................................... 51
Beef and Milk Cows that have Calved, and Beef and Dairy Herd Replacement Heifers....................................... 52
Milk Cow Inventory by County, 2004-2013............................................................................................................ 53
Milk Cows, Monthly Milk Production, and Annual Production............................................................................... 54
Milk Production, Utilization, Milkfat, and Cash Receipts....................................................................................... 55
Monthly and Annual Average Milk Price for Milk Marketed by Producers to Plants.............................................. 55

4
Replacement Milk Cow Price per Head, by Quarter....................................................................................... 56
Cattle and Calves............................................................................................................................................ 57
Inventory of Cattle and Calves, by County.................................................................................................. 57
Inventory of Beef Cows, by County............................................................................................................ 62
Marketings, Cash Receipts, and Gross Income.......................................................................................... 66
Cows, Bulls, Steers, Heifers, and Calves on Farms.................................................................................... 67
Cattle and Calves Inventory January 1, Annual Calf Crop, and Disposition............................................... 67
Cattle Prices.................................................................................................................................................... 69
Florida Livestock Auctions.......................................................................................................................... 69
Cattle and Calves Sold through Florida Auction Markets, by Area............................................................. 69
Poultry............................................................................................................................................................. 70
Annual Value of Production......................................................................................................................... 70
Layers, Eggs Produced, and Value of Production....................................................................................... 70
Broilers Produced, Pounds Produced, Price per Pound, and Value of Production.................................... 70
Layers, Daily Rate of Lay, and Egg Production, by Month and Year........................................................... 72
Broiler-type Chicks Hatched in Florida by Commercial Hatcheries............................................................ 74
Hogs................................................................................................................................................................ 75
Hogs on Farms and Inventory Value........................................................................................................... 75
Hog Inventory, Pig Crop, and Disposition................................................................................................... 75
Hog Inventory December 1, Annual Marketings, Cash Receipts, and Gross Income................................ 76
Florida Commercial Hog Slaughter; Head, Average Live Weight, and Total Live Weight............................ 77

VEGETABLES, MELONS AND BERRIES............................................................................................................. 78


2011-2012 Season Vegetable Highlights........................................................................................................ 79
Weather for the 2012 Growing Season........................................................................................................... 80
Definitions and Explanations........................................................................................................................... 82
Confidentiality of Collected Data and Release Distribution Policy.................................................................. 82
Principal Vegetables by Producing Areas....................................................................................................... 83
Summary of Acreage, Yield, Production, and Value by Crops, 2011 and 2012.............................................. 84
Fruit and Vegetable Acreage, Production, and Value...................................................................................... 85
Snap Beans................................................................................................................................................. 85
Cabbage...................................................................................................................................................... 85
Sweet Corn.................................................................................................................................................. 85
Cucumbers.................................................................................................................................................. 85
Bell Peppers................................................................................................................................................ 85
Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes........................................................................................................................... 86
Squash........................................................................................................................................................ 86
Strawberries................................................................................................................................................ 87
Tomatoes..................................................................................................................................................... 87
Watermelons............................................................................................................................................... 87
Vegetable Planting and Harvesting Dates....................................................................................................... 88
Historical Vegetable Highlights........................................................................................................................ 89

HORTICULTURE................................................................................................................................................... 97
2011-2012 Horticulture Highlights.................................................................................................................. 98
Floriculture....................................................................................................................................................... 99
Cut Cultivated Greens................................................................................................................................... 100
Foliage Plants................................................................................................................................................ 100
Potted Flowering Plants................................................................................................................................ 101
Annual Bedding / Garden Plants................................................................................................................... 102

5
BEES AND HONEY.................................................................................................................................................... 103
Bees and Honey Highlights.................................................................................................................................. 104
Colonies, Yield, Production, Price, Value, and Stock........................................................................................... 104

AQUACULTURE AND SEAFOOD.............................................................................................................................. 105


Aquaculture and Seafood Highlights.................................................................................................................... 106
Aquaculture.......................................................................................................................................................... 106
Value of Sales, 2012 and 2005......................................................................................................................... 106
Value of Sales by Category and Type............................................................................................................... 107
Water Acreage and Size of Operation.............................................................................................................. 108
Tropical/Ornamental Landings and Value Summary........................................................................................ 109
Seafood................................................................................................................................................................ 111
Seafood Annual Landings and Value Summary............................................................................................... 112

FORESTRY................................................................................................................................................................. 115
2011 Forestry Highlights...................................................................................................................................... 116
Economic Output............................................................................................................................................. 116
Employment..................................................................................................................................................... 116
Value Added..................................................................................................................................................... 116
Compensation.................................................................................................................................................. 116
Export Value..................................................................................................................................................... 117
Fiscal Impacts.................................................................................................................................................. 118
Forest Ownership............................................................................................................................................. 118
Forest Distribution........................................................................................................................................... 119
Local Importance............................................................................................................................................. 119
Florida Primary Wood Mills.............................................................................................................................. 119
Annual Harvest Removals by Species Type......................................................................................................... 121
Output of Industrial Products by Product and Species Group............................................................................ 122
Conversion Factors.............................................................................................................................................. 122
Contact Information and References................................................................................................................... 123

EXPORTS................................................................................................................................................................... 124
Florida’s Seaports................................................................................................................................................ 125
Leading Exports Ranked by Year......................................................................................................................... 129
Leading Importers Ranked by Year...................................................................................................................... 129

FLORIDA AGRICULTURE CONTACTS .................................................................................................................... 131


Florida Agriculture Groups................................................................................................................................... 132
Florida Farm Credit Associations......................................................................................................................... 141
Florida Cooperative Extension Service & Extension IFAS / UF Offices................................................................ 141
Florida Fairs and Expositions............................................................................................................................... 147
Florida Farm Bureau Federation Offices.............................................................................................................. 152
USDA Service Centers......................................................................................................................................... 156
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Divisions and Offices............................................. 170

AGRICULTURE STATISTICS AND OTHER INFORMATION...................................................................................... 174


6
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL OVERVIEW
Florida’s 47,500 commercial farms, utilizing 9.25 million acres, continue to produce a wide variety of safe and
dependable food products. From the citrus groves and the nurseries in central and southern Florida, to the vegetables in
various regions around the State, to the cattle and calves throughout the State, these farms and ranches provide Florida
with a large and stable economic base.

In 2012 Florida ranked:

1st in the U.S. in the value of production of oranges and grapefruit.

1st in value of production of fresh market snap beans, cucumbers for fresh market, cucumbers for pickles,
squash, sweet corn, fresh market tomatoes, sugarcane for sugar & seed and watermelons.

2nd in value of production of bell peppers, strawberries, and tangerines.

3rd in value of production of honey.

In 2012, in terms of total value of production, Florida accounted for:

66 percent of the total U.S. value for oranges ($1.5 billion)


65 percent of the total U.S. value for grapefruit ($187 million)
52 percent of the total U.S. value for snap beans ($167 million)
49 percent of the total U.S. value for sugarcane for sugar and seed ($673 million) 1
33 percent of the total U.S. value for bell peppers ($207 million)
31 percent of the total U.S. value for fresh market tomatoes ($268 million)
27 percent of the total U.S. value for squash ($67 million)
27 percent of the total U.S. value for cucumbers for fresh market ($67 million)
27 percent of the total U.S. value for watermelons ($138 milion)
22 percent of the total U.S. value for sweet corn ($180 million)
16 percent of the total U.S. value for tangerines ($55 million)

Florida citrus growers in 2011-2012 produced 146.7 million boxes of oranges (96 percent of which were used for orange
juice) and 18.9 million boxes of grapefruit (57 percent of which were used for grapefruit juice). Fruit sales exceeded
$1.8 billion.

Florida growers harvested vegetables for fresh market from 186,700 acres in 2012. The value of vegetable crops
exceeded $1.1 billion. Florida ranks second to California in the total value of fresh market vegetable production.

Livestock and products in 2011 produced cash receipts of $1.5 billion. Poultry farms generated $363 million in sales,
with $179 million coming from broilers and $181 million coming from eggs. On January 1, 2012 there were 1.66 million
head of cattle on farms and ranches in Florida, including 900,000 head of beef cows and 123,000 head of milk cows.
Florida ranked 14th in the number of chickens on farms in 2011. Florida’s poultry farmers maintained an average of 9.0
million layers in 2011 (producing 2.7 billion eggs) and produced 61.8 million broilers.

The total cash receipts for nursery and greenhouse products in Florida were $1.8 billion in 2011.
1
Data for 2011, the latest year available.

7
8
FLORIDA CASH RECEIPTS - 2011
The Economic Research Service (ERS), USDA, reports that receipts from Florida agricultural products in 2011 totaled to
$8.26 billion. This is an increase of 5.4 percent from 2010.

All crops accounted for nearly 82 percent of total cash receipts. As in previous years, the leading crop commodities were
oranges (17.85 percent of all cash receipts), greenhouse/nursery (21.68 percent), tomatoes (6.83 percent), and sugarcane
(6.16 percent). The leading livestock commodities were cattle and calves (5.90 percent of all cash receipts), dairy products
(6.60 percent), and poultry and eggs (4.39 percent).

Florida Cash receipts, 2011:


By Commodity Groups and Selected Commodities
Cash receipts ($1,000) Cash receipts ($1,000)
Commodity 1,2
Commodity
2011 Percent of total 2011 Percent of total
Total Cash receipts from Field Crops ......................................... 264,008 3.20
Farm Marketings....................... 8,262,486 100.00
Corn ................................................... 14,916 0.18
All Crops ................................... 6,764,474 81.87
Cotton ................................................ 83,225 1.01
Citrus......................................... 1,728,252 20.91
Cotton lint, Upland............................ 70,851 0.86
Grapefruit ................................. 178,162 2.16
Cottonseed ................................... 12,374 0.15
Oranges ................................... 1,475,104 17.85
Hay .................................................. . 28,580 0.35
Tangelos .................................. 12,750 0.15
Peanuts............................................ 129,242 1.56
Tangerines ............................... 62,236 0.75
Soybeans ......................................... . 5,909 0.07
other Fruits and nuts............... 491,300 5.96
Wheat ................................................ 2,136 0.03
Avocados ................................. 22,002 0.27
All other Crops................................. 2,355,894 28.51
Pecans ..................................... 6,230 0.08
Cane for Sugar................................. 508,995 6.16
Blueberries ............................... 69,122 0.84
Other seeds ..................................... 4,000 0.05
Strawberries, Winter ................. 366,300 4.43
Other field crops............................... 23,335 0.28
Misc. fruits & nuts ..................... 27,090 0.33
greenhouse/nursery........................ 1,791,283 21.68
Other berries ............................ 556 0.01
Christmas Trees............................... 2,100 0.03
Vegetables and Melons ............ 1,925,021 23.30
Other Greenhouse/Nursery .............. 1,789,183 21.65
Cabbage................................... 64,994 0.79
Mushrooms ...................................... (NA) (NA)
Cucumbers............................... 89,616 1.08
All livestock and Products ............. 1,498,012 18.13
Green Peppers ......................... 247,720 3.00
Cattle and Calves............................. 487,618 5.90
Potatoes, Spring....................... 136,006 1.65
Hogs ................................................ 3,125 0.04
Sweet Potatoes ........................ 7,487 0.09
Dairy Products: Milk ......................... 545,383 6.60
Snap Beans, Fresh................... 131,280 1.59
Poultry and Eggs................................ 362,802 4.39
Squash..................................... 94,875 1.15
Broilers............................................. 178,571 2.16
Sweet Corn, Fresh.................... 174,150 2.11
Farm Chickens ................................. 543 0.01
Tomatoes ................................. 564,696 6.83
Chicken Eggs ................................... 180,584 2.19
Watermelons ............................ 111,947 1.35
Other Poultry .................................... 2,758 0.03
Misc. vegetables....................... 300,000 3.63
Honey ................................................ 18,117 0.22
Aquaculture........................................ 53,190 0.64
1
Other livestock ................................. 27,080 0.33

NA = Not Available
1
Beginning in 2011, sheep and lambs are included in
other livestock.
2
2011 preliminary. Percents for individual commodities may
not add to totals in some groups because of rounding.

9
Florida Cash receipts:
By Commodity Group and Year
Year Crops Livestock Total cash receipts
(1,000 dollars)

1972 ........................................... 1,219,359 468,397 1,687,756


1973 ........................................... 1,442,362 605,103 2,047,465
1974 ........................................... 1,601,213 544,200 2,145,413
1975 ........................................... 1,879,670 623,905 2,503,575
1976 ........................................... 1,901,292 672,709 2,574,001
1977 ........................................... 2,018,719 742,598 2,761,317
1978 ........................................... 2,579,409 849,213 3,428,622
1979 ........................................... 2,845,812 1,001,876 3,487,688
1980 ........................................... 3,103,833 978,525 4,082,358
1981 ........................................... 3,231,728 1,026,286 4,258,014
1982 ........................................... 3,326,155 1,020,062 4,346,217
1983 ........................................... 3,546,915 1,081,535 4,628,450
1984 ........................................... 3,638,231 1,098,092 4,736,323
1985 ........................................... 3,762,770 1,030,336 4,793,106
1986 ........................................... 3,747,156 1,030,336 4,777,492
1987 ........................................... 4,207,362 1,100,854 5,308,216
1988 ........................................... 4,688,987 1,146,040 5,835,027
1989 ........................................... 5,021,374 1,218,705 6,240,079
1990 ........................................... 4,438,082 1,258,961 5,697,043
1991 ........................................... 4,972,810 1,171,626 6,144,436
1992 ........................................... 4,956,706 1,263,874 6,220,580
1993 ........................................... 4,824,757 1,310,232 6,134,989
1994 ........................................... 4,815,127 1,296,603 6,111,730
1995 ........................................... 4,841,471 1,238,378 6,079,849
1996 ........................................... 5,100,235 1,312,154 6,412,389
1997 ........................................... 5,238,267 1,385,551 6,623,818
1998 ........................................... 5,689,172 1,390,238 7,079,410
1999 ........................................... 5,311,395 1,347,573 6,658,968
2000 ........................................... 5,470,458 1,315,908 6,786,366
2001 ........................................... 5,236,151 1,389,601 6,625,752
2002 ........................................... 5,157,002 1,239,055 6,396,057
2003 ........................................... 5,374,178 1,240,273 6,614,451
2004 ........................................... 5,315,049 1,469,412 6,784,461
2005 ........................................... 6,028,520 1,420,758 7,449,278
2006 ........................................... 5,994,267 1,321,940 7,316,207
2007 ........................................... 6,662,821 1,381,508 8,044,329
2008 ........................................... 6,417,420 1,387,783 7,805,203
2009 ........................................... 6,034,577 1,105,333 7,139,910
2010 ........................................... 6,497,036 1,345,010 7,842,046
2011 ........................................... 6,764,474 1,498,012 8,262,486

10
united states Total Cash receipts:
Leading States, 2011
Rank State Cash receipts Percent of United States
(1,000 dollars)

1 California.................................................. 43,544,001 11.6


2 Iowa ......................................................... 29,892,095 8.0
3 Texas ....................................................... 22,681,267 6.1
4 Nebraska.................................................. 21,814,979 5.8
5 Illinois....................................................... 19,820,267 5.3
6 Minnesota ................................................ 18,536,398 5.0
7 Kansas ..................................................... 15,858,516 4.2
8 Indiana ..................................................... 11,836,487 3.2
9 Wisconsin................................................. 11,740,787 3.1
10 North Carolina .......................................... 10,543,175 2.8
17 Florida ..................................................... 8,262,486 2.2
United States............................................ 374,251,708 100.0

11
united states Vegetable Cash receipts:
Leading States, 2011
Rank State Cash receipts Percent of United States
(1,000 dollars)

1 California .................................................. 7,413,496 35.3


2 Florida ..................................................... 1,925,021 9.2
3 Washington............................................... 1,320,887 6.3
4 Arizona ..................................................... 1,314,381 6.3
5 Idaho ........................................................ 1,077,529 5.1
6 Georgia..................................................... 640,298 3.1
7 Michigan ................................................... 632,481 3.0
8 New York .................................................. 550,960 2.6
9 Wisconsin ................................................. 546,387 2.6
10 North Carolina .......................................... 502,386 2.4
United States ............................................ 20,976,551 100.0

united states Crop Cash receipts:


Leading States, 2011
Rank State Cash receipts Percent of United States
(1,000 dollars)

1 California.................................................. 31,186,007 15.0


2 Iowa ......................................................... 17,542,185 8.4
3 Illinois....................................................... 17,220,167 8.3
4 Nebraska.................................................. 11,754,013 5.6
5 Minnesota ................................................ 11,535,369 5.5
6 Indiana ..................................................... 8,544,706 4.1
7 Kansas..................................................... 6,944,590 3.3
8 Texas ....................................................... 6,863,609 3.3
9 Florida..................................................... 6,764,474 3.2
10 Ohio ......................................................... 6,528,269 3.1
United States............................................ 208,253,802 100.0

12
Florida leading Cash receipts:
By Commodity, 2011
Florida U.S. Florida Florida
Commodity
receipts receipts percent of U.S. national ranking
(1,000 dollars) (percent)
Greenhouse/Nursery ............................. 1,791,283 15,598,464 11.5 2
Oranges ................................................ 1,475,104 2,109,914 69.9 1
Tomatoes .............................................. 564,696 2,232,158 25.3 2
Dairy Products ....................................... 545,383 39,532,545 1.4 16
Sugarcane ............................................. 508,995 1,155,472 44.1 1
Cattle/Calves ......................................... 487,618 62,925,466 0.8 25
Strawberries .......................................... 366,300 366,300 15.3 2
Peppers, Bell ......................................... 247,720 684,941 36.2 2
Eggs ...................................................... 180,584 7,316,743 2.5 14
Broilers .................................................. 178,571 23,172,674 0.8 15
Grapefruit .............................................. 178,162 269,055 66.2 1
Sweet Corn, Fresh................................. 174,150 747,026 23.3 1
Potatoes ................................................ 136,006 3,758,528 3.6 11
Snap Beans (Fresh Market)................... 133,530 465,396 28.7 1
Peanuts ................................................. 129,242 1,012,785 12.8 2
Watermelons ......................................... 111,947 543,824 20.6 1
Squash .................................................. 94,875 283,244 33.5 1
Cucumbers (Fresh & Processing) .......... 89,616 363,064 24.7 1
Cotton.................................................... 83,225 8,339,439 1.0 14
Blueberries ............................................ 69,122 863,885 8.0 7
Cabbage (Fresh Market)........................ 64,994 369,043 17.6 2
Tangerines ............................................ 62,236 249,532 24.9 2
Hay........................................................ 28,580 6,656,155 0.4 35

FloriDA AgriCulTure
CAsH reCeiPTs, 2011
Total= $8,262,486,000

13
14
FARMS AND LAND IN FARMS
Florida had 47,500 commercial farms in 2012, using a total of 9,250,000 acres. There were 5,500 farms with sales
exceeding $100,000. The average farm size was 195 acres. Florida ranks 18th among all states in number of farms and 30th
in land in farms.

Florida Farms and Acreage:


By Year and by Economic Sales Class
Number of farms Total acres
Average
Year $1,000 - $10,000 - $100,000 $1,000 - $10,000 - $100,000
Total Total farm size
$9,999 $99,999 & over $9,999 $99,999 & over
(1,000 acres) (acres)

2002 .............. 44,000 27,600 11,000 5,400 10,300 1,700 2,350 6,250 234.1
2003 .............. 44,000 27,600 11,000 5,400 10,040 1,600 2,300 6,140 228.0
2004 .............. 43,200 27,000 10,700 5,500 9,830 1,600 2,100 6,130 228.0
2005 .............. 42,000 26,000 10,600 5,400 9,570 1,500 2,000 6,070 228.0
2006 .............. 41,000 24,700 10,600 5,700 9,460 1,400 2,000 6,060 231.0
2007 .............. 47,500 29,500 12,700 5,300 9,300 1,400 2,000 5,900 196.0
2008 .............. 47,500 29,500 12,700 5,300 9,250 1,400 1,950 5,900 195.0
2009 .............. 47,500 29,500 12,700 5,300 9,250 1,400 1,950 5,900 195.0
2010 .............. 47,500 29,500 12,600 5,400 9,250 1,400 1,900 5,950 195.0
2011 .............. 47,500 29,600 12,400 5,500 9,250 1,400 1,800 6,050 195.0
2012 .............. 47,500 29,600 12,400 5,500 9,250 1,400 1,900 6,050 195.0

leading states:
Number of farms - 2012
State Number of farms Total acres in farms Average size of farm
(1,000 acres) (acres)

Texas .................................................... 244,700 128,000 523

Missouri ................................................ 106,000 29,000 274

Iowa ...................................................... 92,200 30,700 333

Oklahoma ............................................. 85,500 34,800 407

Kentucky ............................................... 85,500 14,000 164

California............................................... 80,500 25,400 316

Minnesota ............................................. 79,400 26,800 338

Wisconsin ............................................. 76,800 15,000 195

Tennessee ............................................ 76,000 10,800 142

Illinois.................................................... 74,300 26,600 358

United States ........................................ 2,170,000 914,000 421

15
FLORIDA FARM WORKERS
Florida number of All Hired Farm Workers and Hours Worked1
Hired
Date Expected to be employed Number of hours
Number of workers
150 days or more 149 days or less worked per week

2013
April 7-13, 2013................ 48,000 37,000 11,000 40.5
January 6-12, 2013 .......... 43,000 37,000 6,000 40.3
2012
October 7-13, 2012 .......... 47,000 39,000 8,000 37.6
July 8-14, 2012 ................ 39,000 35,000 4,000 39.0
April 8-14, 2012................ 55,000 41,000 14,000 36.5
January 8-14, 2012 .......... 50,000 41,000 9,000 38.5
2011
October 9-15, 2011 .......... 41,000 34,000 7,000 37.3
July 10-16, 2011 .............. 40,000 37,000 3,000 40.3
(2) (2) (2) (2)
April 10-16, 2011..............

January 9-15, 2011 .......... 45,000 38,000 7,000 36.9

1
Excludes Agricultural service workers
2
The April 2011 Farm Labor Survey was not conducted.

Florida Wage rates by Type of Worker1


Type of worker Wage rates for
Date Field and livestock
Field Livestock all hired workers
combined
(dollars per hour)

2013
April 7-13, 2013................ 10.05 10.70 10.12 11.00
January 6-12, 2013 .......... 9.75 10.85 9.88 10.88
2012
October 7-13, 2012 .......... 9.25 9.90 9.32 10.24
July 8-14, 2012 ................ 9.28 9.50 9.30 10.47
April 8-14, 2012................ 10.60 10.35 10.58 11.56
January 8-14, 2012 .......... 10.35 10.65 10.37 11.43
2011
October 9-15, 2011.......... 9.25 10.20 9.35 10.56
July 10-16, 2011 .............. 9.90 10.20 9.95 12.15
(2) (2) (2) (2)
April 10-16, 2011 .............
January 9-15, 2011.......... 9.45 10.05 9.55 10.70
1
Excludes Agricultural service workers
2
The April 2011 Farm Labor Survey was not conducted.

16
FLORIDA FARM INCOME & EXPENSES
Florida – Value Added to the u.s. economy
by the Agricultural Sector via the Production of Goods and Services, 2009-2011
1
Item 2009 2010 2011
(thousand dollars)

Value of crop production ............................................................. 6,035,881 6,483,554 6,762,557


Value of livestock production ...................................................... 1,120,582 1,278,803 1,567,384
Revenues from services and forestry........................................... 482,722 572,170 619,108
Value of agricultural sector production ......................................... 7,639,185 8,334,527 8,949,049
less: Purchased inputs ............................................................... 3,890,444 3,842,261 4,421,100
Farm origin ................................................................................. 897,533 983,037 1,098,580
Manufactured inputs ................................................................... 1,234,142 1,048,731 1,232,428
Other purchased inputs .............................................................. 1,758,769 1,810,493 2,090,092
plus: Net government transactions ............................................. -163,855 -186,457 -135,278
+Direct Government payments ........................................... 76,699 92,998 175,103
-Motor vehicle registration and licensing fees ..................... 10,554 9,455 10,381
-Property taxes .................................................................. 230,000 270,000 300,000
Gross value added ..................................................................... 3,584,886 4,305,809 4,392,671
less: Capital consumption .......................................................... 458,056 468,268 489,444
Net value added ......................................................................... 3,126,830 3,873,541 3,903,227
Less: Payments to stakeholders ................................................ 1,791,162 1,781,865 1,642,345
Employee compensation (total hired labor) ................................. 1,341,892 1,340,223 1,158,462
Net rent received by Non-operator landlords ............................... 35,955 37,549 87,359
Real estate and Non-real estate interest ..................................... 413,315 404,093 396,524
net Farm income ....................................................................... 1,335,668 2,055,676 2,260,882
1
Value of agricultural sector production is the gross value of the commodities and services produced within a year. Net value-added is the
sector's contribution to the National economy and is the sum of the income from production earned by all factors-of-production, regardless of
ownership. Net farm income is the farm operators' share of income from the sector's production activities. The concept presented is consistent
with that employed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

leading states in net Farm income, 2011


State Net farm income
(million dollars)
1. California ................................................................. 16,304.9
2. Iowa ........................................................................ 10,813.2
3. Nebraska.................................................................. 7,456.7
4. Illinois....................................................................... 6,099.7
5. Minnesota ............................................................... 5,784.6
6. Texas ...................................................................... 5,343.9
7. Kansas .................................................................... 5,191.2
8. South Dakota .......................................................... 4,619.9
9. Ohio ........................................................................ 3,886.4
10. Indiana .................................................................. 3,803.9
11. Wisconsin .............................................................. 3,802.7
12. Michigan................................................................. 3,347.9
13. Missouri ................................................................. 3,333.2
14. North Carolina ....................................................... 3,006.9
15. Washington ........................................................... 2,985.4
16.Georgia ................................................................... 2,463.2
17. Idaho ..................................................................... 2,260.9
18. Florida .................................................................. 2,260.9

17
FLORIDA CASH RENTS

Cash rents:
Pasture Land, Cropland-Florida 2011-2012
District Non-irrigated
Pasture land Irrigated cropland
and cropland
county 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012

(dollars per acre)


District 10
Calhoun.................... (D) 25.00 50.00 (D) (D) (D)
Escambia ................. 18.50 (D) 72.00 76.50 (D) (D)
Gadsden .................. 22.00 (D) 36.00 (D) (D) (D)
Holmes..................... 23.50 25.00 35.50 38.00 (D) (D)
Jackson.................... 25.00 (D) 40.50 56.00 (D) (D)
Jefferson .................. 29.50 (D) 36.50 35.00 (D) (D)
Leon......................... 23.00 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)
Okaloosa.................. (D) 21.00 66.50 (D) (D) (D)
Santa Rosa .............. 37.00 (D) 61.50 73.00 (D) (D)
Walton...................... 23.00 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)
Washington .............. (D) 26.00 40.00 44.50 (D) (D)
Other, District 10 ........ 19.50 25.50 41.50 51.00 130.00 152.00
Total ................... 25.00 25.50 50.00 59.00 130.00 152.00

District 30
Columbia.................. 22.00 (D) (D) 44.50 (D) (D)
Dixie ......................... (D) 13.50 (D) 53.00 (D) (D)
Hamilton................... (D) (D) (D) 35.50 (D) (D)
Lafayette .................. (D) (D) (D) 43.50 (D) (D)
Suwannee ................ (D) (D) (D) 30.50 (D) 100.00
Other, District 30 ........ 14.50 15.00 (D) 55.50 100.00 93.50
Total ................... 15.00 15.00 (D) 39.50 100.00 96.00
Footnotes on last page of table. --continued

18
Cash rents:
Pasture Land, Cropland-Florida 2011-2012 (continued)
District Non-irrigated
Pasture land Irrigated cropland
and cropland
county 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012

(dollars per acre)


District 50
Alachua .................... 22.00 20.50 33.00 34.50 102.00 104.00
Flagler ...................... (D) 3.80 (D) (D) (D) (D)
Gilchrist .................... 33.50 32.00 (D) 52.00 106.00 122.00
Hernando ................. 12.00 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)
Hillsborough ............. 11.50 10.50 26.50 21.00 365.00 300.00
Lake ......................... 15.50 16.50 34.50 19.00 125.00 (D)
Levy ......................... 19.00 22.00 41.50 43.00 99.00 155.00
Marion ...................... 18.00 12.50 38.00 (D) 100.00 (D)
Orange ..................... 10.50 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)
Osceola.................... 18.50 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)
Pasco ....................... 14.50 10.50 (D) (D) (D) (D)
Polk.......................... 10.00 10.00 25.00 21.00 (D) (D)
Putnam..................... 15.00 8.10 (D) (D) (D) (D)
St. Johns .................. (D) (D) (D) (D) 160.00 176.00
Sumter ..................... (D) 13.50 (D) 24.00 (D) (D)
Union......................... (D) (D) 38.00 (D) (D) (D)
Volusia ..................... (D) 7.00 (D) 23.50 (D) (D)
Other, District 50 ........ 13.00 7.90 43.50 39.00 152.00 162.00
Total ................... 13.50 10.50 38.00 38.00 146.00 160.00
District 80
Brevard .................... (D) 10.50 (D) (D) (D) (D)
Collier....................... 11.00 6.70 (D) (D) (D) (D)
DeSoto ..................... 16.50 21.00 (D) (D) (D) (D)
Hardee ..................... 12.50 (D) (D) 28.50 144.00 250.00
Hendry ..................... (D) (D) (D) (D) 229.00 (D)
Highlands ................. 19.50 13.50 (D) 39.00 200.00 (D)
Indian River .............. (D) 12.00 (D) (D) (D) (D)
Lee ........................... 11.00 8.30 (D) (D) (D) (D)
Manatee ................... 14.50 11.50 (D) 38.00 (D) 250.00
Martin ....................... (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)
Miami-Dade.............. (D) (D) (D) (D) 410.00 (D)
Okeechobee............. 14.50 17.00 (D) (D) (D) 203.00
Palm Beach.............. (D) (D) (D) 36.00 323.00 (D)
Sarasota................... 9.30 9.00 (D) (D) (D) (D)
St. Lucie ................... 10.50 11.50 (D) (D) 260.00 (D)
Other, District 80 ........ 11.00 11.50 (D) 25.50 273.00 415.00
Total ................... 13.00 13.00 (D) 27.00 312.00 398.00

state Total................. 13.50 12.50 41.00 46.00 205.00 240.00


D - Withheld to avoid disclosing data of individual operations.

19
20
2011-2012 SEASON CITRUS HIGHLIGHTS
U.S. and Florida Production
U.S. citrus utilized production for the 2011-2012 season totaled 11.7 million tons, down slightly from the 2010-2011
season. Florida accounted for 65 percent of the total United States citrus production, while California totaled 32 percent,
and Texas and Arizona combined produced the remaining 3 percent. Total utilized citrus production was down from the
previous year in all citrus reporting states except Florida.
Florida’s share of U.S. citrus production was 170.9 million boxes in the 2011-2012 season, up 3 percent from the previous
season’s 166.1 million boxes. Production of oranges increased while production of grapefruit and tangerines decreased.
Tangelo production remained unchanged from the 2010-2011 season.
Florida’s all orange production increased by 4 percent to 146.6 million boxes. Navel production is 2.65 million boxes,
unchanged from the 2010-2011 season. All grapefruit production is down 5 percent to 18.9 million boxes. Production of
Honey tangerines is down 4 percent and early tangerine production is down 10 percent, resulting in an 8 percent decrease
in all tangerines.

Production by Area and County


Each production area showed an increase in citrus production compared to 2010-2011 except the Indian River District
which produced 1.3 million boxes less than the 2010-2011 season. The top 5 citrus producing counties were Polk (31.2
million boxes) Highlands (23.7 million), Hendry (19.9 million), DeSoto (18.6 million), and Hardee (13.8 million). Polk
County had the largest actual increase in production while Indian River County’s production decreased the most. By
percentage, Pasco County had the greatest increase and Martin County lost the most.
Estimates of county production are prepared from objective survey data used in forecasting citrus crop production. The
apportionment of final harvest to the counties is based on bearing trees, an estimate of the average fruit per tree, and the
drop and size surveys. Sample size used in these surveys and the distribution of the sample groves around the State are
chosen to minimize error in the estimates of production and are not to be considered as accurate for the counties as at the
State or area levels.

Value
The value of the 2011-2012 United States citrus crop was up 6 percent from last season, at $3.44 billion (packinghouse-
door equivalent). Orange value of production increased 5 percent from last season while grapefruit value is up 1 percent.
Tangerine and mandarin value of production is 6 percent higher than last season and lemon value of production is up
16 percent. Tangelo value increased 44 percent from the previous season.
Florida’s $1.35 billion preliminary on-tree value of the 2011-2012 citrus crop is 1 percent less than the revised value of
$1.37 billion for 2010-2011. The price per box is higher for grapefruit and tangelos but lower for all other citrus. The
tangelo on-tree value increased nearly 73 percent from last season. Non-Valencia oranges and all grapefruit also had
increases in the value of production of 5 percent and 2 percent respectively.

Citrus: Florida Value of sales on-Tree:


Crop Years 2002-2003 through 2011-2012
1 1
Crop year Value Crop year Value
(1,000 dollars) (1,000 dollars)
2002-2003 ...................................... 787,378 2007-2008 ..................................... 1,283,994
2003-2004 ...................................... 891,500 2008-2009 ..................................... 1,046,735
2004-2005 ...................................... 754,169 2009-2010 ..................................... 1,131,107
2005-2006 ...................................... 1,024,610 2010-2011 2 ................................... 1,368,626
3
2006-2007 ...................................... 1,499,112 2011-2012 ................................... 1,351,846
1
Excludes lemons beginning in 2003-2004.
2
Revised.
3
Preliminary.

21
Foreign Exports
Fresh fruit exports totaled 9.8 million 4/5 bushel cartons. Japan accounted for the majority of Florida grapefruit exports.
Canada received most of Florida’s orange and specialty fresh fruit exports. A total of 15.3 million gallons of Frozen
Concentrated Orange Juice (FCOJ), and 3.9 million gallons of Frozen Concentrated Grapefruit Juice (FCGJ) were
exported in the 2011-2012 season.

Frozen Concentrate
Final Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice (FCOJ) yield, as reported by the Florida Department of Citrus, was
1.628480 gallons per box of 42° Brix concentrate. A record FCOJ yield of 1.672737 was set in the 2007-2008 season. The
early-midseason portion of the crop finalized at 1.529715 gallons per box. The late crop yielded 1.745597 gallons per box.
The final Frozen Concentrated Grapefruit Juice (FCGJ) yield was 1.324913 gallons per box of 40° Brix concentrate, down
slightly from last season’s final of 1.327872 gallons per box.

The final Frozen Concentrated Tangerine Juice (FCTJ) yield of 1.586671 gallons per box of 42° Brix concentrate was
higher than last season’s final of 1.438629 gallons per box.

2011-2012 Citrus box Weights:


Approximate net weight by fruit type and states
State Orange Grapefruit Tangerine Lemon Lime
(pounds)
1
FL............................... 90 85 95 90 88
2 3 2 4
CA.............................. 80 80 80 80 (X)
TX .............................. 85 80 (X) (X) (X)
5 2 4
AZ .............................. (X) (X) 80 80 (X)
X Not applicable.
1
Includes Temples and tangelos at 90 pounds.
2
Was 75 pounds prior to the 2010-2011 season.
3
Was 67 pounds from 1993-1994 to 2009-2010 and 65 pounds prior to the 1993-1994 season.
4
Was 76 pounds prior to the 2010-2011 season.
5
Was 67 pounds from 1993-1994 to 2008-2009 and 64 pounds prior to the 1993-1994 season.

Florida Citrus, Priced Average Delivered-in Processed Fruit:


Crop Year 2011-2012
Price per
Variety Price per box
pound of solids
(dollars)
All oranges.................................................................. 10.373058 1.591721
Early-midseason ....................................................... 9.382732 1.507921
Valencia .................................................................... 11.480176 1.676907
All grapefruit................................................................ 7.631214 1.522664
White......................................................................... 7.401543 1.506843
Colored ..................................................................... 7.865760 1.538184
SOURCE: Florida Department of Citrus

22
Tree Inventory
Results of the annual commercial citrus inventory show total citrus acreage is 531,493, down 2 percent from the last
survey and the lowest in a series which began in 1966. Compared to the previous inventory, the net decrease of 9,835
acres is less, with a lower gross loss (19,383), and slightly more new plantings (9,548).

Of the 29 counties included in the survey, 24 recorded decreases in acreage, and 5 showed increases. Martin County,
down 2,863 acres, has suffered the greatest loss for four straight years and has been declining since 1994. DeSoto County
has recorded gains in the last 5 surveys and this year’s gain of 1,011 acres is the most of any county. Polk remains the
leader in acreage with 82,572 and in trees with 9.9 million.

Orange acreage declined for the eighth consecutive survey to 464,918, replacing the previous record low of 466,252
tallied in the 1986 inventory. Grapefruit acreage fell to a new low of 48,191, representing only 54 percent of the pre-
hurricanes figure. Specialty acreage continued to decline to a record low of 18,384 and represents only 3.5 percent of the
total citrus acreage.

Total citrus trees have declined steadily from the peak in 1998 to 69,565,400. Polk is the leader with over 9.9 million
trees, followed by Hendry with 9.6 million, DeSoto with 8.6 million, and Highlands with 7.9 million trees. The total is
composed of oranges, over 89 percent; grapefruit, almost 8 percent; and the remainder, including specialty and other
citrus, at 4 percent. Since 2011, bearing trees decreased nearly 1.5 percent to 64,982,000 while non-bearing trees
decreased by 3 percent to 4,583,400.

