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¢ The Shooting of his Dear Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements DDD
Folk Song from Norfolk.
Words and Melody from
Publisher: Boosey and Hawkes Music Publishers
Limited.
The English Song Series • 10 8.557220-21
“Six Folk Songs from Norfolk”
∞ The Stream in the Valley
BRITTEN
Collected and arranged by E.J. Moeran

O come all you young fellows that


(Da unten im Tale) German Folk Song
Translation by Iris Rogers
2 CDs
carry a gun, © Copyright by The Iris Rogers Estate
I’d have you get home by the light of
the sun,
For young Jimmy was a fowler and
Reproduced by Permission of Boosey & Hawkes
Music Publishers Ltd.
© The Britten Estate Limited
Folk Song Arrangements
a-fowling alone,
When he shot his own true love in the room
of a swan.
The stream in the valley
Is troubled and sad,
Felicity Lott, Soprano • Philip Langridge, Tenor
Then home went young Jimmy with his dog
And it’s hard to be telling
How great is my love. Graham Johnson, Piano • Carlos Bonell, Guitar
and his gun,
Saying Uncle, dear Uncle, have you heard You tell me you love me,
what I’ve done? You tell me you’re true
Cursed be that old gunsmith that made my But a little deceiving
old gun Is surely there too.
For I’ve shot my own true love in the room
of a swan.’ If I tell you a thousand times
That I am true
Then out came bold uncle with his locks And if still you won’t heed me
hanging grey, Then I’ll go from you.
Saying, ‘Jimmy, dear Jimmy, don’t you
go away And I’ll thank you for loving me
Don’t leave your own country till the Though we must part,
trial come on, And I’ll wish you your happiness
For you never will be hanged for the Deep in my heart.
shooting of a swan.’

So the trial came on and pretty Polly


did appear,
Saying ‘Uncle, dear Uncle, let Jimmy
go clear,
For my apron was bound round me and he
took me for a swan,
And his poor heart lay bleeding for Polly
his own.’

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CD 1 65:34 But it’s all for the sake For good liquor were sent us
Of my charming Nancy. Our spirits to cheer,
Volume 1: British Isles Volume 5: British Isles She’s the fairest of girls, And where we got one pot,
Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 She’s the choice of my own heart, I wish we had ten,
Graham Johnson, Piano Graham Johnson, Piano She is painted like waxwork And never want for liquor,’
In every part.’ Said the sailor: ‘Amen.’
1 The Salley Gardens 2 2:36 ( The Brisk Young Widow 2 2:07
2 Little Sir William 2 3:01 ) Sally in our Alley 2 4:09 ™ The Soldier and the Sailor £ Bonny at Morn
Folk Song from Oxfordshire Folk Song from Northumberland
3 The Bonny Earl o’ Moray 1 2:36 ¡ The Lincolnshire Poacher 2 2:09 Collected by Cecil Sharp Words and Melody from
4 O can ye sew cushions? 1 2:20 ™ Early one morning 1 3:18 in Oxfordshire, August 1909 “North Country Folk Songs” by W. G. Whittaker
5 The trees they grow so high 2 3:35 £ Ca’ the yowes 1 3:39
6 The Ash Grove 2 2:35 As the soldier and the sailor The sheep’s in the meadows,
7 Oliver Cromwell 2 0:45 Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements Was a-walking one day, The kye’s in the corn,
Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Said the soldier to the sailor: Thou’s ower lang in thy bed,
Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements Graham Johnson, Piano ‘I’ve a mind for to pray.’ Bonny at morn.
Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 ‘Pray on then’, said the sailor,
Graham Johnson, Piano ¢ The Holly and the Ivy 1 2:25 ‘Pray on once again, Canny at night, bonny at morn,
∞ Soldier, won’t you marry me? 1 2 1:41 And whatever you do pray for, Thou’s ower lang in thy bed,
8 Greensleeves 2 1:56 § The Deaf Woman’s Courtship 1 2 1:19 I will answer Amen.’ Bonny at morn.
9 I wonder as I wander 2 3:59
‘Now the first thing I’ll pray for, The bird’s in the nest,
0 The Crocodile 2 4:45 I’ll pray for the Queen, The trout’s in the burn,
That she have peace and plenty Thou hinders thy mother
Volume 3: British Isles All the days of her reign, In many a turn.
Felicity Lott 1, Soprano Philip Langridge Tenor 2 And where she got one man
Graham Johnson, Piano I wish she had ten; Canny at night, bonny at morn…..
And never want for an Army.’
! The Plough Boy 2 1:57 Said the sailor ‘Amen.’ We’re all laid idle
@ There’s none to soothe 2 1:37 Wi’ keeping the bairn,
# Sweet Polly Oliver 2 2:15 ‘Now the next thing I’ll pray for, The lad winnot work
$ The Miller of Dee 2 1:56 I’ll pray for the Queen, And the lass winnot lairn.
That she may have peace and plenty
% The foggy, foggy dew 2 2:34 All the days of her reign. Canny at night, bonny at morn….
^ O Waly, Waly 1 4:03 And where she got one ship
& Come you not from Newcastle? 1 1:10 I wish she had ten;
And never want for a Navy.’
Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements Said the sailor: ‘Amen.’
Philip Langridge, Tenor Graham Johnson, Piano
‘Now the next thing I’ll pray for,
* Pray Goody 0:47 Is a pot of good beer,

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Volume 6: England I would not be a blacksmith CD 2 67:03


Publisher: Boosey &Hawkes Music That smuts his nose and chin,
Publishers Limited. I’d rather be a sailor-boy Volume 4: Moore’s Irish Melodies Volume 6: England
That sails thro’ the wind. Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Carlos Bonell, Guitar
( I will give my love an apple Sailor-boy, sailor-boy, Graham Johnson, Piano
Folk Song from Dorset Sailor-boy for me, ( I will give my love an apple 2 1:16
Words and Melody from If I ever get married 1 Avenging and bright 2 1:34 ) Sailor-boy 2 1:54
“Folksongs for Schools” collected and arranged A sailor’s-wife she’ll be. 2 Sail on, sail on 1 2:26 ¡ Master Kilby 2 1:59
by H.E.D. Hammond and R. Vaughan Williams We go walking on the green grass
Thus, thus, thus
3 How sweet the answer 1 1:57 ™ The Soldier and the Sailor 2 2:39
I will give my love an apple without e’er a core We go walking on the green grass 4 The Minstrel Boy 2 2:23 £ Bonny at Morn 2 2:31
I will give my love a house without e’er a door Thus, thus, thus. 5 At the mid hour of night 2 2:46 ¢ The Shooting of his Dear 2 2:54
I will give my love a palace wherein she may be, 6 Rich and rare 1 3:06
And she may unlock it without any key. ¡ Master Kilby 7 Dear Harp of my Country! 2 2:26 Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements
Folk song from Somerset 8 Oft in the stilly night 1 2:47 Philip Langridge, Tenor
My head is the apple without e’er a core, Words and Melody from 9 The last rose of summer 1 3:45 Christopher Van Kampen, Cello
My mind is the house without e’er a door, “Folk Songs for Schools” 0 O the sight entrancing 2 2:09 Graham Johnson, Piano
My heart is the palace wherein she may be, collected and arranged by Cecil Sharp
And she may unlock it without any key. Volume 2: France ∞ German Folk Song:
In the heat of the day The Stream in the Valley 2:32
) Sailor-boy When the sun shines so freely,
Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2
Folk song from the Appalachian Mountains of There I met Master Kilby Graham Johnson, Piano
Kentucky. So fine and so gay. Unpublished folk song setting
Words and Melody from “Seventeen Nursery Songs ! La Noël passée 2 3:51 Christopher Van Kampen, Cello
from the Appalachian Mountains” (under the title Then I pull’d off my hat @ Voici le Printemps 1 1:46 Graham Johnson, Piano
‘Soldier boy’) collected and arranged by Cecil And I bowed to the ground # Fileuse 1 1:51
Sharp And I said: ‘Master Kilby, $ Le roi s’en va-t’en chasse 1 2:19 § Unidentified folk song setting 3:35
Pray where are you bound?’ % La belle est au jardin d’amour 1 3:12
We go walking on the green grass ^ Il est quelqu’un sur terre 1 4:56 Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements
Thus, thus, thus, ‘I am bound for the West, & Eho! Eho! 2 1:56 is published by Boosey & Hawkes, 2001
Come all you pretty fair maids There in hopes to find rest, * Quand j’étais chez mon père 2 2:00
Come walk along with us. And in Nancy’s soft bosom
So pretty and fair I will build a new nest.
As you take yourself to be,
I’ll choose you for a partner, And if I was the master
Come walk along with me. Of ten thousand pounds
We go walking on the green grass All in gay gold and silver
Thus, thus, thus Or in King William’s crowns.
We go walking on the green grass
Thus, thus, thus. I would part with it all
With my own heart so freely

