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VOTER INTENTION STAGNANT AS TORIES EKE OUT A BARE


LEAD
[Ottawa – September 16, 2010] – After what
could easily be described as an unpredictable
HIGHLIGHTS
summer, Conservative and Liberal support • National federal vote intention:
appears to have stabilized. At 32 points, the ¤ 32.4% CPC
Conservatives have held a small but statistically ¤ 28.9% LPC
significant lead for two consecutive weeks. In the ¤ 16.6% NDP
meantime, the Liberals have remained steady at
¤ 10.7% Green
¤ 8.9% BQ
29 points. This period of inactivity is somewhat
¤ 2.5% other
reminiscent of last spring where both parties
remained anchored below the 33-point mark. • Direction of country:
¤ 50.6% right direction
While the Conservatives and Liberals may be ¤ 38.1% wrong direction
frozen in amber, there appears to be somewhat ¤ 11.4% DK/NR
more volatility among NDP and Green
supporters. In the last week of polling, the NDP • Direction of government:
widened their lead over the Green Party by more ¤ 41.5% right direction
than three points. This movement is as much due ¤ 45.3% wrong direction
to a rise in NDP support as it is to a fall in Green ¤ 13.2% DK/NR
support, suggesting that voters may be switching
between the two parties. Please note that the methodology is provided at the
end of this document.
In this very stable environment, it is appropriate to look at the two-week results for demographic
trends.

The Liberals retain a clear lead among the university educated, though they do not fare nearly as
well among the other education groups. The Conservatives, meanwhile, continue to hold a solid
lead among men and seniors, though they still lag among female voters. However, this gender
gap is not as extreme as has been seen in recent weeks.

Regionally, the stark east-west divide that emerged several weeks ago appears to have
diminished. The Conservatives have pulled into parity with the Liberals in Ontario and they have
gained ground in both Quebec and Atlantic Canada. On the other hand, BC has once again
become a tight three-way race with the Liberals, NDP, and Conservatives all wedged into a
statistical tie.

Finally, we recently started retesting country of birth. While the Liberal Party has traditionally led
among those born outside Canada, last fall the Conservatives pulled into the lead with this group.
It is now clear that the Conservative advantage with the non-native born has been relinquished.

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Top Line Results:

Federal vote Intention: September 8-14


Q. If a federal election were held tomorrow, which party would you vote for?

50

40
32.4
28.9
30

20 16.6

10.7
8.9
10
2.5
0
CPC LPC NDP GP BQ Other
Other

Copyright 2010. No reproduction without permission BASE: Decided Voters; September 8-14, 2010 (n=1,513)

Weekly tracking of federal vote intention


Q. If a federal election were held tomorrow, which party would you vote for?
50

40

30

20

10

Other
Line
6
0
Sep-082008
Nov-08 Jan-09 Mar-09 May-09 Jul-09 Sep-09 Nov-09 Jan-10 Mar-10 May-10 Jul-10 Sep-10
Election
Results
Note: The data on federal vote intention are based on decided voters only.
Our survey also finds that 14.4% of Canadians are undecided/ineligible to vote.

Copyright 2010. No reproduction without permission BASE: Decided voters; most recent data point September 8-14, 2010 (n=1,513)

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Direction of country
Q. All things considered, would you say the country is moving in the right direction or the wrong direction?

Wrong direction Right direction


60

50

40

30

20
May-09 Jul-09 Sep-09 Nov-09 Jan-10 Mar-10 May-10 Jul-10 Sep-10

Copyright 2010. No reproduction without permission BASE: Canadians; most recent data point September 8-14, 2010 (n=half sample)

Direction of government
Q. All things considered, would you say the Government of Canada is moving in the right direction or the wrong
direction?

Wrong direction Right direction


60

50

40

30

20
May-09 Jul-09 Sep-09 Nov-09 Jan-10 Mar-10 May-10 Jul-10 Sep-10

Copyright 2010. No reproduction without permission BASE: Canadians; most recent data point September 8-14, 2010 (n=half sample)

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Methodology:

EKOS’ weekly tracking polls are conducted using Interactive Voice Recognition (IVR) technology,
which allows respondents to enter their preferences by punching the keypad on their phone,
rather than telling them to an operator.

In an effort to reduce the coverage bias of landline only RDD, we created a dual landline/cell
phone RDD sampling frame for this research. As a result, we are able to reach those with both a
landline and cell phone, as well as cell phone only households and landline only households. This
dual frame yields a near perfect unweighted distribution on age group and gender, something
almost never seen with traditional landline RDD sample or interviewer-administered surveys.

The field dates for this survey are September 8 – September 14, 2010. In total, a random sample
of 1,770 Canadians aged 18 and over responded to the survey (including a sub-sample of 1,513
decided voters). The margin of error associated with the total sample is +/-2.3 percentage
points, 19 times out of 20.

Please note that the margin of error increases when the results are sub-divided (i.e., error
margins for sub-groups such as region, sex, age, education). All the data have been statistically
weighted to ensure the samples composition reflects that of the actual population of Canada
according to Census data.

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Annex:

Federal vote Intention: September 1-7


Q. If a federal election were held tomorrow, which party would you vote for?

50

40
32.1
30 28.5

20
15.2
12.5
9.5
10
2.2
0
CPC LPC NDP GP BQ Other
Other

Copyright 2010. No reproduction without permission BASE: Decided Voters; September 1-7, 2010 (n=1,177)

Federal vote Intention: September 1-14 (2-week roll-up)


Q. If a federal election were held tomorrow, which party would you vote for?

50

40
32.3
28.9
30

20
15.4
11.8
9.1
10
2.5
0
CPC LPC NDP GP BQ Other
Other

Copyright 2010. No reproduction without permission BASE: Decided Voters; September 1-14, 2010 (n=2,690)

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