23
Florida Citrus Harvesting season
navel orange
Ambersweet
Hamlin orange
Pineapple orange
Temple
Valencia orange

White seedless grapefruit


Colored seedless grapefruit
seedy grapefruit

K-early Citrus
nova Tangelo
orlando Tangelo
Minneola Tangelo

robinson Tangerine
Fallglo Tangerine
sunburst Tangerine
Dancy Tangerine
Honey Tangerine

lemon lemon
Avocado Avocado

sep oct nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

24
Citrus Production by County 2011-2012

Production
(1,000 Boxes)
Polk 31,229
Highlands 23,692
Hendry 19,924
DeSoto 18,579
Hardee 13,760
St. Lucie 9,378
Indian River 9,369
Collier 9,352
Manatee 6,398
Lake 4,174
Osceola 3,451
Charlotte 3,393
Lee 3,042
Pasco 2,915
Glades 2,720
Hillsborough 2,541
Martin 1,853
Okeechobee 1,769
Orange 1,227
Brevard 637
Marion 381
Sarasota 344
Hernando 249
Volusia 210
Seminole 128
1
Other counties 175

Total 170,890
1
Citrus, Palm Beach, Pinellas, and Putnam
counties.

25
Florida Citrus:
Production by County, Area, and Type, Crop Year 2011 - 2012
Oranges Grapefruit
County Specialty All
and area Non- Late fruit
2
citrus
All White Colored All
Valencia 1 (Valencia)
(1,000 boxes)

Brevard............... 302 236 538 21 37 58 41 637


Charlotte............. 1,023 1,752 2,775 8 333 341 277 3,393
Collier ................. 4,212 4,582 8,794 23 328 351 207 9,352
DeSoto ............... 7,730 10,642 18,372 45 68 113 94 18,579
Glades ................ 1,568 1,042 2,610 - 20 20 90 2,720
Hardee................ 9,193 4,298 13,491 19 64 83 186 13,760
Hendry................ 7,961 10,816 18,777 153 598 751 396 19,924
Hernando............ 223 3 226 - 7 7 16 249
Highlands ........... 8,796 13,605 22,401 283 448 731 560 23,692
Hillsborough........ 1,737 653 2,390 4 7 11 140 2,541
Indian River ........ 1,528 1,007 2,535 2,724 3,962 6,686 148 9,369
Lake ................... 2,285 771 3,056 30 487 517 601 4,174
Lee ..................... 1,117 1,530 2,647 20 223 243 152 3,042
Manatee ............. 3,630 2,664 6,294 18 20 38 66 6,398
Marion ................ 275 43 318 2 18 20 43 381
Martin ................. 492 1,215 1,707 61 66 127 19 1,853
Okeechobee ....... 820 621 1,441 58 169 227 101 1,769
Orange ............... 746 380 1,126 4 29 33 68 1,227
Osceola .............. 1,936 1,031 2,967 185 224 409 75 3,451
Pasco ................. 2,291 507 2,798 3 36 39 78 2,915
Polk .................... 14,822 12,936 27,758 461 1,220 1,681 1,790 31,229
St. Lucie ............. 1,080 1,874 2,954 1,212 5,033 6,245 179 9,378
Sarasota ............. 105 143 248 14 41 55 41 344
Seminole ............ 86 14 100 - 15 15 13 128
Volusia................ 159 24 183 2 17 19 8 210
3
Other counties .. 83 11 94 - 30 30 51 175

Total................... 74,200 72,400 146,600 5,350 13,500 18,850 5,440 170,890


Indian River ........ 2,500 3,100 5,600 4,000 9,100 13,100 348 19,048
Northern ............. 6,109 1,744 7,853 39 615 654 834 9,341
Central................ 25,291 27,456 52,747 911 1,885 2,796 2,402 57,945
Western .............. 22,400 18,400 40,800 100 200 300 527 41,627
Southern............. 17,900 21,700 39,600 300 1,700 2,000 1,329 42,929

Total................... 74,200 72,400 146,600 5,350 13,500 18,850 5,440 170,890


- Represents zero.
1
Includes early, midseason, Navel, and Temple varieties.
2
Tangelos and tangerines.
3
Citrus, Palm Beach, Pinellas, and Putnam counties.

26
Commercial Citrus Acreage by County 2012

Commercial Acres
Polk 82,572
DeSoto 64,258
Hendry 63,792
Highlands 61,525
Hardee 46,792
St. Lucie 37,424
Indian River 32,820
Collier 30,780
Manatee 18,300
Charlotte 13,071
Lake 11,060
Lee 10,589
Osceola 9,502
Glades 8,149
Hillsborough 8,023
Martin 7,183
Pasco 7,040
Okeechobee 6,850
Orange 3,373
Brevard 3,330
Sarasota 1,336
Marion 1,151
Volusia 815
Hernando 800
Seminole 428
Putnam 193
Other counties 1 337
Total 531,493
1
Citrus, Palm Beach, and Pinellas counties.

27
Florida Citrus:
Acreage, by Variety and County, Crop Year 2011 - 2012
Oranges Grapefruit
Specialty All
County Late Seedless 3
Non-Valencia 1 All 2 Seedy All 2 fruit citrus
(Valencia) White Colored
(acres)

Brevard ........................ 1,259 1,579 2,979 50 110 - 160 191 3,330


Charlotte ...................... 3,718 7,645 11,496 41 977 - 1,018 557 13,071
Collier........................... 11,596 17,502 29,098 66 867 - 933 749 30,780
DeSoto ......................... 24,988 37,577 63,155 77 412 - 489 614 64,258
Glades.......................... 4,360 3,498 7,895 - 57 - 57 197 8,149
Hardee ......................... 29,139 15,835 45,520 54 311 13 378 894 46,792
Hendry ......................... 22,057 38,498 60,625 350 1,432 - 1,782 1,385 63,792
Hernando ..................... 654 10 724 1 9 - 10 66 800
Highlands ..................... 19,349 39,156 59,086 291 451 261 1,004 1,435 61,525
Hillsborough ................. 4,933 2,061 7,417 12 77 8 97 509 8,023
Indian River .................. 6,924 6,871 14,000 7,040 10,615 - 17,896 924 32,820
Lake ............................. 5,547 2,418 8,226 44 596 32 675 2,159 11,060
Lee ............................... 3,626 5,936 9,564 47 581 1 629 396 10,589
Manatee ....................... 9,691 7,993 17,856 58 132 3 193 251 18,300
Marion .......................... 758 168 956 4 24 - 28 167 1,151
Martin ........................... 1,275 5,435 6,714 181 186 - 367 102 7,183
Okeechobee................. 2,702 2,965 5,667 210 696 - 914 269 6,850
Orange ......................... 1,725 1,322 3,063 16 31 - 47 263 3,373
Osceola........................ 4,855 3,421 8,415 406 414 1 821 266 9,502
Pasco ........................... 4,962 1,376 6,631 5 65 1 71 338 7,040
Polk.............................. 34,138 38,399 74,863 751 1,698 219 2,725 4,984 82,572
Putnam......................... 115 24 149 - 4 - 4 40 193
St. Lucie ....................... 5,431 13,190 18,690 3,354 14,083 - 17,539 1,195 37,424
Sarasota....................... 405 572 979 35 205 3 243 114 1,336
Seminole ...................... 251 63 325 2 18 - 20 83 428
Volusia ......................... 530 171 701 4 49 3 56 58 815
4
Other Counties ........... 114 9 124 - 35 - 35 178 337

Total ............................ 205,102 253,694 464,918 13,099 34,135 545 48,191 18,384 531,493
- Represents zero.
1
Includes early, midseason, Navel, and Temple varieties.
2
Includes unidentified variety acreage.
3
Tangelos, tangerines, lemons, and other citrus.
4
Citrus, Palm Beach, and Pinellas counties.

28
Commercial Citrus Trees by County 2012

Commercial Trees
(1,000 trees)
Polk 9,938.8
Hendry 9,553.4
DeSoto 8,595.2
Highlands 7,898.3
Hardee 5,726.8
St. Lucie 4,865.6
Collier 4,503.3
Indian River 3,592.3
Manatee 2,368.0
Charlotte 1,869.7
Lake 1,577.4
Lee 1,444.6
Glades 1,240.9
Osceola 1,164.0
Martin 1,102.7
Pasco 984.4
Hillsborough 938.6
Okeechobee 819.4
Orange 405.5
Brevard 387.3
Sarasota 151.4
Marion 137.7
Hernando 88.1
Volusia 85.8
Seminole 52.5
Putnam 29.6
Other counties 1 44.1
Total 69,565.4
1
Citrus, Palm Beach, and Pinellas counties.

29
Florida Citrus:
Trees, by Variety and County, Crop Year 2011 - 2012
Oranges Grapefruit
Specialty All
County Late Seedless 3
Non-Valencia 1 All 2 Seedy All 2 fruit citrus
(Valencia) White Colored

(1,000 trees)

Brevard .................. 152.3 175.6 347.7 4.4 12.5 - 16.9 22.7 387.3

Charlotte ................ 521.2 1,091.7 1,631.3 4.4 128.2 - 132.6 105.8 1,869.7

Collier..................... 1,699.5 2,588.8 4,288.3 7.9 104.8 - 112.7 102.3 4,503.3

DeSoto ................... 3,326.2 5,029.4 8,435.3 9.4 55.7 - 65.1 94.8 8,595.2

Glades.................... 625.8 563.0 1,199.0 - 6.5 - 6.5 35.4 1,240.9

Hardee ................... 3,535.6 1,954.2 5,561.3 5.0 37.6 1.1 43.7 121.8 5,726.8

Hendry ................... 3,235.2 5,860.9 9,106.1 45.3 188.1 - 233.4 213.9 9,553.4

Hernando ............... 72.1 1.3 80.1 0.1 0.9 - 1.0 7.0 88.1

Highlands ............... 2,535.5 4,979.6 7,589.2 27.6 55.0 24.4 107.1 202.0 7,898.3

Hillsborough ........... 561.6 250.3 861.1 1.0 7.2 0.8 9.0 68.5 938.6

Indian River ............ 793.8 808.8 1,635.2 659.4 1,143.6 - 1,832.6 124.5 3,592.3

Lake ....................... 754.5 347.2 1,135.1 5.0 81.2 3.3 89.9 352.4 1,577.4

Lee......................... 463.0 845.2 1,308.5 5.7 68.5 0.1 74.3 61.8 1,444.6

Manatee ................. 1,213.7 1,081.3 2,317.9 5.5 13.4 0.3 19.2 30.9 2,368.0

Marion .................... 87.0 20.5 110.5 0.5 2.4 - 2.9 24.3 137.7

Martin ..................... 187.8 859.0 1,047.2 21.8 20.7 - 42.5 13.0 1,102.7

Okeechobee........... 333.6 343.0 676.6 20.5 84.3 - 105.7 37.1 819.4

Orange ................... 212.4 150.8 365.1 1.1 4.3 - 5.4 35.0 405.5

Osceola.................. 590.0 445.3 1,051.4 42.6 38.3 0.1 81.0 31.6 1,164.0

Pasco..................... 682.9 210.1 932.4 0.7 6.9 0.1 7.7 44.3 984.4

Polk........................ 4,099.0 4,586.7 8,982.8 73.2 169.7 19.9 267.5 688.5 9,938.8

Putnam................... 16.2 3.6 21.3 - 0.7 - 0.7 7.6 29.6

St. Lucie ................. 736.1 1,961.2 2,713.0 389.8 1,575.5 - 1,977.5 175.1 4,865.6

Sarasota................. 45.2 67.8 113.3 4.1 21.1 0.2 25.4 12.7 151.4

Seminole ................ 32.4 7.2 41.0 0.2 2.1 - 2.3 9.2 52.5

Volusia ................... 59.0 16.2 75.2 0.3 5.0 0.2 5.5 5.1 85.8
4
Other Counties ..... 12.7 1.3 14.2 - 4.2 - 4.2 25.7 44.1

Total ...................... 26,584.3 34,250.0 61,640.1 1,335.5 3,838.4 50.5 5,272.3 2,653.0 69,565.4
- Represents zero.
1
Includes early, midseason, Navel, and Temple varieties.
2
Includes unidentified variety tree numbers.
3
Tangelos, tangerines, lemons, and other citrus.
4
Citrus, Palm Beach, and Pinellas.

30
31
Florida Citrus: oranges
Trees, Acreage, Yield, Production, Price, and Value, by Variety, Crop Years 2002-2003 through 2011-2012
Utilization of production On-tree
Crop Bearing Bearing Yield
year trees acreage per acre Price per Value of
Total Fresh Processed
box production

(1,000 trees) (1,000 acres) (boxes) (1,000 boxes) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)
non-Valencia
oranges 1 2
2002-2003 .......... 36,355 283.0 396 112,000 6,773 105,227 2.62 293,594
2003-2004 .......... 34,445 266.3 473 126,000 5,615 120,385 2.20 277,715
2004-2005 .......... 32,165 249.3 317 79,100 4,403 74,697 2.82 223,193
2005-2006 .......... 28,784 220.4 340 75,000 4,896 70,104 4.70 352,833
2006-2007 .......... 27,790 212.7 308 65,600 4,162 61,438 8.92 584,871
2007-2008 .......... 26,824 206.9 404 83,500 3,885 79,615 5.90 492,634
2008-2009 .......... 26,380 204.8 413 84,600 4,342 80,258 5.09 430,684
2009-2010 .......... 25,760 200.3 342 68,600 3,827 64,773 5.95 408,507
2010-2011 .......... 25,253 196.1 358 70,300 4,122 66,178 7.11 500,040
2011-2012 3 ........ 24,909 192.8 385 74,200 3,998 70,202 7.09 525,773
navel oranges
2002-2003 .......... 2,313 18.2 297 5,400 3,882 1,518 4.93 26,597
2003-2004 .......... 2,014 15.7 274 4,300 3,112 1,188 4.26 18,302
2004-2005 .......... 1,784 13.7 182 2,500 2,017 483 9.68 24,191
2005-2006 .......... 1,525 11.8 322 3,800 2,861 939 5.65 21,476
2006-2007 .......... 1,388 10.8 264 2,850 2,228 622 10.57 30,128
2007-2008 .......... 1,303 10.2 294 3,000 2,302 698 6.47 19,403
2008-2009 .......... 1,233 9.6 313 3,000 2,449 551 6.42 19,269
2009-2010 .......... 1,137 8.9 258 2,300 1,873 427 9.68 22,266
2010-2011 .......... 1,089 8.6 308 2,650 2,273 377 10.71 28,371
2011-2012 3 ........ 1,045 8.2 323 2,650 2,159 491 10.54 27,936
late (Valencia)
oranges
2002-2003 .......... 41,682 304.6 299 91,000 2,940 88,060 3.85 350,210
2003-2004 .......... 40,947 298.5 389 116,000 4,278 111,722 3.64 422,212
2004-2005 .......... 40,427 292.5 242 70,700 2,994 67,706 4.24 299,699
2005-2006 .......... 37,170 270.6 269 72,700 2,418 70,282 6.33 460,489
2006-2007 .......... 36,160 263.2 241 63,400 2,234 61,166 11.69 740,871
2007-2008 .......... 34,918 257.0 337 86,700 1,968 84,732 7.30 632,714
2008-2009 .......... 34,374 254.3 306 77,900 2,585 75,315 6.50 506,385
2009-2010 .......... 33,801 250.7 260 65,100 2,033 63,067 8.01 521,408
2010-2011 .......... 32,905 243.9 288 70,200 1,837 68,363 9.71 681,858
2011-2012 3 ........ 32,550 240.6 301 72,400 2,134 70,266 8.85 641,068
All oranges 2
2002-2003 .......... 78,037 587.6 345 203,000 9,713 193,287 3.17 643,804
2003-2004 .......... 75,392 564.8 428 242,000 9,893 232,107 2.89 699,927
2004-2005 .......... 72,592 541.8 276 149,800 7,397 142,403 3.49 522,892
2005-2006 .......... 65,954 491.0 301 147,700 7,314 140,386 5.51 813,322
2006-2007 .......... 63,950 475.9 271 129,000 6,396 122,604 10.28 1,325,742
2007-2008 .......... 61,742 463.9 367 170,200 5,853 164,347 6.61 1,125,348
2008-2009 .......... 60,754 459.1 354 162,500 6,927 155,573 5.77 937,069
2009-2010 .......... 59,561 451.0 296 133,700 5,860 127,840 6.96 929,915
2010-2011 .......... 58,158 440.0 319 140,500 5,959 134,541 8.41 1,181,898
2011-2012 3 ........ 57,459 433.4 338 146,600 6,132 140,468 7.96 1,166,841
1
Early, midseason, and Navel varieties.
2
Includes Temples beginning in 2006-2007.
3
2011-2012 preliminary.

32
33
Florida Citrus: grapefruit
Trees, Acreage, Yield, Production, Price, and Value, by Variety, Crop Years 2002-2003 through 2011-2012
Utilization of production On-tree
Crop Bearing Bearing Yield
year trees acreage per acre Price per Value of
Total Fresh Processed
box production

(1,000 trees) (1,000 acres) (boxes) (1,000 boxes) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

White grapefruit 1
2002-2003................ 3,944 38.6 420 16,200 3,172 13,028 1.77 28,702
2003-2004................ 3,247 31.3 508 15,900 3,273 12,627 1.94 30,862
2004-2005................ 2,712 25.8 132 3,400 1,352 2,048 11.93 40,560
2005-2006................ 2,214 21.3 305 6,500 1,433 5,067 7.47 48,544
2006-2007................ 2,083 19.9 467 9,300 1,961 7,339 2.51 23,305
2007-2008................ 1,895 18.3 492 9,000 1,893 7,107 2.36 21,276
2008-2009................ 1,672 16.4 402 6,600 1,392 5,208 1.82 11,999
2009-2010................ 1,475 14.6 411 6,000 1,526 4,474 5.76 34,531
2010-2011................ 1,434 14.2 412 5,850 1,378 4,472 5.66 33,126
2011-2012 2 .............. 1,377 13.6 393 5,350 1,147 4,203 6.24 33,365

Colored grapefruit
2002-2003................ 6,352 56.9 395 22,500 12,417 10,083 2.93 65,816
2003-2004................ 5,721 51.0 490 25,000 13,384 11,616 4.22 105,433
2004-2005................ 5,079 45.2 208 9,400 6,067 3,333 14.02 131,805
2005-2006................ 4,329 38.5 332 12,800 5,481 7,319 7.90 101,111
2006-2007................ 4,232 37.5 477 17,900 8,998 8,902 5.42 96,975
2007-2008................ 4,094 36.5 482 17,600 8,730 8,870 5.47 96,231
2008-2009................ 3,961 35.5 425 15,100 7,947 7,153 4.68 70,697
2009-2010................ 3,725 33.5 427 14,300 7,831 6,469 8.23 117,625
2010-2011................ 3,602 32.3 430 13,900 7,005 6,895 7.17 99,621
2011-2012 2 .............. 3,557 31.9 423 13,500 6,784 6,716 7.55 101,985

All grapefruit
2002-2003................ 10,296 95.5 405 38,700 15,589 23,111 2.44 94,518
2003-2004................ 8,968 82.3 497 40,900 16,657 24,243 3.33 136,295
2004-2005................ 7,791 71.0 180 12,800 7,419 5,381 13.47 172,365
2005-2006................ 6,543 59.8 323 19,300 6,914 12,386 7.75 149,655
2006-2007................ 6,315 57.4 474 27,200 10,959 16,241 4.42 120,280
2007-2008................ 5,989 54.8 485 26,600 10,623 15,977 4.42 117,507
2008-2009................ 5,633 51.9 418 21,700 9,339 12,361 3.81 82,696
2009-2010................ 5,200 48.1 422 20,300 9,357 10,943 7.50 152,156
2010-2011................ 5,036 46.5 425 19,750 8,383 11,367 6.72 132,747
2011-2012 2 .............. 4,934 45.5 414 18,850 7,931 10,919 7.18 135,350
1
Includes seedy grapefruit.
2
2011-2012 preliminary.

34
Florida Citrus: Tangerines
Trees, Acreage, Yield, Production, Price, and Value, by Variety, Crop Years 2002-2003 through 2011-2012
Utilization of production On-tree
Crop Bearing Bearing Yield
year trees acreage per acre Price per Value of
Total Fresh Processed
box production

(1,000 trees) (1,000 acres) (boxes) (1,000 boxes) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

early Tangerines 1
2002-2003.................... 1,969 12.8 234 3,000 2,110 890 8.39 25,163
2003-2004.................... 1,725 11.4 316 3,600 2,307 1,293 6.15 22,142
2004-2005.................... 1,579 10.5 233 2,450 1,814 636 10.12 24,785
2005-2006.................... 1,301 8.7 328 2,850 1,913 937 10.40 29,640
2006-2007.................... 1,185 8.0 300 2,400 1,661 739 12.01 28,820
2007-2008.................... 1,140 7.7 338 2,600 1,761 839 8.64 22,461
2008-2009.................... 1,125 7.6 336 2,550 1,908 642 5.59 14,263
2009-2010.................... 1,044 7.0 321 2,250 1,550 700 10.72 24,115
2010-2011.................... 999 6.6 394 2,600 1,742 858 9.43 24,525
2011-2012 2 .................. 933 6.2 376 2,330 1,665 665 7.49 17,448

Honey Tangerines
2002-2003.................... 1,347 8.9 281 2,500 1,804 696 8.36 20,897
2003-2004.................... 1,383 9.1 319 2,900 2,133 767 9.16 26,575
2004-2005.................... 1,342 8.8 227 2,000 1,504 496 14.36 28,727
2005-2006.................... 1,234 8.1 327 2,650 1,695 955 8.45 22,391
2006-2007.................... 1,142 7.6 289 2,200 1,411 789 13.27 29,200
2007-2008.................... 1,113 7.3 397 2,900 1,521 1,379 5.02 14,550
2008-2009.................... 1,075 7.1 183 1,300 929 371 8.20 10,660
2009-2010.................... 941 6.3 349 2,200 1,461 739 9.52 20,953
2010-2011.................... 918 6.2 331 2,050 1,265 785 11.17 22,889
2
2011-2012 .................. 885 5.9 332 1,960 1,173 787 10.66 20,888

All Tangerines
2002-2003.................... 3,316 21.7 253 5,500 3,914 1,586 8.40 46,217
2003-2004.................... 3,108 20.5 317 6,500 4,440 2,060 7.46 48,464
2004-2005.................... 2,921 19.3 231 4,450 3,318 1,132 12.02 53,503
2005-2006.................... 2,535 16.8 327 5,500 3,608 1,892 9.44 51,907
2006-2007.................... 2,327 15.6 295 4,600 3,072 1,528 12.64 58,152
2007-2008.................... 2,253 15.0 367 5,500 3,282 2,218 6.70 36,830
2008-2009.................... 2,200 14.7 262 3,850 2,837 1,013 6.49 24,986
2009-2010.................... 1,985 13.3 335 4,450 3,011 1,439 10.14 45,134
2010-2011.................... 1,908 12.8 363 4,650 3,007 1,643 10.23 47,558
2011-2012 2 .................. 1,818 12.1 355 4,290 2,838 1,452 8.99 38,554
1
Includes Fallglo and Sunburst varieties.
2
2011-2012 preliminary.

35
Florida Citrus:
Trees, Acreage, Yield, Production, Price, and Value, by Variety, Crop Years 2002-2003 through 2011-2012
Utilization of production On-tree
Crop Bearing Bearing Yield
year trees acreage per acre Price per Value of
Total Fresh Processed
box production
(1,000 trees) (1,000 acres) (boxes) (1,000 boxes) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

Tangelos
2002-2003 ..... 1,151 9.1 258 2,350 608 1,742 2.60 6,114
2003-2004 ..... 1,052 8.0 125 1,000 545 455 7.48 7,484
2004-2005 ..... 814 6.4 242 1,550 495 1,055 2.45 3,794
2005-2006 ..... 828 6.3 222 1,400 547 853 5.37 7,512
2006-2007 ..... 704 5.5 227 1,250 428 822 8.24 10,298
2007-2008 ..... 668 5.2 288 1,500 432 1,068 2.87 4,309
2008-2009 ..... 659 5.2 221 1,150 504 646 1.73 1,984
2009-2010 ..... 593 4.7 191 900 415 485 4.34 3,902
2010-2011 ..... 555 4.3 267 1,150 443 707 5.58 6,423
1
2011-2012 ... 527 4.1 280 1,150 434 716 9.65 11,101

Temples 2
2002-2003 ..... 509 4.2 310 1,300 305 995 2.01 2,615
2003-2004 ..... 393 3.4 412 1,400 342 1,058 1.07 1,502
2004-2005 ..... 332 2.9 224 650 213 437 2.48 1,615
2005-2006 ..... 289 2.5 280 700 209 491 3.16 2,214
2006-2007 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2007-2008 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2008-2009 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2009-2010 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2010-2011 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2011-2012 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)

lemons
2002-2003 ..... 151 0.9 94 85 (NA) (NA) 3.85 327
2003-2004 3 ... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2004-2005 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2005-2006 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2006-2007 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2007-2008 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2008-2009 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2009-2010 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2010-2011 ..... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
2011-2012 .... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
NA Not available.
1
2011-2012 preliminary.
2
Included in non-Valencia oranges beginning in 2006-2007.
3
Estimates discontinued.

36
Avocados in Florida
Production of Florida avocados increased from the previous season by 344,000 bushels, or 38 percent. Bearing acreage is
estimated at 7,400 acres. The price per bushel is $18.90, down 6 percent from the previous season. Total value of crop
production is $23,512,000.
In Florida, most early season varieties of avocados are West Indian types, whereas midseason and late varieties are mostly
Guatemalan-West Indian hybrids or Guatemalan types. Commercial production is primarily in Miami-Dade and Collier
counties. Florida avocados have a lower fat content than those from other states and countries, are typically larger than
avocados from California, and are available from June through the end of February.

Florida Avocado:
Trees, Acreage, Yield, Production, Utilization, Price, and Value, Crop Years 2002-2003 through 2011-2012
Crop Bearing Yield Price per Value of
Production 1
year acreage per acre bushel production
(1,000 acres) (bushels) (1,000 bushels) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)
Avocados
2002-2003 ................ 5.9 210 1,240 13.90 17,236
2003-2004 ................ 6.1 111 680 20.20 13,736
2004-2005 ................ 6.4 175 1,120 12.90 14,448
2005-2006 2 .............. 5.3 91 480 23.50 11,280
2006-2007 ................ 6.5 86 560 22.80 12,768
2007-2008 ................ 7.0 157 1,100 11.00 12,100
2008-2009 ................ 7.5 146 1,098 12.00 13,176
2009-2010 ................ 7.4 126 928 15.00 13,920
2010-2011 ................ 7.4 122 900 20.00 18,000
2011-2012 ................ 7.4 168 1,244 18.90 23,512
1
One bushel equals 50 pounds.
2
Hurricane Wilma affected production.

37
38
2012 FIELD CROPS HIGHLIGHTS
Value
The 2012 total value of production for corn, cotton, cottonseed, hay, peanuts, pecans, soybeans, and wheat totaled $491
million, an increase of 24% from the previous year’s total of $396 million. The total value of peanut production increased
47 percent and was valued at $236 million. The value of production of cotton ($67.9 million) decreased 21 percent, while
the value of production for cottonseed ($12.2 million) increased 5 percent.

Acreage and Production


Acreage harvested in 2012 for corn, cotton, hay, peanuts, soybeans, and wheat totaled 702 thousand acres, up 19 percent
from the 592 thousand acres harvested in 2011. Harvested acres for corn (40,000), hay (320,000), peanuts (200,000),
soybeans (20,000), and wheat (15,000) increased; whereas, acreage for cotton (107,000) decreased. Production increased
for corn (36%), cotton (9%), hay (18%), peanuts (42%), soybeans (81%), and wheat (71%).

Sugarcane
Florida producers harvested 410 thousand acres of sugarcane for sugar and seed in 2012, up 3 percent from the previous
year. Production in 2012 was up 4 percent totaling 15,578 thousand tons. The value of production for the 2011 crop was
$673 million, up 37 percent from the previous year.

Crop Weather
In January 2012, moderate to severe drought conditions persisted throughout the State. Low temperatures across Florida
dipped below freezing early in the month and again mid-month. Enjoyable daytime temperatures were in the 70s and 80s
for most of the month. Sugarcane harvest was well underway.

In February, drought conditions worsened for most of the State, with significant portions of the Panhandle reporting
extreme drought conditions. At the beginning of the month, lows ranged between the mid-20s to the 60s and highs were
in the 70s and 80s. At month’s end, low temperatures were mostly in the mid-40s and highs reached the mid-to-high 80s.
Harvesting of sugarcane continued throughout the month.

In March, producers welcomed rainfall across the Panhandle and northern Florida early in the month. Additional rainfall
was recorded throughout the State, but at month’s end, extreme drought conditions were prevalent in a band stretching
from Jacksonville southwest through Gainesville and onto the Gulf Coast. The drought was also present in Sarasota and
Manatee counties. Highs were in the 80s, lows ranged between the 40s and 60s. Producers began planting corn, peanuts,
and potatoes.

In April, hot, dry conditions and minimal rainfall at the beginning of the month worsened the drought conditions across
the State. Widespread rainfall during the middle of the month was reported. Low temperatures were in the 40s and the
low 50s, with highs in the 80s. Corn planting was completed during the month, while peanut planting was 21 percent
complete at the end of the month.

In May, scattered showers across the State did little to alleviate the drought conditions for most of the month. Tropical
Storm Beryl at the end of the month brought substantial rainfall to the State and greatly improved the moisture deficit.
Highs were in the lower 90s while lows were in the upper 60s. Winter wheat was harvested and peanut planting was 91
percent complete at the end of the month.

In June, beneficial rains dramatically improved the drought conditions. Tropical Storm Debby brought widespread
downpours and most stations recorded significant rainfall. At month’s end only a portion of the Panhandle and Southwest
Florida was categorized as abnormally dry. Daytime highs were mostly in the upper 80s and low 90s. Evening lows were
in the 60s and 70s. Peanut planting was completed early in the month and was 45 percent pegged at month’s end. Hay
was harvested when weather permitted.

39
In July, drought conditions remained mostly unchanged, with a portion of the Panhandle and Southwest Florida
categorized as being abnormally dry or in a moderate drought. Intermittent rain and hot temperatures prevailed. At the
end of the month, corn harvest was underway. Hay harvest continued as well.

In August, ample rainfall across the State eliminated all drought conditions. Low temperatures were in the mid 60s, while
the highs were in the upper 90s. At the end of the month, peanut harvest was just underway. Corn harvest was almost
complete.

In September, areas of south Florida picked up five inches of rain from Tropical Storm Isaac as it passed just south of
Key West early in the month. Rainfall from Tropical Storm Isaac helped refill Lake Okeechobee to rise three-quarters of
a foot in two days. Florida had no abnormally dry areas according to the U.S. Drought Monitor throughout the month.
Minimum temperatures ranged from the 50s to the 70s, while the maximum temperatures were in the upper 80s to the 90s.
Peanut harvest was well underway, some growers reported superior yields. Sugarcane planting began in south Florida.

In October, Florida had no abnormally dry areas according to the U.S. Drought Monitor throughout the month. Scattered
rainfall aided producers as they worked to harvest their fall crops. Low temperatures ranged from the 50s to the 70s,
while high temperatures were in the 80s to low 90s. Peanut harvest was nearing completion at the end of the month, while
cotton harvest continued.

In November, rainfall was light and scattered across the State. Cooler weather and dry conditions were the norm.
Portions of the Panhandle were abnormally dry at month’s end. Some freezing temperatures were reported in Northern
Florida late in the month. The cotton harvest was nearing completion.

In December, the State was abnormally dry in the Panhandle and in South Florida. Field crop harvesting was complete in
the Panhandle, while sugarcane harvest continued in South Florida.

Precipitation Monitor
2012 September - December, Florida
Sept. 17 - 23, 2012 Oct. 23 - 29, 2012

Nov. 19 - 25, 2012 Dec. 23 - 29, 2012

Precipitation in inches:

Source: Southeast Regional Climate Center

40
Florida Field Crops:
Acreage, Yield, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2003 through 2012
Crop Area Season Value
and Yield Production average of
year Planted Harvested price production
(1,000 acres) (bushels) (1,000 bushels) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

Corn 1
2003..................... 75 39 82 3,198 2.55 8,155
2004..................... 70 32 90 2,880 2.30 6,624
2005..................... 65 28 94 2,632 2.00 5,264
2006..................... 60 30 82 2,460 2.80 6,888
2007..................... 70 35 90 3,150 4.00 12,600
2008..................... 70 35 105 3,675 4.50 16,538
2009..................... 70 37 100 3,700 4.00 14,800
2010..................... 60 25 105 2,625 4.70 12,338
2011..................... 70 33 100 3,300 6.65 21,945
2012..................... 75 40 112 4,480 7.90 35,392

(pounds) (1,000 bales)


2
Cotton, upland
2003 .................... 94.0 92.0 610 117.0 0.655 36,785
2004 .................... 89.0 87.0 601 109.0 0.464 24,276
2005 .................... 86.0 85.0 762 135.0 0.480 31,104
2006 .................... 103.0 101.0 789 166.0 0.462 36,812
2007 .................... 85.0 81.0 687 116.0 0.580 32,294
2008 .................... 67.0 65.0 916 124.0 0.504 29,998
2009 .................... 82.0 78.0 723 117.5 0.673 37,957
2010 .................... 92.0 89.0 766 142.0 0.779 53,097
2011 .................. 122.0 118.0 744 183.0 0.978 85,908
2012 .................. 108.0 107.0 897 200.0 0.707 67,872

(1,000 tons)

Cottonseed
2003 .................... (X) (X) (X) 37.0 99.00 3,663
2004 .................... (X) (X) (X) 35.0 86.00 3,010
2005 .................... (X) (X) (X) 41.1 75.00 3,083
2006 .................... (X) (X) (X) 49.3 92.50 4,560
2007 .................... (X) (X) (X) 32.9 161.00 5,297
2008 .................... (X) (X) (X) 32.6 207.00 6,748
2009 .................... (X) (X) (X) 34.5 135.00 4,658
2010 .................... (X) (X) (X) 40.0 130.00 5,200
2011 .................... (X) (X) (X) 53.0 218.00 11,554
2012 .................... (X) (X) (X) 58.0 210.00 12,180

X Not applicable --continued


All 2012 estimates are preliminary.
1
Planted for all purposes; harvested for grain.
2
Production in 480-pound net weight bales.
3
Baled hay.
4
Planted for all purposes; harvested for dry nuts or beans.
5
Estimates of season average price and value of production for the 2012 crop will be available February 2014.

41
Florida Field Crops:
Acreage, Yield, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2003 through 2012 (continued)
Crop Area Season Value
and Yield Production average of
year Planted Harvested price production
(1,000 acres) (tons) (1,000 tons) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

Hay, All 3
2003...................... (X) 255 2.50 638 90.00 57,420
2004...................... (X) 260 2.50 650 93.00 60,450
2005...................... (X) 290 2.45 711 98.50 70,034
2006...................... (X) 300 2.30 690 101.00 69,690
2007...................... (X) 320 3.00 960 116.00 111,360
2008...................... (X) 300 3.00 900 136.00 122,400
2009...................... (X) 300 2.70 810 140.00 113,400
2010...................... (X) 320 2.40 768 141.00 108,288
2011...................... (X) 260 2.40 624 164.00 102,336
2012...................... (X) 320 2.30 736 167.00 122,912

(pounds) (1,000 pounds)

Peanuts 4
2003...................... 125 115 3,000 345,000 0.185 63,825
2004...................... 145 130 2,800 364,000 0.181 65,884
2005...................... 160 152 2,700 410,400 0.167 68,537
2006...................... 130 120 2,500 300,000 0.173 51,900
2007...................... 130 119 2,700 321,300 0.186 59,762
2008...................... 150 140 3,200 448,000 0.221 99,008
2009...................... 115 105 3,200 336,000 0.202 67,872
2010...................... 145 135 3,500 472,500 0.213 100,643
2011...................... 170 157 3,500 549,500 0.292 160,454
2012...................... 210 200 3,900 780,000 0.302 235,560

(bushels) (1,000 bushels)

soybeans 4
2003...................... 13 12 30 360 6.90 2,484
2004...................... 19 17 34 578 5.60 3,237
2005...................... 9 8 32 256 5.40 1,382
2006...................... 7 5 27 135 6.25 844
2007...................... 14 12 24 288 8.90 2,563
2008...................... 32 29 38 1,102 8.50 9,367
2009...................... 37 34 38 1,292 9.50 12,274
2010...................... 25 23 30 690 11.00 7,590
2011...................... 18 16 27 432 11.00 4,752
2012...................... 21 20 39 780 14.00 10,920

X Not applicable – continued


All 2012 estimates are preliminary.
1
Planted for all purposes; harvested for grain.
2
Production in 480-pound net weight bales.
3
Baled hay.
4
Planted for all purposes; harvested for dry nuts or beans.
5
Estimates of season average price and value of production for the 2012 crop will be available February 2014.