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Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) Pour mettre à mon chapeau ‘roun’ my hat for to tie.
Folk Song Arrangements Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many,
Benjamin Britten occupies an unrivalled position in and recitals, often in difficult circumstances, offering Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
English music of the twentieth century and a place of the encouragement to those who heard them. The re- Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry.
greatest importance in the wider musical world. While opening of Sadler’s Wells and the staging of Britten’s
Elgar was in some ways part of late nineteenth-century opera Peter Grimes started a new era in English opera. Mais des os de la bête So a pipe I did make me
German romantic tradition, Britten avoided the trap The English Opera Group was founded and a series of Me fis un chalumiau Of the bones white and dry,
offered by musical nationalism and the insular debt to chamber operas followed, with larger scale works that Pour jouer à la fête For to sing and make merry
folk-music of his older compatriots, while profiting from established Britten as a composer of the highest stature, A la fêt’ du hamiau. When the spring-time is nigh.
that tradition in a much wider European context. He may a position recognised shortly before his early death by Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
be seen as following in part a path mapped out by his elevation to the peerage, the first English composer Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many,
Mahler. He possessed a special gift for word-setting and ever to be so honoured. Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
vocal writing, a facility that Purcell had shown and that It was in some sense a certain nostalgia that lay Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry.
was the foundation of a remarkable series of operas that behind Britten’s many folk-song arrangements. He had a
brought English opera for the first time into international particular gift for bringing out the qualities implicit in a Pour fair’ danser l’ village, Then the young and the pretty,
repertoire. Tonal in his musical language, he knew well melody and text, something displayed to admirable Dessous le grand ormiau O, their skirts they let fly,
how to use inventively, imaginatively, and, above all, effect in his version of The Beggar’s Opera. The first set Et les jeun’s et les vieilles And the old and the ugly
musically, techniques that in other hands often seemed of songs from the British Isles was published in 1943, Les pieds dans les sabiots. For to dance they did try.
arid. His work owed much to the friendship and constant but the seven arrangements were made during Britten’s Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
companionship of the singer Peter Pears, for whom time in America and formed an element in recital Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many,
Britten wrote many of his principal operatic rôles and programmes offered there by Pears and the composer Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
whose qualities of voice and intelligence clearly had a [CD1, 1-7]. It was generously reviewed by Vaughan Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry.
marked effect on his vocal writing. Williams, modestly decrying his own very different
Born in the East Anglian seaside town of Lowestoft approach to such material. Each song is dedicated to a Translations by Iris Rogers
in 1913, Britten showed early gifts as a composer, friend in America. The set starts with The Salley © 1946 by Hawkes & Son (London) Ltd.
studying with Frank Bridge before a less fruitful time at Gardens, dedicated to the Australian-born singer Clytie Reproduced by Permission of
the Royal College of Music in London. His association Mundy, with whom Pears took lessons in America, an Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.
with the poet W.H. Auden, with whom he undertook Irish song, with folk-style words by W.B. Yeats. The
various collaborations, was in part behind his departure second of the set, Little Sir William, dedicated to
with Pears in 1939 for the United States, where William Mayer, father of a family into which Pears and
opportunities seemed to offer, away from the petty Britten were welcomed in America, is a ballad, its words
jealousies and inhibitions of his own country. The slightly modified in publication to avoid the traditional
outbreak of war brought its own difficulties. Britten and anti-semitism of the text. The poignant Scottish lament
Pears were firmly pacifist in their views, but were for The Bonny Earl o’ Moray is dedicated to the
equally horrified at the excesses of National Socialism psychiatrist Mildred Titley, wife of the Superintendent
and sufferings that the war brought. Britten’s nostalgia of the Long Island Home, where William Mayer was
for his native country and region led to their return to Medical Director. A second Scottish tune O can ye sew
England in 1942, when they rejected the easy option of cushions? is a lullaby, dedicated to Clytie Mundy’s
nominal military service as musicians in uniform in daughter Meg, a singer, and the moving The trees they
favour of overt pacifism, but were able to give concerts grow so high, a Somerset folk-song, with its gradually