42
Florida Field Crops:
Acreage, Yield, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2003 through 2012 (continued)
Crop Area Season Value
and Yield Production average of
year Planted Harvested price production
(1,000 acres) (tons) (1,000 tons) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

sugarcane For
sugar and seed
2003 ...................... (X) 438 39.3 17,231 31.55 549,669
2004 ...................... (X) 406 35.2 14,281 30.30 432,714
2005 ...................... (X) 401 31.8 12,746 28.00 356,888
2006 ...................... (X) 400 35.9 14,346 31.10 446,161
2007 ...................... (X) 393 36.1 14,177 31.60 447,993
2008 ...................... (X) 401 33.1 13,255 30.10 398,975
2009 ...................... (X) 387 36.0 13,939 39.50 550,591
2010 ...................... (X) 392 33.1 12,972 38.00 492,936
2011 ...................... (X) 397 37.6 14,930 (NA) 673,343
(1) (1)
2012 ...................... (X) 410 38.0 15,578
sugarcane For
sugar
2003 ...................... (X) 419.0 39.3 16,467 31.90 525,297
2004 ...................... (X) 385.0 34.9 13,437 30.30 407,141
2005 ...................... (X) 376.0 31.4 11,806 28.00 330,568
2006 ...................... (X) 382.0 35.8 13,676 31.10 425,324
2007 ...................... (X) 375.0 36.0 13,500 31.60 426,600
2008 ...................... (X) 384.0 32.9 12,634 30.10 380,283
2009 ...................... (X) 370.0 35.9 13,283 39.50 524,679
2010 ...................... (X) 374.0 32.7 12,230 38.00 464,740
2011 ...................... (X) 380.0 37.5 14,250 45.10 642,675
2012 ...................... (X) 396.0 36.6 14,494 (NA) (NA)

(bushels) (1,000 bushels)


Wheat, Winter
2003...................... 20 12 41 492 3.00 1,476
2004...................... 18 15 45 675 3.45 2,329
2005...................... 18 8 45 360 3.10 1,116
2006...................... 8 5 42 210 3.15 662
2007...................... 13 9 55 495 4.00 1,980
2008...................... 25 23 55 1,265 5.50 6,958
2009...................... 17 14 43 602 4.30 2,589
2010...................... 12 7 40 280 5.00 1,400
2011...................... 12 8 45 360 6.60 2,376
2012...................... 20 15 41 615 6.30 3,875

NA Not available.
X Not applicable.
1
Planted for all purposes; harvested for grain.
2
Production in 480-pound net weight bales.
3
Baled hay.
4
Planted for all purposes; harvested for dry nuts or beans.
5
Estimates of season average price and value of production for the 2012 crop will be available February 2014.

43
Florida Pecans:
Production, Price, and Value by Variety, Crop Years 2003 through 2012
Utilized production Price per pound
Year Improved Native and Improved Native and
All pecans All pecans
varieties 1 seedling varieties seedling
(1,000 pounds) (dollars)
2003............................ 500 1,600 2,100 1.000 .600 .695
2004............................ 400 100 500 1.500 .950 1.390
2005............................ 300 700 1,000 1.400 .850 1.020
2006............................ 200 300 500 1.800 1.500 1.620
2007............................ 1,700 200 1,900 1.000 .700 .968
2008............................ 1,400 300 1,700 2.000 1.100 1.840
2009............................ 1,500 1,600 3,100 1.200 1.100 1.150
2010............................ 1,200 300 1,500 1.900 1.100 1.740
2011............................ 1,400 2,600 4,000 1.850 1.400 1.560
2012............................ 1,100 900 2,000 1.100 0.750 0.943
1
Budded, grafted, or top worked varieties.

Florida Pecans:
Value of Utilized Production by Variety, Crop Years 2003 through 2012
1
Year Improved varieties Native and seedling All pecans
(1,000 dollars)

2003.................................................. 500 960 1,460


2004.................................................. 600 95 695
2005.................................................. 420 595 1,015
2006.................................................. 360 450 810
2007.................................................. 1,700 140 1,840
2008.................................................. 2,800 330 3,130
2009.................................................. 1,800 1,760 3,560
2010.................................................. 2,280 330 2,610
2011.................................................. 2,590 3,640 6,230
2012.................................................. 1,210 675 1,885
1
Budded, grafted, or topworked varieties.

44
Florida Peanuts:
Acreage, Yield and Production, by District and County, 2011 and 2012
Planted for Harvested for Yield
District Production
all purposes dry peanuts per acre
and
county 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012

(acres) (pounds) (1,000 pounds)

District 10

Calhoun ............... 3,900 4,700 3,600 4,400 3,500 2,909 12,600 12,800

Escambia ............. 6,600 8,400 6,100 8,100 4,180 4,383 25,500 35,500

Holmes................. 7,100 8,400 6,400 7,800 2,891 3,577 18,500 27,900

Jackson................ 32,300 36,300 29,500 34,900 3,356 3,725 99,000 130,000

Okaloosa.............. 2,000 3,400 1,800 3,200 3,333 4,625 6,000 14,800

Santa Rosa .......... 16,000 25,300 14,900 24,200 3,893 4,479 58,000 108,400

Walton.................. 5,500 4,400 5,100 4,200 3,333 4,000 17,000 16,800

Washington .......... 4,400 4,300 4,100 4,100 3,902 4,244 16,000 17,400

Other, District 10 .. 3,500 5,300 3,200 5,100 2,938 3,216 9,400 16,400

Total................... 81,300 100,500 74,700 96,000 3,507 3,958 262,000 380,000

District 30

Columbia.............. 6,500 8,500 5,900 8,100 3,254 2,901 19,200 23,500


(1) (1) (1) (1)
Hamilton............... 6,700 6,200 3,952 24,500
(1) (1) (1) (1)
Madison ............... 10,400 9,900 3,838 38,000

Suwannee ............ 14,100 17,000 13,000 16,200 3,846 4,136 50,000 67,000

Other, District 30 .. 13,500 14,900 12,600 13,800 3,913 4,094 49,300 56,500

Total................... 40,800 50,800 37,700 48,000 3,793 3,854 143,000 185,000

Other, State............ 47,900 58,700 44,600 56,000 3,240 3,839 144,500 215,000

State Total.............. 170,000 210,000 157,000 200,000 3,500 3,900 549,500 780,000

1
Included in Other, District 30.

45
Florida Cotton:
Acreage, Yield and Production, by District and County, 2011 and 2012
District Planted Harvested Yield per acre Production
and
county 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012
(acres) (pounds) (bales)

District 10

Calhoun................... 9,600 9,100 9,500 9,000 884 869 17,500 16,300

Escambia ............... 11,800 9,700 11,600 9,700 886 1,099 21,400 22,200

Holmes................... 5,200 5,800 4,650 5,700 557 901 5,400 10,700

Jackson.................. 45,700 45,200 43,300 44,600 732 860 66,000 79,900

Santa Rosa ............ 24,700 16,000 24,600 15,800 626 969 32,100 31,900

Walton.................... 5,200 5,700 5,000 5,700 749 943 7,800 11,200

Washington ............ 3,700 5,200 3,650 5,200 842 849 6,400 9,200

Other, District 10 ........ 8,100 5,300 7,900 5,300 814 888 13,400 9,800

Total....................... 114,000 102,000 110,200 101,000 740 909 170,000 191,200

Other State................. 8,000 6,000 7,800 6,000 800 704 13,000 8,800

State Total.................. 122,000 108,000 118,000 107,000 744 897 183,000 200,000

Florida sugarcane for sugar:


Acreage, Yield and Production, by County, 2010 and 2011
Harvested Yield per acre Production
County
2010 2011 2010 2011 2010 20111
(acres) (acres) (tons) (tons) (tons) (tons)

Glades ............................... 22,000 24,000 28.2 38.3 620,000 920,000

Hendry ............................... 49,000 52,000 28.2 37.5 1,380,000 1,950,000

Martin................................. 8,000 5,400 46.3 40.7 370,000 220,000

Palm Beach........................ 295,000 298,000 33.4 37.8 9,860,000 11,250,000


Other, State........................ -- 600 -- 40.0 -- 24,000

State Total.............................. 374,000 380,000 32.7 37.8 12,230,000 14,364,000


1
2011 County estimates have not been revised at publication date.

46
47
Planting and Harvesting Seasons of Selected Florida Field Crops
Crop Usual Planting Dates Usual Harvesting Dates
(Principal producing areas
Begin Most Active End
- Agricultural Statistics
Districts or Counties)
Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb

Corn for grain


(10, 30, 50)

Corn for silage


(10, 30, 50)

Corn for forage


(10, 30, 50)

Cotton
(10, 30)

Peanuts for nuts


(10, 30, 50)

Potatoes
(30, 50, 80)

Soybeans
(10, 30)

Sugarcane
(3 counties*)

Tobacco
(10, 30, 50)

Winter Wheat
(10, 30)

Hay
(Statewide)

Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb
* Palm Beach, Hendry, and Glades

48
Escambia Holmes
Santa Rosa Jackson
Okaloosa Walton
Washington Gadsden Nassau
Calhoun Leon Jefferson Hamilton
Madison Hamilton
Bay
Bay
Duval
Liberty Baker
Wakulla Suwannee Columbia
Suwannee

10 Gulf Taylor
Franklin Lafayette
Union
Union
Clay St. Johns
Bradford
Dixie

30
Gilchrist
Gilchrist
Alachua Putnam
Flagler

Levy
Marion
Marion
Volusia

Citrus
Seminole
Sumter Lake
Lake
Hernando
Hernando Orange

50
Brevard
Pasco
Pasco
Osceola
Hillsborough
Hillsborough
Polk
Pinellas

Indian River

Manatee Hardee Okeechobee


St. Lucie
Highlands
Highlands
Sarasota DeSoto
Martin

Florida
Charlotte Glades

Palm Beach
Lee Hendry

Agricultural
Broward

80
Collier

Statistics
Monroe
Dade

Districts Source: USDA

49
50
LIVESTOCK HIGHLIGHTS
Dairy
Florida dairies produced 2.34 billion pounds of milk in 2012, up from 2.27 billion pounds produced during 2011. Annual
milk production per cow was 19,008 pounds, down from 19,067 pounds per cow in 2012. On January 1, 2013, there were
123,000 milk cows on Florida farms and commercial dairies, up from 120,000 milk cows a year earlier. The top ranking
counties for dairy cattle on January 1, 2013, were Okeechobee, Lafayette, and Gilchrist. Florida ranked 19th among States
in the number of milk cows.

Cash receipts from marketings of Florida milk in 2012 totaled $520 million, down from $547 million in 2011. In 2012, the
highest price of replacement milk cows was $1,490 per head in January. The annual average farm-gate price for milk in
Florida was $22.30 per hundredweight in 2012, down from $24.20 in 2011.

Beef

All cattle and calves on Florida farms and ranches as of January 1, 2013, including dairy cattle, totaled 1,660,000 head,
down 50,000 from 2012. The three top ranking counties for cattle were Okeechobee, Highlands, and Osceola counties.
Beef cows in Florida were 908,000 head, down 32,000 head from 2012. Nationally, Florida ranked 12th in beef cows and
17th in total cattle. Calves born during 2012 totaled 860,000, down 30,000 head from 2011.

Cash receipts from cattle and calf marketings were $669 million in 2012, up from $488 million in 2011. The average
annual price of cattle marketed in Florida in 2012 was $104.00 per hundredweight, up from $88.70 per hundredweight in
2011. The average price for calves in 2012 was $160.00 per hundredweight, up from $130.00 per hundredweight in 2011.

Poultry

Hens and pullets of laying age on farms in December 2012 were 8.74 million birds, compared to 10.2 million birds in
December 2011. Florida egg production from December 1, 2011 to November 30, 2012, was 2,514 million eggs, a
decrease from the previous year’s production of 2,666 million eggs.

The total value of Florida egg production in 2012 was $183 million, up from $178 million in 2011. The value of broilers
produced in Florida during 2012 totaled $179 million, up from $176 million a year earlier.

Florida liveweight broiler production in 2012 totaled 357 million pounds, down from 383 million pounds produced in
2011. Broilers produced in Florida during 2012 totaled 60 million birds, down three percent from 62 million birds in
2011. Broilers hatched in Florida were 53 million birds, down from 56 million birds in 2011.

Hogs

The hog inventory in Florida on January 1, 2012 was 15,000 head. There were 29,000 head of hogs marketed in Florida in
2012, down from 34,000 head in 2011. There were 66,900 head slaughtered in 2012, down from 94,900 head in 2011. The
average market year price in 2012 was $64.00 per hundredweight, down from $64.70 per hundredweight in 2011. Cash
receipts from hogs in 2012 were $2.56 million.

51
Florida Cows and Heifers:
Beef and Milk Cows that have Calved, and Beef and Dairy Herd Replacement Heifers: January 1, 2004-2013
Cows and heifers that have calved Heifers 500 pounds and over
Year Milk cattle
Other
Total Beef Milk Percent of Total Beef Milk
Heifers
Total
(1,000 head)

2004............... 1,090 950 140 12.8 200 140 40 20


2005............... 1,070 932 138 12.9 205 145 40 20
2006............... 1,050 916 134 12.8 200 140 40 20
2007............... 1,080 950 130 12.0 205 145 30 30
2008............... 1,060 940 120 11.3 200 135 35 30
2009............... 1,060 942 118 11.1 200 140 35 25
2010............... 1,070 958 112 10.5 190 135 30 25
2011............... 1,040 926 114 11.0 160 110 30 20
2012............... 1,060 940 120 11.3 180 115 35 30
2013............... 1,030 908 122 10.2 175 115 35 25

Florida Milk Cows:


Inventory by County: January 1, 2004-2013
Year Alachua De Soto Duval Escambia Gilchrist
(head)
(1)
2004 .......................... 2,100 3,000 1,000 14,000
(1)
2005 .......................... 1,900 2,800 900 15,000
(1) (1)
2006 .......................... 1,700 400 13,000
(1) (1) (1)
2007 .......................... 1,900 18,000
(1) (1)
2008 .......................... 4,000 3,000 15,000
(1) (1)
2009 .......................... 2,700 3,400 14,500
(1) (1)
2010 .......................... 2,000 3,200 14,000
(1) (1)
2011 .......................... 2,500 3,300 13,900
(1) (1)
2012 .......................... 2,700 3,400 14,800
(1) (1)
2013 .......................... 2,800 3,600 15,000

Year Hardee Hernando Highlands Hillsborough Holmes


(head)

2004.......................... 11,000 2,200 4,600 3,100 900


2005.......................... 12,000 1,800 6,200 3,500 1,000
2006.......................... 11,000 2,400 6,400 3,100 1,000
2007.......................... 12,000 1,900 5,800 1,800 900
2008.......................... 12,000 1,900 5,300 1,800 900
2009.......................... 12,000 1,600 6,000 1,400 800
2010.......................... 11,000 1,300 5,800 1,100 800
2011.......................... 11,300 1,400 6,000 1,300 800
2012.......................... 12,000 1,600 6,100 1,400 1,000
2013.......................... 12,200 1,700 6,200 1,400 1,000
Footnotes on next page --continued

52
Florida Milk Cows:
Inventory by County: January 1, 2004-2013 (continued)

Year Jackson Lafayette Lake Levy Manatee


(head)

2004 ............................ 1,700 11,000 2,300 8,600 3,900


(1) (1)
2005 ............................ 1,900 11,500 3,000
(1) (1)
2006 ............................ 1,400 11,000 3,200
(1) (1)
2007 ............................ 1,200 12,000 2,900
2008 ............................ 1,200 14,000 100 100 2,500
2009 ............................ 900 14,500 100 100 3,400
2010 ............................ 1,000 14,000 100 100 3,400
(1) (2)
2011 ............................ 900 14,000 3,300
2012 ............................ 900 14,800 100 100 3,600
2013 ............................ 900 15,000 100 100 3,500

Year Marion Okeechobee Pasco Sarasota Sumter


(head)
(1)
2004 .......................... 3,400 30,000 4,200 1,100
(1) (1)
2005 .......................... 3,200 33,000 3,600
(1) (1) (1)
2006 .......................... 30,000 3,100
(1) (1) (1)
2007 .......................... 31,000 1,700
(1) (1)
2008 .......................... 31,000 1,700 1,500
(1) (1)
2009 .......................... 29,500 1,900 3,000
(1) (1)
2010 .......................... 28,000 1,800 3,000
(1) (1)
2011 .......................... 28,500 1,700 2,900
(1) (1)
2012 .......................... 30,000 2,000 3,100
(1) (1)
2013 .......................... 30,500 2,000 3,100
2 3
Year Suwannee Washington Other counties Noncommercial Total
(head)
(1)
2004 ....................... 8,500 23,100 300 140,000
(1)
2005 ....................... 10,000 26,400 300 133,000
(1)
2006 ....................... 11,000 34,700 300 134,000
(1)
2007 ....................... 9,000 29,600 300 130,000
2008 ....................... 9,000 300 14,400 300 120,000
2009 ....................... 7,500 300 14,100 300 118,000
2010 ....................... 7,000 300 13,800 300 112,000
2011 ....................... 7,300 300 14,300 300 114,000
2012 ....................... 7,600 300 14,200 300 120,000
2013 ....................... 7,800 300 14,500 300 122,000
1
Included in Other counties.
2
Combined with other counties to avoid disclosing individual operations.
3
Non-commercial production is used on farms where produced.
All milk cows both dry and in milk which have calved at least once

53
Florida Milk Cows and Production:
Milk Cows, Monthly Milk Production per Cow, and Annual Production: 2003-2012
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
Milk Cows Thousands

2003 ............. 147 146 145 144 143 142 141 140 139 140 140 140 147
2004 ............. 140 139 138 138 139 139 139 138 137 137 137 138 140
2005 ............. 138 139 139 138 138 137 136 135 134 135 136 135 137
2006 ............. 134 134 133 133 133 132 131 130 129 129 130 130 132
2007 ............. 130 130 130 129 128 126 127 126 125 125 125 124 125
2008 ............. 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 119 119 118 118
2009 ............. 118 117 117 117 117 116 115 114 114 113 113 112 112
2010 ............. 112 113 113 114 115 115 115 114 113 114 114 114 114
2011 ............. 116 118 119 119 119 119 119 119 119 120 120 120 119
2012 ............. 122 122 122 123 123 123 123 123 123 122 122 123 123
Monthly
Production Pounds
Per Cow
2003 ............. 1,360 1,290 1,435 1,415 1,385 1,290 1,215 1,120 1,020 1,105 1,180 1,355 15,218
2004 ............. 1,435 1,415 1,550 1,515 1,525 1,395 1,340 1,225 1,025 1,165 1,250 1,450 16,326
2005 ............. 1,520 1,475 1,640 1,570 1,585 1,440 1,315 1,235 1,105 1,135 1,220 1,360 16,591
2006 ............. 1,485 1,425 1,640 1,540 1,520 1,415 1,350 1,180 1,100 1,185 1,245 1,390 16,447
2007 ............. 1,470 1,415 1,610 1,580 1,615 1,465 1,380 1,215 1,150 1,120 1,200 1,360 16,832
2008 ............. 1,550 1,530 1,655 1,568 1,625 1,440 1,375 1,240 1,160 1,225 1,320 1,520 17,167
2009 ............. 1,660 1,540 1,760 1,710 1,700 1,535 1,450 1,325 1,180 1,230 1,360 1,545 18,070
2010 ............. 1,615 1,595 1,820 1,770 1,700 1,600 1,530 1,335 1,255 1,335 1,465 1,660 18,658
2011 ............. 1,775 1,690 1,865 1,740 1,725 1,630 1,520 1,400 1,300 1,350 1,460 1,630 19,067
2012 ............. 1,780 1,720 1,865 1,800 1,770 1,620 1,520 1,410 1,250 1,310 1,460 1,580 19,008

Annual Milk (million pounds)


Production
2003 ............. 200 188 208 204 198 183 171 157 142 155 165 190 2,161
2004 ............. 201 197 214 209 212 194 186 169 140 160 171 200 2,253
2005 ............. 210 205 228 217 219 197 179 167 148 153 166 184 2,273
2006 ............. 199 191 218 205 202 187 177 153 143 153 162 177 2,171
2007 ............. 191 184 209 204 207 185 175 153 144 140 150 169 2,104
2008 ............. 186 184 199 188 195 173 165 149 139 146 157 179 2,060
2009 ............. 196 180 206 200 199 178 167 151 135 139 154 173 2,078
2010 ............. 181 180 206 202 196 184 176 152 142 152 167 189 2,127
2011 ............. 206 199 222 207 205 194 181 167 155 162 175 196 2,269
2012 ............. 217 210 228 221 218 199 187 173 154 160 178 193 2,338

54
Florida Milk:
Milk Production, Utilization, Milkfat, and Cash Receipts: 2003-2012
Total milk Milk used Milk sold to Cash receipts
Year 1 2 Milkfat
production on farms plants and dealers from marketings
(million pounds) (percent) (1,000 dollars)

2003............................. 2,161 5 2,156 3.56 329,868


2004............................. 2,253 5 2,248 3.62 431,616
2005............................. 2,273 6 2,267 3.60 421,662
2006............................. 2,171 6 2,165 3.66 344,235
2007............................. 2,104 7 2,097 3.63 459,243
2008............................. 2,060 6 2,054 3.60 464,204
2009............................. 2,078 6 2,072 3.58 350,168
2010............................. 2,127 6 2,121 3.60 439,047
2011............................. 2,269 6 2,269 3.67 547,646
2012............................. 2,338 5 2,338 3.66 520,036
1
Excludes milk fed to calves.
2
Includes sales directly to consumers by producers who sell milk from their own herds. Also includes milk produced by institutional herds.

Florida Milk Price:


Monthly and Annual Price for Milk Marketed by Producers to Plants: 2003-20121
Year January February March April May June

(dollars per cwt)

2003 ...................... 14.70 14.30 13.90 13.60 13.70 13.70


2004 ...................... 16.10 15.80 16.10 17.80 23.80 25.20
2005 ...................... 20.90 18.00 19.60 18.20 18.80 17.70
2006 ...................... 17.50 17.50 16.50 15.20 14.90 14.70
2007 ...................... 17.60 17.40 18.20 18.90 19.80 21.80
2008 ...................... 24.50 23.20 20.40 22.00 21.90 22.80
2009 ...................... 20.40 16.30 14.90 15.80 16.30 15.50
2010 ...................... 20.00 20.00 19.60 18.40 19.00 20.50
2011 ...................... 20.80 21.90 23.30 24.20 24.40 25.30
2012 ...................... 23.50 21.70 21.10 20.50 20.10 19.90

Weighted
Year July August September October November December
Average
(dollars per cwt)

2003 ...................... 13.80 15.00 17.80 17.80 18.40 18.00 15.30


2004 ...................... 22.10 18.90 18.30 19.10 18.60 18.70 19.20
2005 ...................... 18.00 18.60 17.90 18.60 18.90 18.00 18.60
2006 ...................... 15.30 15.00 14.90 16.50 16.50 16.50 15.90
2007 ...................... 24.90 25.80 26.00 25.90 25.90 23.90 21.90
2008 ...................... 25.50 23.90 23.10 21.00 22.20 21.00 22.60
2009 ...................... 15.70 15.50 16.10 17.70 18.20 19.40 16.90
2010 ...................... 21.00 21.00 21.40 22.00 22.80 22.30 20.70
2011 ...................... 25.80 26.80 26.80 24.50 23.70 23.20 24.20
2012 ...................... 20.50 21.90 22.90 24.20 25.70 25.40 22.30
1
Milk eligible for fluid market

55
Florida replacement Milk Cow Price:
Price per Head, by Quarter: 2003-2012
Year January April July October
(dollars per head)

2003 .................................. 1,600 1,500 1,450 1,510


2004 .................................. 1,490 1,700 1,900 1,810
2005 .................................. 1,860 1,860 1,940 1,960
2006 .................................. 1,980 1,910 1,880 1,850
2007 .................................. 1,770 1,850 2,050 2,250
2008 .................................. 2,200 2,250 2,350 2,250
2009 .................................. 1,990 1,550 1,550 1,350
2010 .................................. 1,360 1,450 1,360 1,400
2011 .................................. 1,360 1,480 1,550 1,620
2012 .................................. 1,490 1,450 1,440 1,470

56
Florida Cattle And Calves:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013, and County Rank 2013
Year Alachua Baker Bay Bradford Brevard Broward
(head)
(2)
2004 ....................... 45,000 4,000 11,000 23,000 13,000
(2)
2005 ....................... 46,000 4,000 10,000 24,000 13,000
(2)
2006 ....................... 46,000 4,000 10,000 24,000 12,000
(2)
2007 ....................... 48,000 4,000 11,000 24,000 12,000
(2)
2008 ....................... 48,000 5,000 11,000 24,000 8,000
(2)
2009 ....................... 46,000 5,000 10,000 29,000 5,000
(2)
2010 ....................... 46,000 6,000 10,000 26,000 3,000
2011 ....................... 44,000 5,500 1,000 9,500 25,000 3,000
2012 ....................... 47,000 5,100 1,000 10,200 29,000 5,000
2013 45,500 5,000 1,000 9,900 28,000 4,900
(1) (1) (1)
Rank....................... 11 39 45 31 16 40

Year Calhoun Charlotte Citrus Clay Collier Columbia


(head)

2004 ....................... 4,000 20,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 18,000


2005 ....................... 4,000 20,000 8,000 9,000 9,000 18,000
2006 ....................... 4,000 19,000 8,000 9,000 9,000 17,000
2007 ....................... 4,000 20,000 8,000 9,000 12,000 18,000
2008 ....................... 4,000 22,000 7,000 7,000 11,000 20,000
2009 ....................... 4,000 24,000 7,000 6,000 11,000 21,000
2010 ....................... 4,000 19,500 7,000 6,000 11,000 22,000
2011 ....................... 3,500 19,000 6,700 5,700 10,500 21,000
2012 ....................... 4,000 22,000 7,100 6,100 11,200 21,500
2013 ....................... 3,900 21,000 6,900 5,900 10,900 21,000
(1) (1) (1) (1)
Rank....................... 42 21 35 38 29 21 (1)

Year De Soto Dixie Duval Escambia Flagler Gadsden


(head)

2004 ....................... 76,000 4,000 9,000 9,000 6,000 5,000


2005 ....................... 74,000 4,000 8,000 10,000 5,000 5,000
2006 ....................... 73,000 4,000 8,000 9,000 5,000 5,000
2007 ....................... 77,000 4,000 8,000 9,000 6,000 5,000
2008 ....................... 75,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 5,000 5,000
2009 ....................... 73,000 7,000 6,000 7,000 5,000 6,000
2010 ....................... 73,000 8,500 5,500 7,000 4,000 6,000
2011 ....................... 70,000 8,000 5,500 6,000 4,000 5,500
2012 ....................... 72,000 7,500 6,100 7,100 5,100 6,100
2013 ....................... 70,000 7,300 5,900 6,900 5,000 5,900
Rank....................... 6 35 38 (1) 36 (1) 39 (1) 38 (1)
Footnotes on last page of table. --continued

57
Florida Cattle And Calves:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013, and County Rank 2013 (continued)

Year Gilchrist Glades Gulf Hamilton Hardee Hendry


(head)
(2)
2004...................... 34,000 69,000 8,000 88,000 85,000
(2)
2005...................... 34,000 68,000 8,000 85,000 84,000
(2)
2006...................... 33,000 67,000 8,000 85,000 83,000
(2)
2007...................... 35,000 71,000 8,000 88,000 85,000
(2)
2008...................... 37,000 65,000 8,000 87,000 77,000
(2)
2009...................... 37,000 59,000 8,000 85,000 67,000
(2)
2010...................... 38,500 56,000 8,500 86,000 58,000
(2)
2011...................... 36,000 54,000 8,000 82,000 57,000
2012...................... 38,000 59,000 500 8,200 85,000 65,000
2013...................... 37,000 57,000 500 7,900 83,000 63,000
Rank ..................... 14 (1) 8 46 (1) 34 5 7 (1)

Year Hernando Highlands Hillsborough Holmes Indian River Jackson


(head)

2004...................... 17,000 101,000 59,000 18,000 16,000 40,000


2005...................... 17,000 101,000 58,000 17,000 15,000 39,000
2006...................... 16,000 100,000 57,000 17,000 15,000 37,000
2007...................... 17,000 101,000 61,000 17,000 16,000 36,000
2008...................... 16,000 105,000 63,000 22,000 17,000 42,000
2009...................... 16,000 105,000 64,000 28,000 19,000 48,000
2010...................... 15,000 110,000 67,000 33,000 20,000 54,000
2011...................... 15,000 100,000 63,000 31,000 19,000 51,000
2012...................... 16,300 105,000 65,000 28,500 19,500 49,000
2013...................... 15,800 105,000 63,000 27,500 18,900 47,500
(1)
Rank ..................... 25 2 7 18 23 10

Year Jefferson Lafayette Lake Lee Leon Levy


(head)

2004...................... 10,000 20,000 28,000 14,000 5,000 44,000


2005...................... 10,000 20,000 28,000 14,000 5,000 44,000
2006...................... 10,000 20,000 29,000 14,000 5,000 41,000
2007...................... 10,000 21,000 28,000 14,000 5,000 40,000
2008...................... 11,000 25,000 25,000 13,000 4,000 37,000
2009...................... 12,000 28,000 23,000 13,000 3,000 35,000
2010...................... 13,000 32,000 21,000 12,500 2,000 33,000
2011...................... 11,500 30,000 21,000 11,500 2,000 31,000
2012...................... 12,200 28,000 23,500 13,000 3,100 35,500
2013...................... 11,900 27,000 23,000 12,600 3,000 34,500
(1) (1
Rank ..................... 28 18 21 27 43 16
Footnotes on last page of table. --continued

58
Florida Cattle And Calves:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013, and County Rank 2013 (continued)

Year Madison Manatee Marion Martin Miami-Dade Nassau


(head)

2004 ....................... 19,000 53,000 43,000 25,000 4,000 6,000


2005 ....................... 19,000 53,000 42,000 24,000 3,000 6,000
2006 ....................... 18,000 52,000 40,000 24,000 3,000 6,000
2007 ....................... 19,000 54,000 41,000 25,000 3,000 7,000
2008 ....................... 27,000 47,000 39,000 24,000 3,000 7,000
2009 ....................... 36,000 41,000 45,000 23,000 3,000 7,000
2010 ....................... 44,000 36,000 48,000 23,000 3,000 7,000
2011 ....................... 41,000 36,000 46,000 22,000 2,900 6,500
2012 ....................... 38,000 38,500 47,000 23,500 3,000 7,100
2013 ....................... 37,000 37,500 45,500 23,000 3,000 6,900
(1) (1) (1) (1)
Rank ....................... 14 13 11 21 43 35 (1)

Year Okaloosa Okeechobee Orange Osceola Palm Beach Pasco


(head)

2004........................ 4,000 162,000 13,000 115,000 4,000 42,000


2005........................ 4,000 158,000 13,000 110,000 4,000 48,000
2006........................ 4,000 155,000 13,000 110,000 4,000 47,000
2007........................ 4,000 156,000 12,000 114,000 4,000 48,000
2008........................ 4,000 150,000 12,000 105,000 4,000 43,000
2009........................ 4,000 145,000 11,000 105,000 4,000 38,000
2010........................ 3,000 145,000 11,000 105,000 4,000 35,000
2011........................ 2,500 135,000 10,500 100,000 3,900 34,000
2012........................ 4,100 140,000 11,000 105,000 4,000 39,000
2013........................ 4,000 135,000 10,700 100,000 3,900 38,000
(1) (1) (1)
Rank ....................... 41 1 30 3 42 12

Year Pinellas Polk Putnam St. Johns St. Lucie Santa Rosa
(head)
2004........................ (2) 105,000 10,000 4,000 28,000 6,000
2005........................ (2) 99,000 9,000 4,000 27,000 6,000
2006........................ (2) 98,000 9,000 4,000 26,000 5,000
2007........................ (2) 102,000 10,000 4,000 26,000 5,000
2008........................ (2) 100,000 9,000 4,000 25,000 6,000
2009........................ (2) 99,000 9,000 3,000 23,000 6,000
2010........................ (2) 100,000 9,000 3,000 21,000 8,000
2011........................ (2) 95,000 8,600 2,900 21,000 7,000
2012........................ 500 100,000 9,500 3,000 23,500 6,100
2013........................ 500 97,000 9,200 2,900 23,000 5,900
Rank ....................... 46 (1) 4 32 (1) 44 (1) 21 (1) 38 (1)
Footnotes on last page of table. --continued

59
Florida Cattle And Calves:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013, and County Rank 2013 (continued)

Year Sarasota Seminole Sumter Suwannee Taylor Union


(head)

2004 ....................... 21,000 10,000 43,000 46,000 5,000 8,000


2005 ....................... 20,000 10,000 44,000 44,000 5,000 8,000
2006 ....................... 20,000 10,000 44,000 43,000 5,000 8,000
2007 ....................... 20,000 9,000 47,000 44,000 5,000 8,000
2008 ....................... 19,000 8,000 42,000 53,000 5,000 8,000
2009 ....................... 17,000 7,000 36,000 55,000 4,000 9,000
2010 ....................... 17,000 6,000 37,000 62,000 3,500 10,000
2011 ....................... 16,300 6,000 34,000 59,000 3,500 9,000
2012 ....................... 17,500 7,000 36,500 56,000 4,100 9,500
2013 ....................... 17,000 6,800 35,000 54,000 4,000 9,200
Rank....................... 24 37 15 9 41 (1) 32 (1)
3
Year Volusia Wakulla Walton Washington Other counties Total
(head)
2004 ....................... 12,000 1,000 10,000 8,000 3,000 1,740,000
2005 ....................... 11,000 1,000 9,000 8,000 3,000 1,710,000
2006 ....................... 10,000 1,000 8,000 8,000 3,000 1,680,000
2007 ....................... 10,000 1,000 9,000 8,000 3,000 1,730,000
2008 ....................... 11,000 1,100 16,000 8,000 2,900 1,710,000
2009 ....................... 13,000 1,000 22,000 9,000 3,000 1,700,000
2010 ....................... 13,000 1,000 29,000 9,500 3,000 1,720,000
2011 ....................... 12,000 1,000 27,000 9,000 2,000 1,630,000
2012 ....................... 14,000 1,000 24,000 9,200 1,000 1,710,000
2013 ....................... 13,600 1,000 23,500 8,900 1,000 1,660,000
(1)
Rank....................... 26 45 20 33
All classes, for both beef and dairy
1
Two or more counties with similar ranking.
2
Included in Other counties.
3
Combined with other counties to avoid disclosing individual operations.

60
61
Florida beef Cows:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013 and County Rank 2013
Year Alachua Baker Bay Bradford Brevard Broward
(head)
(2)
2004 ....................... 23,000 2,000 7,000 14,000 5,000
(2)
2005 ....................... 23,000 2,000 7,000 14,000 5,000
(2)
2006 ....................... 24,000 2,000 7,000 13,000 5,000
(2)
2007 ....................... 26,000 2,000 7,000 14,000 5,000
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2008 ....................... 27,000 3,000
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2009 ....................... 27,000 2,000
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2010 ....................... 28,000 1,000
(2) (2) (2)
2011 ....................... 26,000 600 2,000
(2) (2) (2)
2012 ....................... 26,500 600 2,000
(2) (2) (2)
2013 ....................... 26,000 600 1,900
Rank ....................... 7 (1) 28 26 (1)

Year Calhoun Charlotte Citrus Clay Collier Columbia


(head)

2004 ....................... 2,000 14,000 5,500 3,000 7,000 11,000


2005 ....................... 2,000 14,000 5,000 3,000 7,000 10,000
2006 ....................... 2,000 13,000 5,000 3,500 7,000 10,000
2007 ....................... 2,000 13,000 5,000 4,000 8,000 10,000
(2) (2) (2)
2008 ....................... 14,000 8,000 12,000
(2) (2) (2)
2009 ....................... 15,000 7,000 12,000
(2) (2) (2)
2010 ....................... 16,500 7,000 13,000
(2) (2) (2)
2011 ....................... 15,000 6,900 11,500
(2) (2) (2)
2012 ....................... 15,000 7,000 11,800
(2) (2) (2)
2013 ....................... 14,500 6,800 11,400
Rank ....................... 13 19 16

Year De Soto Dixie Duval Escambia Flagler Gadsden


(head)

2004 ....................... 45,000 2,000 3,000 3,500 4,000 2,500


2005 ....................... 45,000 2,000 3,000 3,500 4,000 2,500
2006 ....................... 46,000 2,000 2,500 3,500 4,000 2,500
2007 ....................... 48,000 2,000 3,000 3,500 4,000 2,500
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2008 ....................... 42,000 4,000
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2009 ....................... 41,000 3,500
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2010 ....................... 40,000 3,500
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2011 ....................... 40,000 3,400
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2012 ....................... 41,000 3,400
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2013 ....................... 39,500 3,300
Rank ....................... 5 24
Footnotes on last page of table. --continued

62
Florida beef Cows:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013 and County Rank 2013 (continued)

Year Gilchrist Glades Hamilton Hardee Hendry Hernando


(head)

2004....................... 8,000 34,000 5,000 50,000 48,000 8,000


2005....................... 8,000 34,000 5,000 50,000 48,000 8,000
2006...................... 8,000 33,000 5,000 50,000 48,000 7,000
2007....................... 8,000 35,000 5,000 52,000 49,000 7,000
(2) (2) (2)
2008....................... 8,000 49,000 7,000
(2) (2) (2)
2009...................... 8,000 47,000 8,000
(2) (2) (2)
2010....................... 8,500 47,000 8,500
(2) (2) (2)
2011...................... 8,000 46,000 7,900
(2) (2) (2)
2012...................... 8,000 47,000 8,000
(2) (2) (2)
2013....................... 7,700 45,000 7,700
Rank ..................... 18 (1) 4 18 (1)

Year Highlands Hillsborough Holmes Indian River Jackson Jefferson


(head)

2004...................... 59,000 30,000 8,000 11,000 20,000 5,000


2005....................... 57,000 30,000 8,000 11,000 19,000 4,500
2006...................... 57,000 29,000 8,000 10,000 18,000 4,000
2007...................... 61,000 30,000 8,000 10,000 17,000 4,000
(2)
2008....................... 61,000 33,000 11,000 11,000 21,000
(2)
2009...................... 63,000 36,000 15,000 12,000 25,000
(2)
2010...................... 64,000 40,000 17,000 14,000 30,000
(2)
2011....................... 62,000 37,000 16,000 12,000 28,000
(2)
2012...................... 63,000 36,500 15,500 12,000 27,000
(2
2013...................... 61,000 35,000 15,000 11,600 26,000
Rank ..................... 3 6 12 15 8

Year Lafayette Lake Lee Leon Levy Liberty


(head)

2004...................... 3,000 15,000 9,000 2,500 23,000 500


2005...................... 3,000 14,000 9,000 2,000 21,000 500
2006....................... 3,000 13,000 8,000 2,000 21,000 500
2007...................... 3,000 14,000 8,000 2,000 21,000 500
(2)
2008...................... 4,000 14,000 8,000 2,000 20,000
(2)
2009....................... 5,000 13,000 8,000 1,500 19,000
(2)
2010...................... 5,500 14,000 8,500 1,600 18,000
(2)
2011...................... 4,900 12,000 8,000 1,500 18,500
(2)
2012....................... 4,900 13,000 8,000 1,500 19,000
(2)
2013...................... 4,700 12,600 7,700 1,400 18,400
Rank ..................... 22 14 18 (1) 27 11
Footnotes on last page of table. --continued

63
Florida beef Cows:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013 and County Rank 2013 (continued)
Year Madison Manatee Marion Martin Miami-Dade Nassau
(head)

2004 ....................... 12,000 29,000 24,000 12,000 2,500 3,000


2005 ....................... 11,000 29,000 24,000 12,000 2,500 3,000
2006 ....................... 11,000 29,000 24,000 12,000 2,000 2,000
2007 ....................... 11,000 30,000 27,000 13,000 2,000 2,000
(2) (2) (2)
2008 ....................... 27,000 27,000 1,800
(2) (2) (2)
2009 ....................... 23,000 27,000 2,000
(2) (2) (2)
2010 ....................... 21,000 27,000 2,000
(2) (2) (2)
2011 ....................... 22,000 26,000 2,000
(2) (2) (2)
2012 ....................... 23,000 26,500 2,000
(2) (2) (2)
2013 ....................... 22,000 26,000 1,900
Rank....................... 9 (1) 8 (1) 26 (1) (2)

Year Okaloosa Okeechobee Orange Osceola Palm Beach Pasco


(head)

2004 ....................... 2,000 70,000 8,000 75,000 2,500 28,000


2005 ....................... 2,000 70,000 8,000 73,000 2,500 26,000
2006 ....................... 2,000 69,000 8,000 73,000 3,000 26,000
2007 ....................... 2,000 69,000 8,000 76,000 3,000 26,000
(2) (2)
2008 ....................... 2,000 67,000 75,000 25,000
(2) (2)
2009 ....................... 2,000 66,000 75,000 23,000
(2) (2)
2010 ....................... 2,000 64,000 75,000 23,000
(2) (2)
2011 ....................... 2,000 65,000 74,000 22,000
(2) (2)
2012 ....................... 2,000 66,000 74,000 23,000
(2) (2)
2013 ....................... 1,900 64,000 71,000 22,000
Rank....................... 26 (1) 2 1 9 (1)

Year Pinellas Polk Putnam St. Johns St. Lucie Santa Rosa
(head)
(2)
2004 ...................... 60,000 5,000 2,500 23,000 4,000
(2)
2005 ...................... 60,000 5,000 2,500 22,000 4,000
(2)
2006 ...................... 62,000 5,000 2,500 20,000 3,500
(2)
2007 ...................... 65,000 6,000 2,500 21,000 3,500
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2008 ...................... 2,500 4,000
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2009 ...................... 2,000 4,000
(2) (2) (2) (2)
2010 ...................... 2,000 4,000
(2) (2) (2)
2011 ...................... 100 2,000 3,900
(2) (2) (2)
2012 ...................... 100 2,000 3,900
(2) (2) (2)
2013 ...................... 100 1,900 3,800
Rank ...................... 30 26 (1) 23
Footnotes on last page of table. --continued

64
Florida beef Cows:
Inventory by County, January 1, 2004-2013 and County Rank 2013 (continued)

Year Sarasota Seminole Sumter Suwannee Taylor Union


(head)

2004....................... 15,000 7,000 31,000 18,000 3,000 4,000


2005....................... 14,000 7,000 30,000 17,000 3,000 4,000
2006....................... 13,000 6,000 30,000 16,000 2,500 4,000
2007....................... 13,000 6,000 31,000 16,000 3,000 4,500
(2) (2)
2008....................... 10,000 18,000 3,000 5,000
(2) (2)
2009....................... 9,900 20,000 3,000 6,000
(2) (2)
2010....................... 7,500 22,000 2,500 6,000
(2) (2)
2011....................... 9,000 20,000 2,500 6,000
(2) (2)
2012....................... 9,500 20,000 2,900 6,000
(2) (2)
2013....................... 9,200 19,300 2,800 5,800
Rank ...................... 17 10 25 20
3
Year Volusia Wakulla Walton Washington Other counties Total
(head)
2004....................... 5,500 500 6,000 3,500 1,000 950,000
2005....................... 5,500 500 6,000 3,500 1,000 932,000
2006....................... 5,000 500 5,000 3,500 1,000 916,000
2007....................... 5,000 500 6,000 3,500 1,000 950,000
(2)
2008....................... 500 7,000 3,500 302,700 940,000
(2)
2009....................... 500 8,000 5,000 297,600 942,000
(2)
2010....................... 500 9,500 5,500 299,410 958,000
(2)
2011....................... 500 8,000 5,000 288,800 926,000
(2)
2012....................... 500 8,000 5,000 294,900 940,000
(2)
2013....................... 500 7,700 4,800 285,500 908,000
Rank ...................... 29 18 (1) 21
Beef production brood cows only, which have calved at least once
1
Two or more counties with similar ranking.
2
Included in Other counties.
3
Combined with other counties to avoid disclosing individual operations.

65
Florida Cattle and Calves:
Marketings, Cash Receipts, and Gross Income: 2003-2012
1 Price Per 100 Pounds Cash Gross
Year Marketings 2 3
Cattle Calves Receipts Income
(1,000 lbs) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)
2003 ............................ 478,730 50.50 96.60 348,411 349,694
2004 ............................ 491,080 63.20 121.00 451,857 453,474
2005 ............................ 481,360 80.00 130.00 502,268 504,356
2006 ............................ 477,110 78.20 120.00 344,235 344,394
2007 ............................ 470,400 76.40 112.00 449,098 451,398
2008 ............................ 473,900 70.70 98.90 405,124 407,567
2009 ............................ 458,695 67.30 93.70 375,149 377,045
2010 ............................ 541,340 76.30 111.00 499,237 501,764
2011 ............................ 448,160 88.70 130.00 487,618 489,962
2012 ............................ 521,150 104.00 160.00 669,200 672,820
1
Excludes custom slaughter for use on farms where produced and inter-farms sales within States.
2
Receipts from marketings and sales of farm slaughter.
3
Cash receipts plus the value of home consumption.

66
Florida Cattle and Calves:
Cows, Bulls, Steers, Heifers and Calves on Farm: January 1, 2004-2013
Cattle kept for milk Beef cattle and all calves
Total
Heifers 500 pounds and over Calves cattle
Year Milk 500 lbs Beef under
Total Total and
Cows1 and Cows 1 Replacement Other 500 calves
Bulls 3 Steers
over 2 heifers 4 heifers pounds 3
(1,000 head)

2004......... 140 40 180 950 60 140 20 20 370 1,560 1,740


2005......... 138 40 178 932 60 145 20 20 355 1,532 1,710
2006......... 134 40 174 916 60 140 20 20 350 1,506 1,680
2007......... 130 30 160 950 60 145 30 20 365 1,570 1,730
2008......... 120 35 155 940 60 135 30 20 370 1,555 1,710
2009......... 118 35 153 942 60 140 25 20 360 1,547 1,700
2010......... 112 30 142 958 60 135 25 20 380 1,578 1,720
2011......... 114 30 144 926 60 110 20 20 350 1,486 1,630
2012......... 120 35 155 940 60 115 30 20 390 1,555 1,710
2013......... 122 35 157 908 55 115 25 20 380 1,503 1,660
1
Cows and heifers that have calved.
2
Milk replacement heifers which have not calved.
3
Includes small number for dairy use.
4
Beef replacement heifers which have not calved.

Florida Cattle and Calves:


Inventory January 1, Annual Calf Crop, and Disposition: 2003-2012
1 2 Farm
On hand January Calf Marketings
slaughter
Year Inshipments Deaths
All cattle crop cattle and
All cows 1 Total Cattle Calves 3
and calves calves
(1,000 head)

2003 ............. 1,750 1,100 920 60 929 267 662 2 59


2004 ............. 1,740 1,090 900 75 944 263 681 2 59
2005 ............. 1,710 1,070 880 65 913 261 652 2 60
2006 ............. 1,680 1,050 910 130 929 228 701 2 59
2007 ............. 1,730 1,080 900 107 962 241 721 2 63
2008 ............. 1,710 1,060 880 120 947 246 701 2 61
2009 ............. 1,700 1,060 900 120 941 231 710 2 57
2010 ............. 1,720 1,070 870 100 1,004 303 701 2 54
2011 ............. 1,630 1,040 890 90 838 231 607 2 60
2012 ............. 1,710 1,060 860 90 931 281 650 2 67
1
Cows and heifers that have calved.
2
Includes custom slaughter for use on farms where produced and State outshipments, but excludes inter-farm sales within States.
3
Excludes custom slaughter for farmers at commercial establishments.

67
68
Florida livestock Auctions:
Location and Day of Sale
Sale day Auction market Mailing address Phone

Columbia Livestock Market of Lake City, Inc. P.O. Box 354, Lake City, Florida 32055 386-755-2300
(Slaughter hogs & feeder pigs, every 3rd Wednesday)

Ocala Livestock Market


P.O. Drawer 1508, Ocala, Florida 34482 352-732-4454
(Hog and goat sale 1st Friday)

Monday Okeechobee Livestock Market, Inc. P.O. Box 1288, Okeechobee, Florida 34973 863-763-3127

Cattlemenʼs Livestock Auction Market, Inc. P.O. Box 26, Lakeland, Florida 33802 863-665-5088

863-773-9747
Hardee Livestock Market, Inc. P.O. Box 1479, Wauchula, Florida 33873
863-773-9560

Townsend Livestock P.O. Box 577, Madison, Florida 32340 850-973-4094


(Hog sale - Monday; Feeder Pigs - 4th Friday)

Tri-State Cattlemenʼs Market, Inc. P.O. Box 744, Graceville, Florida 32440 850-263-3001
Tuesday
Okeechobee Livestock Market, Inc. P.O. Box 1288, Okeechobee, Florida 34973 863-763-3127

352-793-2021
Sumter Co. Farmerʼs Market, Inc. P.O. Box 62, Webster, Florida 33597
352-793-3551

863-494-3737
Arcadia State Livestock Market P.O. Drawer 1418, Arcadia, Florida 34266
863-773-9747
Wednesday
North Florida Livestock Market 12171 S U.S. Highway 441, Lake City, Florida 32025 386-755-3576
(Hog sale 4th Saturday each month)

Florida Cattle and Calves:


Cattle and Calves Sold through Florida Auction Markets, by area: 2003-2012
1
Year All areas North Central South
(head)
2003 .................................... 524,700 149,700 121,600 253,400
2004 .................................... 477,300 138,400 103,600 235,300
2005 .................................... 428,400 116,100 92,500 219,900
2006 .................................... 430,000 121,300 85,500 223,200
2007 .................................... 435,700 124,900 88,600 222,200
2008 .................................... 386,800 103,400 79,900 203,500
2009 .................................... 398,280 100,590 85,310 212,390
2010 .................................... 408,040 98,900 83,520 225,620
2011 .................................... 382,140 93,720 79,160 209,260
2012 .................................... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
NA Not Available
1
Does not include sales through video auctions

69
Florida Chickens:
Annual Value of Production: 2003-2012
Year Broilers Eggs Other chickens Total
(1,000 dollars)

2003.................................... 178,955 145,027 364 324,346


2004.................................... 208,440 159,878 700 369,018
2005.................................... 201,564 100,723 635 302,922
2006.................................... 159,300 119,687 502 279,489
2007.................................... 179,654 186,471 816 366,941
2008.................................... 173,144 234,515 389 408,048
2009.................................... 115,164 152,616 398 268,178
2010.................................... 151,493 150,746 382 302,621
2011.................................... 175,889 177,861 543 354,293
2012.................................... 178,500 183,166 435 362,101

Florida eggs:
Layers, Eggs Produced, and Value of Production: 2003-2012
Average layers Eggs Eggs Value per Value of
Year
during year per layer produced dozen Production
(thousands) (number of eggs) (millions) (cents) (1,000 dollars)

2003............................. 10,763 261 2,804 62.1 145,107


2004............................. 11,316 271 3,068 62.5 159,878
2005............................. 10,963 272 2,980 40.6 100,723
2006............................. 10,985 268 2,938 48.9 119,687
2007............................ 10,764 268 2,885 77.6 186,471
2008............................. 10,385 265 2,749 102.0 234,515
2009............................. 9,847 271 2,670 68.6 152,616
2010............................. 9,523 272 2,592 69.8 150,746
2011............................. 9,560 279 2,666 83.6 177,861
2012............................. 9,003 279 2,514 (NA) 183,166

Florida broilers:
Number and Pounds Produced, Price per Pound, and Value of Production: 2003-2012
Broilers Pounds Value of
Year Value per pound
produced produced production
(thousands) (cents) (1,000 dollars)
2003.................................... 91,300 511,300 35.0 178,955
2004.................................... 78,500 463,200 45.0 208,440
2005.................................... 75,100 458,100 44.0 201,564
2006.................................... 75,000 442,500 36.0 159,300
2007.................................... 73,300 417,800 43.0 179,654
2008.................................... 63,800 376,400 46.0 173,144
2009.................................... 42,000 252,000 46.0 115,164
2010.................................... 51,700 314,300 48.0 151,493
2011.................................... 61,800 383,200 47.0 175,889
2012.................................... 59,500 357,000 (NA) 178,500
NA Not Available

70
71
Florida layers and eggs:
Layers, Daily Rate of Lay, and Egg Production, by Month, and Year: 2003-2012
1
Year December January February March April May
layers (thousands)

2003................... 10,534 10,601 10,868 10,903 10,577 10,506


2004................... 10,989 11,039 11,275 11,481 11,456 11,376
2005................... 10,677 10,325 10,465 10,772 10,839 10,880
2006................... 11,481 11,513 11,406 11,416 11,111 10,751
2007................... 11,271 11,315 11,216 10,674 10,315 10,430
2008................... 10,948 10,907 10,876 10,697 10,460 10,389
2009................... 10,340 10,173 9,948 9,989 9,894 9,605
2010................... 10,127 9,903 9,664 9,560 9,382 9,088
2011................... 9,794 9,534 9,374 9,468 9,569 9,508
2012................... 10,003 9,715 9,485 9,343 8,899 8,517
Daily rate
(per 100 layers)
of lay
2003................... 70.1 70.0 70.3 72.2 72.2 70.0
2004................... 74.9 73.9 74.0 75.9 77.4 74.0
2005................... 74.6 73.7 75.8 77.6 77.5 75.3
2006................... 73.9 71.2 72.0 74.0 74.4 74.1
2007................... 73.3 71.8 73.9 74.0 74.0 73.3
2008................... 73.4 73.6 74.5 73.3 70.4 71.4
2009................... 75.2 72.9 70.0 71.7 74.8 74.5
2010................... 77.4 73.9 74.3 76.9 74.6 71.7
2011................... 78.4 78.8 77.3 74.9 74.5 74.0
2012................... 79.7 78.4 74.5 76.0 77.5 75.7
egg
(millions of eggs)
Production
2003................... 229 230 214 244 229 228
2004................... 255 253 242 270 266 261
2005................... 247 236 222 259 252 254
2006................... 263 254 230 262 248 247
2007................... 256 252 232 245 229 237
2008................... 249 249 235 243 221 230
2009................... 241 230 195 222 222 222
2010................... 243 227 201 228 210 202
2011................... 238 233 203 220 214 218
2012................... 247 236 205 220 207 200
1
December of preceding year. --continued

72
Florida layers and eggs:
Layers, Daily Rate of Lay, and Egg Production, by Month, and Year: 2003-2012 (continued)

Year June July August September October November Average

layers (thousands)

2003 .............. 10,755 10,813 10,812 10,852 10,926 11,009 10,763


2004 .............. 11,553 11,622 11,464 11,379 11,202 10,954 11,316
2005 .............. 10,930 11,080 11,210 11,354 11,526 11,496 10,963
2006 .............. 10,740 10,619 10,498 10,616 10,703 10,967 10,985
2007 .............. 10,434 10,564 10,642 10,656 10,783 10,869 10,764
2008 .............. 10,232 9,974 9,927 9,930 10,005 10,277 10,385
2009 .............. 9,512 9,611 9,705 9,700 9,721 9,961 9,847
2010 .............. 9,108 9,322 9,594 9,524 9,354 9,652 9,523
2011 .............. 9,416 9,416 9,473 9,553 9,681 9,938 9,560
2012 .............. 8,415 8,372 8,507 8,797 9,044 8,942 9,003
Daily rate
(per 100 layers)
of lay
2003 .............. 70.4 71.6 71.9 71.0 72.6 74.2 71.4
2004 .............. 70.4 71.9 72.9 72.9 74.3 76.7 74.1
2005 .............. 74.1 72.8 72.5 73.4 73.0 73.6 74.5
2006 .............. 72.3 71.7 74.1 73.2 72.9 75.7 73.3
2007 .............. 73.8 74.5 73.7 72.9 73.3 73.0 73.5
2008 .............. 72.0 71.2 70.8 70.2 71.9 74.9 72.3
2009 .............. 73.6 72.5 73.1 75.3 78.0 79.6 74.3
2010 .............. 72.5 73.0 73.6 74.9 74.8 76.7 74.5

2011 .............. 74.3 75.0 75.9 77.1 77.6 78.5 76.4

2012 .............. 74.1 74.0 76.2 77.3 75.3 76.0 76.2


egg
(millions of eggs)
Production
2003 .............. 227 240 241 231 246 245 2,804
2004 .............. 244 259 259 249 258 252 3,068
2005 .............. 243 250 252 250 261 254 2,980
2006 .............. 233 236 241 233 242 249 2,938
2007 .............. 231 244 243 233 245 238 2,885
2008 .............. 221 220 218 209 223 231 2,749
2009 .............. 210 216 220 219 235 238 2,670
2010 .............. 198 211 219 214 217 222 2,592
2011 .............. 210 219 223 221 233 234 2,666
2012 .............. 187 192 201 204 211 204 2,514

73
Florida Chicks Hatched:
Broiler-type Chicks Hatched in Florida by Commercial Hatcheries: 2003-2012
Year January February March April May June
(thousands)

2003.......................... 5,756 5,224 5,899 5,668 5,587 4,808


2004.......................... 4,940 4,669 4,939 4,758 5,021 4,873
2005.......................... 4,854 4,483 4,953 4,819 4,948 4,901
2006.......................... 4,964 4,583 5,052 4,897 5,113 4,593
2007.......................... 4,982 4,587 5,007 4,990 5,108 4,834
2008.......................... 5,013 4,774 5,225 5,038 4,949 4,832
2009.......................... 3,871 3,398 3,645 3,476 3,648 3,634
2010.......................... 4,647 4,542 4,893 4,627 4,997 4,863
2011.......................... 4,707 4,345 4,963 4,889 4,896 4,814
2012.......................... 4,496 4,148 4,272 4,347 4,540 4,355

Year July August September October November December Total


(thousands)

2003.......................... 4,874 4,944 4,801 4,977 4,781 4,926 62,245


2004.......................... 4,987 4,901 4,746 4,933 4,735 4,901 58,403
2005.......................... 5,068 5,080 4,856 5,109 4,930 5,039 59,039
2006.......................... 5,007 5,066 4,899 5,051 4,883 4,874 58,982
2007.......................... 5,029 5,051 4,820 5,069 4,881 4,974 59,332
2008.......................... 5,095 4,851 4,627 4,435 4,378 4,698 57,915
2009.......................... 3,788 3,638 3,279 4,351 4,393 4,818 45,939
2010.......................... 4,969 5,055 4,784 4,674 4,431 4,743 57,225
2011.......................... 4,962 4,945 4,708 4,327 4,337 4,547 56,440
2012.......................... 4,514 4,515 4,442 4,309 4,138 4,498 52,574

74
Florida Hogs and Pigs:
Number on Farms and Inventory Value: 2003-2012
Number on farms – December 1 Market hogs and pigs Total
Year Total Under 50-119 120-179 180 Pounds Inventory
Breeding Market value
Head 50 Pounds Pounds Pounds and over

(1,000 head) (1,000 dollars)

2003............... 30 5 25 13 7 3 2 2,070
2004............... 20 4 16 8 3 3 2 2,200
2005............... 20 4 16 8 4 2 2 2,000
2006............... 20 4 16 7 4 4 1 1,860
2007............... 20 5 15 7 5 2 1 1,520
2008............... 20 5 15 6 6 2 1 1,860
2009............... 20 5 15 6 5 3 1 1,740
2010............... 15 3 12 4 4 2 2 1,650
2011............... 16 4 12 4 4 2 2 2,080
2012............... 15 3.5 11.5 4 3.5 2 2 1,800

Florida Hogs and Pigs:


Inventory, Pig Crop, and Disposition: 2003-2012
Inventory
Sows 1 Farm
Year December 1 of Pig crop Inshipments Marketings Deaths
farrowing Slaughter
Previous Year
(1,000 head)

2003 ................... 30 10 70 8 78 1.0 4.0


2004 ................... 30 8 60 16 82 1.0 3.0
2005 ................... 20 8 58 18 71 1.0 4.0
2006 ................... 20 8 56 15 67 1.0 3.0
2007 ................... 20 8 56 15 67 1.0 3.0
2008 ................... 20 8 56 11 62 1.0 4.0
2009 ................... 20 7 54 9 58 1.0 4.0
2010 ................... 20 4 28 3 33 1.0 2.0
2011 ................... 16 4 28 10 34 0.7 2.3
2012 ................... 15 4 24 6 29 0.7 1.3
1
Includes custom slaughter for use on farms where produced, but excludes inter-farm sales within State.

75
Florida Hogs:
Inventory December 1, Annual Marketings, Cash Receipts, and Gross Income: 2003-2012
Price per Cash Gross
Year Head Marketings 1
100 pounds receipts 2 income 3
(1,000 head) (1,000 pounds) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2003............................ 35 14,200 30.00 4,286 4,400


2004............................ 30 14,532 43.70 6,362 6,482
2005............................ 20 10,411 44.50 4,642 4,736
2006............................ 20 9,169 39.40 3,643 3,660
2007............................ 20 9,140 39.10 3,596 3,651
2008............................ 20 8,140 39.40 3,226 3,279
2009............................ 20 8,240 41.80 3,447 3,507
2010............................ 15 4,800 55.10 2,640 2,788
2011............................ 16 4,894 64.70 3,125 3,259
2012............................ 15 4,043 64.00 2,561 2,694
1
Excludes custom slaughter for use on farms where produced and interfarm sales within the State.
2
Receipts from marketings and sale of farm slaughter.
3
Cash receipts plus the value of home consumption.

76
Florida Commercial Hogs slaughter:1
Head, Average Live Weight, and Total Live Weight: 2003-2012
Year Head Average live weight Total live weight
(pounds)

2003........................................ 108,200 176 19,081,000


2004........................................ 99,000 174 17,243,000
2005........................................ 95,500 133 12,657,000
2006........................................ 95,900 132 12,643,000
2007........................................ 88,400 145 12,794,000
2008........................................ 82,700 135 11,166,000
2009........................................ 82,500 143 11,809,000
2010........................................ 76,800 133 10,212,000
2011........................................ 94,949 122 11,563,000
2012........................................ 66,900 138 9,176,000
1
Includes slaughter under Federal inspection, excludes farm slaughter

77
78
2011-2012 SEASON VEGETABLE HIGHLIGHTS

2012 United States Fresh Market Vegetable Production Up 1 Percent from 2011
United States fresh market vegetable and melon production for the 24 selected crops estimated in 2012 totaled 438 million
hundredweight, up 1 percent from last year. The harvested area covered 1.68 million acres, up 1 percent from 2011. Value
of the 2012 crop is estimated at 10.1 billion dollars, down 6 percent from a year ago. The three largest crops, in terms of
production, are onions, head lettuce, and watermelons, which combined to account for 36 percent of the total production.
Onions, tomatoes, and sweet corn claim the highest values, accounting for 26 percent of the total value when combined.

For the vegetables and melons estimated in 2012, Florida was the second leading fresh market vegetable state, in 2012
accounting for 11 percent of the harvested area, 9 percent of production, and 11 percent of the value of production.

leading Fresh Market Vegetable states in 2012


Area harvested Production Value
Rank Percent Percent Percent
State State State
of total of total of total
1 ........................... California 43.8 California 48.5 California 50.1
2 ........................... Florida 11.1 Florida 8.7 Florida 11.4
3 ........................... Arizona 6.5 Arizona 7.3 Arizona 6.9
4 ........................... Georgia 6.1 Georgia 5.0 Georgia 5.1
5 ........................... New York 3.8 Washington 4.2 New York 4.0

In 2012, NASS began estimating vegetable production on a calendar year basis. Data included in this publication reflects
vegetable acreage, yield, production, and value for January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012. Monthly price data was
not available for vegetables during 2012.

Production was up for many vegetables compared to the previous year, but prices were down and resulted in a lower total
value of production. Prices were up for snap beans, cucumbers, watermelons, and blueberries.

Value
The 2012 value of Florida production for the seven major vegetable crops, berries, and watermelons totaled $1.41 billion,
down 19 percent from the 2011 value of $1.73 billion. The ranking from the highest to lowest value of the published
vegetable and berry crops are: (1) tomatoes, (2) peppers, (3) strawberries, (4) sweet corn, (5) snap beans,
(6) watermelons, (7) cucumbers, (8) squash, (9) blueberries, and (10) cabbage. Crops that increased in value and
percentage increase included cucumbers (30%), snap beans (27%), watermelons (23%), and sweet corn (3%). Crops that
decreased in value and percentage included strawberries (-45%), tomatoes (-38%), cabbage (-22%), bell peppers (-16%),
squash (-13%), and blueberries (-10%).

Acreage
The harvested acreage for 2012 of the major vegetable crops, watermelons, potatoes, sweet potatoes, strawberries, and
blueberries totaled 242,800, up from the 232,700 acres harvested the previous year. Crops with increased acreage included
sweet potatoes (210%), blueberries (18%), cucumbers (14%), cabbage (14%), snap beans (7%), squash (4%),
watermelons (4%), potatoes (3%), tomatoes (2%), and peppers (2%). Crops with less acreage and percentage decrease
included strawberries (-12%) and sweet corn (-2%).

79
Principal Fresh Market Vegetable Planted, Harvested, Production and Value – Florida: 2010-20121
Year Area planted Area harvested Production Value of production
(acres) (1,000 cwt) (1,000 dollars)

2010 ................................................... 190,200 176,500 34,277 1,527,289

2011 ................................................... 199,500 180,400 36,458 1,293,853


2012 ................................................... 201,400 186,700 38,095 1,145,281
1
Only includes estimates for the selected crops in the NASS annual program. These crops are not estimated for all States that might produce them. See
the 2007 Census of Agriculture for a comprehensive tally of total vegetable acres by State. Includes processing total for dual usage crops (asparagus,
broccoli, and cauliflower)

Production

Production in 2012 of the major vegetable crops, watermelons, potatoes, sweet potatoes, strawberries, and blueberries
totaled 49.76 million hundredweight, up 2 percent from 2011. Production increased for sweet potatoes (58%), cucumber
(18%), cabbage (14%), sweet corn (7%), tomatoes (5%), peppers (2%), and snap beans (1%). Crops with less production
and percentage decrease included strawberries (26%), blueberries (20%), squash (-10%), potatoes (2%), and watermelons
(-1%).

Weather for the 2012 Growing Season

January 2012 began with freezing temperatures in the southern portions of the State and caused some damage to the
vegetable crops. Most vegetable growers worked around the clock in the fields to protect their crops and plants from the
chilling temperatures. Strawberry growers ran overhead sprinklers to form ice caps on plants as cold protection.
Harvesting and replanting of winter vegetables continued in the southern Peninsula. Hastings growers began planting
potatoes. Market movement included snap beans, cabbage, celery, sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant, endive, escarole, bell
peppers, radishes, squash, and tomatoes.

February saw dry conditions and average temperatures. Producers were irrigating fields throughout the month due to
drought conditions. Vegetable planting continued in St. Lucie County. Some damage was reported in St. Johns County to
potatoes and Putnam County to cabbage due to frost. Producers harvested snap beans, cabbage, celery, sweet corn,
eggplant, endive, escarole, bell peppers, radishes, squash, strawberries, and tomatoes.

During March, the harvesting of winter vegetables was ongoing in south Florida and increased as the month progressed.
Favorable weather conditions allowed planting and harvesting to remain on schedule. Producers were planting
watermelons in north-central Florida. Supplies of strawberries increased as growers met the demands of the March
Strawberry Festival. Some farmers were planting and preparing fields for the spring harvest (April-July). Very light
harvesting of blueberries was underway.

In April, drought conditions prevailed throughout most of the State. Clear, dry conditions allowed fieldwork and
harvesting to progress unabated. The dry weather increased the need for irrigation in the central and southern Peninsula
areas. Cabbage and celery supplies declined as the season ended. The watermelon harvest began earlier than usual. The
potato harvest began in the Hastings area.

In May, drought conditions continued. The vegetable harvest finished in the Miami-Dade area, while potato harvest
continued in Flagler and Putnam counties. Watermelon, squash, and cantaloupe harvest continued. Quincy tomato
growers prepared fields for summer harvesting. Producers marketed snap beans, blueberries, cantaloupes, sweet corn,
cucumbers, eggplant, okra, bell peppers, squash, tomatoes, and watermelons.

June brought heavy rains as Tropical Storm Beryl and Debby passed through the State. Rain and wet fields delayed
harvesting in many areas. In Gilchrist County, producers harvested watermelons. Tomato harvesting continued in
Gadsden County. In Washington County, watermelon and sweet corn fields were harvested at a rapid pace. In Miami-
Dade County, mangoes and avocadoes were marketed. Tomato harvesting remained active in the Quincy area with
supplies declining seasonally. Growers marketed avocados, cantaloupes, mangoes, and tomatoes.

80
In July most vegetables were finished for the season. There was some tomato harvesting in western and central Florida. In
Okeechobee County, irrigated sweet corn harvesting continued. Northern Peninsula growers were still harvesting light
supplies of watermelons as the season concluded.

In August vegetable growers were busy with land preparation, fumigating, and laying plastic for the fall crops. Harvesting
and replanting of okra and sweet potatoes was underway. Rain late in the month disrupted some land preparations and
planting schedules around Charlotte, Collier, Hendry, and Lee counties.

September began with Tropical Storm Isaac bringing up to five inches of rainfall to South Florida. In the southern
counties, vegetable growers continued to prepare land and planting increased seasonally. Flagler and Putnam county
growers planted cabbage. Okra, cucumbers, and tomatoes were being marketed at the end of the month.

In October, the fall vegetable harvest was in full swing with lots of activity at the local farmers markets. Growers were
planting winter vegetables in south Miami-Dade County. The harvest of tomatoes continued in Gadsden County.
Strawberry planting was in full swing in Hillsborough County. Vegetables being marketed included tomatoes, beans,
corn, cucumbers, okra, watermelon, and light volumes of eggplants.

In November, growers enjoyed mild temperatures and dry conditions. Harvesting and replanting of winter vegetables
was progressing well in south Florida, while cabbage and strawberry planting continued in other parts of the State. Crops
coming to market included green beans, sweet corn, cucumber, squash, peppers, tomatoes, and watermelons.

In December, dry conditions prompted vegetable growers to irrigate to keep moisture levels up. Above normal
temperatures for this time of year resulted in good growing conditions for vegetables. Tomato harvest ended in Gadsden
County. Vegetables marketed included corn, cucumbers, green beans, eggplant, lettuce, peppers, radishes, and tomatoes.
Early marketing of strawberries was also reported.

u.s. Drought Monitor


2012 by Quarter, Florida
January 3, 2012 April 3, 2012

July 3, 2012 October 2, 2012

Intensity:
D0, Abnormally D1, Drought D2, Drought D3, Drought D4, Drought
Dry Moderate Severe Extreme Exceptional

81
DEFINITIONS AND EXPLANATIONS
Planted Acreage is the total acreage which has been planted for harvest during the crop year. Acreage lost and replanted
to the same crop in time for harvest in the same quarter is counted only once. Acreage harvested and planted again to the
same crop is counted twice.
Harvested Acreage is the acreage partially or completely harvested. Acreage lost before or at maturity through natural or
economic causes is not included in the acreage for harvest.
Yield is the average production per harvested acre of merchantable quality harvested and sold or utilized for human
consumption.
Production is the quantity actually harvested and sold or utilized for human consumption.
Unit Value for fresh market sales is the equivalent price received, f.o.b. shipping point basis and encompasses all grades
and sizes marketed or utilized. Included are packing charges, selling charges, precooling, top ice, or other costs which
contribute to the value of the product at shipping point. The value per unit for quantities sold to processors is the average
value paid for usable quantities, on a "delivered to plant door" basis. This value includes transportation and other normal
costs incident to delivery at plant door.
Total Value is the equivalent value of production sold or utilized based on the unit value. Cullage and other quantities not
sold or utilized because of natural or economic factors are excluded.
Other Counties include harvested acreage for all counties for which either published data would result in the disclosure
of individual operations or acreage totals for specific commodities of minor importance in the State.
Production And Price Unit - The official USDA vegetable crop estimates are published on a weight basis. For this
bulletin, the official estimates for most vegetable crops have been converted to hundredweight. If changes in container
weights are necessary, all data pertaining to the production of the commodity in question are revised to maintain
comparability between years. The table below gives the net weight used per container and the number of containers per
hundredweight for Florida produce.
Florida Produce1
Estimated Number of Estimated Number of
Commodity Unit Commodity Unit
net weight units per cwt net weight units per cwt

(pounds) (pounds)
Snap Beans.................... Bushel 30 3.333 Lettuce, Iceberg .............. Carton 50 2.000
Blueberries..................... Flat 11 9.090 Lettuce, Romaine............ Carton 40 2.500
Cabbage ........................ Crate 50 2.000 Lettuce, Leaf................... Carton 25 4.000
Carrots ........................... Sack 48 2.083 Okra................................ Bushel 30 3.333
Cauliflower ..................... Carton 25 4.000 Parsley............................ Crate 21 4.762
Celery ............................ Crate 60 1.667 Bell Pepper ..................... Bushel 28 3.571
Chinese Cabbage........... Crate 50 2.000 Potatoes ......................... Sack 100 1.000
Sweet Corn .................... Crate 42 2.381 Radishes......................... Carton 15 6.667
Cucumbers..................... Bushel 55 1.818 Squash ........................... Bushel 42 2.381
Eggplant......................... Bushel 33 3.030 Strawberries.................... Flat 12 8.333
Escarole ......................... Crate 25 4.000 Sweet Potatoes............... Crate 50 2.000
Lettuce, Bibb .................. Carton 10 10.000 Tomatoes........................ Carton 25 4.000
Lettuce, Boston .............. Carton 20 5.000 Watermelons................... Cwt 100 1.000
1
Most common unit, estimated weight, and units per hundredweight, 2012 crop season

CONFIDENTIALITY OF COLLECTED DATA


All information collected from individual agricultural producers is held strictly confidential. Data provided by individual producers or other
agricultural firms are used only to compile and publish statistics at the county, State, and national levels. Statistics at the county and State level are
not published if they will potentially disclose information about an individual or operation. In addition, all names and addresses obtained by this
office are held confidential.

82
PrinCiPAl VegeTAbles
by ProDuCTion AreAs
1 - WesT
A. Holmes-Jackson-Washington counties: Butter beans, field peas,
watermelons.
B. Gadsden County: Pole beans, squash, sweet corn, tomatoes.
2 - norTH
C. Suwannee Valley: Beans, corn, cucumbers, greens, peas, peppers,
potatoes, squash, watermelons.
D. Starke-Brooker-Lake Butler: Lima beans, snap beans, blueberries,
cucumbers, peppers, squash, strawberries.
E. Hastings: Cabbage, potatoes.
F. Gainesville-Alachua: Blueberries, bush beans, cucumbers, peppers,
potatoes, squash.
G. Island Grove-Hawthorne: Blueberries, cucumbers, peppers, sweet corn,
squash, watermelons.
3 - norTH CenTrAl
H. Oxford-Pedro: Tomatoes, watermelons.
I. Sanford-Oviedo-Zellwood: Cabbage, chinese cabbage, sweet corn,
cucumbers, greens, spinach.
J. Webster: Cucumbers, eggplant, peppers.
4 - WesT CenTrAl
K. Lake Placid: Sweet corn, radishes, lettuce, parsley, beets.
L. Plant City-Balm: Blueberries, bush and pole beans, lima beans, cabbage,
cucumbers, eggplant, field peas, greens, squash, strawberries, cherry
tomatoes, watermelons.
M. Palmetto-Ruskin: Cabbage, cauliflower, potatoes, strawberries, tomatoes,
cherry tomatoes, plum tomatoes, watermelons.
N. Sarasota: Cabbage, celery, cucumbers, sweet corn, escarole, lettuce,
radishes.
O. Wauchula: Blueberries, cucumbers, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes,
watermelons, squash.
5 - eAsT CenTrAl
P. Ft. Pierce: Tomatoes, watermelons, snap beans.
6 - souTHWesT
Q. Snap beans, sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant, sweet and hot peppers,
potatoes, squash, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, plum tomatoes,
watermelons.
7 - eVerglADes
R. Bush beans, cabbage, celery, Chinese cabbage, sweet corn, escarole,
greens, lettuce, radishes.
8 - souTHeAsT
S. Martin County: Cabbage, potatoes, tomatoes, watermelons.
T. Pompano: Bush beans, lima beans, sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant,
sweet and hot peppers, squash, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, plum
tomatoes.
U. Homestead: Bush and pole beans, cabbage, sweet corn, eggplant, okra,
pickles, potatoes, squash, strawberries, tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, plum
tomatoes.