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Aux herbages nouveaux. Where a young lamb may play. developing then diminishing accompaniment, to Bobby harp-chord, briskly struck, before the more ominous
Rothman, the son of a friend introduced by the Meyers. growling bass of the third verse. Sail on, sail on is a song
Eho! Eho! Eho! …. Eho! Eho! Eho! … The Welsh The Ash Grove, with its fine use of canon, a of parting, as the boat gently rocks, while fragmentary
favourite device, has a dedication to Beata, daughter of echo is duly heard in How sweet the answer. The wild
Et les ombres lointaines, But this perilous country William and Elisabeth Mayer, and the lively Suffolk harp of The Minstrel Boy is heard to brave effect,
Leurz’y cach’ leurs bourreaux, Is the home of the foe, nursery-rhyme Oliver Cromwell to their son followed by the nocturnal At the mid hour of night, over
Malgré leurs plaintes vaines, And the wolf he is hungry Christopher. a drone-like bass. The device of canon is used once more
Les loups mang’ les agneaux. For this lamb white as snow. The second volume of arrangements [CD2, !-*] in Rich and rare, Dear Harp of my Country! has harp-
was published in 1946 and dedicated to Britten’s young like figuration, while Oft in the stilly night unwinds over
Eho! Eho! Eho! … Eho! Eho! Eho! … friends Arnold and Humphrey Gyde, the latter his repeated bass figuration, later inverted. The very
godson, the children of the singer Sophie Wyss, who familiar The last rose of summer is nostalgically
T’es mon agneau, ma reine Little lamb my sweet Chloe, gave the first performances of Les Illuminations. The accompanied by harp arpeggiations, and the album ends
Les grand’ vill’ c’est le bois, Do not stray far and wide, present writer remembers hearing some of these and with the patriotic ostinato of O the sight entrancing.
Par ainsi Madeleine, For the wolf’s in the city, other songs a few years earlier. They include a The fifth volume once more brings together songs
T’en vas pas loin de moi! Just you stay by my side! Christmas carol, a celebration of spring, a spinning- from the British Isles. It was published in 1961, but
song, Fileuse, with apt accompanying figuration, a represents songs written at least during the preceding
Eho! Eho! Eho! … Eho! Eho! Eho! … hunting-song, with the necessary suggestions of the decade [CD1, (-£]. Britten again uses canon in the
hunting-horns, a shepherd idyll, a sterner spinning-song, lively narrative of The Brisk Young Widow and subtle
* Quand j’étais chez mon père Heigh ho, heigh hi! with a repeated bass figure, a pastoral love-song, and a use of the rising interval on the girl’s name in Sally in
final sad tale from a shepherd-boy, with a haunting our Alley. The Lincolnshire Poacher presents further
Quand j’étais chez mon père Oh I lived with my daddy, refrain. opportunities for canonic writing, as it reaches its
Apprenti pastoureau, An apprentice was I, Published in 1947, bringing together further songs that climax, to which Early one morning offers a gentle
Il m’a mis dans la lande, Just a poor shepherd laddie had already formed part of concert repertoire for Peter contrast. The volume closes with the Robert Burns Ca’
Pour garder les troupiaux. To my sheep I did cry. Pears and the composer, the third volume [CD1, !-&], the yowes, the melody used as a source of canon in
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, devoted to songs from the British Isles, starts with The reduced note values.
Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many, Plough Boy, his whistling over the lea vividly first The sixth volume, also published in 1961, is for high
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, illustrated in the opening bars. The sad Scottish song voice and guitar, songs performed by Peter Pears and the
Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry. There’s none to soothe is followed by the lively guitarist Julian Bream [CD2, ( - ¢ ]. The running
narrative of Sweet Polly Oliver, in which Britten resorts accompaniment of the first song, I will give my love an
Mais je n’en avais guère Oh they weren’t very many, to his favourite device of canon, The Miller of Dee, with apple, a Dorset folk-song, is fully within the idiom of the
Je n’avais qu’ trois agneaux; And the lambs they did die, his mill-wheel duly turning, and the wicked guitar, a characteristic of the second cheerful
Et le loup de la plaine For the wolf swallowed daily suggestiveness of The foggy, foggy dew. To this O Waly, Appalachian Sailor-boy, with its nautical touches and
M’a mangé le plus biau. All the best and most spry. Waly offers a contrast, and the set ends with Come you uses of grand and petit barré. There is a graceful chordal
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, not from Newcastle?, over an ostinato bass variously accompaniment to Master Kilby, exploring in its
Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many, harmonized. conclusion the varied possibilities of guitar timbre. A
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, It was not until 1960 that a fourth volume of folk- pattern of ascending thirds marks The Soldier and the
Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry. song arrangements appeared, this time devoted to a Sailor, and the North Country Bonny at Morn uses
group of Moore’s Irish Melodies [CD2, 1-0]. Once varied arpeggiation, exploring, as elsewhere, the
Il était si vorace O the wolf was so greedy again some of these songs had been heard in much harmonies inherent in traditional guitar tuning. The final
N’a laissé que la piau, Only bones he let lie, earlier recitals. The first song, Avenging and bright, is song is The Shooting of his Dear, in which characteristic
N’a laissé que la queue, Only tails he did leave me, marked Fast and fierce, with opening suggestions of a guitar harmony again makes its appearance.

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The collection Tom Bowling and Other Song Pears and the contralto Norma Procter from the 1950s. et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
Arrangements was published in 2001, edited, with a The Holly and the Ivy [CD1, ¢] has not been dated, and Il est dans la vallée. And down there in the valley’s
useful introduction, by Paul Kildea. It brings together The Stream in the Valley (Da unten im Tale) [CD2, ∞] Un moulin près du pont. A mill where love doth stay.
songs performed but not published during the was first broadcast in 1946 with the cellist Maurice
composer’s lifetime, some of them held back through Gendron, the first song in a projected set of German L’amour y moud’ sa graine, There love shall grind the barley,
copyright problems with collectors of the melodies and folk-song arrangements. Also included is an Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel!
their publishers. Greensleeves, I wonder as I wander unidentified folk-song setting, here, in the absence of Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along,
and the sailor’s yarn The Crocodile [CD1, 8-0] date words, given to the cello [CD2, §]. et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
from 1940-41, Pray Goody, [CD1, *] from 1945-46, and L’amour y moud’ sa graine, There love shall grind the barley
Soldier, won’t you marry me and The Deaf Woman’s Tant que le jour est long. All through the live-long day.
Courtship [CD1, ∞-§] apparently for recitals by Peter Keith Anderson
La nuit vers les étoiles. To stars that shine above me,
Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel!
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along,
et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
La nuit vers les étoiles. To stars that shine above me,
Soupire sa chanson. The night shall sing her lay.

La rou’ s’y est brisée. A broken wheel’s my story,


Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel!
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along,
et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
La rou’ s’y est brisée. A broken wheel’s my story,
Finie est la chanson. And finished is my lay.

& Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho!

Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho!


Les agneaux vont aux plaines. Keep your lambs in the valley.
Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho!
Et les loups vont aux bois. For the wolf’s in the wood.

Tant qu’aux bords des fontaines The white lambs they do dally,
Ou dans les frais ruisseaux, By the fountain and spring,
Les blancs moutons s’y baignent, As they bathe and skip gladly,
Y dansant au préau All around in a ring

Eho! Eho! Eho! … Eho! Eho! Eho! …

Mais queuqu’fois par vingtaine But perchance there are twenty,


Y s’éloign’ des troupeaux, From the flock far will stray,
Pour aller sous les chênes, As they search for new country,