83
Florida Vegetables, Watermelons, Potatoes, and berries:
Acreage, Yield, Production and Value, Crop Years 2011 and 2012
Planted acreage Harvested acreage Yield per acre
Crop
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012

(acres) (cwt)
Vegetables
Snap beans ...................................... 46,000 46,000 40,000 42,700 60 57
Cabbage ........................................... 8,800 9,900 8,100 9,200 340 340
Sweet corn........................................ 50,500 49,000 43,000 42,000 150 165
Cucumbers ....................................... 10,000 11,200 9,500 10,800 250 260
Bell peppers...................................... 18,700 18,800 17,600 18,000 250 250
Squash ............................................. 9,600 10,000 9,300 9,700 150 130
Tomatoes.......................................... 30,000 30,000 28,500 29,000 320 330
Total ............................................... 173,600 174,900 156,000 161,400 (X) (X)
Watermelons..................................... 25,900 26,500 24,400 25,300 310 295
Potatoes 1 ......................................... 36,400 37,000 35,600 36,600 256 244
Sweet potatoes ................................. 3,300 6,400 3,000 6,300 160 120
Strawberries...................................... 9,900 8,900 9,900 8,700 250 210
Blueberries........................................ (X) (X) 3,800 4,500 56 38

Total, all crops ................................ 249,100 253,700 232,700 242,800 (X) (X)

Production Value per cwt Total value


Crop
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012

(1,000 cwt) (dollars per cwt) (1,000 dollars)


Vegetables
Snap beans ..................................... 2,400 2,434 54.70 68.60 131,280 166,972
Cabbage........................................... 2,754 3,128 23.60 16.30 64,994 50,986
Sweet corn ....................................... 6,450 6,930 27.00 26.00 174,150 180,180
Cucumbers ...................................... 2,375 2,808 21.90 24.00 52,013 67,392
Bell peppers ..................................... 4,400 4,500 56.30 46.00 247,720 207,000
Squash ............................................. 1,395 1,261 55.00 52.90 76,725 66,707
Tomatoes ......................................... 9,120 9,570 47.70 28.00 435,024 267,960
Total............................................... 28,894 30,628 (X) (X) 1,181,906 1,007,197
Watermelons .................................... 7,564 7,464 14.80 18.50 111,947 138,084
Potatoes 1 ......................................... 9,112 8,917 15.80 (D) 144,769 (D)
Sweet potatoes................................. 480 756 (D) (D) (D) (D)
Strawberries ..................................... 2,475 1,827 148.00 110.00 366,300 200,970
Blueberries ....................................... 214 171 323.00 363.00 69,122 62,073

Total, all crops ............................... 48,739 49,763 (X) (X) 1,874,044 1,408,324
X Not applicable.
D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.
1
2012 data is preliminary.

84
Florida snap beans:
Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2010.................... 36,400 32,200 60 1,932 69.90 135,047


2011.................... 46,000 40,000 60 2,400 54.70 131,280
2012.................... 46,000 42,700 57 2,434 68.60 166,972

Florida Cabbage:
Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2010 ..................... 10,500 9,700 300 2,910 24.10 70,131


2011 ..................... 8,800 8,100 340 2,754 23.60 64,994
2012 ..................... 9,900 9,200 340 3,128 16.30 50,986

Florida sweet Corn:


Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)
2010....................... 45,100 42,100 140 5,894 32.10 189,197
2011....................... 50,500 43,000 150 6,450 27.00 174,150
2012....................... 49,000 42,000 165 6,930 26.00 180,180

Florida Cucumbers:
Acreage, Production and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)
2010 ...................... 12,000 11,600 200 2,320 20.60 47,792
2011 ...................... 10,000 9,500 250 2,375 21.90 52,013
2012 ...................... 11,200 10,800 260 2,808 24.00 67,392

Florida bell Peppers:


Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) ($1,000 dollars)

2010 ......................... 18,800 17,700 230 4,071 72.60 295,555


2011 ......................... 18,700 17,600 250 4,400 56.30 247,720
2012 ......................... 18,800 18,000 250 4,500 46.00 207,000

85
Florida Potatoes:
Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-20121,2
Crop Area Value of
Yield per acre Production Value per cwt
year Planted Harvested production

(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

spring (Hastings)
2010.......................... 21,500 20,300 250 5,075 14.60 74,095
2011.......................... 23,400 23,100 270 6,237 13.90 86,694
2012.......................... 23,500 23,300 240 5,592 (D) (D)

spring (other)
2010.......................... 11,700 11,500 250 2,875 22.50 64,688
2011.......................... 13,000 12,500 230 2,875 20.20 58,075
2012.......................... 13,500 13,300 250 3,325 (D) (D)

spring (Total)
2010.......................... 33,200 31,800 250 7,950 17.40 138,783
2011.......................... 36,400 35,600 256 9,112 15.80 144,769
2012.......................... 37,000 36,600 244 8,917 (D) (D)
D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.
1
Data will be released in September 2013.
2
Includes processing

Florida sweet Potatoes:


Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-20123
Crop Area Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(1,000 acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2010......................... 3.5 3.4 130 442 (D) (D)


2011......................... 3.3 3.0 160 480 (D) (D)
2012......................... 6.4 6.3 120 756 (D) (D)
(D)
3
Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.
Estimates began in 2009

Florida squash:
Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2010.......................... 9,500 9,100 120 1,092 52.00 56,784


2011.......................... 9,600 9,300 150 1,395 55.00 76,725
2012.......................... 10,000 9,700 130 1,261 52.90 66,707

86
Florida strawberries:
Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2010.......................... 8,800 8,800 220 1,936 187.00 362,032


2011.......................... 9,900 9,900 250 2,475 148.00 366,300
2012.......................... 8,900 8,700 210 1,827 110.00 200,970

Florida Tomatoes:
Acreage, Fresh Market Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage 1 Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) ($1,000 dollars)

2010....................... 32,000 29,500 290 8,555 72.50 620,238


2011....................... 30,000 28,500 320 9,120 47.70 435,024
2012....................... 30,000 29,000 330 9,570 28.00 267,960
1
Fresh market only. Includes round and plum or pear-shaped varieties, and U-Pic

Florida Watermelons:
Acreage, Production, and Value, Crop Years 2010-2012
Crop Acreage Value of
Yield per acre Production Price per cwt
year Planted Harvested production
(acres) (cwt) (1,000 cwt) (dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2010....................... 25,900 24,600 305 7,503 15.00 112,545


2011....................... 25,900 24,400 310 7,564 14.80 111,947
2012....................... 26,500 25,300 295 7,464 18.50 138,084

87
Planting and Harvesting Seasons of Selected Florida Vegetables, Berries, Melons
Usual Planting Dates 1 Usual Harvesting Dates
CROP
Begin Most Active End
JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL
Snap Beans 2 .........

Blueberries............

Cabbage ................

Carrots ..................

Cantaloupes...........

Celery....................

Sweet Corn............

Cucumbers ............

Eggplant................

Escarole/Endive ....

Lettuce/Romaine...

Peppers..................

Potatoes.................

Radishes................

Squash 3 ................

Strawberries ..........

Tomatoes ..............

Watermelon...........

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL
1
Usual date direct seeded or transplanted.
2
Includes pole beans.
3
A small acreage of summer squash is marketed locally during July and August.

88
HISTORICAL VEGETABLE HIGHLIGHTS

*Disclaimer: The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services provides the subsequent historic production and value of production charts from the
USDA-NASS/FASS. The data used to compose the following charts is intended to give the reader an overview of the past twelve years with respect to market changes
and fluctuations. However, it should be noted that all data prior to 2010 is based on marketing years; July 1-June 30, not calendar years; Jan 1-Dec 31. For this reason,
all data prior to 2010 also includes the fall growing season of the previous year. As new data becomes available in the coming years, USDA-FASS, will continue to add
calendar year data.

Value of Production & Production of Snap Beans*

Florida Value of Production


Snap Beans

Florida Production
Snap Beans

89
Production of Cabbage & Bell Peppers*

Florida Production
Cabbage

Florida Production
Bell Peppers

90
Value of Production & Production of Sweet Corn*

Florida Value of Production


Sweet Corn

Florida Production
Sweet Corn

91
Value of Production & Production of Cucumbers*

Florida Value of Production


Cucumbers

Florida Production
Cucumbers

92
Value of Production & Production of Squash *

Florida Value of Production


Squash

Florida Production
Squash

93
Production of Strawberries & Tomatoes*

Florida Production
Strawberries

Florida Production
Tomatoes

94
Value of Production & Production of Watermelons*

Florida Value of Production


Watermelons

Florida Production
Watermelons

95
Value of Production of Potatoes*

Florida Value of Production


Potatoes

96
97
2011-2012 HORTICULTURE HIGHLIGHTS
Florida’s 2012 Floriculture Value of Sales down Two Percent
Florida is the second largest U.S. producer of floriculture crops. The State’s gross wholesale value of sales for all
floriculture crops from producers with more than $10,000 in sales for 2012 totaled $812 million, down $23.4 million or
three percent from 2011. The Sunshine State produced 20 percent of the Nation’s $3.99 billion wholesale value of sales
for operations with $100,000 or more in sales.

Florida Leads the Nation in Indoor Foliage Plant Sales, Propagative Material, and Cut Cultivated Greens
Florida continues to dominate in foliage sales, representing 72 percent of the Nation’s foliage sales at $464 million, up 5
percent from the previous year. This increase in foliage sales is in-line with that of the Nation’s, which had $642 million
in sales and was up 5 percent. Florida’s value of propagative material totaled $77.4 million, 21 percent of the Nation’s
$366 million total. Florida represents 81 percent of the Nation’s sales of cut cultivated greens at $57.8 million, up $3.1
million or 6 percent from last year. Nationwide sales of cut cultivated greens totaled $71.0 million, down 1 percent.

Number of Producers
The total number of producers with sales of $100,000 or more decreased from 702 in 2011 to 634 in 2012, or 10%. The
number of producers in Florida within the various sales categories decreased for all categories except those with sales of
$500,000 or more, which increased from 208 to 213.

Area Used for Production


Florida floriculture acreage in the open and uncovered decreased from 2011. Shade and temporary cover square footage in
the State increased. For film plastic greenhouse footage, operations with sales $10,000 or more decreased by 7 percent.

98
Florida Floriculture:
Producers, Production Areas, and Value for Operations with $10,000+ Sales, 2003-2012
Number of Expanded
Year 1 Total covered area Open ground 2
producers wholesale value
(1,000 square feet) (acres) (1,000 dollars)

2003 .................................. 1,106 373,654 9,572 830,824


2004 .................................. 1,020 387,210 9,477 884,126
2005 .................................. 932 382,551 8,736 956,580
2006 .................................. 832 347,187 8,344 804,854
2007 .................................. 869 346,769 8,918 967,944
2008 .................................. 887 316,974 6,587 763,566
2009 .................................. 811 322,637 9,805 814,895
2010 ................................. 749 307,854 6,538 826,077
2011 ................................. 702 287,463 5,881 835,233
2012 3 ................................ 634 284,371 5,411 811,814
1
Does not include woody ornamentals, trees, shrubs, and sod.
2
Value of all crops grown with sales of $10,000 or more, combines the wholesale value of sales as reported by operations with $100,000 or more
and an estimated value for operations with sales between $10,000 and $99,000. This is derived by multiplying the number of producers in each
range of sales by the mid-point of the range.
3
Preliminary.

99
Florida Cut Cultivated greens:
Producers, Quantity Sold, and Value for Operations with $100,000+ Sales, 2003-2012
1
Number of producers Quantity sold Value of all sales at wholesale
Years Leatherleaf All other Leatherleaf All other Leatherleaf All other
ferns cut greens ferns cut greens ferns cut greens
(1,000 bunches) (1,000 dollars)
(3)
2003................... 97 105 56,786 47,132 33,940
(3)
2004................... 91 97 52,368 45,560 31,462
(3)
2005................... 85 91 47,464 48,413 30,452
(3)
2006................... 87 93 43,205 44,501 33,650
(3)
2007................... 77 87 39,120 38,338 36,056
(3)
2008................... 77 84 34,001 32,981 36,133
(3)
2009................... 76 72 31,162 29,292 26,704
(3)
2010 .................. 67 69 27,780 28,613 30,781
(3)
2011 .................. 68 69 25,779 25,006 29,678
2012 2................. 69 67 32,110 (3)
31,468 26,344
3
1
Equivalent wholesale value of all sales. Bunches are not comparable as units differ depending on crop variety.
2
Preliminary.

Florida Foliage Plants:


Producers and Value for Operations with $100,000+ Sales, 2003-2012
Hanging baskets Potted plants
Year 1
Producers Value of all sales at wholesale Producers Value of all sales at wholesale 1
(1,000 dollars) (1,000 dollars)

2003 .................... 142 30,712 381 393,170


2004 .................... 122 26,316 355 443,412
2005 .................... 123 46,301 319 447,727
2006 .................... 112 30,709 290 326,154
2007 .................... 107 36,515 310 457,401
2008 .................... 107 25,685 301 326,308
2009 .................... 72 32,393 276 367,378
2010 ................... 71 40,531 252 383,572
2011 .................... 96 41,033 239 401,617
2012 2 .................. 86 37,565 250 426,070
1
Equivalent wholesale value of all sales.
2
Preliminary.

100
Florida Potted Flowering Plants:
Number of Producers, Number of Pots, Quantity Sold, and Value, 2010-20113
Quantity Sold Wholesale Price Value of all
Producers Number of Number of sales at
Less than 5 inches 1
Selected Crops pots less than pots 5 inches
5 inches or more wholesale
5 inches or more
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012

(number) (1,000) (dollars per pot) ($1,000)


(2) (2)
African Violets............................. 8 8 966 1,021 19 0.98 1.17 3.02 1,004 1,196
(2) (2) (2) (2)
Azaleas, Finished Florist............. 10 7 447 395 4.15 4.23 1,853 1,672
Florist Chrysanthemums............ 9 8 630 605 958 892 1.71 1.71 3.46 3.43 4,392 4,094
Easter Lilies............................... 8 12 - - 411 435 (X) (X) 4.12 4.15 1,693 1,805
Orchids...................................... 47 39 837 963 4,156 1,345 6.01 4.79 9.35 9.92 43,889 17,955
Poinsettias................................. 20 23 362 355 3,027 3,924 1.67 1.71 3.99 4.16 12,682 12,771
(2) (2) (2) (2)
Roses, Florist ............................ 8 9 354 344 5.96 4.96 2,109 1,698
(2) (2) (2) (2)
Spring Flowering Bulbs.............. 9 8 242 168 3.97 4.71 960 791
Other Flowering Plants .............. 61 53 1,454 1,633 8,325 5,364 2.09 2.03 5.11 5.30 45,580 31,744
1
Equivalent wholesale value of all sales
2
Quantity and price combined into pot size with greatest production to avoid disclosing data of individual operations.
3
Operations with $100,000 + Sales
- Represents zero
(X) Not applicable

101
Florida Annual bedding/garden Plants:
Number of Producers, Quantity Sold, Price, and Value, 2010-20114
Quantity Sold Wholesale Price Value of all
Producers Number of pots Number of sales at
Less than 5 inches 1
Selected Crops less than 5 pots 5 inches
5 inches or more wholesale
inches or more
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012

(number) (1,000) (dollars per pot) ($1,000)


Begonias .................................... 39 40 5,391 5,901 468 589 0.69 0.69 2.53 2.46 4,904 5,521
Geraniums / Veg Cuttings ........... 40 41 1,519 1,788 2,338 2,556 1.19 1.13 2.22 2.25 6,998 7,771
(3) (3) (3) (3)
Geraniums from Seeds .............. 7 9 427 508 0.61 0.70 260 355
Impatiens, New Guinea.............. 35 39 1,779 3,052 607 869 1.10 1.14 2.83 2.39 3,675 5,556
Impatiens, Other ........................ 37 31 8,154 4,589 947 1,055 0.62 0.70 2.29 2.29 7,224 5,628
Marigolds ................................... 25 26 2,717 2,764 305 604 0.70 0.71 1.83 1.25 2,460 2,717
Pansies / Violas ......................... 22 26 2,600 1,917 294 862 0.67 0.72 1.91 1.12 2,304 2,346
Petunias .................................... 33 40 2,756 2,697 1,629 1,403 0.77 0.83 1.90 1.86 5,217 4,848
Other Flowering & Foliar ............ 39 38 9,537 13,108 8,423 6,441 0.72 088 2.02 2.38 23,881 26,865
Vegetable Type Plants2.............. 14 18 3,236 2,029 509 459 0.91 1.33 3.38 3.67 4,665 4,383
Wholesale 1
Producers Quantity Sold Value of all sales at wholesale
Selected Crops Unit Price
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012
(dollars per
(number) (1,000 units) ($1,000)
unit)
Begonias .................................... Baskets 12 12 27 31 5.57 5.37 150 166
Impatiens, Other ......................... Baskets 12 13 87 97 5.24 4.77 456 463
Impatiens, New Guinea.............. Baskets 11 12 20 21 5.34 5.56 107 117
Petunias .................................... Baskets 11 13 66 69 5.43 5.36 358 370
Other Flowering & Foliar ............ Baskets 13 10 139 104 6.46 4.61 898 479
Other Flowering & Foliar ............ Flats 7 8 144 163 6.50 7.08 936 1,154
1
Equivalent wholesale value of all sales.
2
Bedding plants for home use, excludes transplants for commercial production.
3
Quantity and price combined into pot size with greatest production to avoid disclosing data of individual operations
4
Operations with $100,000 + Sales
(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing data of individual operations.

102
103
BEES AND HONEY HIGHLIGHTS

Florida Honey Production


There were 199,000 honey producing colonies in Florida in 2012. Colonies used only for pollination or from which honey
was not harvested were not included. Honey production in 2012 from producers with five or more colonies was 12.7
million pounds, 16 percent above 2011. Florida ranked third in production behind North and South Dakota. The average
honey yield was 64 pounds per colony, three pounds above 2011. Producers received an average of 181 cents per pound
for the honey, up 13 cents per pound from the previous year. The value of Florida honey production in 2012 was $23.1
million, up from the 2011 value of $18.4 million.

Florida Honey:
Number of Colonies, Yield, Production, Price, Value, and Stocks, 2003-2012
Honey
producing Yield per Average price Value of Stocks
Year Production 2 3 4
colonies
1 colony per pound production December 15

(1,000 colonies) (pounds) (1,000 pounds) (cents) (1,000 dollars) (1,000 pounds)

2003....................... 210 71 14,910 132 19,681 1,491


2004....................... 205 98 20,090 100 20,090 2,009
2005....................... 160 86 13,760 86 11,834 2,477
2006....................... 170 81 13,770 101 13,908 1,790
2007....................... 160 71 11,360 99 11,246 1,363
2008....................... 150 79 11,850 132 15,642 1,304
2009....................... 170 68 11,560 142 16,415 1,618
2010 ...................... 200 69 13,800 156 21,528 1,794
2011....................... 180 61 10,980 168 18,446 988
2012....................... 199 64 12,736 181 23,052 1,274
1 3
Honey producing colonies are the maximum number of colonies from Value of production is equal to production multiplied by average price
which honey was taken during the year. It is possible to take honey per pound.
4
from colonies which did not survive the entire year. Producers with 5 Stocks held by producers.
or more colonies. Colonies which produced honey in more than one
State were counted in each State.
2
Average price per pound based on expanded sales.

104
105
AQUACULTURE & SEAFOOD HIGHLIGHTS
Florida aquaculture producers reported sales in 2012 of $69 million based upon a survey conducted for the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Aquaculture. This survey was administered by the Florida
Agricultural Statistics Service.

Reported sales in 2012 were above those of $66 million reported in 2005, the last time this survey was conducted. There
were 686 operations that reported being in business during 2012; of those, 404 operations reported appreciable sales. The
operations without sales reflect either new operations which have not yet sold a product or operations in business that did
not market any product in 2012.

Florida aquaculturists produced animals or plants for ornamental, food or miscellaneous markets. Ornamental sales
totaled $35.5 million and consisted of freshwater or marine animals and plants that included freshwater fish, crayfish or
marine fish, corals, live rock, snails, and shrimp sold to the aquarium or water garden markets. Sales of aquaculture
products for human consumption totaled $24.1 million and included freshwater or marine fish, clams, oysters, shrimp,
prawns, alligators, and turtles.

Florida Aquaculture:
Value of Sales, 2012 and 2005
Value of Sales Operations with Sales
Item
2012 2005 2012 2005
(dollars)

Ornamental Fish....................................... 27,269,000 33,232,000 101 133


Mollusks................................................... 11,889,000 10,694,000 139 153
Alligators .................................................. 7,995,000 4,070,000 10 14
Aquatic Plants .......................................... 5,327,000 8,360,000 19 17
Other Food Fish ....................................... 2,978,000 1,731,000 31 19
Tilapia ...................................................... 1,227,000 477,000 47 18
Catfish...................................................... 390,000 1,434,000 17 23
Live Rock ................................................. 373,000 341,000 12 6
All Other Aquaculture ............................... 11,303,000 5,436,000 (NA) (NA)
Total......................................................... 68,751,000 65,775,000 404 359
(NA) Not Available

106
Florida Aquaculture:
Value of Sales by Category, 2001, 2003, 2005, and 2012
Ornamental
Year Total Aquatic Plants Mollusks Alligators Other
Fish
(1,000 dollars)

2012 ........... 68,751 27,269 5,327 11,889 7,995 16,271


2005 ........... 65,775 33,232 8,360 10,694 4,070 9,419
2003 ........... 82,800 47,229 7,733 12,970 2,450 12,418
2001 ........... 86,200 42,424 8,102 18,264 3,250 14,260

Florida Aquaculture:
Value of Sales, 2012
Operations Value of
Type
With Sales Sales
(dollars)

Freshwater Ornamental Fish ....................................................... 90 26,035,000


Egg Layers................................................................................ 78 19,485,000
Live Bearers .............................................................................. 45 6,550,000
Marine Ornamental Fish .............................................................. 15 1,234,000
Freshwater Ornamental Invertebrates ......................................... 12 437,000
Marine Ornamental Invertebrates ................................................ 47 2,439,000
Coral ......................................................................................... 27 1,052,000
Live Rock .................................................................................. 12 373,000
Clams........................................................................................ 8 200,000
1
Other Marine Ornamental Invertebrates .................................. 7 814,000
Food & Bait Fish.......................................................................... 74 4,595,000
Tilapia ....................................................................................... 47 1,227,000
Catfish....................................................................................... 17 390,000
2
Other Food Fish ...................................................................... 31 2,978,000
Mollusks ...................................................................................... 139 11,889,000
Hard Clam................................................................................. 137 11,594,000
3
Other Mollusks ........................................................................ 8 295,000
Shrimp/Prawn/Crayfish................................................................ 18 7,603,000
Shrimp....................................................................................... 13 7,489,000
Crayfish..................................................................................... 7 114,000
Reptiles....................................................................................... 33 9,192,000
Alligator Live Animals ................................................................ 7 1,412,000
Other Alligator Products 4 .......................................................... 5 6,583,000
Turtles and Turtle Products ....................................................... 28 1,197,000
Aquatic Plants ............................................................................. 19 5,327,000
Aquarium Plants........................................................................ 11 4,844,000
5
Other Aquatic Plants ............................................................... 12 483,000
Total reported Aquaculture sales ........................................... 404 68,751,000
1 4
Includes shrimp, snails, and others. Includes eggs, hides, and meat.
2 5
Includes bream, bass, trout, sturgeon, and others. For water garden and wetlands restoration.
3
Includes sunray venus clams and oysters.

107
Florida Aquaculture:
Water Acreage, Size of Operation, 2012
Percent
Water Acreage Operations Acres Percent Acres
Operations
Under 3...................................... 420 413 61.3 9.2
3 to 5.9....................................... 112 465 16.3 10.4
6 to 19.9..................................... 107 1,042 15.6 23.2
20 to 49.9................................... 31 891 4.5 19.8
50 and up................................... 16 1,679 2.3 37.4
Total .......................................... 686 4,490 100.0 100.0

108
Florida Marine landings summary:
Tropical Ornamentals 20121,2 ( Marine, Commercial)
Average
Species Total Numbers Total Trips Estimated Value
Price

Angelfish.................................................. 20,989 1,169 13.00 269,638


Barracuda ................................................ 5 2 9.50 48
Basses..................................................... 1,221 272 7.77 9,491
Batfish...................................................... 287 77 3.25 933
Bigeye...................................................... 14 12 17.04 239
Blennies................................................... 3,015 341 2.44 7,371
Brotulas ................................................... 48 13 3.99 192
Butterflyfish .............................................. 2,141 386 6.89 14,758
Cardinalfish.............................................. 2,220 269 1.89 4,200
Catfish ..................................................... 25 7 14.50 363
Clingfish................................................... 460 80 1.08 499
Damselfish ............................................... 7,190 385 2.68 19,293
Drum........................................................ 2,900 312 3.97 11,520
Filefish ..................................................... 1,062 139 2.34 2,483
Flounder .................................................. 832 128 1.05 876
Goatfish ................................................... 21 13 5.37 113
Gobies ..................................................... 14,106 495 2.49 35,091
Groupers.................................................. 34 18 24.12 820
Grunts...................................................... 4,419 288 7.13 31,526
Hamlets ................................................... 772 217 4.21 3,251
Jacks ....................................................... 1,291 49 20.30 26,203
Jawfish..................................................... 10,338 215 3.51 36,307
Lizardfish ................................................. 10 6 9.65 97
Mojarras................................................... 25 1 1.00 25
Morays..................................................... 421 114 11.88 5,002
Parrotfish ................................................. 773 219 8.11 6,271
Porgies .................................................... 6 4 15.25 92
Puffers ..................................................... 4,987 584 1.89 9,427
Rays And Skates ..................................... 501 147 54.84 27,476
Remoras .................................................. 31 18 5.56 173
Scorpionfish ............................................. 691 135 1.43 987
Seahorses................................................ 17,718 359 2.14 37,965
Searobin .................................................. 284 79 3.64 1,032
Sharks ..................................................... 64 14 44.09 2,822
Sheepshead............................................. 5 2 22.00 110
Snappers ................................................. 57 8 10.49 598
Spadefish................................................. 244 27 8.47 2,066
1
All 2012 Data is Preliminary --continued
2
Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission http://research.myfwc.com/

109
Florida Marine landings summary
Tropical Ornamentals: Marine, Commercial 20121,2 (continued)
Species Total Numbers Total Trips Average Price Estimated Value

Squirrelfish............................................... 417 58 10.41 4,342


Stargazers ............................................... 28 8 2.50 70
Surgeonfish.............................................. 3,329 451 5.85 19,474
Sweepers................................................. 91 6 9.33 849
Toadfish................................................... 290 92 2.25 652
Triggerfish................................................ 2 2 25.00 50
Trumpetfish.............................................. 11 8 10.18 115
Trunkfish.................................................. 1,813 169 0.83 1,510
Wrasses................................................... 8,215 590 4.67 38,344
Misc. Fish................................................. 1,481 262 6.14 9,087
Total Finfish ........................................... 122,365 2,087 6.92 846,750
Anemones................................................ 65,798 520 1.10 72,395
Anemones, Corallimorphs ........................ 33,727 360 2.55 86,009
Zoanthids................................................. 23,058 94 0.30 6,993
Bryozoa ................................................... 188 30 10.57 1,988
Chiton ...................................................... 1,525 45 2.09 3,186
Clams ...................................................... 1,002 46 6.94 6,955
Conchs .................................................... 68,487 104 0.23 15,591
Crabs ....................................................... 2,362,790 2,763 0.21 487,439
Octocorals................................................ 32,237 695 4.08 131,529
Jellyfish.................................................... 3,430 100 2.13 7,312
Lobsters................................................... 407 107 2.67 1,087
Nudibranchs............................................. 16,081 404 1.18 18,990
Octopus ................................................... 437 103 3.79 1,656
Oyster ...................................................... 580 84 4.42 2,566
Polychaetes ............................................. 2,364 55 4.07 9,627
Sand Dollars ............................................ 1,210,123 157 0.10 120,802
Scallops ................................................... 19,557 425 0.73 14,275
Sea Cucumbers ....................................... 10,382 526 1.20 12,442
Shrimp ..................................................... 1,459,782 1,423 0.22 325,043
Snails....................................................... 2,595,701 2,289 0.15 385,470
Sponges .................................................. 19,239 658 3.02 58,006
Starfish .................................................... 35,501 909 1.13 39,992
Tunicates ................................................. 3,073 107 2.59 7,969
Urchins .................................................... 46,116 801 2.25 103,818
Whelks..................................................... 2,016 50 1.44 2,908
Misc. Invertebrates................................... 3,774 54 5.40 20,369
1
All 2012 Data is Preliminary --continued
2
Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission http://research.myfwc.com/

110
Florida Marine landings summary
Tropical Ornamentals: Marine, Commercial 20121,2 (continued)
Species Total Numbers Total Trips Average Price Estimated Value

Total invertebrates .................................. 8,774,090 4,760 0.23 2,061,787


Plants........................................................ 18,921 719 2.02 38,243
Total Plants ............................................. 18,040 679 2.49 45,000
Live Rock.................................................. 88,409 147 2.39 210,863
Live Sand.................................................. 5,070 14 1.28 6,509
Total live rock/sand.............................. 65,909 141 2.23 146,711
1
All 2012 Data is Preliminary
2
Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission http://research.myfwc.com/

111
Florida Annual landings summary:
Marine, Commercial 1,2
Average Dollar
Species Total Pounds Total Trips Estimated Value
Value per Trip

Amberjacks ................................................. 1,307,321 3,449 390 1,345,419


Bait fish ....................................................... 1,378,994 1,722 246 423,007
Ballyhoo ...................................................... 1,116,124 500 1596 798,214
Blue Runner ................................................ 255,684 8,407 28 238,454
Bluefish ....................................................... 330,506 6,132 21 128,159
Bumper, Atlantic.......................................... 27,834 335 37 12,296
Catfish......................................................... 9,050 305 16 4,982
Clams, Hard (wild only) .............................. 56,151 3,097 130 403,266
Cobia .......................................................... 186,487 3,053 190 581,011
Conch (Whelk, Helmet) .............................. 2,485 30 40 1,202
Crab, Blue (hard) ........................................ 8,389,950 33,599 288 9,691,845
Crab, Blue (soft) ......................................... 75,351 2,383 262 624,279
Crab, Stone................................................. 2,579,734 19,813 1196 23,693,799
Croaker ....................................................... 86,099 1,803 29 52,025
Dolphin........................................................ 370,505 2,276 309 703,652
Drum, Black ................................................ 30,861 1,084 25 27,527
Eels............................................................. 844 14 89 1,249
Flounders.................................................... 194,465 4,087 124 507,474
Goatfishes................................................... 11,289 10 283 2,825
Grouper, Black ............................................ 68,533 986 238 234,355
Grouper, Gag .............................................. 689,443 3,760 673 2,529,606
Grouper, Other............................................ 20,776 369 143 52,734
Grouper, Red .............................................. 3,493,418 4,082 2206 9,006,901
Grouper, Scamp.......................................... 165,201 1,889 312 589,074
Grouper, Snowy .......................................... 130,169 844 450 379,627
Grouper, Warsaw ........................................ 5,587 80 168 13,454
Grouper, Yellowedge................................... 370,177 376 3452 1,298,131
Grouper, Yellowfin....................................... 659 12 176 2,107
Grunts ......................................................... 276,611 3,274 73 239,536
Herring, Thread ........................................... 1,174,296 83 2274 188,717
Hogfish........................................................ 45,483 730 210 153,175
Jack, Crevalle ............................................. 614,486 7,272 68 494,743
Jack, Mixed ................................................. 63,421 401 92 36,808
Jack, Other.................................................. 78,174 2,682 27 73,186
Kingfish (Whiting) ....................................... 376,583 2,928 138 403,864
Ladyfish ...................................................... 1,127,822 2,935 189 554,758
Lobster, Spanish ......................................... 2,413 49 160 7,821
1
All 2012 data is Preliminary --continued
2
Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission http://research.myfwc.com/

112
Florida Annual landings summary:
Marine, Commercial 1,2 (continued)
Average Dollar
Species Total Pounds Total Trips Estimated Value
Value per Trip
Lobster, Spiny ............................................. 5,764,633 17,056 2085 35,568,331
Mackerel, King ............................................ 5,449,751 16,366 538 8,807,952
Mackerel, Spanish....................................... 4,081,486 8,934 309 2,756,456
Menhaden ................................................... 146,025 198 283 56,078
Misc. Food fish............................................ 583,300 7,705 80 618,109
Misc Industrial fish...................................... 1,030,356 64 1846 118,153
Misc. Invertebrates...................................... 2,327,277 599 2059 1,233,072
Mojarra........................................................ 545,157 5,773 110 633,521
Mullet, Black................................................ 8,466,401 21,559 223 4,818,014
Mullet, Black, roe......................................... 3,845 56 343 19,180
Mullet, Silver ............................................... 372,425 1,860 95 177,482
Octopus ...................................................... 23,660 447 63 28,248
Oysters ....................................................... 2,210,316 36,098 179 6,474,490
Permit ......................................................... 4,968 228 33 7,545
Pinfish ......................................................... 194,339 2,129 106 225,137
Pompano .................................................... 244,657 5,157 188 969,996
Porgies........................................................ 427,705 2,472 208 514,782
Rays & Skates ............................................ 10,800 27 62 1,671
Sand Perch (Serranidae) ............................ 72 8 36 290
Sardines, Scaled ......................................... 30,273 152 528 80,199
Sardines, Spanish ....................................... 2,010,080 163 1884 307,127
Scad, bigeye (goggle eye) .......................... 116,267 383 567 217,102
Scad, round (cigarfish) ............................... 652,262 61 7024 428,491
Sea Bass, Mixed ......................................... 297,327 1,253 273 342,567
Seatrout, Sand ............................................ 4,986 78 60 4,715
Seatrout, Silver ........................................... 7,039 69 71 4,898
Seatrout, Spotted ........................................ 52,896 1,273 89 112,944
Seatrout, Weakfish...................................... 3,257 337 12 3,950
Shark .......................................................... 998,015 978 477 466,063
Shark Fins................................................... 28,662 707 798 563,855
Sheepshead................................................ 339,920 9,467 34 317,510
Shrimp, Bait ................................................ 1,558,878 16,825 426 7,165,792
Shrimp, Brown ............................................ 2,075,634 1,271 3631 4,614,593
Shrimp, Other.............................................. 186,186 862 714 615,862
Shrimp, Pink................................................ 8,679,263 2,113 7172 15,154,260
Shrimp, Rock .............................................. 1,840,352 297 8670 2,575,023
Shrimp, Royal Red ...................................... 528,298 25 37953 948,827
Shrimp, White ............................................. 4,898,005 3,427 2971 10,180,511
1
All 2012 Data is Preliminary --continued
2
Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission http://research.myfwc.com/

113
Florida Annual landings summary:
Marine, Commercial 1,2 (continued)
Average Dollar
Species Total Pounds Total Trips Estimated Value
Value per Trip
Snapper, Grey (Mangrove) ......................... 242,771 4,375 128 560,957
Snapper, Lane ............................................ 17,786 1,117 39 43,681
Snapper, Mixed ........................................... 52 2 76 151
Snapper, Mutton.......................................... 125,722 2,395 122 292,669
Snapper, Other ........................................... 31,533 270 245 66,067
Snapper, Red.............................................. 1,320,332 2,385 1913 4,562,308
Snapper, Silk............................................... 39,326 173 693 119,934
Snapper, Vermilion...................................... 1,496,766 1,993 1869 3,725,185
Snapper, Yellowtail ..................................... 1,693,661 5,720 769 4,397,293
Sponge (pieces) ......................................... 263,786 438 1145 501,451
Spot ............................................................ 16,577 800 16 12,895
Squid .......................................................... 41,460 298 69 20,536
Swordfish .................................................... 1,151,425 1,234 3318 4,094,118
Tilapia (Nile Perch) ..................................... 254,692 626 205 128,210
Tilefish (Golden) ......................................... 487,318 478 2621 1,252,717
Tilefish, Blueline (Gray) .............................. 36,938 236 191 45,110
Triggerfish................................................... 148,760 2,233 106 237,169
Tuna, Albacore............................................ 80,282 239 440 105,072
Tuna, Bigeye............................................... 315,607 281 3603 1,012,475
Tuna, Blackfin ............................................. 15,643 297 64 19,065
Tuna, Bluefin............................................... 37,197 63 2958 186,331
Tuna, Mixed ............................................... 41 1 83 83
Tuna, Skipjack ............................................ 1,269 16 128 2,047
Tuna, Yellowfin ........................................... 472,096 321 5407 1,735,669
Tunny, Little (Bonito) .................................. 921,200 6,269 44 276,862
Wahoo ........................................................ 31,780 486 176 85,700
1
All 2012 Data is Preliminary
2
Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission http://research.myfwc.com/

114
115
FORESTRY HIGHLIGHTS

Economic Output:
Florida’s nearly 16 million acres of timberlands supported economic activities which generated $13.95 billion in total
output impacts in 2011. This was an 8% drop from 2010, but 3% more than in 2008 at the lowest point in the recent
economic recession (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Economic impacts of forestry, wood and paper product manufacturing industries in Florida between 2001 and 2011.

Employment:
2011 employment impacts were nearly 76,000 full and part-time jobs, which was 14,000 fewer jobs than in 2010. The
2011 employment in forestry and forest products industry represented a 17% increase over 2008 employment at the lowest
point of the recession.

Value Added:
At $6.01 billion, value added impacts were also lower in 2011 than in 2010 by 17% (Fig. 1), but still 30% higher than in
2008.

Compensation:
The pulp and paper products industry supported 75% of income paid to the labor force employed in forestry and related
industries in 2011. At 13%, forest management and logging was the next largest sector in terms of income paid out to
workers in 2011. Secondary wood products sector generated 7% of income, while lumber, veneer and panels
manufacturing paid the remaining 5% of wages and benefits in forestry-related occupations (Fig. 2).

116
Figure 2. Labor income impacts distribution among forestry, wood and paper product industry sectors in Florida, 2011.

Export Value:
At $5.15 billion in 2011, and similarly to other economic indicators, the export value of Florida’s forest products to out-
of-state destinations dropped 7% since 2010 (Fig. 3).

Figure 3. Export value of Florida’s forest products to out-of-state destinations between 2001 and 2011.

117
Fiscal Impacts:
In 2011, indirect business tax impacts of forestry and forest products industries in Florida were $401 million. Of that
amount, $310 million was generated by pulp and paper sector, $64 million by forest tract management and logging
activities, $16 million by lumber, veneer and panel manufacturing, and $11 million by secondary products manufacturing
industries.

Total other property income impacts, such as interests, rents, royalties and dividends, were $1.78 billion in 2011. The
largest share again was generated by pulp and paper manufacturing at $1.52 billion. Forest tract management and logging
activities generated $160 million, the secondary forest products sector $64 million, while lumber, veneer and panels
manufacturing generated $41 million.

Forest Ownership:
Florida timberland ownership, which supports forest products industry is 71% private (65% non-industrial, and 6% forest
industry) 15% state, 11% federal, 3% county and municipal (Fig. 4). That translates into 11.3 million acres in private
ownerships, 2.4 million acres in state, 1.7 million acres in federal and 0.5 million acres in county and municipal.

Figure 4. Florida timberland ownership by major ownership sectors, 2011.

118
Forest Distribution:
Although forests cover about 50% of the state’s land area, Florida’s timberlands are located mostly north of Orlando (Fig.
5). In the northern half of the state most counties are at least 50% forested, whereas the peninsular Florida is forested
40% or less. Liberty County in northwest Florida is the most forested with timberlands covering more than 90% of its
area. On the other hand, a number of counties in southeast Florida support less than 10% of timberland (Fig. 5).

Figure 5. Florida timberlands as percentage of county area, 2011.

Local Importance:
In 2012, there were 58 primary wood using mills in Florida (see following table). The local economic importance
of forests depends on a number of factors including proximity to markets.

Florida Primary Wood Mills:


Mills in Florida by Type and Number, 2012
Mill Type Number of Mills

Total 58
Sawmill....................................................................... 22
Mulch ......................................................................... 9
Pulp / Paper ............................................................... 6
Chip-and –Saw........................................................... 4
Post............................................................................ 4
--continued

119
Florida Primary Wood Mills:
Mills in Florida by Type and Number, 2012 (continued)
Mill Type Number of Mills

Total 58
Pole............................................................................ 3
Firewood .................................................................... 2
Horse Bedding............................................................ 2
Plywood...................................................................... 2
Chip............................................................................ 1
Pellet .......................................................................... 1
Strand Board .............................................................. 1
Veneer........................................................................ 1

The primary wood using mills in Florida are located mostly in the northern part of the state (Fig. 6) in proximity
to timberland resources. Depending on type and size, which dictates raw material needs, they have the biggest economic
impact in a zone of 50 to 75 mile radius. This corresponds to an area from which they can purchase wood in the most
economical way, providing income to local timberland owners.

Figure 6. Florida primary wood processing facilities, 2012.

120
Florida Annual Harvest removals:
By Species Type of Growing-stock Trees at least 5 inches d.b.h., 2011
Ownership group - Major
Species group
Total Public Private

(cubic feet)
Total 510,153,212 48,478,232 461,674,980
Softwoods:
Longleaf and slash pine ............................................. 318,032,269 32,396,406 285,635,863

Loblolly and shortleaf pine.......................................... 107,212,228 299,709 106,912,519


Other yellow pines...................................................... 25,577,734 13,908,518 11,669,217
Cypress...................................................................... 12,632,390 28,349 12,604,042
Other eastern softwoods ............................................ 150,470 24,237 126,233
Hardwoods:
Select white oaks ....................................................... 1,200,735 - 1,200,735
Other white oaks ........................................................ 2,601,086 266,026 2,335,060
Other red oaks ........................................................... 17,341,021 1,163,273 16,177,748
Hickory....................................................................... 2,180,810 - 2,180,810
Soft maple.................................................................. 2,120,123 89,077 2,031,046
Sweetgum .................................................................. 5,261,810 16,395 5,245,415
Tupelo and blackgum ................................................. 9,477,566 - 9,477,566
Ash ............................................................................ 2,199,110 - 2,199,110
Yellow-poplar ............................................................. 1,093,509 - 1,093,509

Other eastern soft hardwoods .................................... 2,999,973 286,243 2,713,730

Other eastern hard hardwoods ................................... 72,378 - 72,378

Source: Miles, P.D. Thu Sep 19 12:05:02 CDT 2013. Forest Inventory EVALIDator web-application version 1.5.1.05.
St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station.

121
Florida output of industrial Products:
By Product and Species Group, 2009 and 2011
Year Percent
Product and Species Group Change
2009 2011 Change

(thousand cubic feet)


Saw logs
Softwood .............................................................................. 117,773 101,464 -16,309 -13.8
Hardwood ............................................................................. 1,864 2,055 191 10.2
Total................................................................................. 119,637 103,519 -16,118 -13.5
Veneer logs
Softwood .............................................................................. 18,686 17,084 -1,602 -8.6
Hardwood ............................................................................. 1,256 1,293 37 2.9
Total................................................................................. 19,942 18,377 -1,565 -7.8
Pulpwood
Softwood .............................................................................. 249,195 264,358 15,163 6.1
Hardwood ............................................................................. 16,029 13,884 -2,145 -13.4
Total................................................................................. 265,224 278,242 13,018 4.9
1
Other industrial
Softwood .............................................................................. 68,873 64,598 -4,275 -6.2
Hardwood ............................................................................. 902 2,586 1,684 186.7
Total................................................................................. 69,775 67,184 -2,591 -3.7
All industrial
Softwood .............................................................................. 454,527 447,504 -7,023 -1.5
Hardwood ............................................................................. 20,051 19,818 -233 -1.2
Total................................................................................. 474,578 467,322 -7,256 -1.5
1
Includes composite panels, poles, posts, mulch, log homes, industrial fuelwood, and all other industrial products.

Source: Bentley J.W., Cooper J.A. and Howell M. 2013. Florida's Timber Industry - Timber Product Output and Use, 2011.
Forest Inventory and Analysis Factsheet. Asheville, NC: US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Conversion Factors1
Categories
Wood Type
Saw Logs Veneer Logs Pulpwood2
0.16912 cu ft = 0.16793 cu ft =
1 board ft 1 board ft
Softwood 76.00 cubic feet/cord
5.91 board ft = 5.95 board ft =
1 cubic foot 1 cubic foot
0.17007 cu ft = 0.16848 cu ft =
1 board ft 1 board ft
Hardwood 75.00 cubic feet/ cord
5.88 board ft = 5.94 board ft =
1 cubic foot 1 cubic foot
1
Conversion factors vary with stem size (d.b.h.) and species. The factors shown are for trees of average
diameters removed in Florida during the latest survey period.
2
Cubic feet of solid wood per cord.

Source: Bentley J.W., Cooper J.A. and Howell M. 2013. Florida's Timber Industry - Timber Product Output and Use, 2011.
Forest Inventory and Analysis Factsheet. Asheville, NC: US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

122
References:
IMPLAN software and Florida region data for 2011 (MIG, Inc.). Compiled by Alan W. Hodges, University of Florida, January 25,
2013.

Miles, P.D. March 01, 2013. Forest Inventory EVALIDator web-application version 1.5.1.04. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of
Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. [Available only on internet: http://apps.fs.fed.us/Evalidator/tmattribute.jsp]

Contact Information:
Jarek Nowak, Forest Utilization Specialist
Florida Forest Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
3125 Conner Blvd, C-25
Tallahassee, FL 323997
Phone: 850-681-5883; Fax: 850-681-5809
Email: Jarek.Nowak@FreshFromFlorida.com
http://www.floridaforestservice.com/index.html

*Disclaimer: The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services provides the data and materials on the following charts
‘as is’ and without warranties of any kind either expressed or implied. The user assumes the entire risk related to their use of this
information.

123
124
FLORIDA’S SEAPORTS

Port Canaveral
Port Canaveral is currently home to seven year-round cruise ships from three major cruise lines. Cargo activity at Port
Canaveral is expected to increase significantly with the continued growth of the 2.8 million-barrel Seaport Canaveral fuel
tank farm and the further development of bulk cargo facilities to serve the central Florida market. Principal exports for
the port include fresh citrus and single-strength juice, juice concentrates, automobiles and heavy equipment.
• Hinterland: The central and north Florida counties of Brevard, Polk, Indian River, Lake Okeechobee,
Orange, Osceola, Seminole, Volusia and Southeast U.S.

Port Citrus
The effort behind Port Citrus is to establish a public port within Citrus County to grow the economic vitality and quality
of life in the area. The concept behind Port Citrus is to take full advantage of a valuable asset: the Cross Florida Barge
Canal.

Port Everglades
Port Everglades is one of the nation’s leading container ports and south Florida’s main seaport for receiving petroleum
products including gasoline, jet fuel and alternative fuels. The total value of economic activity at Port Everglades in FY
2011 (latest data available) was approximately $15.3 billion. More than 160,000 Florida jobs are impacted by the port,
including almost 11,400 people who work for companies that provide direct services to Port Everglades.
• Hinterland: Primarily southeastern Florida extending northward to a 24-county area (including Pasco,
Polk, Osceola and Brevard), south Monroe, and west to the Gulf of Mexico. In trade with
Latin America, the hinterland is the entire U.S.

Port of Fernandina
The Port of Fernandina provides terminal service to numerous pulp and paper producers located throughout Florida and
the Southeast. The containerized commodities moving through the port include wood pulp, automobile and truck parts,
steel products, chemicals, beverages, food stuff, machinery, consumer goods and building materials.
• Hinterland: The southeastern U.S. and gulf states; major metropolitan areas include Tampa, Orlando,
Jacksonville, Atlanta and New Orleans. As the most westerly port on the East Coast, the
Midwest and the Great Lakes region can also be served efficiently.

Port of Fort Pierce


St. Lucie County owns 20 acres at the port, adjacent to 67 acres owned privately, as well as 12 acres that house the
privately owned Indian River Terminal. The port’s privately-held facilities have served bulk, containerized and other
general cargo traffic moving into the Bahamian and Caribbean islands. Principal imports, through the private terminals,
have been aragonite and cement.
• Hinterland: St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee, Highlands, Hendry, Glades and Martin counties.

Port of Jacksonville
The Jacksonville Port Authority (JAXPORT) is an independent agency responsible for the development of public seaport
facilities in Jacksonville. It owns three cargo facilities and a cruise terminal, and according to a 2009 study, generates
65,000 jobs and more than $19 billion in annual economic impact for the north Florida region.
• Hinterland: Primarily defined as the U.S. Southeast and Midwest. Jacksonville’s geographic location
allows JAXPORT inbound cargo to reach 50 million consumers and 60 percent of the U.S.
population within a 24-hour truck drive.

125
Port of Key West
The Port of Key West includes cruise berths at Mallory Square, the Navy’s Outer Mole Pier, and the privately owned Pier
B at the Weston Resort. The port brings in almost a million total passengers per year resulting in a local business impact
of approximately $85 million. The port also provides 1,260 direct and indirect jobs to the citizens of Key West and
contributes 15 percent of the city’s total tax revenue.
• Hinterland: U.S. cruise homeports, Florida west coast ferry ports, city of Key West and Monroe County.

Port Manatee
Port Manatee is a multi-purpose deepwater seaport on Tampa Bay serving bulk, breakbulk, container, heavy-lift/project
and general cargo customers. Comprised of 1,100 acres, Port Manatee is supported by nearly 4,000 acres of land located
just outside the port’s gates.
• Hinterland: Florida counties within a 100-mile radius including Lee, Charlotte, DeSoto, Sarasota,
Hardee, Polk, Hillsborough, Highlands, Pasco, Hernando, Pinellas and Manatee, as well as
the U.S. Southeast, eastern U.S. and Midwest/Chicago area.

PortMiami
PortMiami has been recognized around the globe with the dual distinction of being the Cruise Capital of the World and
the Cargo Gateway of the Americas. The port continues to be a powerful economic engine contributing more than $27
billion annually to the Florida economy and supporting more than 207,000 jobs.
• Hinterland: For east-west trade the hinterland extends from the south Florida counties of Miami-Dade,
Broward, Monroe and Palm Beach throughout the state. For north-south trade it includes all
of Florida and extends into the Southeast, Northeast and Midwest.

Port of Palm Beach


The Port of Palm Beach generates approximately 2,850 jobs in its community. The 160-acre port is located 80 miles
north of the city of Miami and has a 300-foot wide inlet channel. The Port of Palm Beach is an important distribution
center for commodities being shipped all over the world, and especially the Caribbean Basin. Operations include
containerized, dry bulk, liquid bulk, breakbulk, roll on/roll off and heavy-lift/project cargoes.
• Hinterland: Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Okeechobee, Highlands, Glades, Hendry, Brevard, Indian
River, Monroe, Miami-Dade, Broward, Hillsborough and Orange counties.

Port Panama City


Port Panama City handles more than 1.5 million tons of cargo per year including containerized cargo, copper cathodes,
steel plate, steel coils, kraft paper, wood pellets and aggregates. The port provides essential support service for five major
manufacturing companies, including two located on the port.
• Hinterland: Northwest Florida, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee.

Port of Pensacola
From its early shipments of regionally harvested lumber, locally made bricks and sailing ship masts, to the locally
manufactured paper and power plant components being moved today, the Port of Pensacola has always existed, at least in
part, to serve local and regional business interests.
• Hinterland: Southeastern and Midwestern U.S. roughly bounded by the Great Lakes to the north, the
Mississippi River to the west, the Gulf of Mexico to the south and the Atlantic Ocean to the
east.

Port of Port St. Joe


Located in Gulf County, Florida, the Port of Port St. Joe offers a deepwater seaport with two separate bulkheads – one
featuring nearly 1,900 linear feet at the ship channel turning basin and the other offering nearly 900 linear feet on the
Intracoastal Waterway.
• Hinterland: North Florida, Alabama and Georgia.

126
Port of St. Petersburg
The Port of St. Petersburg, located on Tampa Bay, is exploring opportunities to attract mega yachts, research and other
vessels, as well as to further enhance the benefits of a new Research and Development Center on the eastern end of the
port.
• Hinterland: Port users would come from other parts of Florida and from around the world as the port
focuses on the mega yacht business sector.

Port of Tampa
The Port of Tampa is largest of the Florida ports by tonnage and area. It is a vital energy products gateway to West
Central Florida and an important global distribution point for fertilizer. The port accommodates a broad mix of bulk,
breakbulk, roll on/roll off, neo-bulk and container cargo.
• Hinterland: Central Florida for energy, building, citrus and fertilizer products. As for container cargo,
Florida, and through CSX, the U.S. Midwest and entire eastern seaboard.

*Source: All above information on Florida’s ports is available from the Florida Ports Council for more information please visit:
http://www.flaports.org/Assets/3132013104713AM_State_of_Florida_Ports_2013_Florida_Ports_Councilweb.pdf

127
128
FLORIDA EXPORTS INFORMATION

In 2012, Florida Ranked 7th among the states in the United States
with agricultural exports topping $4 billion, according to Euromonitor International.

Florida Agricultural exports1


Leading Exports Ranked by Year 2012
Year
Commodity Group
2009 2010 2011 2012
(dollars)
1. Meat, Fresh & Frozen ....................................... 331,533,794 355,339,523 545,746,365 594,760,211

2. Vegetables, Fruit, Juices................................... 342,616,044 417,739,113 533,271,774 504,115,122

3. Edible Fruits, Nuts ............................................ 403,474,273 419,033,229 440,792,541 421,383,285

4. Edible Vegetables............................................. 277,060,517 255,386,137 297,979,358 271,593,381

5. Fish, Crustaceans............................................. 167,850,219 206,393,064 279,515,441 255,806,854

6. Dairy Products .................................................. 103,401,253 110,351,011 136,490,240 166,319,710

7. Prepared Meat and Fish ................................... 70,587,086 79,289,504 94,669,933 108,226,105

8. Live Trees & Plants........................................... 106,560,221 107,391,474 105,759,295 77,051,804

9. Sugars .............................................................. 51,705,417 50,181,510 60,581,225 75,545,984


10. Live animals...................................................... 52,272,578 48,659,293 43,304,512 36,431,889
1
Source: Euromonitor International – http://www.euromonitor.com/

Florida’s Agriculture importers1


Leading Importers Ranked by Year 2012
Importers 2009 2010 2011 2012

World 2,917,705,395 3,149,573,825 3,927,611,416 4,041,350,679


1. Canada ........................................................... 827,259,458 842,794,594 991,104,542 962,694,536
2. Netherlands..................................................... 170,875,945 186,161,891 265,328,518 251,922,548
3. Bahamas......................................................... 162,487,189 164,044,057 178,746,073 189,784,295
4. Dominican Republic ........................................ 134,160,248 146,079,052 154,291,054 180,337,993
5. Panama........................................................... 78,431,039 99,506,422 143,169,584 168,422,502
1
Source: Euromonitor International – http://www.euromonitor.com/

129
170 countries and territories imported Florida agricultural commodities in 2012.

Florida Agricultural Exports


$4,000 $4,041
$3,928
Millions US Dollars

$3,500

$3,071 $3,150
$3,000 $2,918
$2,719
$2,500
$2,255

$2,000 $1,863 $1,959 $2,056

$1,500
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Number of Foreign Importers


180
177
175
173
170 170
166
165
162
160
157
156
155 153
151 152
150
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Florida Around
the World

130
Florida Agriculture CONTACTS

Table of Contents
Florida Agricultural Groups..........................................................................................................132

Aquaculture..................................................................................................................................................132

Cattle............................................................................................................................................................132

Citrus...........................................................................................................................................................133

Dairy............................................................................................................................................................135


Education.....................................................................................................................................................135

Equine..........................................................................................................................................................136


Fruits, Vegetables and Nuts..........................................................................................................................137


Forestry........................................................................................................................................................138

Horticultural................................................................................................................................................138


Miscellaneous...............................................................................................................................................139

Farm Credit Associations...................................................................................................................................... 141

Florida Cooperative Extension Service and Extension IFAS/UF Office Locations................................................ 141

Florida Fairs and Expositions................................................................................................................................ 147

Florida Farm Bureau Offices................................................................................................................................. 152

USDA Service Centers........................................................................................................................................... 156

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Divisions and Offices............................................. 170

Agriculture Statistics and Other Information......................................................................................................174

131
Florida Agriculture Groups Southeastern Fisheries Association, Inc.
1118-B Thomasville Road
Important users of agricultural statistics are farm Tallahassee, Florida 32303
organizations, agribusiness and transportation firms, Phone: (850) 224-0612
state and national policy makers and foreign buyers Fax: (850) 222-3663
of agricultural products. These vital Florida Agricul- Website: www.seafoodsustainability.us
ture Groups provide the majority of the data collected
through a broad program of sample surveys throughout Cattle
the year.
Florida Angus Association
Aquaculture 8448 S.E. 3rd Court
Ocala, Florida 34480
Florida Aquatic Plant Growers Association Phone: (352) 854-0536
Florida Aquatic Nurseries, Inc. Website: www.floridaangusassociation.com
700 South Flamingo Road
Davie, Florida 33325 Florida Association of Livestock Markets
Phone: (954) 472-5120 Post Office Box 421929
Fax: (954) 472-5446 Kissimmee, Florida 34742
Website: www.floridaaquatic.com Phone: (407) 846-4557
Fax: (407) 933-8209
Aquatic Plants of Florida, Inc. Email: fbcpmg@aol.com
Habitat Restoration & Farm Direct Native Plants
8120 Blaikie Court Florida Barzona Breeders Association
Sarasota, Florida 34240 8485 Croom Rital Road
Phone: (941) 378-2700 Brooksville, Florida 34602
Fax: (941) 378-0200 Phone: (352) 799-0086
Website: www.apofl.com Website: www.lakeorioleranch.com

Florida Aquaculture Association Florida Braford Breeders Association


Post Office Box 1519 Adams Ranch
Winter Haven, Florida 33882 Post Office Box 12909
Phone: (863) 293-5710 Fort Pierce, Florida 34979
Fax: (863) 299-5154 Phone: (772) 461-6321
Email: DBoozer1@aol.com Fax: (772) 461-6874
Website: www.flaa.org Website: www.adamsranch.com

Florida Tropical Fish Farms Association Florida Brahman Association


Post Office Box 1519 6001 Canoe Creek Road
Winter Haven, Florida 33882 Saint Cloud, Florida 34772
Phone: (863) 293-5710 Phone: (407) 908-9866
Fax: (863) 299-5154 Email: info@floridabrahman.org
Email: flassn@aol.com Website: www.floridabrahman.org
Website: www.ftffa.com

132
Florida Cattlemen’s Association National Cattlemen’s Beef Association –
Physical Address: Legislative Issues Branch
800 Shakerag Road 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue North West, Suite 300
Kissimmee, Florida 34744 Washington, D.C. 20004
Mailing Address: Phone: (202) 347-0228
Post Office Box 421929 Fax: (202) 638-0607
Kissimmee, Florida 34742-1929
Phone: (407) 846-6221 West Florida Livestock Association
Fax: (407) 933-8209 2140 West Jefferson Street
Website: www.floridacattlemen.org Quincy, Florida 32351
Phone: (850) 875-7255
Florida Cracker Cattle Association Fax: (850) 875-7257
Florida Department of Agriculture Email: gadsden@ufl.edu
and Consumer Services
Division of Animal Industry Citrus
407 South Calhoun Street
Mayo Building, Room 327 Citrus Administrative Committee
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0800 Post Office Box 24508
Phone: (850) 410-0944 Lakeland, Florida 33802-4508
Fax: (850) 410-0957 Phone: (863) 682-3103
Email: Stephen.Monroe@freshfromflorida.com Fax: (863) 683-9563
Email: info@citrusadministrativecommittee.org
Florida Limousin Breeders Association Website: www.citrusadministrativecommittee.org
12450 91st Street
Fellsmere, Florida 32948 Florida Citrus Commission
Phone: (772) 571-1119 P.O. Box 9010
Bartow, Florida 33831-9010
Florida Red Brangus Association Phone: (863) 537-3999
28616 Northwest 142 Ave.
High Springs, Florida 32643 Florida Citrus Mutual
Phone: (352) 226-0538 Post Office Box 89
Website: www.marvelfarms.com Lakeland, Florida 33802
Phone: (863) 682-1111
Florida Santa Gertrudis Association Fax: (863) 682-1074
55404 Terrell Farms Road Email: info@flcitrusmutual.com
Callahan, Florida 32011 Website: www.flcitrusmutual.com
Hilda Edenfield
Phone: (850) 762-8388 Florida Citrus Packers
Post Office Box 1113
National Cattlemen’s Beef Association – Lakeland, Florida 33802-1113
Headquarters Phone: (863) 682-0151
9110 East Nichols Avenue, Suite 300 Fax: (863) 688-6758
Centennial, Colorado 80112
Phone: (303) 694-0305
Fax: (303) 694-2851
Website: www.beefusa.org

133
Florida Citrus Nurserymen’s Association Haines City Citrus Growers Association
IFAS Southwest Center #8 Railroad Avenue
2686 State Road 29 N Post Office Box 337
Immokalee, Florida 34142-9515 Haines City, Florida 33845
Phone: (863) 422-1174
Florida Citrus Processors Association Website: www.hilltopcitrus.com
1611 Harden Blvd.
Lakeland, Florida 33803 Highlands County Citrus Growers Association
Phone: (863) 680-9908 6419 US 27 South
Fax: (863) 683-2849 Sebring, Florida 33876
Website: www.fcplanet.org Phone: (863) 385-8091
Fax: (863) 385-6829
Florida Department of Citrus Scientific Research Email: feedback@hccga.com
700 Experiment Station Road Website: www.hccga.com
Lake Alfred, Florida 33850
Phone: (863) 295-5950 Indian River Citrus League
Fax: (863) 295-5920 7925 20th Street
Vero Beach, Florida 32966
Florida Department of Citrus Phone: 1-800-435-5727
Mailing Address: (772) 562-2728
Post Office Box 9010 Fax: (772) 562-2577
Bartow, Florida 33831-9010 Email: info@ircitrusleague.org
Physical Address: Website: www.ircitrusleague.org
Bob Crawford Agricultural Center
605 E. Main Street Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association
Bartow, Florida 33830 10 East Oak Street, Suite B
Phone: (863) 537-3999 Arcadia, Florida 34266
Fax: 1-877-FLA-CITRUS Phone: (863) 494-0061
Fax: (863) 494-4976
Florida Gift Fruit Shippers Association Email: oj@prvcitrus.org
5500 West Concord Avenue Website: www.prvcitrus.org
Orlando, Florida 32808-7700
Phone: (407) 295-1491 Showcase of Citrus
Fax: (407) 290-0918 5010 Highway 27
Email: info@fgfsa.com Clermont, Florida 34714
Website: www.fgfsa.com Phone: (352) 394-4377
Website: www.showcaseofcitrus.com
Gulf Citrus Growers Association
11741 Palm Beach Blvd., Suite 202 Winter Garden Citrus Growers Association
Fort Myers, Florida 33905 Mailing Address:
Phone: (239) 690-0281 Post Office Box 770069
Fax: (239) 690-0857 Winter Garden, Florida 34777-0069
Website: www.gulfcitrus.org Physical Address:
75 2nd Street
Winter Garden, Florida 34787
Phone: (407) 656-4423

134
Dairy Sunbelt Milk Producers, Inc
19039 121st Road
Ag-Ad Agency, Inc. McAlpin, Florida 32062
166 Lookout Place, Suite 101
Maitland, Florida 32751 Education
Phone: (407) 645-1950
Fax: (407) 647-0606 Ag Institute of Florida
Post Office Box 940625
American Dairy Goat Association Maitland, Florida 32794-0625
Post Office Box 865 Email: info@aginstitute.org
Spindale, North Carolina 28160 Website: www.aiflorida.org
Phone: (828) 286-3801
Fax: (828) 287-0476 Florida Ag in the Classroom, Inc.
Email: ADGA@adga.org Post Office Box 110015
Website: www.adga.org Gainesville, Florida 32611-0015
Phone: (352) 846-1391
Florida Fax: (352) 846-1390
Dairy Farmers, Inc. Email: faitc@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
166 Lookout Place, Suite 100 Website: www.flagintheclassroom.com
Maitland, Florida 32751
Phone: (407) 647-8899 Florida A&M University Agricultural Sciences
Fax: (407) 647-0606 306 South Perry Paige Building
Website: www.floridamilk.com Tallahassee, Florida 32307
Phone: (850) 599-3383
Florida Dairy Goat Association Fax: (850) 412-7603
Post Office Box 45
Lamont, Florida 32336 Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Email: admin@sweetgumminis.com University Of Florida
Website: www.fdga.org Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Post Office Box 110210
Florida Dairy Products Association Gainesville, Florida 32611-0210
2834 Remington Green Circle Suite 101 Phone: (352) 392-1761
Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Fax: (352) 846-0458
Phone: (850) 878-3447 Website: www.solutionsforyourlife.ufl.edu
Fax: (850) 878-0454
Email: fdpa@fdpa.net Florida 4-H Youth Development
Website: www.fdpa.net University of Florida
3101 McCarty Hall B
Southeast Milk, Inc. Post Office Box 110225
1950 South East County Highway 484 Gainesville, Florida 32611-0225
Belleview, Florida 34420 Phone: (352) 846-0996
Phone: 1-800-598-7866 Fax: (352) 846-0999
Fax: (352) 245-9434 Email: fourh@ifas.ufl.edu
Email: info@southeastmilk.org Website: www.florida4h.org
Website: www.southeastmilk.org

135
Florida FFA Association Florida Quarter Horse Association
5700 SW 34th Street, Suite 106 Post Office Box 325
Gainesville, Florida 32608 Laurel, Florida 34272
Phone: (352) 378-0060 Phone: (941) 321-3247
Fax: (352) 378-6061 Fax: (941) 426-0000
Website: www.flaffa.org Email: FQHAsecretary@aol.com
Website: www.fqha.net
Florida FFA Leadership Training Center
5000 Firetower Road Florida Quarter Horse Racing Association
Haines City, Florida 33844 9085 Magnolia Hill Drive
Phone: (863) 439-7332 Tallahassee, Florida 32309
Fax: (863) 439-2995 Phone: (850) 345-4777
Email: ggbartley@floridaffafoundation.org Website: www.fqhra.com
Website: www.flaltc.org
The Florida Cracker Horse Association
Wedgworth Leadership Institute for Agriculture 2992 Lake Bradford Road South
and Natural Resources Tallahassee, Florida 32310
Post Office Box 112060 Phone: (850) 575-6522
121 Bryant Hall Website: www.floridacrackerhorses.com
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611 Florida Morgan Horse Association
Phone: (352) 392-1038 4005 57th Street E.
Fax: (352) 392-0589 Palmetto, Florida 34221
Website: www.wedgworthleadership.com Rich Davis
Phone: (727) 421-2387
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) Website: www.fmha.net
Post Office Box 110270
Gainesville, Florida 32611-0270 The Sunshine State Horse Council, Inc.
Phone: (352) 392-1963 Post Office Box 6663
Website: www.cals.ufl.edu Brandon, Florida 33508-6011
Phone: (813) 651-5953
Equine Website: www.sshc.org

Florida Foxtrotter Association Paso Fino Horse Association, Inc.


Post Office Box 3695 Post Office Box 836570
Belleview, Florida 34421 Miami, Florida 33283
Phone: (352) 843-5315 Phone: (305) 551-1428
Website: www.floridafoxtrotters.org Email: info@floridapfha.org
Website: www.floridapfha.org
Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’
and Owners’ Associations Florida Standardbred Breeders and Owners
801 South West 60th Avenue Association
Ocala, Florida 34474 1800 South West 3rd Street
Phone: (352) 629-2160 Pompano Beach, Florida 33069
Fax: (352) 629-3603 Phone: (954) 972-5400
Email: info@ftboa.com Fax: (954) 978-9070
Website: www.ftboa.com Website: www.myfsboa.com

136
Flordia Paint Horse Club Florida Organic Growers and Consumers, Inc.
10051 South East County Road 763 Post Office Box 12311
Arcadia, Florida 34266 Gainesville, Florida 32604
Phone: (863) 494-6686 Phone: (352) 377-6345
Website: www.floridapainthorseclub.com Fax: (352) 377-8363
Website: www.foginfo.org
Florida Palomino Exhibitors Association
Post Office Box 337 Florida Peanut Producers Association
Sumterville, Florida 33585 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 1
Phone: (352) 302-9128 Marianna, Florida 32448
Email: FloridaPalomino@hotmail.com Phone: (850) 526-2590
Website: www.floridapalomino.com Fax: (850) 526-2277
Website: www.flpeanuts.com
Florida Reining Horse Association
Post Office Box 770190 Florida Strawberry Growers Association
Ocala, Florida 34477 13138 Lewis Gallagher Road
Website: www.frha.com Dover, Florida 33527
Phone: (813) 752-6822
Florida Fruit, Vegetable and Nuts Fax: (813) 752-2167
Website: www.flastrawberry.com
Florida Avocado Administrative Committee
Post Office Box 900188 Florida Sugarcane League
Homestead, Florida 33090-0188 Post Office Drawer 1208
Phone: (305) 247-0848 Clewiston, Florida 33440
Fax: (305) 245-1315 Phone: (863) 983-9151
Email: avocadocommittee@bellsouth.net Fax: (863) 983-2792

Florida Blueberry Growers Association Florida Sweet Corn Council


Post Office Box 646 Post Office Box 948153
Bartow, Florida 33831 Maitland, Florida 32794
Phone: (863) 255-3557 Phone: (321) 214-5200
Email: flbbga@gmail.com Fax: (321) 214-0210
Website: www.floridablueberrygrowers.com Website: www.freshsupersweetcorn.com

Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association Florida Tomato Committee


Post Office Box 948153 800 Trafalgar Court, Suite 300
800 Trafalgar Court, Suite 200 Maitland, Florida 32751
Maitland, Florida 32794-8153 Phone: (407) 660-1949
Phone: (321) 214-5200 Fax: (407) 660-1656
Fax: (321) 214-0210 Website: www.floridatomatoes.org
Website: www.ffva.com
Florida Watermelon Association
Florida Grape Growers Association 1255 North 15th Street, Unit 7
111 Yelvington Road, Suite 1 Immokalee, Florida 34142
East Palatka, Florida 32131 Phone: (239) 658-1442
Phone: (386) 329-0318 Fax: (239) 658-1448
Fax: (386) 329-1262 Email: patty@flfwa.com
Website: www.fgga.org Website: www.flfwa.com

137
Gadsden County Tomato Growers Association Florida Forestry Association
2140 West Jefferson Street Post Office Box 1696
Quincy, Florida 32351 Tallahassee, Florida 32302
Phone: (850) 875-7255 Phone: (850) 222-5646
Fax: (850) 875-7257 Fax: (850) 222-6179
E-mail: info@forestfla.org
National Watermelon Promotional Board Website: www.floridaforest.org
3361 Rouse Road, Suite 150
Orlando, Florida 32817 Florida Society of American Foresters
Toll Free: 1-877-599-9595 3890 North Longvalley Road
Phone: (407) 657-0261 Hernando, Florida 34442
Fax: (407) 657-2213 Phone: (863) 670-0734
Email: info@watermelon.org Fax: (352) 588-2206
Website: www.watermelon.org Email: erich@nrpsforesters.com
Website: www.flsaf.org
Peanut Advisory Council
24486 US Highway 139 Southeastern Wood Producers Association, Inc.
O’Brien, Florida 32971 Post Office Box 9
Phone: (386) 935-1451 Hilliard, Florida 32046
Phone: (904) 845-7133
Quincy Tomato Growers Exchange, Inc. Fax: (904) 845-7345
Post Office Box 948153 Website: www.sewpa.com
Maitland, Florida 32794
Phone: (321) 214-5200 Southern Pine Inspection Bureau
Fax: (321) 214-0210 Post Office Box 10915
Pensacola, Florida 32524-0915
Sugarcane Growers Cooperative Phone: (850) 434-2611
Post Office Box 666 Fax: (850) 433-5594
Belle Glade, Florida 33430-0666 Website: www.spib.org
Phone: (561) 996-5556
Fax: (561) 996-4780 Horticultural
Email: info@scgc.org
Website: www.scgc.org Association of Florida Native Nurseries
Post Office Box 972
Tropical Fruit Advisory Council and Tropical Fruit Melbourne, Florida 32902
Growers of South Florida Phone: (321) 917-1960
24801 Southwest 248th Street Fax: (815) 927-0128
Homestead, Florida 33030 Website: www.afnn.org
Phone: (305) 247-5727
Website: www.tropicalfruitgrowers.com Florida Federation of Garden Clubs
1400 South Denning Drive
Forestry Winter Park, Florida 32789-5662
Phone: (407) 647-7016
Florida Christmas Tree Association Fax: (407) 647-5479
443 Cody Drive Email: FFGC@earthlink.net
Orange Park, Florida 32068 Website: www.ffgc.org
Phone: (904) 272-3890
Website: www.flchristmastrees.com

138
Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc. Miscellaneous
Post Office Box 110200
Gainesville, Florida 32611-0200 Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services,
Phone: (850) 594-4721 USDA-Veterinary Services
Fax: (850) 594-1068 8100 North West 15th Place
Website: www.ffsp.net Gainesville, Florida 32606
Phone: (352) 313-3060
Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Fax: (352) 313-3063
Association Website: www.aphis.usda.gov
(Florida Citrus Nurserymen’s Association is now part of
FNGLA) Florida Agricultural Advisory Council
1533 Park Center Drive The Capitol, LL28
Orlando, Florida 32835-5705 Tallahassee, Florida 32399
Phone: 1-800-375-3642 Phone: (850) 488-3022
(407) 295-7994 Fax: (850) 488-7585
Fax: (407) 295-1619
Email: info@fngla.org Florida Agricultural Aviation Association
Website: www.fngla.org 2720 Sneed Road
Fort Pierce, Florida 34945-4711
Florida State Horticultural Society, Inc. Phone: (772) 465-0714
Citrus Research and Education Center Fax: (772) 461-9050
700 Experiment Station Road
Lake Alfred, Florida 33850-2299 Florida Farm Bureau Marketing Division
Phone: (863) 956-1151 7705 US Highway 441
Fax: (703) 836-2024 Leesburg, Florida 34788
Email: fshs@crec.ifas.ufl.edu Phone: 1-800-654-0941
Website: www.fshs.org (352) 728-1561
Fax: (352) 728-5838
Florida Turfgrass Association Website: www.fwffb.com
120 East Pine Street, Suite 1
Lakeland, Florida 33801 Florida Feed Association
Phone: (800) 882-6721 Post Office Box 10471
Website: www.ftga.org Tampa, Florida 33679-0471
Phone: (813) 620-9007
Tampa Bay Wholesale Growers Association Fax: (813) 620-3624
2404 Airport Road Email: robbieg@mannapro.com
Plant City, Florida 33563 Website: www.floridafeed.com
Phone: (813) 655-1914
Website: www.tbwg.org Florida Fertilizer and Agrichemical Association
411 East Orange Street
Wildflower Seed and Plant Growers Lakeland, Florida 33801
Association, Inc. Phone: (863) 686-4827
Post Office Box 776 Fax: (863) 682-8626
Crescent City, Florida 32112 Website: www.ffaa.org
Phone: (352) 988-8117
Website: www.floridawildflowers.com