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Mais j’aime un pauv’ garcon, ‘I love a lad,’ said she, Felicity Lott
Qui aime Nanon! ‘And he loves Marie!’ Felicity Lott was born and educated in Cheltenham, read French at Royal Holloway College, of which she is now an
Honorary Fellow, and singing at the Royal Academy of Music, of which she is a Fellow. Her operatic repertoire
% La belle est au jardin d’amour Beauty in love’s garden ranges from Handel to Stravinsky, but she has built up her formidable international reputation as an interpreter of
the great rôles of Mozart and Strauss. At the Royal Opera House she has sung Anne Trulove, Blanche, Ellen Orford,
La belle est au jardin d’amour Beauty in love’s garden is bound, Eva, Countess Almaviva and under Mackerras, Tate, Davis and Haitink, the Marschallin. At the Glyndebourne
La belle est au jardin d’amour Beauty in love’s garden is bound. Festival her rôles include Anne Trulove, Pamina, Donna Elvira, Octavian, Christine (Intermezzo), Countess
Il y’a un mois ou cinq semaines. Full thirty nights and many a morning. Madeleine (Capriccio) and the title-rôle in Arabella; in Paris at the Opéra Bastille, Opéra Comique, Châtelet and
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. Palais Garnier she has sung Cleopatra, Donna Elvira, Fiordiligi, Countess Madeleine, the title-rôle in La belle
Hélène, La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein and the Marschallin. At the Metropolitan Opera, New York, she sang
Son père la cherche partout, Father is searching all around, the Marschallin under Carlos Kleiber and Countess Almaviva under James Levine. She has sung with the Berlin and
Son père la cherche partout, Father is searching all around. Vienna Philharmonic and Chicago Symphony Orchestras under Solti, the Munich Philharmonic under Mehta, the
Son amoureux qui est en peine. And Colin weepeth for his darling. London Philharmonic under Haitink, Welser-Möst and Masur, the Concertgebouw Orchestra under Masur, the
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. Boston Symphony under Previn, the New York Philharmonic under Previn and Masur, the BBC Symphony
Orchestra with Sir Andrew Davis in London, Sydney and New York and the Cleveland Orchestra under Welser-
‘Berger, berger, n’as tu point vu, ‘Shepherd say where can she be found, Möst in Cleveland and Carnegie Hall. A founder member of The Songmakers’ Almanac, Felicity Lott has appeared
Berger, berger, n’as tu point vu, Shepherd say where can she be found. on the major recital platforms of the world, including the Salzburg, Prague, Bergen, Aldeburgh, Edinburgh and
Passer ici celle que j’aime?’ Hast thou not seen my dear a-passing?’ Munich Festivals, the Musikverein and Konzerthaus in Vienna and the Salle Gaveau, Musée d’Orsay, Opéra
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down hey down a-downing. Comique, Châtelet and Théâtre des Champs Elysées in Paris. She has a particularly close association with the
‘Elle est là bas dans ce vallon, ‘She’s by the fountain down below, Wigmore Hall. Her many awards include honorary doctorates at the Universities of Oxford, Loughborough,
Elle est là bas dans ce vallon, She’s by the fountain down below. Leicester, London and Sussex and the Royal Academy of Music and Drama Glasgow. She was made a CBE in the
A un oiseau conte ses peines.’ And to her dove she is complaining.’ 1990 New Year Honours and in 1996 was created a Dame Commander of the British Empire. In February 2003 she
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. was awarded the title of Bayerische Kammersängerin. She has also been awarded the titles Officier de l’Ordre des
Arts et des Lettres and Chevalier de l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur by the French Government.
Le bel oiseau s’est envolé, The pretty bird hath ta’en her woe,
Le bel oiseau s’est envolé, The pretty bird hath ta’en her woe, Philip Langridge
Et le chagrin bien loin emmène. And with its far away he’s flying. Philip Langridge was born in Kent and studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He is one of the world’s
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. most distinguished singers, whose musical and dramatic qualities ensure that he is in constant demand throughout
Europe, the United States and Japan. In recognition of these qualities, he was made a Commander of the British
^ Il est quelqu’un sur terre There’s someone in my fancy Empire in the Queen’s Birthday Honours of 1994. He has also received a number of other awards, including the
prestigious Olivier Award for Osud, the Singer of the Year Award from the Royal Philharmonic Society and The
Il est quelqu’un sur terre There’s someone in my fancy, Worshipful Company of Musicians’ Santay Award. He was awarded the NFMS/Charles Groves Prize 2001 for his
Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel! outstanding contribution to British Music. His remarkable versatility and command of a wide variety of styles is
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along, reflected in his extensive discography, ranging from the early classical period to the present day. These recordings
et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song. have gained him two Grammy Awards (Moses und Aron, and Peter Grimes), the Gramophone Award (War
Il est quelqu’un sur terre There’s someone in my fancy, Requiem) and a Classic CD Award (The Turn of the Screw). On video he can be seen in Peter Grimes, Billy Budd,
Vers qui mes rêves vont. To him my thoughts do stray. Idomeneo, La Clemenza di Tito, From the House of the Dead, Wozzeck, Oberon, Jenůfa and Oedipus Rex, which
won the Classical Music Award. International festivals and opera houses with which he is particularly closely
Il est dans la vallée. And down there in the valley, associated include Salzburg, the Metropolitan Opera New York, La Scala, Milan, Bayerische Staatsoper, Munich,
Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel! the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Glyndebourne, Edinburgh, and the English National Opera. In concert
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along, Philip Langridge has worked with the world’s leading conductors including Abbado, Barenboim, Gergiev, Haitink,
Harnoncourt, Levine, Ozawa, Previn, Rattle and Solti, and appeared with the world’s major orchestras.

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Graham Johnson $ Le roi s’en va-t’en chasse The King is gone a-hunting
Graham Johnson is recognised as one of the world’s leading vocal accompanists. Born in Rhodesia, he came to
London to study in 1967. After he left the Royal Academy of Music, his teachers included Gerald Moore and Geoffrey Le roi s’en va-t’en chasse, The King is gone a-hunting
Parsons. In 1972 he was the official pianist at Peter Pears’ first master-classes at The Maltings, Snape, which brought Dans le bois des Bourbons Beneath the greenwood tree,
him into contact with Benjamin Britten, a link which strengthened his determination to accompany. In 1976 he formed Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
the Songmakers’ Almanac to explore neglected areas of piano-accompanied vocal music; the founder singers were Dans le bois des Bourbons Beneath the greenwood tree,
Dame Felicity Lott, Ann Murray, Anthony Rolfe Johnson and Richard Jackson, artists with whom he has Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.
established long and fruitful collaborations both on the concert platform and in the recording studio. Some two
hundred and fifty Songmakers’ programmes have been presented over the years. Graham Johnson has accompanied Ne trouve rien en chasse, He’s caught no bird a-hunting,
such distinguished singers as Sir Thomas Allen, Victoria de los Angeles, Elly Ameling, Arleen Auger, Brigitte Ni cailles, ni pigeons, No pigeon catcheth he,
Fassbaender, Matthias Goerne, Thomas Hampson, Simon Keenlyside, Philip Langridge, Serge Leiferkus, Edith Mathis, Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
Lucia Popp, Christoph Prégardien, Dame Margaret Price, Dorothea Röschmann, Peter Schreier, Dame Elisabeth Ni cailles, ni pigeons, No pigeon catcheth he,
Schwarzkopf, and Sarah Walker. His relationship with the Wigmore Hall is a special one. He devised and accompanied Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.
concerts in the hall’s re-opening series in 1994, and in its centenary celebrations in 2001. He has been chairman of the
jury for the Wigmore Hall Song Competition since its inception. He is Senior Professor of Accompaniment at the Rencontre une bergère But he’s found a shepherd maiden
Guildhall School of Music and has led a biennial scheme for Young Songmakers since 1985. His achievements Qui dormait dans les joncs, Asleep beneath a tree,
include the devising and accompaniment of a set of complete Schubert Lieder on 37 discs for Hyperion Records, to Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
be followed by a complete Schumann series, and there is an ongoing French song series to include the complete Qui dormait dans les joncs, Asleep beneath a tree,
songs of such composers as Chausson, Chabrier and Fauré. All these discs are issued with Graham Johnson’s own Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.
programme notes. He has also recorded for Sony, BMG, Harmonia Mundi, Forlane, EMI and DGG. Awards include
the Gramophone solo vocal award in 1989 (with Dame Janet Baker), 1996 (Die schöne Müllerin with Ian Bostridge), ‘Voulez vous être reine, ‘And wilt thou be my queen-a,
1997 (for the inauguration of the Schumann series with Christine Schäfer), and 2001 (with Magdalena Kožená). He Dedans mes beaux donjons, And live in state with me,
was The Royal Philharmonic Society’s Instrumentalist of the Year in 1998; in June 2000 he was elected a member of Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
the Royal Swedish Academy of Music. He is author of The Songmakers’ Almanac; Twenty years of recitals in London Dedans mes beaux donjons, And live in state with me,
and The French Song Companion for Oxford University Press. He was made an OBE in the 1994 Queen’s Birthday Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.’
Honours list, and in 2002 he was created Chevalier in the Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the French Government.
‘Vous aurez des carrosses ‘Oh thou shalt have a carriage
Carlos Bonell Et de l’or à foison, And gold in quantity,
Carlos Bonell has enjoyed an immensely varied career. His activities include television, film and CD recordings, Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
international tours, concertos with the major orchestras and concerts with his own ensemble. He can be heard on the Et de l’or à foison, And gold in quantity,
soundtracks of the Hollywood films City of Angels and The Honest Courtesan and on the television films Inspector Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.’
Morse and The Politician’s Wife. Carlos Bonell first gained prominence through his critically acclaimed Decca
recording of Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra and Charles Dutoit, which ‘Et cour de grandes dames, ‘At court I’ve stately ladies,
was awarded a coveted rosette by the Penguin CD guide. He has appeared in concert with a wide variety of musicians De ducs et de barons, Two barons one grandee,
including guitarists John Williams, Paco Peña, Juan Martin and Martin Taylor, violinists Salvatore Accardo, Pinchas Mon aimable bergére. My adorable maiden.
Zukerman and Levon Chilingirian, and singers Patricia Rozario, Teresa Berganza, Cleo Laine and Philip Langridge. De ducs et de barons, Two barons one grandee,
Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.’