139
Florida Mosquito Control Association Florida State Beekeepers Association
11625 Landing Place 5002 North West 64th Lane
North Palm Beach, Florida 33408 Gainesville, Florida 32653
Phone: (855) 687-3622 Website: www.floridabeekeepers.org
Website: www.floridamosquito.org
Florida State Grange
Florida Pest Management Association 3915 38th Avenue East
6882 Edgewater Commerce Parkway Palmetto, Florida 34221
Orlando, Florida 32810 Phone: (941) 729-8036
Phone: 1-800-426-4829
(407) 293-8627 Florida Association of Wholesale Distributors, Inc.
Fax: (407) 292-0918 Post Office Box 3739
Website: www.flpma.org Lakeland, Florida 33802
Phone: (863) 688-0007
Florida Petroleum Marketers Association Fax: (863) 688-0002
209 Office Plaza Drive Website: www.fawd.org
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
Phone: 1-800-523-9166 Florida Trucking Association
(850) 877-5178 350 East College Avenue
Fax: (850) 877-5864 Tallahassee, Florida 32301-1565
Website: www.fpma.org Phone: (850) 222-9900
Fax: (850) 222-9363
Florida Pork Improvement Group Website: www.fltrucking.org
Post Office Box 147030
Gainesville, Florida 32614-7030 Florida Veterinary Medical Association
Phone: (352) 374-1542 7207 Monetary Drive
Fax: (352) 374-1592 Orlando, Florida 32809
Phone: 1-800-992-3862
Florida Poultry Federation (407) 851-3862
1625 Summit Lake Drive, Suite 300 Fax: (407) 240-3710
Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Website: www.fvma.com
Phone: (850) 402-2930
Fax: (850) 402-0139 Meat Sheep Alliance of Florida
7112 County Road 214
Florida Propane Gas Association Melrose, Florida 32666
Post Office Box 11026 Email: amy@msasheep.com
Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Website: http://msasheep.com
Phone: (850) 681-0496
Fax: (850) 222-7892 The Mosaic Company
Website: www.floridapropane.org 13830 Circa Crossing Drive
Lithia, Florida 33547
Florida Retail Federation www.mosaicfla.com
227 South Adams Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
Phone: (888) 357-3824
Fax: (850) 561-6625
Website: www.frf.org

140
Perennial Peanut Producers Association Farm Credit of Northwest Florida
Post Office Box 352 Post Office Box 7000
Madison, Florida 32341 Marianna, Florida 32447
Phone: (850) 973-2399 Phone: 1-800-527-0647
Email: pppa@perennialpeanuthay.org (850) 526-4910
Website: www.perennialpeanuthay.org Fax: (850) 482-6597
Email: info@farmcredit-fl.com
Southeastern Meat Association Website: www.farmcredit-fl.com
Post Office Box 620777
Oviedo, Florida 32762
Phone: (407) 365-5661
Florida Cooperative
Email: info@southeasternmeat.com Extension Service
Website: www.southeasternmeat.com
and Extension IFAS/UF
Viticulture Advisory Council Office Locations
19239 US Highway 27 North
Clermont, Florida 34711 Extension service is a partnership between state, federal,
Phone: (352) 394-8627 and county governments to provide scientific knowledge
Fax: (352) 394-7490 and expertise to the public. The University of Florida
(UF), together with Florida A&M University (FAMU),
administers the Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
Farm Credit Associations
At the University of Florida, Extension service is lo-
Part of the nationwide Farm Credit system, created by
cated in the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Congress in 1916 to provide rural America with a de-
(IFAS), along with the College of Agricultural and Life
pendable source of funding for agriculture and agricul-
Sciences (CALS) and the Florida Agricultural Research
ture-related enterprises.
and Education Center, and is called UF/IFAS Extension.
Farm Credit of Central Florida
UF/IFAS Extension encompasses thousands of Exten-
115 South Missouri Avenue, Suite 400
sion faculty members, scientists, educators, administra-
Lakeland, Florida 33815
tive staff, and volunteers, all working to provide solu-
Phone: (863) 682-4117
tions for your life.
Fax: (863) 688-9364
Email: marketing@farmcreditCFL.com
www.solutionsforyourlife.com is the web site of Univer-
Website: www.farmcreditcfl.com
sity of Florida Extension Service. You can explore topics
in lawn and garden care, family life and consumer
Farm Credit of Florida
choices, agriculture, community development, the envi-
Post Office Box 213069
ronment, and youth development. Above all, our site is
West Palm Beach, Florida 33421
focused on getting you timely and relevant solutions for
Phone: (561) 965-9001
improving your life.
(800) 432-4156
Fax: (561) 965-9099
Website: www.farmcreditfl.com

141
Florida Cooperative Extension Service – Broward County Extension Office
State Office (Florida) 3245 College Avenue
University of Florida Davie, Florida 33314-7719
Post Office Box 110210 Phone: (954) 357-5270
Gainesville, Florida 32611 Fax: (954)-357-5271
Phone: (352) 392-1761 Website: http://www.broward.org/extension
Fax: (352) 846-0458
Calhoun County Extension Office
Alachua County Extension Office 20816 Central Avenue East, Suite 1
2800 North East 39th Avenue Blountstown, Florida 32424
Gainesville, Florida 32609-2658 Phone: (850) 674-8323
Phone: (352) 955-2402 Fax: (850) 674-8353
Email: alachua@ifas.ufl.us Email: calhoun@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://alachua.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://calhoun.ifas.ufl.edu

Baker County Extension Office Charlotte County Extension Office


1025 West Macclenny Avenue 25550 Harbor View Road, Suite 3
Macclenny, Florida 32063-9640 Port Charlotte, Florida 33980
Phone: (904) 259-3520 Phone: (941) 764-4340
Email: baker@ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (941) 764-4343
Website: http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/ Website: http://charlotte.ifas.ufl.edu

Bay County Extension Office Citrus County Extension Office


Bay County Extension 3650 West Sovereign Path, Suite 1
2728 E. 14th Street Lecanto, Florida 34461
Panama City, Florida 32401-5022 Phone: (352) 527-5700
Phone: (850) 784-6105 Fax: (352) 527-5749
Fax: (850) 784-6107 Email: extension@bocc.citrus.fl.us
Email: bay@ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://citrus.ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/
Clay County Extension Office
Bradford County Cooperative Extension Service 2463 State Road 16 West
2266 North Temple Avenue Green Cove Springs, Florida 32043-0278
Starke, Florida 32091-1612 Phone: (904) 284-6355
Phone: (904) 966-6224 (904) 269-6355
(904) 966-6299 Fax: (904) 529-9776
Email: bradford@mail.ifas.ufl.edu Email: clay@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://bradford.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://clay.ifas.ufl.edu

Brevard County Extension Office Collier County Extension Office


3695 Lake Drive 14700 Immokalee Road
Cocoa, Florida 32926-4219 Naples, Florida 34120-1468
Phone: (321) 633-1702 Phone: (239) 353-4244
Fax: (321) 633-1890 Email: collier@ifas.ufl.edu
Email: brevard@ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://collier.ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://brevard.ifas.ufl.edu

142
Columbia County Extension Office Franklin County Extension Office
164 South West Mary Ethel Lane 66 Fourth Street
Lake City, Florida 32025 Apalachicola, Florida 32320-1775
Phone: (386) 752-5384 Phone: (850) 653-9337
Fax: (386) 758-2173 Fax: (850) 653-9447
Email: columbia@ifas.ufl.edu Email: franklin@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://columbia.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu

DeSoto County Extension Office Gadsden County Extension Office


2150 North East Roan Street 2140 West Jefferson Street
Arcadia, Florida 34266-5025 Quincy, Florida 32351-1905
Phone: (863) 993-4846 Phone: (850) 875-7255
Fax: (863) 993-4849 Fax: (850) 875-7257
Email: desoto@ifas.ufl.edu Email: gadsden@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://gadsden.ifas.ufl.edu

Dixie County Extension Office Gilchrist County Extension Office


99 North East 121st Street 125 East Wade Street
Cross City, Florida 32628 Trenton, Florida 32693
Phone: (352) 498-1237 Phone: (352) 463-3174
Fax: (352) 498-1471 Fax: (352) 463-3197
Email: HVHoughton@ifas.ufl.edu Email: gilchrist@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://dixie.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://gilchrist.ifas.ufl.edu

Duval County Extension Office Glades County Extension Office


1010 North McDuff Avenue 900 US Highway 27
Jacksonville, Florida 32254 SW Moore Haven, Florida 33471
Phone: (904) 387-8850 Phone: (863) 946-0244
Email: duval@ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (863) 946-0629
Website: http://duval.ifas.ufl.edu Email: tyceerprevatt@ufl.edu
Website: http://glades.ifas.ufl.edu
Escambia County Extension Office
3740 Stefani Road Gulf County Extension Office
Cantonment, Florida 32533-7792 200 North 2nd Street
Phone: (850) 475-5230 Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
Fax: (850) 475-5233 Phone: (850) 639-3200
Email: escambia@ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (850) 639-3201
Website: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu Email: gulf@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu
Flagler County Extension Office
150 Sawgrass Road Hamilton County Extension Office
Bunnell, Florida 32110 1143 North West US Highway 41
Phone: (386) 437-7464 Jasper, Florida 32052-5856
Fax: (386) 586-2102 Phone: (386) 792-1276
Email: mcreamer@flaglercounty.org Fax: (386) 792-6446
Website: http://www.flaglercounty.org/index. Email: hamilton@ifas.ufl.edu
aspx?nid=110 Website: http://hamilton.ifas.ufl.edu

143
Hardee County Extension Office Indian River County Extension Office
507 Civic Center Drive 1028 20th Place, Suite D
Wauchula, Florida 33873-9460 Vero Beach, Florida 32960-5305
Phone: (863) 773-2164 Phone: (772) 770-5030
Fax: (863) 773-6861 Fax: (772)-770-5148
Email: hardee@ifas.ufl.edu Email: indian@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://hardee.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://indian.ifas.ufl.edu

Hendry County Extension Office Jackson County Extension Office


1085 Pratt Boulevard 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 3
LaBelle, Florida 33935 Marianna, Florida 32448
Phone: (863) 674-4092 Phone: (850) 482-9620
(863) 983-1598 Fax: (850) 482-9287
Fax: (863) 674-4637 Email: Jackson@ifas.ufl.edu
Email: hendry@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://hendry.ifas.ufl.edu
Jefferson County Extension Office
Hernando County Extension Office 2729 West Washington Street
1653 Blaise Drive Monticello, Florida 32344-5963
Brooksville, Florida 34601 Phone: (850) 342-0187
Phone: (352) 754-4433 Fax: (850) 342-3483
Website: http://extension.hernandocounty.us Email: jefferson@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://jefferson.ifas.ufl.edu
Highlands County Extension Office
4509 George Boulevard Lafayette County Extension Office
Sebring, Florida 33875 176 South West Community Circle, Suite D
Phone: (863) 402-6540 Mayo, Florida 32066-4000
Fax: (863) 402-6544 Phone: (386) 294-1279
Email: highlands@ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (386) 294-2016
Website: http://highlands.ifas.ufl.edu Email: domoore@ufl.edu
Website: http://lafayette.ifas.ufl.edu
Hillsborough County Extension Office
5339 South CR 579 Lake County Extension Office
Seffner, Florida 33584-3334 1951 Woodlea Road
Phone: (813) 744-5519 Tavares, Florida 32778
Fax: (813) 744-5776 Phone: (352) 343-4101
Website: http://hillsborough.extension.ufl.edu Fax: (352) 343-2767
Email: lake@ufl.edu
Holmes County Extension Office Website: http://lake.ifas.ufl.edu
1169 East Highway 90
Bonifay, Florida 32425-6012 Lee County Extension Office
Phone: (850) 547-1108 3406 Palm Beach Boulevard
Fax: (850) 547-7433 Fort Myers, Florida 33916-3736
Email: holmes@ifas.ufl.edu Phone: (239) 533-4327
Website: http://holmes.ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (239) 485-2305
Email: lee@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu

144
Leon County Extension Office Martin County Extension Office
615 Paul Russell Road 2614 South East Dixie Highway
Tallahassee, Florida 32301-7060 Stuart, Florida 34996
Phone: (850) 606-5200 Phone: (772) 288-5654
Fax: (850) 606-5201 Fax: (772) 288-4354
Website: http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu Email: martin@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://martin.ifas.ufl.edu
Levy County Extension Office
625 North Hathaway Avenue, Alt. 27 Miami-Dade County Extension Office
Bronson, Florida 32621 18710 South West 288th Street
Phone: (352) 486-5131 Homestead, Florida 33030-2309
Fax: (352) 486-5481 Phone: (305) 248-3311
Email: levy@ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (305) 246-2932
Website: http://levy.ifas.ufl.edu Email: dade@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://miami-dade.ifas.ufl.edu
Liberty County Extension Office
10405 North West Theo Jacobs Way Monroe County Extension Office
Bristol, Florida 32321 1100 Simonton Street, # 2-260
Phone: (850) 643-2229 Key West, Florida 33040
Email: liberty@ifas.ufl.edu Phone: (305) 292-4501
Website: http://liberty.ifas.ufl.edu Key West Fax: (305) 292-4415
Key Largo Fax: (305) 453-8749
Madison County Extension Office Email: monroe@ifas.ufl.edu
184 College Loop Website: http://monroe.ifas.ufl.edu
Madison, Florida 32340-1426
Phone: (850) 973-4138 Nassau County Extension Office
Fax: (850) 973-2000 543350 US Highway 1
Email: madison@ifas.ufl.edu Callahan, Florida 32011-6486
Website: http://madison.ifas.ufl.edu Phone: (904) 879-1019
Fax: (904) 879-2097
Manatee County Extension Office Email: nassau@ifas.ufl.edu
1303 17th Street West Website: http://nassau.ifas.ufl.edu
Palmetto, Florida 34221
Phone: (941) 722-4524 Okaloosa County Extension Office
Fax: (941) 721-6608 3098 Airport Road
Email: manatee@ifas.ufl.edu Crestview, Florida 32539-7124
Website: http://manatee.ifas.ufl.edu Phone: (850) 689-5850
Fax: (850) 689-5727
Marion County Extension Office Website: http://okaloosa.ifas.ufl.edu
2232 North East Jacksonville Road
Ocala, Florida 34470 Okeechobee County Extension Office
Phone: (352) 671-8400 458 Highway 98 North
Website: http://www.marioncountyfl.org/CountyExten- Okeechobee, Florida 34972-2303
sion/Extension_default.aspx Phone: (863) 763-6469
Fax: (863) 763-6745
Email: okeechobee@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu

145
Orange County Extension Office Putnam County Extension Office
6021 South Conway Road 111 Yelvington Road, Suite 1
Orlando, Florida 32812-3604 East Palatka, Florida 32131-2114
Phone: (407) 254-9200 Phone: (386) 329-0318
Fax: (407) 850-5125 Fax: (386) 329-1262
Email: orange@ifas.ufl.edu Email: putnam@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://orange.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://putnam.ifas.ufl.edu

Osceola County Extension Office Saint Johns County Extension County


Osceola Heritage Park 3125 Agricultural Center Drive
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane St. Augustine, Florida 32092-0572
Kissimmee, Florida 34744-6107 Phone: (904) 209-0430
Phone: (321) 697-3000 Email: stjohns@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://osceola.ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://stjohns.ifas.ufl.edu

Palm Beach County Extension Office Saint Lucie County Extension Office
559 North Military Trail 8400 Picos Road Suite 101
West Palm Beach, Florida 33415 Fort Pierce, Florida 34945-3045
Phone: (561) 233-1700 Phone: (772) 462-1660
Email: palmbeach@ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (772) 462-1510
Website: www.pbcgov.com/coextension Email: stlucie@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://stlucie.ifas.ufl.edu
Pasco County Extension Office
Pasco County Fairgrounds Santa Rosa County Extension Office
36702 State Road 52 6263 Dogwood Drive
Dade City, Florida 33525-5198 Milton, Florida 32570-3500
Phone: (352) 518-0156 Phone: (850) 623-3868
(800) 368-2411 (850) 932-9047
Fax: (352) 523-1921 Fax: (850) 623-6151
Website: http://pasco.ifas.ufl.edu Email: santarosa@ifas.ufl.edu
Website: http://santarosa.ifas.ufl.edu
Pinellas County Extension Office
12520 Ulmerton Road Sarasota County Extension Office
Largo, Florida 33774 6700 Clark Road, Twin Lakes Park
Phone: (727) 582-2100 Sarasota, Florida 34241-9328
Website: http://pinellas.ifas.ufl.edu Phone: (941) 861-5000
Website: http://sarasota.ifas.ufl.edu
Polk County Extension Office
1702 Highway 17-98 South Seminole County Extension Office
Bartow, Florida 33830 250 West County Home Road
Phone: (863) 519-8677 Sanford, Florida 32773
Fax: (863) 534-0001 Phone: (407) 665-5560
Email:polk@ifas.ufl.edu Website: http://www.seminolecountyfl.gov/extensionservices
Website: http://polk.ifas.ufl.edu

146
Seminole Tribe of Florida Wakulla County Extension Office
15465 Reservation Road 84 Cedar Avenue
Okeechobee, Florida 34974 Crawfordville, Florida 32327-2063
Phone: (954) 966-6300 Phone: (850) 926-3931
Fax: (800) 683-7800 Fax: (850) 926-8789
Website: www.semtribe.com Email: sswenson@ufl.edu or cathy52@ufl.edu
Website: http://wakulla.ifas.ufl.edu
Sumter County Extension Office
7620 State Road 471, Suite 2 Walton County Extension Office
Bushnell, Florida 33513-8716 732 North 9th Street
Phone: (352) 793-2728 DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433-3804
Fax: (352) 793-6376 Phone: (850) 892-8172
Email: sumter@ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (850) 892-8443
Website: http://sumter.ifas.ufl.edu Email: tdbyrd@ufl.edu
Website: http://walton.ifas.ufl.edu
Suwannee County Extension Office
1302 11th Street South West Washington County Extension Office
Live Oak, Florida 32064 Washington County Agricultural Center
Phone: (386) 362-2771 1424 Jackson Avenue (Hwy 90), Suite A
Fax: (386) 364-1698 Chipley, Florida 32428-1620
Email: suwannee@ifas.ufl.edu Phone: (850) 638-6180
Website: http://suwannee.ifas.ufl.edu (850) 638-6265
Fax: (850) 638-6181
Taylor County Extension Office Email: washington@ifas.ufl.edu
203 Forest Park Drive Website: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu
Perry, Florida 32348-6340
Phone: (850) 838-3508
Fax: (850) 838-3546
Florida Fairs and
Email: megharley@ufl.edu Expositions
Website: http://taylor.ifas.ufl.edu
Please contact each fair directly for information regard-
Union County Extension Office ing tickets, entertainment or vendor services.
25 North East 1st Street
Lake Butler, Florida 32054-1701 Baker County Fair
Phone: (386) 496-2321 Post Office Box 492
Fax: (386) 496-1111 Macclenny, Florida 32063
Email: union@ifas.ufl.edu Phone: (904) 838-1121
Website: http://union.ifas.ufl.edu Fax: (904) 259-1515
Website: www.bakercountyfair.org
Volusia County Extension Office
Volusia County Agricultural Center Bradford County Fair
3100 East New York Avenue 2300 North Temple Avenue
DeLand, Florida 32724 Starke, Florida 32091
Phone: (386) 822-5778 Phone: (904) 964-5252
Fax: (386) 822-5767 Fax: (904) 964-8631
Email: dgriffis@co.volusia.fl.us Website: www.bradfordcountyfair.net
Website: http://volusia.org/extension

147
Brevard County Fair Citrus County Fair
3695 Lake Drive 3600 South Florida Avenue
Cocoa, Florida 32926 Inverness, Florida 34450
Phone: (321) 633-1702 Ext. 238 Phone: (352) 726-2993
Fax: (321) 633-1890 Fax: (352) 726-3121
Website: www.brevardcountyfair.com Email: citruscountyfair@embarqmail.com
Website: www.citruscountyfair.com
Broward County Fair
3389 Sheridan Street, Suite 411 Clay County Agricultural Fair
Hollywood, Florida 33021 Post Office Box 1066
Phone: (954) 922-2224 Green Cove Springs, Florida 32043
Fax: (954) 929-8888 Phone: (904) 284-1615
Website: www.browardcountyfair.com Fax: (904) 529-9690
Email: clayfair@bellsouth.net
Central Florida Fair Website: www.claycountyfair.org
4603 West Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32808 Collier County Fair
Phone: (407) 295-3247 751 39th Avenue Northeast
Fax: (407) 295-2082 Naples, Florida 34120
Email: cff@centralfloridafair.com Phone: (239) 455-1444
Website: www.centralfloridafair.com Fax: (239) 455-6701
Email: info@colliercountyfair.com
Central Panhandle Fair Website: www.colliercountyfair.com
Post Office Box 35007
Panama City, Florida 32412 Columbia County Fair
Phone: (850) 769-2645 Post Office Box 1376
Fax: (850) 785-0524 Lake City, Florida 32056
Phone: (386) 752-8822
Chalo Nitka Festival; Glades County Youth Fax: (386) 752-7506
and Livestock Show Website: www.columbiacountyfair.org
Post Office Box 1003
Moore Haven, Florida 33471 DeSoto County Fair
Phone: (863) 946-0300 Post Office Box 970
Fax: (863) 946-0629 Arcadia, Florida 34265
Website: www.chalonitka.com Phone: (863) 494-5678 or (863) 990-2909
Fax: (863) 494-8400
Charlotte County Fair Email: vlkeenacres@embarqmail.com
2333 El Jobean Road Website: www.desotocountyfair.org
Port Charlotte, Florida 33948
Phone: (941) 629-4252 Firefighters’ Indian River County Fair
Fax: (941) 629-6540 1818 Commerce Avenue
Email: ccfair@embarqmail.com Vero Beach, Florida 32960
Website: www.thecharlottecountyfair.com Phone: (772) 562-2974
Fax: (772) 778-5882
Website: www.firefightersfair.org

148
Flagler County Fair, Youth Show Hendry County Fair and LiveStock Show Inc.
Post Office Box 517 Post Office Box 1356
Bunnell, Florida 32110 Clewiston, Florida 33440
Phone: (386) 437-2551 Phone: (863) 983-9282
Fax: (386) 437-8444 Fax: (863) 983-4453
Email: flaglerctyfair@bellsouth.net Email: info@hendrycountyfair.com
Website: www.flaglercountyfair.com Website: www.hendrycountyfair.com

Florida State Fair Hernando County Fair and Youth Livestock Show
Post Office Box 11766 Post Office Box 10456
Tampa, Florida 33680 Brooksville, Florida 34603
Phone: 1-800-345-FAIR Phone: (352) 796-4552
(813) 621-7821 Fax: (352) 799-2842
Fax: (813) 740-3505 Email: info@hernandofairgrounds.com
Website: www.floridastatefair.com Website: www.hernandocountyfair.com

Florida Strawberry Festival Highlands County Fair


Post Office Drawer 1869 781 Magnolia Avenue
Plant City, Florida 33564 Sebring, Florida 33870
Phone: (813) 752-9194 Phone: (863) 382-2255
Fax: (813) 754-4297 Fax: (863) 385-7773
Website: www.flstrawberryfestival.com Email: info@hcfair.net
Website: www.hcfair.net
Greater Hillsborough County Fair
Post Office Box 100 Greater Holmes County Fair
Sydney, Florida 33587 2477 Barefield Lane
Phone: (813) 737-3247 Bonifay, Florida 32425
Fax: (813) 737-4889 Phone: (850) 547-9944
Email: hillsboroughcountyfair@verizon.net Fax: (850) 547-4461
Website: www.hillsboroughcountyfair.com
Jackson County Fair
Greater Jacksonville Agricultural Fair & Expo Center Post Office Box 330
510 Fairgrounds Place Marianna, Florida 32447
Jacksonville, Florida 32202 Phone: (850) 482-3744
Phone: (904) 353-0535 Fax: (850) 482-5525
Fax: (904) 353-5458
Email: jaxfair@bellsouth.net Lake County Fair
Website: www.jacksonvillefair.com Post Office Box 221
Eustis, Florida 32726
Hardee County Fair Association Phone: (352) 357-7111
Post Office Box 1236 Fax: (352) 357-7347
Wauchula, Florida 33873 Email: lakecofair@aol.com
Phone: (863) 773-0165 Website: www.lakecofair.com
Website: www.HardeeCountyFair.org

149
Levy County Fair Northwest Florida Fair
Post Office Box 818 1958 Lewis Turner Boulevard
Williston, Florida 32696 Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547
Phone: (352) 528-2516 Phone: (850) 862-0211
Fax: (352) 528-1031 Fax: (850) 864-2395
Website: www.levycountyfair.com Website: www.nwffair.com

Manatee County Fair Okeechobee County Fair


1402 14th Avenue West 4601 Highway 710 East
Palmetto, Florida 34221 Okeechobee, Florida 34972
Phone: (941) 722-1639 Phone: (863) 467-1690
Fax: (941) 722-5054 Fax: (863) 763-6232
Email: info@manateecountyfair.com Email: Info@OkeechobeeCountyFair.com
Website: www.manateecountyfair.com Website: www.okeechobeecountyfair.com

Martin County Fair and Youth Livestock Show Osceola County Fair and Livestock Show
2616 Southeast Dixie Highway 1911 Kissimmee Valley Lane
Stuart, Florida 34996 Kissimmee, Florida 34744
Phone: (772) 220-3247 Phone: (321) 697-3050
Fax: (772) 220-2424 Fax: (321) 697-3060
Email: martincfair@aol.com Website: www.osceolacountyfair.com
Website: www.martincountyfair.com
Pasco County Fair
Miami-Dade County Fair 36722 State Road 52
10901 Southwest 24th Street Dade City, Florida 33525
Miami, Florida 33165 Phone: (352) 567-6678
Phone: (305) 223-7060 Fax: (352) 523-1807
Fax: (305) 554-6092 Email: pascocountyfair@atlantic.net
Website: www.fairexpo.com Website: www.pascocountyfair.com

North Florida Fair Pensacola Interstate Fair


441 Paul Russell Road 2172 West Nine Mile Road, PMB 210
Tallahassee, Florida 32301 Pensacola, Florida 32534
Phone: (850) 878-3247 ext. 305 Phone: (850) 944-4500
Fax: (850) 942-6950 Fax: (850) 944-4526
Email: northfloridafair@comcast.net Website: www.pensacolafair.com
Website: www.northfloridafair.com
Polk County Youth Fair
Northeast Florida Fair Post Office Box 9005, Drawer HS03
Post Office Box 1070 Bartow, Florida 33831
Callahan, Florida 32011 Phone: (863) 519-8677 ext. 116
Phone: (904) 879-4682 Fax: (863) 534-0001
Fax: (904) 879-7513 Website: http://polk.ifas.ufl.edu/youth_fair.shtml
Website: www.neflfair.org

150
Putnam County Fair and Expo South Florida Fair
Post Office Box 400 Post Office Box 210367
East Palatka, Florida 32131 West Palm Beach, Florida 33421-0367
Phone: (386) 328-3247 Phone: (561) 793-0333
Fax: (386) 328-3239 Fax: (561) 790-5246
Website: www.putnamfairandexpo.com Website: www.southfloridafair.com

Saint Lucie County Fair Southwest Florida, Lee County Fair


Post Office Box 12478 11831 Bayshore Road
Fort Pierce, Florida 34979 Fort Myers, Florida 33917
Phone: (772) 464-2910 Phone: (239) 543-7469
Fax: (772) 464-8892 Fax: (239) 543-4110
Website: www.stluciecountyfair.org Email: swwfair@earthlink.net
Website: www.leeciviccenter.com
Santa Rosa County Fair
Post Office Box 884 Sumter County Fair
Milton, Florida 32572 Post Office Box 647
Phone: (850) 623-1115 Webster, Florida 33597
Email: Info@srcfair.com Phone: (352) 793-2750
Website: www.srcfair.com Fax: (352) 793-8001
Email: sumterfair@aol.com
Sarasota County Agricultural Fair Website: www.sumterfair.net
3000 Ringling Blvd.
Sarasota, FL 34237 Suwannee County Fair Association
Phone: (941) 365-0818 Post Office Box 266
Fax: 1-888-502-2505 Live Oak, Florida 32064
Email: info@sarasotafair.com Phone: (386) 362-7366
Website: www.sarasotafair.com Email: suwanneecountyfair@live.com
Website: www.suwanneecountyfair.org
St. Johns County Agricultural Fair
5840 State Road 207 Volusia County Fair, Youth Show
Elkton, Florida 32033 3150 East New York Avenue
Phone: (904) 692-4603 DeLand, Florida 32724
Fax: (904) 692-2720 Phone: (386) 734-9514
Website: www.stjohnsfair.com Fax: (386) 734-7176
Email: info@volusiacountyfair.com
Southeastern Youth Fair Website: www.volusiacountyfair.com
Post Office Box 404
Ocala, Florida 34478-0404 Walton County Fair
Phone: (352) 629-1255 Post Office Box 550
Fax: (352) 629-5995 DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435
Email: seyfair@aol.com Phone: (850) 892-5261
Website: www.seyfair.com Fax: (850) 892-5261
Email: waltoncountyfair@embarqmail.com
Website: www.waltoncountyfair.com

151
Florida Farm Bureau Broward County Farm Bureau
2121 North State Road 7
Federation Offices Margate, Florida 33063
Phone: (954) 972-2525
The Sunshine State’s largest general agricultural organi- Fax: (954) 969-9543
zation with about 138,000 member-families represent- Website: www.browardfarmbureau.com
ing Farm Bureaus in 60 counties. Membership provides
a multitude of benefits, and you don’t have to be a Calhoun-Gulf County Farm Bureau
farmer to be a member of Florida Farm Bureau. 17577 Main Street North
Blountstown, Florida 32424
Florida Farm Bureau Federation – Phone: (850) 674-5471
State Office (Florida) Fax: (850) 674-5260
Post Office Box 147030
Gainesville, Florida 32614-7030 Charlotte County Farm Bureau
Phone: (352) 378-8100 1278 South East US Highway 31
Fax: (352) 374-1501 Arcadia, Florida 34266
Website: www.floridafarmbureau.org Phone: (863) 494-3636
Fax: (863) 494-4332
Alachua County Farm Bureau
US Highway 441 Unit 20 Hernando-Citrus County Farm Bureau
Alachua, Florida 32615 617 Lamar Avenue
Phone: (386) 418-4008 Brooksville, Florida 34601
Fax: (386) 462-7948 Phone: (352) 796-2526
Website: www.alachuacountyfarmbureau.com Fax: (352) 754-9580

Baker County Farm Bureau Clay County Farm Bureau


539 South 6th Street 3960 Lazy Acres Road
Macclenny, Florida 32063 Middleburg, Florida 32068
Phone: (904) 259-6332 Phone: (904) 282-0644
Fax: (904) 259-6730 Fax: (904) 282-6944

Bay County Farm Bureau Collier County Farm Bureau


303 Mosley Drive 1101 West Main Street, Suite 2
Lynn Haven, Florida 32444 Immokalee, Florida 34142
Phone: (850) 872-2077 Phone: (239) 657-6500
Fax: (850) 769-4590 Fax: (239) 657-6565

Bradford County Farm Bureau Columbia County Farm Bureau


2270 North Temple Avenue 605 South West State Road 47
Starke, Florida 32091 Lake City, Florida 32025
Phone: (904) 964-6369 Phone: (386) 752-4003
Fax: (904) 964-9666 Fax: (386) 752-0585

Brevard County Farm Bureau


111 Virginia Avenue
Cocoa, Florida 32922
Phone: (321) 636-4361
Fax: (321) 632-2858

152
Dade County Farm Bureau Gilchrist County Farm Bureau
1850 Old Dixie Highway 306 West Wade Street
Homestead, Florida 33033 Trenton, Florida 32693
Phone: (305) 246-5514 Phone: (352) 463-2298
Fax: (305) 247-5812 Fax: (352) 463-3877
Website: www.dade-agriculture.org
Glades County Farm Bureau
DeSoto County Farm Bureau Post Office Box 1365
1278 South East US Highway 31 LaBelle, Florida 33975
Arcadia, Florida 34266 Phone: (863) 675-2535
Phone: (863) 494-3636 Fax: (863) 675-3586
Fax: (863) 494-4332
Calhoun-Gulf County Farm Bureau
Dixie County Farm Bureau 17577 Main Street North
Post Office Box 426 Blountstown, Florida 32424
Trenton, Florida 32693 Phone: (850) 674-5471
Phone: (352) 463-2298 Fax: (850) 674-5260
Fax: (352) 463-3877
Hamilton County Farm Bureau
Duval County Farm Bureau 1117 US Highway 41 North West
5542 Dunn Avenue Jasper, Florida 32052
Jacksonville, Florida 32218 Phone: (386) 792-1458
Phone: (904) 768-4836 Fax: (386) 792-2793
Fax: (904) 766-1245
Hardee County Farm Bureau
Escambia County Farm Bureau 1017 US Highway 17 North
153 Highway 97 Wauchula, Florida 33873
Molino, Florida 32577 Phone: (863) 773-3117
Phone: (850) 587-2135 Fax: (863) 773-2369
Fax: (850) 587-2137
Hendry County Farm Bureau
Flagler County Farm Bureau Post Office Box 1365
1000 Palm Coast Parkway Southwest, Suite 202 LaBelle, Florida 33975
Palm Coast, Florida 32137 Phone: (863) 675-2535
Phone: (386) 447-5282 Fax: (863) 675-3586
Fax: (386) 447-5307
Hernando-Citrus County Farm Bureau
Franklin County Farm Bureau 617 Lamar Avenue
Please contact main office Brooksville, Florida 34601
Phone: (352) 378-8100 Phone: (352) 796-2526
Fax: (352) 754-9580
Gadsden County Farm Bureau
2111 West Jefferson Street Highlands County Farm Bureau
Quincy, Florida 32351 6419 US Highway 27 South
Phone: (850) 627-7196 Sebring, Florida 33876
Fax: (850) 875-1432 Phone: (863) 385-5141
Fax: (863) 385-5356
Website: www.highlandsfarmbureau.com

153
Hillsborough County Farm Bureau Leon County Farm Bureau
100 South Mulrennan Road 3375-C Capital Circle Northeast
Valrico, Florida 33594 Tallahassee, Florida 32308
Phone: (813) 685-9121 Phone: (850) 877-6581
Fax: (813) 681-3779 Fax: (850) 877-8998
Website: www.hcfarmbureau.org Website: www.leonfarmbureau.com

Holmes County Farm Bureau Levy County Farm Bureau


1108 North Waukesha Street Post Office Box 998
Bonifay, Florida 32425 Chiefland, Florida 32644
Phone: (850) 547-4227 Phone: (352) 493-4780
Fax: (850) 547-1451 Fax: (352) 493-9599

Indian River County Farm Bureau Liberty County Farm Bureau


7150 20th Street, Suite A 17577 Main Street North
Vero Beach, Florida 32966 Blountstown, Florida 32424
Phone: (772) 562-4119 Phone: (850) 674-5471
Fax: (772) 569-3111
Madison County Farm Bureau
Jackson County Farm Bureau 233 West Base Street
4379 Lafayette Street Madison, Florida 32340
Marianna, Florida 32446 Phone: (850) 973-4071
Phone: (850) 482-5751 Fax: (850) 973-3857
Fax: (850) 482-1018
Manatee County Farm Bureau
Jefferson County Farm Bureau 5620 Tara Boulevard, Suite 101
105 West Anderson Street Bradenton, Florida 34203
Monticello, Florida 32344 Phone: (941) 746-6161
Phone: (850) 997-2213 Fax: (941) 739-7846
Fax: (850) 997-4805 Website: www.manateecountyfarmbureau.org

Lafayette County Farm Bureau Marion County Farm Bureau


Post Office Box 336 5800 South West 20th Street
Mayo, Florida 32066 Ocala, Florida 34474
Phone: (386) 294-1399 Phone: (352) 237-2124
Fax: (386) 294-4399 Fax: (352) 237-2127
Website: www.marioncountyfarmbureau.org/
Lake County Farm Bureau
30241 State Road 19 Martin County Farm Bureau
Tavares, Florida 32778 506 South West Federal Highway, Suite 102
Phone: (352) 343-4407 Stuart, Florida 34994
Fax: (352) 343-4627 Phone: (772) 286-1038
Fax: (772) 286-6849
Lee County Farm Bureau
14180 Metropolis Avenue, Suite 1 Monroe County Farm Bureau
Fort Myers, Florida 33912 Please contact main office
Phone: (239) 561-5100 Phone: (352) 378-8100
Fax: (239) 561-7001

154
Nassau County Farm Bureau 2nd Location: (Western) Palm Beach County
Post Office Box 5007 Farm Bureau
Callahan, Florida 32011 12773 West Forest Hill Boulevard, Suite 104
Phone: (904) 879-3498 Wellington, Florida 33414
Fax: (904) 879-6633 Phone: (561) 792-1991

Okaloosa County Farm Bureau Pasco County Farm Bureau


921 West James Lee Boulevard 12445 US Highway 301
Crestview, Florida 32536 Dade City, Florida 33525
Phone: (850) 682-3536 Phone: (352) 567-5641
Fax: (850) 682-0882 Fax: (352) 567-9638

Okeechobee County Farm Bureau Pinellas County Farm Bureau


401 North West 4th Street 1165 Lakeview Road
Okeechobee, Florida 34972 Clearwater, Florida 33756
Phone: (863) 763-3101 Phone: (727) 466-6390
Fax: (863) 763-1624 Fax: (727) 466-6870