‘Merci, merci, beau Sire, ‘I thank you, Sir, most kindly,


Mais j’aime un pauv’ garcon, I love a lad,’ said she,
Qui aime sa bergère My adorable maiden.

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CD1 He is with the little schoolfellows out on The words of love then spoken; Lie senseless and dead.
Volume 1: British Isles the green. The eyes that shone,
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Playing some pretty play’. Now dimm’d and gone, So soon may I follow,
Publishers Limited The cheerful hearts now broken! When friendships decay,
Mamma went to the Boyne water Thus in the stilly night And from love’s shining circle
1 The Salley Gardens That is so wide and deep, Ere slumber’s chain has bound me, The gems drop away!
Irish Tune, words by W.B. Yeats Saying, ‘Little Sir William, if you are there, Sad Mem’ry brings the light When true hearts lie wither’d,
Oh pity your mother’s weep’. Of other days around me. And fond ones are flown,
Down by the Salley gardens my love and I Oh! who would inhabit
did meet, ‘How can I pity your weep, mother, When I remember all This bleak world alone!
She passed the Salley gardens with little And I so long in pain? The friends, so link’d together,
snow-white feet. For the little pen knife sticks close to I’ve seen around me fall 0 O the sight entrancing
She bid me take love easy, as the leaves my heart like leaves in wintry weather, (Planxty Sudley)
grow on the tree, And the School wife hath me slain. I feel like one who treads alone
But I being young and foolish with her did Some banquet hall deserted, O the sight entrancing,
not agree. Go home, go home my mother dear Whose lights are fled, whose garlands dead, When morning’s beam is glancing.
And prepare my winding sheet, And all but he departed! O’er files array’d
In a field by the river my love and I For tomorrow morning before 8 o’clock, Thus in the stilly night With helm and blade,
did stand, You with my body shall meet. Ere slumber’s chain has bound me, And plumes in the gay wind dancing.
And on my leaning shoulder she laid her Sad Mem’ry brings the light
snow-white hand; And lay my Prayer Book at my head, Of other days around me. When hearts are all high beating,
She bid me take life easy as the grass grows And my grammar at my feet, And the trumpet’s voice repeating
on the weirs, That all the little schoolfellows as 9 The last rose of summer That song whose breath
But I was young and foolish, and now am they pass by (Groves of Blarney) May lead to death,
full of tears. May read them for my sake.’ But never to retreating.
’Tis the last rose of summer Then if a cloud comes over
2 Little Sir William 3 The Bonny Earl o’ Moray Left blooming alone; The brow of sire or lover,
Somerset Folk Song Scottish Tune All her lovely companions Think ’tis the shade
Are faded and gone; By vict’ry made,
Easter day was a holiday Ye Hielands and ye Lowlands, No flow’r of her kindred, Whose wings right o’er us hover.
Of all days in the year, O where hae ye been? No rosebud is nigh
And all the little schoolfellows went out They hae slain the Earl o’ Moray, To reflect her blushes, O the sight entrancing …
to play, And laid him on the green. Or give sigh for sigh.
But Sir William was not there. Yet ’tis not helm or feather –
He was a braw gallant I’ll not leave thee, thou lone one, For ask yon despot whether
Mamma went to the School wife house And he rade at the ring; To pine on the stem; His pluméd bands could bring such hands
And knockèd at the ring, And the bonnie Earl o’ Moray Since the lovely are sleeping, And heart as ours together.
Saying, ‘Little Sir William if you are there, He might hae been a King. Go, sleep thou with them; Leave pomps to those who need ’em –
Pray let your mother in’. Thus kindly I scatter Adorn but man with freedom,
O lang will his Lady Thy leaves o’er the bed And proud he braves
The School wife open’d the door and said: Look frae the Castle Doune, Where thy mates of the garden The gaudiest slaves
‘He is not here today. Ere she see the Earl o’ Moray

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Could not bring that proud soul under, So lone and lovely, thro’ this bleak way? Come soundin’ thru’ the toon. 5 The trees they grow so high
The harp he lov’d ne’er spoke again, Are Erin’s sons so good or so cold Somerset Folk Song
For he tore its chords asunder; As not to be tempted by woman or gold?’ O wae tae ye, Huntley,
And said ‘No chain shall sully thee, And wherefore did ye sae? The trees they grow so high and the leaves
Thou soul of love and brav’ry! ‘Sir Knight! I feel not the least alarm; I bade ye bring him wi’ you they do grow green,
Thy songs were made for the pure and free, No son of Erin will offer me harm; And forbade ye him to slay. And many a cold winter’s night my love
They shall never sound on slav’ry.’ For, tho’ they love woman and golden store, and I have seen.
Sir Knight, they love honour and virtue more!’ He was a braw gallant Of a cold winter’s night, my love, you and I
5 At the mid hour of night And he played at the glove; alone have been,
(Molly, my dear) On she went and her maiden smile And the bonnie Earl o’ Moray Whilst my bonny boy is young, he’s
In safety lighted her round the green isle; He was the Queen’s love! a-growing.
At the mid hour of night when stars are And blest for ever was she who relied
weeping, I fly Upon Erin’s honour and Erin’s pride! O lang will his Lady O father, dearest father, you’ve done to me
To the lone vale we lov’d when life shone Look frae the Castle Doune, great wrong,
warm in thine eye; 7 Dear Harp of my Country! Ere she see the Earl o’ Moray You’ve tied me to a boy when you know he
And I think that if spirits can steal from the (Kate Tyrrel) Come soundin’ thru’ the toon. is too young.
region of air, O daughter, dearest daughter, if you wait
To revisit past scenes of delight, thou wilt Dear Harp of my Country! in darkness I found thee, 4 O can ye sew cushions? a little while,
come to me there, The cold chain of silence had hung o’er thee long; Scottish Tune A lady you shall be while he’s growing.
And tell me our love is remembered e’en in When proudly, my own Island Harp! I unbound thee,
the sky. And gave all thy chords to light, freedom, and song! O can ye sew cushions and can ye sew sheets I’ll send your love to college all for a year
The warm lay of love and the light tone of gladness And can ye sing ballulow when the bairn greets? or two,
Then I’ll sing the wild song, which once Have waken’d thy fondest, thy liveliest thrill; And hie and baw, birdie, and hie and baw lamb, And then in the meantime he will do
’twas rapture to hear, But so oft hast thou echo’d the deep sigh of sadness, And hee and baw birdie, my bonnie wee lamb. for you;
When our voices, both mingling, breathed That e’en in thy mirth it will steal from thee still. I’ll buy him white ribbons, tie them round
like one on the ear, Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? his bonny waist
And, as Echo far off thro’ the vale my sad Dear Harp of my Country! farewell to thy numbers, Black’s the life that I lead wi’ ye To let the ladies know that he’s married.
orison rolls, This sweet wreath of song is the last we shall twine; Many o’ you, little for to gi’ ye,
I think, oh my Love! ’tis they voice from the Go, sleep with the sunshine of Fame on thy slumbers, Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? I went up to the college and I looked over
kingdom of souls Till touch’d by some hand less unworthy than mine. the wall,
Faintly answering still the notes which If the pulse of the patriot, soldier, or lover, I’ve placed my cradle on yon hilly top Saw four and twenty gentlemen playing at
once were so dear! Have throbb’d at our lay, ’tis thy glory alone; And aye as the wind blew my cradle did rock. bat and ball.
I was but as the wind, passing heedlessly over, O hush-a-by, babie, O baw lily loo, I called for my true love, but they would
6 Rich and rare And all the wild sweetness I waked was thy own! And hee and baw birdie, my bonnie wee doo. not let him come,
(The summer is coming) All because he was a young boy and
8 Oft in the stilly night Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? growing.
Rich and rare were the gems she wore, Black’s the life that I lead wi’ ye
And a bright gold ring on her wand she bore; Oft in the stilly night Many o’ you, little for to gi’ ye, At the age of sixteen, he was a married man
But O her beauty was far beyond Ere slumber’s chain has bound me, Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? And at the age of seventeen he was father
Her sparkling gems and her snow-white wand. Fond mem’ry brings the light to a son.
Of other days around me: And at the age of eighteen the grass grew
‘Lady! dost thou not fear to stray, The smiles, the tears of boyhood’s years, over him,

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Cruel death soon put an end to his growing. Hee-haw – buried and dead, CD2 Through calm, through tempest, stop no more;
There grew an old apple tree over his head, Volume 4: Moore’s Irish Melodies The stormiest sea’s a resting place
And now my love is dead and in his grave Hee-haw – over his head. Publisher: Boosey and Hawkes Music Publishers To him who leaves such hearts on shore.
doth lie. Limited. Or, if some desert land we meet,
The green grass grows o’er him so very, The apples were ripe and ready to fall; Where never yet false-hearted men
very high. Hee-haw – ready to fall; 1 Avenging and bright Profaned a world, that else were sweet,
I’ll sit and I’ll mourn his fate until the There came an old woman to gather them all, (Crooghan a venee) Then rest thee, bark, but not till then.
day I die, Hee-haw – gather them all.
And I’ll watch all o’er his child while he’s growing. Avenging and bright fall the swift sword of Erin 3 How sweet the answer
Oliver rose and gave her a drop, On him who the brave sons of Usna betrayed! (The Wren)
6 The Ash Grove Hee-haw – gave her a drop, For ev’ry fond eye which he waken’d a tear in,
Welsh Tune Which made the old woman go hippety hop, A drop from his heart-wounds shall weep o’er her blade. How sweet the answer Echo makes
Hee-haw – hippety hop. To music at night;
Down yonder green valley where streamlets By the red cloud which hung over Conner’s When, rous’d by lute or horn, she wakes,
meander, The saddle and bridle, they lie on the shelf, dark dwelling, And far away, o’er lawns and lakes,
When twilight is fading, I pensively rove, Hee-haw – lie on the shelf, When Ulda’s three champions lay sleeping in gore – Goes answering light.
Or at the bright noontide in solitude wander If you want any more you can sing it yourself By the billows of war which so often high swelling,
Amid the dark shades of the lonely Ash-grove. Hee-haw – sing it yourself. Have wafted these heroes to victory’s shore! Yet love hath echoes truer far,
’Twas there while the blackbird was And far more sweet,
joyfully singing, Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements We swear to avenge them! – no joy shall be tasted, Than e’er beneath the moonlight’s star,
I first met my dear one, the joy of my heart; Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers The harp shall be silent, the maiden unwed, Of horn, or lute, or soft guitar,
Around us for gladness the bluebells Limited Our halls shall be mute, and our fields shall The songs repeat.
were ringing. lie wasted,
Ah! then little thought I how soon we should part. 8 Greensleeves Till vengeance be wreaked on the murderer’s head! ’Tis when the sigh, in youth sincere,
Traditional Folk Song Yes, monarch! though sweet are our home recollections, And only then –
Still glows the bright sunshine o’er valley © The Britten Estate Limited Though sweet are the tears that from tenderness fall; The sigh, that’s breath’d for one to hear,
and mountain, Words reproduced by permission of Though sweet are our friendships, our hope Is by that one, that only dear,
Still warbles the blackbird his note from The Britten Estate Limited and affections, Breath’d back again.
the tree; Revenge on a tyrant is sweetest of all.
Still trembles the moonbeam on streamlet Alas my love you do me wrong 4 The Minstrel Boy
and fountain, To cast me off discourteously; 2 Sail on, sail on (The Moreen)
But what are the beauties of nature to me. And I have loved you so long, (The humming of the Ban)
With sorrow, deep sorrow, my bosom is laden Rejoicing in your company. The Minstrel Boy to the war is gone
All day I go mourning in search of my love. Sail on, sail on, thou fearless bark, In the ranks of death you’ll find him;
Ye echoes, O tell me, where is the sweet maiden? Greensleeves was all my joy, Wherever blows the welcome wind; His father’s sword he has girded on,
She sleeps ’neath the green turf down by the Greensleeves was my delight. It cannot lead to scenes more dark, And his wild harp slung behind him.
Ash-grove. Greensleeves was my heart of gold, More sad than those we leave behind. ‘Land of Song’, said the warrior bard,
And who but my lady Greensleeves? Each smiling billow seems to say ‘Tho’ all the world betrays thee,
7 Oliver Cromwell ‘Tho’ death beneath our surface be, One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard
Nursery Rhyme from Suffolk I have been ready at your hand, Less cold we are, less false than they, One faithful harp shall praise thee.’
To grant whatever you did crave; Whose smiling wreck’d thy hopes and thee!
Oliver Cromwell lay buried and dead And I have waged both life and land, Sail on, sail on, through endless space, The Minstrel fell! but the foeman’s chain