Orange County Farm Bureau Polk County Farm Bureau


Post Office Box 585694 1715 US Highway 17 South
Orlando, Florida 32858 Bartow, Florida 33830
Phone: (407) 889-5732 Phone: (863) 533-0561
Fax: (407) 464-2142 Fax: (863) 533-9241
Website: www.pcfb.org
Osceola County Farm Bureau
1680 East Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway Putnam - St. Johns County Farm Bureau
Kissimmee, Florida 34744 1470 South US Highway 17
Phone: (407) 847-5189 East Palatka, Florida 32131
Fax: (407) 847-9351 Phone: (386) 325-5822
Fax: (386) 325-9484
Palm Beach County Farm Bureau
13121 Military Trail Santa Rosa County Farm Bureau
Delray Beach, Florida 33484 Post Office Box 490
Phone: (561) 498-5200 Jay, Florida 32565
Fax: (561) 498-3078 Phone: (850) 675-4572
Fax: (850) 675-4764
1st Location: (Western) Palm Beach County
Farm Bureau Sarasota County Farm Bureau
3019 State Road 15, Suite 5 7289 Palmer Boulevard
Belle Glade, Florida 33430-5354 Sarasota, Florida 34240
Phone: (561) 996-0343 Phone: (941) 371-2043
Fax: (561) 996-9911 Fax: (941) 377-8448

Seminole County Farm Bureau


Post Office Box 585694
Orlando, Florida 32858
Phone: (407) 889-5732
Fax: (407) 464-2142

155
Putnam-Saint Johns County Farm Bureau Walton County Farm Bureau
147 South US Highway 17 684 North 9th Street
East Palatka, Florida 32131 DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433
Phone: (386) 325-5822 Phone: (850) 892-5512
Fax: (386) 325-9484 Fax: (850) 929-3655

Saint Lucie County Farm Bureau Washington County Farm Bureau


3327 Orange Avenue 1361 Jackson Avenue
Fort Pierce, Florida 34947 Chipley, Florida 32428
Phone: (772) 465-0440 Phone: (850) 638-1756
Fax: (772) 465-0428 Fax: (850) 638-0306

Sumter County Farm Bureau USDA Service Centers


7610 State Road 471
Bushnell, Florida 33513 USDA Service Centers are designed to be a single loca-
Phone: (352) 793-4545 tion where customers can access the services provided
Fax: (352) 793-6410 by the Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Con-
servation Service and the Rural Development agencies.
Suwannee County Farm Bureau This website will provide the address of a USDA Service
407 Dowling Avenue South East Center and other Agency offices serving your area along
Live Oak, Florida 32064 with information on how to contact them.
Phone: (386) 362-1274
Fax: (386) 364-1136 Farm Service Agency – State Office (Florida)
Post Office Box 141030
Taylor County Farm Bureau Gainesville, Florida 32614-1030
813 South Washington Street Phone: (352) 379-4500
Perry, Florida 32347 Fax: (352) 379-4580
Phone: (850) 584-2371
Fax: (850) 584-8112 USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service –
State Office (Florida)
Union County Farm Bureau Post Office Box 141510
325 South East 6th Street Gainesville, Florida 32614-1510
Lake Butler, Florida 32054 Phone: (352) 338-9500
Phone: (386) 496-2171 Fax: (352) 338-9578
Fax: (386) 496-4296
USDA Rural Development – State Office (Florida)
Volusia County Farm Bureau Post Office Box 147010
3090 East New York Avenue Gainesville, Florida 32614-7010
DeLand, Florida 32724 Phone: (352) 338-3402
Phone: (386) 734-1612 Fax: (352) 338-3405
Fax: (386) 734-1793

Wakulla County Farm Bureau


2468 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, Florida 32327
Phone: (850) 926-3425
Fax: (850) 926-1100

156
Alachua County Bradford County
Gainesville Service Center Gainesville Service Center
5709 NW 13th Street 5709 North West 13th Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653-2130 Gainesville, Florida 32653-2130
Phone: (352) 376-7414 Phone: (352) 376-7414
Fax: (352) 373-4984 Fax: (352) 373-4984
• Farm Service Agency • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office
Ocala Service Center 971 West Duval Street, Suite 190
2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 Lake City, Florida 32055-3736
Ocala, Florida 34470 Phone: (386) 719-5590
Phone: (352) 732-7534 Fax: (386) 754-4139
Fax: (352) 732-9728 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Brevard County
Baker County Kissimmee Service Center
Baldwin Service Center 1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane
260 US Highway 301 North Kissimmee, Florida 34744
Baldwin, Florida 32234-1440 Phone: (407) 847-4201
Phone: (904) 266-0088 Fax: (407) 847-9665
Fax: (904) 266-4858 • Farm Service Agency
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Rural Development Area Office
2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office Davenport, Florida 33897-8614
971 West Duval Street, Suite 190 Phone: (863) 420-4833
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736 Fax: (863) 424-7333
Phone: (386) 719-5590 • Rural Development (Area Office)
Fax: (386) 754-4139
• Rural Development (Area Office) Broward County
Royal Palm Beach Service Center
Bay County 420 South State Road 7
Bonifay Service Center Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306
103 North Oklahoma Street Phone: (561) 792-2727
Bonifay, Florida 32425-2311 Fax: (561) 792-9094
Phone: (850) 547-2850 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
Fax: (850) 547-2674 • Conservation District
• Farm Service Agency • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Natural Resources Conservation Service

Marianna Service Center


2741 Pennsylvania Avenue
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027
Phone: (850) 526-2610
Fax: (850) 526-7534
• Rural Development (Area Office)

157
Calhoun County Clay County
Blountstown Service Center East Palatka Service Center
17413 North West Leonard Street 111 Yelvington Road, Suite 3
Blountstown, Florida 32424-1343 East Palatka, Florida 32131-2114
Phone: (850) 674-8388 Phone: (386) 328-5051
Fax: (850) 674-5099 Fax: (386) 328-3054
• Farm Service Agency • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office
Marianna Service Center 971 West Duval Street, Suite 190
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue Lake City, Florida 32055-3736
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027 Phone: (386) 719-5590
Phone: (850) 526-2610 Fax: (386) 754-4139
Fax: (850) 526-7534 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Collier County
Charlotte County Naples Service Center
Ft. Myers Service Center 14700 Immokalee Road
3434 Hancock Bridge Parkway Naples, Florida 34120-1468
Fort Myers, Florida 33903-7094 Phone: (239) 455-4100
Phone: (239) 997-7331 Fax: (239) 455-2693
Fax: (239) 997-7557 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Farm Service Agency • Conservation District
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fort Myers Service Center
3434 Hancock Bridge Parkway
Sarasota Service Center Fort Myers, Florida 33903-7094
6942 Professional Parkway East Phone: (239) 997-7331
Sarasota, Florida 34240-8426 Fax: (239) 997-7557
Phone: (941) 907-0011 • Farm Service Agency
Fax: (941) 907-0015 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Conservation District
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Citrus County
Bushnell Service Center Office Columbia County
7620 State Road 471, Suite 3 Lake City Service Center
Bushnell, Florida 33513 2304 South West Main Boulevard, Suite 103
Phone: (352) 793-2651 Lake City, Florida 32025
Fax: (352) 793-2089 Phone: (386) 752-8447
• Farm Service Agency Fax: (386) 752-8278
• Farm Service Agency
Ocala Service Center • Natural Resources Conservation Service
2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 • Conservation District
Ocala, Florida 34470
Phone: (352) 732-7534
Fax: (352) 732-9728
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Rural Development (Area Office)

158
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office Duval County
971 West Duval Street, Suite 190 Baldwin Service Center
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736 260 US Highway 301 North
Phone: (386) 719-5590 Baldwin, Florida 32234-1440
Fax: (386) 754-4139 Phone: (904) 266-0088
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fax: (904) 266-4858
• Farm Service Agency
DeSoto County • Natural Resources Conservation Service
Wauchula Service Center • Conservation District
316 North 7th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873-2606 Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office
Phone: (863) 773-4764 971 West Duval Street, Suite 190
Fax: (863) 773-2445 Lake City, Florida 32055-3736
• Farm Service Agency Phone: (386) 719-5590
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Fax: (386) 754-4139
• Conservation District • Rural Development (Area Office)

Fort Myers Service Center Escambia County


3434 Hancock Bridge Parkway Molino Service Center
Fort Myers, Florida 33903-7094 151 State Highway 97
Phone: (239) 997-7331 Molino, Florida 32577
Fax: (239) 997-7557 Phone: (850) 587-5345
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fax: (850) 587-5406
• Farm Service Agency
Dixie County • Natural Resources Conservation Service
Bronson Service Center • Conservation District
625 North Hathaway Avenue
Bronson, Florida 32621-6123 Milton Service Center
Phone: (352) 486-2125 6277 Dogwood Drive
Fax: (352) 486-1724 Milton, Florida 32570-3500
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Phone: (850) 623-2441
• Conservation District Fax: (850) 623-5903
• Farm Service Center
Trenton Service Center
723 East Wade Street Crestview Service Center
Trenton, Florida 32693-3316 934 North Ferdon Boulevard
Phone: (352) 463-2358 Crestview, Florida 32536-1706
Fax: (352) 463-1144 Phone: (850) 682-2416
• Farm Service Agency Fax: (850) 682-1095
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Ocala Service Center
2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 Flagler County
Ocala, Florida 34470 East Palatka Service Center
Phone: (352) 732-7534 111 Yelvington Road Suite 3
Fax: (352) 732-9728 East Palatka, Florida 32131-2114
• Rural Development (Area Office) Phone: (386) 328-5051
Fax: (386) 328-3054
• Farm Service Agency

159
Flagler County (continued) Gilchrist County
Deland Service Center Trenton Service Center
101 Heavensgate Road 723 East Wade Street
DeLand, Florida 32720 Trenton, Florida 32693-3316
Phone: (386) 985-4037 Phone: (352) 463-2358
Fax: (386) 985-4881 Fax: (352) 463-1144
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Farm Service Agency
• Conservation District
Bronson Service Center
Ocala Service Center 625 North Hathaway Avenue
2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 Bronson, Florida 32621-6123
Ocala, Florida 34470 Phone: (352) 486-2125
Phone: (352) 732-7534 Fax: (352) 486-1724
Fax: (352) 732-9728 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Conservation District

Franklin County Ocala Service Center


Blountstown Service Center 2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204
17413 North West Leonard Street Ocala, Florida 34470
Blountstown, Florida 32424-1343 Phone: (352) 732-7534
Phone: (850) 674-8388 Fax: (352) 732-9728
Fax: (850) 674-5099 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Glades County
24704 US Highway 27
Marianna Service Center Moore Haven, Florida 33471
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue Phone: (863) 946-1031
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027 Fax: (863) 946-1033
Phone: (850) 526-2610 • Farm Service Agency
Fax: (850) 526-7534
• Rural Development (Area Office) LaBelle Service Center
1085 Pratt Boulevard
Gadsden County La Belle, Florida 33935-4480
Quincy Service Center Phone: (863) 674-4160
2144 West Jefferson Street Fax: (863) 675-3577
Quincy, Florida 32351-1905 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
Phone: (850) 627-6365 • Conservation District
Fax: (850) 627-4267
• Farm Service Agency Royal Palm Beach Service Center
• Natural Resources Conservation Service 420 South State Road 7
• Conservation District Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306
Phone: (561) 792-2727
Marianna Service Center Fax: (561) 792-9094
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue • Rural Development (Area Office)
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027
Phone: (850) 526-2610
Fax: (850) 526-7534
• Rural Development (Area Office)

160
Gulf County Hendry County
Blountstown Service Center Moore Haven Service Center
17413 North West Leonard Street Post Office Box 1339
Blountstown, Florida 32424-1343 Moore Haven, Florida 33471
Phone: (850) 674-8388 Phone: Temporary (863) 763-3345
Fax: (850) 674-5099 Fax: Temporary (863) 763-6407
• Farm Service Agency • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
LaBelle Service Center
Marianna Service Center 1085 Pratt Boulevard
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue LaBelle, Florida 33935-4480
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027 Phone: (863) 674-4160
Phone: (850) 526-2610 Fax: (863) 675-3577
Fax: (850) 526-7534 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Conservation District

Hamilton County Royal Palm Beach Service Center


Live Oak Service Center 420 South State Road 7
10096 US Highway 129 Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306
Live Oak, Florida 32060-6745 Phone: (561) 792-2727
Phone: (386) 362-2861 Fax: (561) 792-9094
Fax: (386) 362-3375 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Hernando County
San Antonio Service Center
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office 30435 Commerce Drive, Suite 103
971 West Duval Street, Suite 190 San Antonio, Florida 33576-8003
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736 Phone: (352) 588-5211
Phone: (386) 719-5590 Fax: (352) 388-5472
Fax: (386) 754-4139 • Farm Service Agency
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Natural Resources Conservation Service

Hardee County Rural Development Area Office


Wauchula Service Center 2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129
316 North 7th Avenue Davenport, Florida 33897-8614
Wauchula, Florida 33873-2606 Phone: (863) 420-4833
Phone: (863) 773-4764 Fax: (863) 424-7333
Fax: (863) 773-2445 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District

Fort Myers Service Center


3434 Hancock Bridge Parkway
Fort Myers, Florida 33903-7094
Phone: (239) 997-7331
Fax: (239) 997-7557
• Rural Development (Area Office)

161
Highlands County Crestview Service Center
Sebring Service Center 934 North Ferdon Boulevard
4505/4507 George Boulevard Crestview, Florida 32536-1706
Sebring, Florida 33872 Phone: (850) 682-2416
Phone: (863) 385-7853 Fax: (850) 682-1095
Fax: (863) 385-7028 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Indian River County
• Conservation District Fort Pierce Service Center
8400 Picos Road
Okeechobee Service Center Fort Pierce, Florida 34945-3045
450 US Highway 98 North Phone: (772) 461-4546
Okeechobee, Florida 34972-2303 Fax: (772) 465-0165
Phone: (863) 763-3343 • Farm Service Agency
Fax: (86) 763-6407 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Farm Service Agency
Royal Palm Beach Service Center
Royal Palm Beach Service Center 420 South State Road 7
420 South State Road 7 Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306
Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306 Phone: (561) 792-2727
Phone: (561) 792-2727 Fax: (561) 792-9094
Fax: (561) 792-9094 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Jackson County
Hillsborough County Marianna Service Center
Plant City Service Center 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue
201 South Collins Street Suite 201 Marianna, Florida 32448-4027
Plant City, Florida 33563 Phone: (850) 526-2610
Phone: (813) 752-1474 Fax: (850) 482-4062
Fax: (813) 754-7297 • Farm Service Agency
• Farm Service Agency • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Conservation District
• Conservation District • Rural Development (Area Office)

Rural Development Area Office Jefferson County


2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129 Monticello Service Center
Davenport, Florida 33897-8614 1244 North Jefferson Street
Phone: (863) 420-4833 Monticello, Florida 32344-2249
Fax: (863) 424-7333 Phone: (850) 997-2072
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fax: (850) 997-6277
• Farm Service Agency
Holmes County • Natural Resources Conservation Service
Bonifay Service Center • Conservation District
103 North Oklahoma Street
Bonifay, Florida 32425-2311
Phone: (850) 547-2850
Fax: (850) 547-2674
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District
162
Marianna Service Center Lee County
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue Fort Myers Service Center
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027 3434 Hancock Bridge Parkway
Phone: (850) 526-2610 Fort Myers, Florida 33903-7094
Fax: (850) 526-7534 Phone: (239) 997-7331
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fax: (239) 997-7557
• Farm Service Agency
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office • Natural Resources Conservation Service
971 West Duval Street • Conservation District
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736 • Rural Development
Phone: (386) 719-5590
Fax: (352) 754-4139 Leon County
• Rural Development (Area Office) Tallahassee Service Center
615 Paul Russell Road
Lafayette County Tallahassee, Florida 32301-7060
Mayo Service Center Phone: (850) 877-3724
176 South West Community Circle, Suite B Fax: (850) 878-5354
Mayo, Florida 32066-4000 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
Phone: (386) 294-1851 • Conservation District
Fax: (384) 294-2154
• Farm Service Agency Monticello Service Center
• Natural Resources Conservation Service 1244 North Jefferson Street
• Conservation District Monticello, Florida 32344-2249
Phone: (850) 997-2072
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office Fax: (850) 997-6277
971 West Duval Street • Farm Service Agency
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736
Phone: (386) 719-5590 Marianna Service Center
Fax: (386) 754-4139 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue
• Rural Development (Area Office) Marianna, Florida 32448-4027
Phone: (850) 526-2610
Lake County Fax: (850) 526-7534
Tavares Service Center • Rural Development (Area Office)
1725 David Walker Drive
Tavares, Florida 32778-4954 Levy County
Phone: (352) 742-7005 Bronson Service Center
Fax: (352) 343-6275 625 North Hathaway Avenue
• Farm Service Agency Bronson, Florida 32621-6123
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Phone: (352) 486-2125
• Conservation District Fax: (352) 486-1724
• Farm Service Agency
Ocala Service Center • Natural Resources Conservation Service
2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 • Conservation District
Ocala, Florida 34470
Phone: (352) 732-7534
Fax: (352) 732-9728
• Rural Development (Area office)

163
Levy County (continued) Sarasota Service Center
Ocala Service Center 6942 Professional Parkway East
2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 Sarasota, Florida 34240-8426
Ocala, Florida 34470 Phone: (941) 907-0011
Phone: (352) 732-7534 Fax: (941) 907-0015
Fax: (352) 732-9728 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Rural Development (Area office) • Conservation District

Liberty County Fort Myers Service Center


Blountstown Service Center 3434 Hancock Bridge Parkway
17413 North West Leonard Street Fort Myers, Florida 33903-7094
Blountstown, Florida 32424-1343 Phone: (239) 997-7331
Phone: (850) 674-8388 Fax: (239) 997-7557
Fax: (850) 674-5099 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Marion County
Ocala Service Center
Marianna Service Center 2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue Ocala, Florida 34470
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027 Phone: (352) 732-7534
Phone: (850) 526-2610 Fax: (352) 732-9728
Fax: (850) 526-7534 • Farm Service Agency
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Madison County • Conservation District
Madison Service Center
1416 East US 90, Unit 1 Martin County
Madison, Florida 32340-3010 Fort Pierce Service Center
Phone: (850) 973-2205 8400 Picos Road
Fax: (850) 973-3935 Fort Pierce, Florida 34945-3045
• Farm Service Agency Phone: (772) 461-4546
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Fax: (772) 465-0165
• Conservation District • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office
971 West Duval Street, Suite 190 Royal Palm Beach Service Center
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736 420 South State Road 7
Phone: (386) 719-5590 Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306
Fax: (386) 754-4139 Phone: (561) 792-2727
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fax: (561) 792-9094
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Manatee County
Wauchula Service Center
316 North 7th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873-2606
Phone: (863) 773-4764
Fax: (863) 773-2445
• Farm Service Agency

164
Miami-Dade Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office
Florida City Service Center 971 West Duval Street, Suite 190
1450 North Krome Avenue, Suite 102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3736
Florida City, Florida 33034-2400 Phone: (386) 719-5590
Phone: (305) 242-1197 Fax: (386) 754-4139
Fax: (305) 242-1286 • Rural Development (Area Office
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Okaloosa County
• Conservation District Crestview Service Center
934 North Ferdon Boulevard
Royal Palm Beach Service Center Crestview, Florida 32536-1706
420 South State Road 7 Phone: (850) 682-2416
Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306 Fax: (850) 682-1095
Phone: (561) 792-2727 • Farm Service Agency
Fax: (561) 792-9094 • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Rural Development
• Conservation District
Monroe County
Florida City Service Center Okeechobee County
1450 North Krome Avenue, Suite 102 Okeechobee Service Center
Florida City, Florida 33034-2400 450 US Highway 98 North
Phone: (305) 242-1197 Okeechobee, Florida 34972-2303
Fax: (305) 242-1286 Phone: (863) 763-3345
• Farm Service Agency Fax: (863) 763-6407
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Farm Service Agency
• Conservation District • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District
Royal Palm Beach Service Center
420 South State Road 7 Royal Palm Beach Service Center
Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306 420 South State Road 7
Phone: (561) 792-2727 Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306
Fax: (561) 792-9094 Phone: (561) 792-2727
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fax: (561) 792-9094
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Nassau County
Baldwin Service Center Orange County
260 US Highway 301 North Tavares Service Center
Baldwin, Florida 32234-1440 1725 David Walker Drive
Phone: (904) 266-0088 Tavares, Florida 32778-4954
Fax: (904) 266-4858 Phone: (352) 742-7005
• Farm Service Agency Fax: (352) 343-6275
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Farm Service Agency

165
Orange County (continued) Pasco County
Kissimmee Service Center San Antonio Service Center
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane 30435 Commerce Drive, Suite 103
Kissimmee, Florida 34744 San Antonio, Florida 33576-8003
Phone: (407) 847-4201 Phone: (352) 588-5211
Fax: (407) 847-9665 Fax: (352) 388-5472
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
Rural Development Area Office • Conservation District
2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129
Davenport, Florida 33897-8614 Rural Development Area Office
Phone: (863) 420-4833 2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129
Fax: (863) 424-7333 Davenport, Florida 33897-8614
• Rural Development (Area Office) Phone: (863) 420-4833
Fax: (863) 424-7333
Osceola County • Rural Development (Area Office)
Kissimmee Service Center
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane Pinellas County
Kissimmee, Florida 34744 Plant City Service Center
Phone: (407) 847-4201 201 South Collins Street, Suite 201
Fax: (407) 847-9665 Plant City, Florida 33563
• Farm Service Agency Phone: (813) 752-1474
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Fax: (813) 754-7297
• Conservation District • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
Rural Development Area Office • Conservation District
2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129
Davenport, Florida 33897-8614 Rural Development Area Office
Phone: (863) 420-4833 2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129
Fax: (863) 424-7333 Davenport, Florida 33897-8614
• Rural Development (Area Office) Phone: (863) 420-4833
Fax: (863) 424-7333
Palm Beach County • Rural Development (Area Office)
Royal Palm Beach Service Center
420 South State Road 7 Polk County
Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306 Bartow Service Center
Phone: (561) 792-2727 1700 Highway 17 South
Fax: (561) 792-9094 Bartow, Florida 33830
• Farm Service Agency Phone: (863) 533-2051
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Fax: (863) 533-1884
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Farm Service Agency
• Conservation District • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District

166
Rural Development Area Office Sarasota County
2629 Waverly Barn Road, Suite 129 Sarasota Service Center
Davenport, Florida 33897-8614 6942 Professional Parkway East
Phone: (863) 420-4833 Sarasota, Florida 34240-8426
Fax: (863) 424-7333 Phone: (941) 907-0011
• Rural Development (Area Office) Fax: (941) 907-0015
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
Putnam County • Conservation District
East Palatka Service Center
111 Yelvington Road Suite 3 Wauchula Service Center
East Palatka, Florida 32131-2114 316 North 7th Avenue
Phone: (386) 328-5051 Wauchula, Florida 33873-2606
Fax: (386) 328-3054 Phone: (863) 773-4764
• Farm Service Agency Fax: (863) 773-2445
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Farm Service Agency
• Conservation District
Fort Myers Service Center
Ocala Service Center 3434 Hancock Bridge Parkway
2441 NE 3rd Street Suite 204 Fort Myers, Florida 33903-7094
Ocala, Florida 34470 Phone: (239) 997-7331
Phone: (352) 732-7534 Fax: (239) 997-7557
Fax: (352) 732-9728 • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Seminole County
Santa Rosa County DeLand Service Center
Milton Service Center 101 Heavensgate Road
6277 Dogwood Drive DeLand, Florida 32720
Milton, Florida 32570-3500 Phone: (386) 985-4037
Phone: (850) 623-2441 Fax: (386) 985-4881
Fax: (850) 623-8012 • Farm Service Agency
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Ocala Service Center
• Conservation District 2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204
Ocala, Florida 34470
Crestview Service Center Phone: (352) 732-7534
934 North Ferdon Boulevard Fax: (352) 732-9728
Crestview, Florida 32536-1706 • Rural Development (Area Office)
Phone: (850) 682-2416
Fax: (850) 682-1095 Saint Johns County
• Rural Development (Area Office) East Palatka Service Center
111 Yelvington Road Suite 3
East Palatka, Florida 32131-2114
Phone: (386) 328-5051
Fax: (386) 328-3054
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District

167
St. John’s County (continued) Suwannee County
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office Live Oak Service Center
971 West Duval Street, Suite 190 10096 US Highway 129
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736 Live Oak, Florida 32060-6745
Phone: (386) 719-5590 Phone: (386) 362-2681
Fax: (386) 754-4139 Fax: (386) 362-3375
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
Saint Lucie County • Conservation District
Fort Pierce Service Center
8400 Picos Road Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office
Fort Pierce, Florida 34945-3045 971 West Duval Street, Suite 190
Phone: (772) 461-4546 Lake City, Florida 32055-3736
Fax: (772) 465-0165 Phone: (386) 719-5590
• Farm Service Agency Fax: (386) 754-4139
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Rural Development (Area Office)
• Conservation District
Taylor County
Royal Palm Beach Service Center Mayo Service Center
420 South State Road 7 176 South West Community Circle, Suite B
Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414-4306 Mayo, Florida 32066-4000
Phone: (561) 792-2727 Phone: (386) 294-1851
Fax: (561) 792-9094 Fax: (386) 294-2154
• Rural Development (Area Office • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
Sumter County • Conservation District
Bushnell Service Center
7620 State Road 471, Suite 3 Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office
Bushnell, Florida 33513 971 West Duval Street, Suite 190
Phone: (352) 793-2651 Lake City, Florida 32055-3736
Fax: (352) 793-2089 Phone: (386) 719-5590
• Farm Service Agency Fax: (386) 754-4139
• Rural Development (Area Office)
Tavares Service Center
1725 David Walker Drive Union County
Tavares, Florida 32778-4954 Lake City Service Center
Phone: (352) 742-7005 2304 South West Main Boulevard, Suite 103
Fax: (352) 343-6275 Lake City, Florida 32025
• Natural Resources Conservation Service Phone: (386) 752-8447
• Conservation District Fax: (386) 752-8278
• Farm Service Agency
Ocala Service Center • Natural Resources Conservation Service
2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 • Conservation District
Ocala, Florida 34470
Phone: (352) 732-7534
Fax: (352) 732-9728
• Rural Development (Area Office)

168
Rural Development Lake City Area 3 Office Crestview Service Center
971 West Duval Street, Suite 190 934 North Ferdon Boulevard
Lake City, Florida 32055-3736 Crestview, Florida 32536-1706
Phone: (386) 719-5590 Phone: (850) 682-2416
Fax: (386) 754-4139 Fax: (850) 682-1095
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Rural Development (Area Office)

Volusia County Washington County


DeLand Service Center Bonifay Service Center
101 Heavensgate Road 103 North Oklahoma Street
DeLand, Florida 32720 Bonifay, Florida 32425-2311
Phone: (386) 985-4037 Phone: (850) 547-2850
Fax: (386) 985-4881 Fax: (850) 547-2674
• Farm Service Agency • Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service • Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District • Conservation District

Ocala Service Center Marianna Service Center


2441 North East 3rd Street, Suite 204 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue
Ocala, Florida 34470 Marianna, Florida 32448-4027
Phone: (352) 732-7534 Phone: (850) 526-2610
Fax: (352) 732-9728 Fax: (850) 526-7534
• Rural Development (Area Office) • Rural Development (Area Office)

Wakulla County
Monticello Service Center
1244 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32344-2249
Phone: (850) 997-2072
Fax: (850) 997-6277
• Farm Service Agency

Marianna Service Center


2741 Pennsylvania Avenue
Marianna, Florida 32448-4027
Phone: (850) 526-2610
Fax: (850) 526-7534
• Rural Development (Area Office)

Walton County
DeFuniak Springs Service Center
239 John Baldwin Road
DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433
Phone: (850) 892-3712
Fax: (850) 892-6002
• Farm Service Agency
• Natural Resources Conservation Service
• Conservation District

169
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Commissioner’s Office Division of Animal Industry
The Capitol, Level 10 Office of the State Veterinarian
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0810 407 South Calhoun St.
(850) 488-3022 328 Mayo Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0800
• Office of Agricultural Emergency Preparedness (850) 410-0900
• Office of Energy
• Office of Agricultural Law Enforcement • Bureau of Animal Disease Control
• Office of Inspector General • Bureau of Diagnostic Laboratories
• Office of Legislative Affairs
• Office of Policy and Budget Kissimmee, Florida
• Cabinet Affairs (321) 697-1400
• Executive Programs Live Oak, Florida
• General Counsel (386) 330-5700

Division of Administration Division of Aquaculture


407 South Calhoun St. 1203 Governors Square
509 Mayo Building Suite 501
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0800 Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(850) 617-7000 (850) 488-5471

• Bureau of Agriculture Management Information • Bureau of Aquaculture Development


Center (AGMIC) • Bureau of Aquaculture Environmental Services
• Bureau of Finance and Accounting
• Bureau of General Services Division of Consumer Services
• Bureau of Personnel Management 2005 Apalachee Parkway
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-6500
Division of Agricultural Environmental Services (850) 410-3800
3125 Conner Blvd.
130 Administration Building • Bureau of Compliance
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1650 • Bureau of Mediation and Enforcement
(850) 617-7900
Consumer Hotline: 1-800-HELP-FLA
• Bureau of Agriculture Environmental Laboratories En Espańol: 1-800-FL-AYUDA
(850) 617-7830
• Bureau of Fair Rides Inspection
• Bureau of Compliance Monitoring (850) 921-1530
(850) 617-7850
• Bureau of Liquified Petroleum Gas Inspections
• Bureau of Entomology and Pest Control (850) 921-1600
(850) 617-7997
• Bureau of Standards
• Bureau of Pesticides (850) 921-1570
(850) 617-7917
Fort Lauderdale, Field Office
Office of Agricultural Water Policy Port Everglades Petroleum Testing Laboratory
1203 Governors Square Blvd., Suite 200 (954) 468-2719
Tallahassee, FL 32301-2960 Tampa, Field Office
(850) 617-1700 Tampa Petroleum Testing Laboratory
(813) 272-2260
170
Florida Forest Service • Myakka River District Office
3125 Conner Blvd. (941) 751-7627
228 Administration Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1650 • Okeechobee District Office
(850) 681-5800 (863) 462-5160

• Bureau of Forest Protection • Caloosahatchee District Office


(850) 681-5900 (239) 690-3500

• Bureau of Forest Management • Everglades District Office


(850) 681-5880 (954) 475-4120

• Bureau of Forest Logistics and Support Division of Food Safety


(850) 681-5850 3125 Conner Boulevard, Suite D
101 Administration Building
• Bureau of Field Operations Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1650
(850) 681-5940 (850) 245-5595

• Blackwater Forestry Center • Compliance Section


(850) 957-6140 • Food Export Certificates

• Chipola Forestry Center • Bureau of Chemical Residue Labs


(850) 872-4175 (850) 617-7500

• Tallahassee Forestry Center • Bureau of Dairy Industry


(850) 488-1871 (850) 245-5410

• Perry District Office • Bureau of Food Laboratories


(850) 838-2299 (850) 617-7550

• Suwannee District Office • Bureau of Food and Meat Inspection


(386) 758-5700 (850) 245-5520

• Jacksonville District Office Division of Food Nutrition and Wellness


(904) 266-5001 600 South Calhoun St., Suite 120
Tallahassee, Florida 32399
• Wacassassa Forestry Center (850) 617-7400
(352) 955-2005
• Customer Service
• Bunnell District Office 1-800-504-6609
(386) 446-6785 • Summer Food Service Program Hotline
1-800-622-5985
• Withlacoochee Forestry Center
(352) 754-6777 Division of Fruit and Vegetables
500 Third Street Northwest
• Orlando District Office Winter Haven, FL 33881
(407) 856-6512 (863) 297-3900

• Lakeland District Office • Bureau of Inspection


(863) 648-3163 • Bureau of Technical Control
171
Division of Licensing • Ag In The Classroom
Post Office Box 6687 (352) 846-1391
Tallahassee, Florida 32314-6687
(850) 245-5500 • Florida Agricultural Museum
(386) 446-7630
• Bureau of License Issuance
• Bureau of Regulation and Enforcement • Florida Agricultural Promotional Campaign (FAPC)
• Bureau of Support Services (850) 617-7327

• Fort Walton Regional Office • Florida Market Bulletin


(850) 833-9146 (850) 617-7368

• Tallahassee Regional Office • Research, Development and Information


(850) 245-5498 Services Section
(850) 617-7330
• Jacksonville Regional Office
(904) 448-4341 • Fruit and Vegetable Market News
(407) 365-8813
• Orlando Regional Office
(407) 245-0883 • Bureau of State Farmers’ Market
(850) 617-7380
• Tampa Regional Office
(813) 272-2552 • Florida City Farmers’ Market
Paul Cardwell, Senior Market Manager
• Punta Gorda Regional Office (305) 246-6334
(941) 575-5770
• Fort Myers Farmers’ Market
• West Palm Beach Regional Office Lee Crews, Senior Market Manager
(561) 681-2530 (239) 332-6910

• Miami Regional Office • Fort Pierce Farmers’ Market


(305) 377-5950 Michael Brown, Senior Market Manager
(772) 468-3917
Division of Marketing and Development
407 South Calhoun St. • Gadsden Farmers’ Market
435 Mayo Building (850) 627-6484
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0800
(850) 488-4031 • Immokalee Farmers’ Market
Jerry Hubbart, Senior Market Manager
• Bureau of Agricultural Dealer’s Licenses (239) 658-3505
• Bureau of Development and Information
• Bureau of Education and Communication • Palatka Farmers’ Market
• Bureau of Food Distribution Terry Driggers, Senior Market Manager
• Bureau of Seafood and Aquaculture Marketing (386) 329-3713
• Bureau of State Farmers’ Markets

• Florida Agricultural Statistics Services


(407) 648-6013

172
• Plant City Farmers’ Market
Fred Irwin, Senior Market Manager
(813) 359-2620

• Pompano Farmers’ Market


Joseph Swick, Senior Market Manager
(954) 786-4828

• Sanford Farmers’ Market


Doris Denis, Senior Market Manager
(407) 330-6783

• Starke Farmers’ Market


Terry Driggers, Senior Market Manager
(386) 329-3713

• Suwannee Valley Farmers’ Market


Jay Thomas, Market Specialist III
(386) 963-5903

• Trenton Farmers’ Market


Terry Driggers, Senior Market Manager
(386) 963-5903

• Wauchula Farmers’ Market


Diana Durrance, Senior Market Manager
(863) 773-9850

Division of Plant Industry


1911 Southwest 34th St.
Gainesville, Florida 32608-1201
(352) 395-4700

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 147100
Gainesville, Florida 32614-7100

• Bureau of Citrus Budwood Registration


• Bureau of Entomology, Nematology
and Plant Pathology
• Bureau of Methods Development and
Biological Control
• Bureau of Pest Eradication and Control
• Bureau of Plant and Apiary Inspection

• Plant Industry Helpline:


(888) 397-1517

• Citrus Health Response Program:


(800) 282-5153
173
AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS & OTHER INFORMATION

Internet E-Mail Subscriptions

NASS national & State reports and data are available on Free e-mail subscriptions are available via
the World Wide Web, the Internet. automated mailing lists for National and State
reports. You can subscribe to individual reports
National Homepage and they will be sent directly to your e-mail
address soon after the official release time.
http://www.nass.usda.gov
National Reports via E-mail
The national homepage has links to all agency products and
services such as publications, graphics, historic data, State National reports contain statistics from all states and are the
information, statistical research, Census of Agriculture, a most timely source of data. For more information, see:
search engine and a Published Estimates Data Base to query
and download State or county historic data. There are also http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp
links to our Customer Service unit, a Kids Page, and all other
federal statistics outside the National Agricultural Statistics or send e-mail to:
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For a monthly summary of USDA estimates, forecasts and usda-reports@usda.mannlib.cornell.edu


projections of commodities, prices, trade issues, and world
crop developments, see: and in the body of the message type the word: list

http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/ State Reports via E-mail


Ag_Newsletter/index.asp
State reports are distributed after national reports but they
usually contain more local information. To learn more about
Florida Homepage this service, see:

www.nass.usda.gov/fl/ http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/
index.asp
The Florida web site offers much of the same information as
the national homepage but in a format designed for Florida or send e-mail to: listserv@newsbox.usda.gov
customers. The reports contain the same statistics but offer
more details about agriculture in Florida. Links are also and in the message text (not the subject), type two lines with
available to other sites such as the Florida Department of one word on each line: lists
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To subscribe to the Florida Weather & Crop News the
message text (not the subject) would be:
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All NASS reports are still printed on paper. Census reports
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diskettes or CD-ROM with national, State, and county Auto-Fax
statistics. Most of these products are in Lotus 1-2-3
spreadsheet format or comma separated (CSV) files. Selected NASS reports and
information items are available from a free fax service called
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found in the Products & Services catalog issued every connected to your FAX machine to call:
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Voice prompts will guide you to selected items of interest.
The first time you access the system, request Document
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174
The “Fresh From Florida”
brand is a symbol of quality
and the logo is recognized
around the globe. Behind the
logo is our dedicated team of
marketing professionals with a
proven track record of increasing
sales of Florida agricultural products.
Direct benefits* of membership in the
program include:

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• Point of purchase materials to display


with Florida grown products

• Choice of customized FFF business signage -


2x3 metal farm gate sign, 3x6 vinyl weatherproof banner
or 2x6 vinyl weatherproof banner

• Participation in the logo incentive program.

• Company listing and website link on the


“Fresh from Florida” website

• Subscription to the “Fresh from Florida”


magazine and e-newsletter
*Benefits of the program are subject to change depending upon legislative funding.

Join Today! Visit FreshFromFlorida.com or call us at (850) 617-7399.

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SUWANEE
GADSDEN VALLEY
STARKE

Providing Essential TRENTON PALATKA

Marketing Infrastructure
State Farmers’ Markets assist in the marketing of farm SANFORD

products by providing modern marketing facilties to move PLANT CITY

products from the farm to the consumer. There are 13 State


Farmers’ Markets that offer attendant services such as FORT
PIERCE
WAUCHULA
refrigeration, truck weigh scales, packing houses, coolers,
offices, farm supplies, restaurants, produce brokerage sales, FORT
MYERS

and produce and freight shipping companies. Through volume POMPANO

production and marketing, effective competition is assured for IMMOKALEE

FLORIDA
both small amd large growers and buyers. CITY

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