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Off to the tailor she did go § The Deaf Woman’s Courtship Your love and goodwill for to gain. Now listen you landsmen unto me,
As hard as she could run, Appalachian Folk Song To tell you the truth I’m bound,
Brought him back the finest that was there. Words and melody collected by Cecil Sharp Greensleeves was all my joy, What happened to me by going to sea,
Now soldier put it on. © The Britten Estate Limited Greensleeves was my delight. And the wonders that I found:
Words reproduced by permission of Greensleeves was my heart of gold, Shipwreck’d I was once off Perouse,
‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me? The Britten Estate Limited And who but my lady Greensleeves? And cast upon the shore,
It’s O a fife and drum.’ So then I did resolve to roam,
‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you ‘Old woman, old woman, The country to explore.
When I’ve got no shoes to put on?’ Are you fond of smoking?’ 9 I wonder as I wander
‘Speak a little louder, sir, From Songs of the Hill Folk To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!
Off to the shoe shop she did go I’m rather fond of hearing.’ Words and melody collected by John Jacob Niles To my rit fal lal li dee!
As hard as she could run, © 1934 (Renewed) by G. Schirmer Inc. (ASCAP) To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!
Brought him back the finest that was there. ‘Old woman, old woman, International Copyright Secured. To my rit fal lal li dee!
Now soldier put them on. Are you fond of knitting?’ All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by permission.
‘Speak a little louder, sir, ’Twas far I had not scouted out
‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me? I’m rather hard of hearing.’ I wonder as I wander out under the sky, When close alongside the ocean,
It’s O a fife and drum.’ How Jesus our Saviour did come for to die I saw something move which at first I thought
‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you ‘Old woman, old woman, For poor or’n’ry people like you and like I, Was all the world in motion;
With a wife and baby at home?’ Will you let me court you?’ I wonder as I wander out under the sky. But steering up close alongside,
‘Speak a little louder, sir, I found ’twas a crocodile,
I just begin to hear you,’ When Mary birthed Jesus ’twas in a cow stall And from his nose to the tip of his tail
With wise men and shepherds and farmers and all, He measured five hundred mile.
‘Old woman, old woman, On high from God’s heaven the stars’ light did fall
Don’t you want to marry me?’ And the promise of ages it did then recall. To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!...
Lawks a mercy on you, sir,
I think that now I hear you.’ If Jesus had wanted for any wee thing, ’Twas a crocodile, I plainly could see,
A star in the sky or a bird on the wing He was not of a common race,
Or all of God’s angels in Heav’n for to sing, For I was obliged to climb a high tree
He surely could’ve had it ‘cause he was the King! Before I could see his face.
And when he lifted up his jaw,
I wonder as I wander out under the sky, Though perhaps you may think ’tis a lie,
How Jesus our Saviour did come for to die He reach’d above the clouds for miles three score,
For poor or’n’ry people like you and like I, And almost touch’d the sky.
I wonder as I wander out under the sky.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!...
0 The Crocodile
From English County Songs While up aloft the wind was high,
Words and melody collected by It blew a gale from the south.
L. Broadwood and J.A. Fuller Maitland I lost my hold and away did fly
© The Britten Estate Limited Right into the crocodile’s mouth.
Words reproduced by permission of He quickly closed his jaws on me,
The Britten Estate Limited And thought he got a victim,

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But I ran down his throat d’ye see’ Volume 3: British Isles We’ll gang down by Clouden side, The holly bears a colour
And that’s the way I tricked him. Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Through the hazels, spreading wide As green as any tree;
Publishers Limited O’er the waves that sweetly glide, And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... To the moon sae clearly. To set poor sinners free.
! The Plough Boy
I travelled on for a month or two, Tune by W. Shield Ca’ the yowes to the knowes … The rising of the sun...
Till I got into his maw,
Where I found of rum kegs not a few, A flaxen-headed cowboy, as simple as may be, Fair and lovely as thou art, The holly bears a berry
And a thousand fat bullocks in store. And next a merry plough-boy, I whistled o’er the lea; Thou hast stol’n my very heart; As red as any blood,
Of life I banished all my care, But now a saucy footman, I strut in worsted lace, I can die but canna part, And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
For of food I was not stinted. And soon I’ll be a butler, and whey my jolly face. My bonnie dearie. To do poor sinners good.
And in this crocodile I lived ten years
And very well contented. When steward I’m promoted, I’ll snip the trademen’s bill, Ca’ the yowes to the knowes … The rising of the sun...
My master’s coffers empty, my pockets for to fill.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... When lolling in my chariot, so great a man I’ll be, Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements The holly bears a prickle
You’ll forget the little plough-boy who Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers As sharp as any thorn;
This crocodile being very old, whistled o’er the lea. Limited And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
One day alas he died. At Christmas day in the morn.
He was ten long years a-getting old I’ll buy votes at elections, and when I’ve made the pelf, ¢ The Holly and the Ivy
He was so long and wide. I’ll stand poll for the parliament, and then vote in myself. Traditional Folk Song The rising of the sun...
His skin was eight miles thick Whatever’s good for me, sir, I never will oppose: Words and melody collected by Cecil Sharp
I’m sure or very near about. When all my ayes are sold off, why then I sell my noes. © The Britten Estate Limited ∞ Soldier, won’t you marry me?
For I was full ten years or more Words reproduced by permission of Appalachian Folk Song
A-cutting my way out. I’ll joke, harangue and paragraph, with speeches The Britten Estate Limited Words and melody collected by Cecil Sharp
charm the ear, © The Britten Estate Limited.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... And when I’m tired on my legs, then I’ll The holly and the ivy Words reproduced by permission of
sit down a peer. Are trees that’s both well known; The Britten Estate Limited
And now I am once more got on earth In court or city honour so great a man I’ll be, Of all the trees that grows in woods,
I’ve vowed no more to roam, You’ll forget the little plough-boy who The holly bears the crown. ‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me?
In a ship that passed I got a berth, whistled o’er the lea. It’s O a fife and drum.’
And now I’m safe at home. The rising of the sun, ‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you
And if my story you should doubt, @ There’s none to soothe The running of the deer, When I’ve got no hat to put on?’
Should you ever travel the Nile, Hullah’s Song-Book (Scottish) The playing of the merry harp
It’s ten to one you’ll find the shell Sweet singing in the choir. Off to the hat shop she did go
Of the wonderful crocodile. There’s none to soothe my soul to rest, As hard as she could run,
There’s none my load of grief to share The holly bears a blossom, Brought him back the finest that was there.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... Or wake to joy this lonely breast, As white as any flower; Now soldier put it on.
Or light the gloom of dark despair. And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To be our sweet Saviour. ‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me?
The voice of joy no more can cheer, It’s O a fife and drum.’
The look of love no more can warm The rising of the sun…. ‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you
Since mute for aye’s that voice so dear, When I’ve got no coat to put on?’

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¡ The Lincolnshire Poacher Bad luck to every gamekeeper that will not And closed that eye alone could charm. Then push, push, push the bowl, my boys,
sell his deer, and pass it round to me,
When I was bound apprentice in famous O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the # Sweet Polly Oliver The longer we sit here and drink, the
Lincolnshire, season of the year. Old English Tune merrier we shall be’.
Full well I served my master for more than
seven year ™ Early one morning As sweet Polly Oliver lay musing in bed, So sang the jolly miller who lived on the river Dee;
Till I took up to poaching as you will A sudden strange fancy came in to her head. He worked and sung from morn till night, no lark
quickly hear; Early one morning, just as the sun was rising, ‘Nor father nor mother shall make me false prove, more blithe than he.
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the I heard a maid sing in the valley below; I’ll’list as a soldier, and follow my love.’ And this the burden of his song for ever used to be.
season of the year. ‘O don’t deceive me, O never leave me! ‘I care for nobody, no, not I, since nobody cares for me.’
How could you use a poor maiden so?’ So early next morning she softly arose,
As me and my companions were setting And dressed herself up in her dead brother’s clothes. % The foggy, foggy dew
of a snare, ‘O gay is the garland, fresh are the roses She cut her hair close, and she stained her face brown, From Suffolk
’Twas there we spied the gamekeeper, for I’ve culled from the garden to bind on thy brow. And went for a soldier to fair London Town.
him we did not care, O don’t deceive me, O do not leave me! When I was a bachelor I lived all alone, and
For we can wrestle and fight, my boys, and How could you use a poor maiden so? Then up spoke the sergeant one day at his drill: worked at the weaver’s trade
jump o’er anywhere; ‘Now who’s good for nursing? A captain, he’s ill.’ And the only, only thing that I ever did wrong, was
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the Remember the vows that you made, to your Mary, ‘I’m ready’, said Polly to nurse him she’s gone, to woo a fair young maid.
season of the year. Remember the bow’r where you vow’d to be true And finds it’s her true love all wasted and wan. I wooed her in the winter time, and in the summer too.
O don’t deceive me, O never leave me! And the only, only thing I did that was wrong,
As me and my companions were setting How could you use a poor maiden so?’ The first week the doctor kept shaking his head, was to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew.
four or five ‘No nursing, young fellow, can save him,’ he said.
And taking on ’em up again, we caught a Thus sung the poor maiden, her sorrow bewailing, But when Polly Oliver had nursed him back to life One night she came to my bedside when I
hare alive, Thus sung the poor maid in the valley below; He cried, ‘You have cherished him as if you lay fast asleep.
We took the hare alive, my boys, and thro’ ‘O don’t deceive me! O do not leave me! were his wife.’ She laid her head upon my bed and she
the woods did steer, How could you use a poor maiden so?’ began to weep.
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the O then Polly Oliver, she burst into tears She sighed, she cried, she damn’ near died,
season of the year. £ Ca’ the yowes And told the good doctor her hopes and her fears she said: ‘What shall I do?’
Words by Robert Burns And very shortly after, for better or for worse, So I hauled her into bed and I covered up her head,
I threw him on my shouldier, and then we The captain took joyfully his pretty soldier nurse. just to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew.
trudged home, Ca’ the yowes to the knowes,
We took him to a neighbour’s house and Ca’ them where the heather growes, $ The Miller of Dee Oh I am a bachelor and I live with my son,
sold him for a crown, Ca’ them where the burnie rowes, Hullah’s Song-Book (English) and we work at the weaver’s trade
We sold him for a crown, my boys, but I did My bonnie dearie. And ev’ry single time that I look into his eyes,
not tell you where, There was a jolly miller once lived on the river Dee; he reminds me of the fair young maid.
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the Hark the mavis evening sang, He worked and sung from morn till night, no lark He reminds me of the winter time, and of the
season of the year. Sounden Clouden’s woods amang; more blithe than he. summer too,
Then a-folding let us gang, And this the burden of his song for ever used to be, And of the many, many times that I held her in my
Success to every gentleman that lives in My bonnie dearie. ‘I care for nobody, no, not I, since nobody cares for me. arms, just to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew.
Lincolnshire,
Success to every poacher that wants to sell Ca’ the yowes to the knowes … I love my mill, she is to me like parent, child, and wife,
a hare, I would not change my station for any other in life.

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^ O Waly, Waly Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements A brisk young farmer, There’s ne’er a lady in the land
From Somerset (Cecil Sharp) Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music With his hat turn’d up all round, That’s half so sweet as Sally;
Publishers Limited Seeking to gain her. She is the darling of my heart
The water is wide I cannot get o’er, ‘My dear, for love of you And lives in our alley.
And neither have I wings to fly. * Pray Goody This wide world I’d go through
Give me a boat that will carry two, From Hullah’s Song-Book If you will but prove true Of all the days within the week,
And both shall row, my love and I. Words by Kane O’Hara You shall wed a farmer.’ I dearly love but one day,
Melody by Charles Burney And that’s the day that comes between
O, down in the meadows the other day, © The Britten Estate Limited Says she: ‘I’m not for you A Saturday and Monday,
A-gath’ring flowers both fine and gay, Nor no such fellow, For then I’m dressed all in my best,
A-gath’ring flowers both red and blue, Pray goody please to moderate the rancour I’m for a lively lad To walk abroad with Sally;
I little thought what love can do. of your tongue, With lands and riches, She is the darling of my heart
Why flash those sparks of fury from your eyes? ’Tis not your hogs and yowes And lives in our alley.
I leaned my back up against some oak, Remember when the judgement’s weak, the Can maintain furbelows,
Thinking that he was a trusty tree; prejudice is strong. My silk anti satin clothes When she is by I leave my work,
But first he bended, and then he broke; A stranger why will you despise? Are all my glory.’ I love her so sincerely:
And so did my false love to me. My master comes like any Turk
Ply me, try me, ‘O madam, don’t be coy And bangs me most severely:
A ship there is, and she sails the sea, Prove e’er you deny me, For all your glory, But let him bang his bellyful
She’s loaded deep as deep can be, If you cast me off For fear of another day I’ll bear it all for Sally;
But not so deep as the love I’m in; You blast me never more to love. And another story. She is the darling of my heart,
I know not if I sink or swim. If the world on you should frown And lives in our alley.
Pray Goody.. Your topknot must come down
O, love is handsome and love is fine, To a Lindsey-woolsey gown. My master carries me to Church
And love’s a jewel while it is new, Volume 5: British Isles Where is then your glory?’ And often I am blamed
But when it is old, it groweth cold, Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Because I leave him in the lurch
And fades away like morning dew. Publishers Limited At last there came that way As soon as text is named;
A sooty collier, I leave the Church in sermon-time
& Come you not from Newcastle? ( The Brisk Young Widow With his hat bent down all round, And slink away to Sally;
Hullah’s Song-Book (English) Words and Melody collected by He soon did gain her She is the darling of my heart
Cecil Sharp Whereat the farmer swore; And lives in our alley.
Come you not from Newcastle? ‘The widow’s mazed, I’m sure.
Come you not there away? In Chester town there liv’d I’ll never court no more My master and the neighbours all
O met you not my true love, A brisk young widow, A brisk young widow!’ Make game of me and Sally,
Riding on a bonny bay? For beauty and fine clothes And, but for her, I’d better be
None could excel her, ) Sally in our Alley A slave and row a galley;
Why should I not love my love? She was proper stout and tall, Words by Henry Carey But when my seven long years are out,
Why should not my love love me? Her fingers long and small, O then I’ll marry Sally;
Why should I not speed after him, She’s a comely dame withall, Of all the girls that are so smart O then we’ll wed and then we’ll bed,
Since love to all is free? She’s a brisk young widow. There’s none like Pretty Sally; But not in our alley.
She is the darling of my heart
A lover soon there came, And lives in our alley.

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^ O Waly, Waly Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements A brisk young farmer, There’s ne’er a lady in the land
From Somerset (Cecil Sharp) Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music With his hat turn’d up all round, That’s half so sweet as Sally;
Publishers Limited Seeking to gain her. She is the darling of my heart
The water is wide I cannot get o’er, ‘My dear, for love of you And lives in our alley.
And neither have I wings to fly. * Pray Goody This wide world I’d go through
Give me a boat that will carry two, From Hullah’s Song-Book If you will but prove true Of all the days within the week,
And both shall row, my love and I. Words by Kane O’Hara You shall wed a farmer.’ I dearly love but one day,
Melody by Charles Burney And that’s the day that comes between
O, down in the meadows the other day, © The Britten Estate Limited Says she: ‘I’m not for you A Saturday and Monday,
A-gath’ring flowers both fine and gay, Nor no such fellow, For then I’m dressed all in my best,
A-gath’ring flowers both red and blue, Pray goody please to moderate the rancour I’m for a lively lad To walk abroad with Sally;
I little thought what love can do. of your tongue, With lands and riches, She is the darling of my heart
Why flash those sparks of fury from your eyes? ’Tis not your hogs and yowes And lives in our alley.
I leaned my back up against some oak, Remember when the judgement’s weak, the Can maintain furbelows,
Thinking that he was a trusty tree; prejudice is strong. My silk anti satin clothes When she is by I leave my work,
But first he bended, and then he broke; A stranger why will you despise? Are all my glory.’ I love her so sincerely:
And so did my false love to me. My master comes like any Turk
Ply me, try me, ‘O madam, don’t be coy And bangs me most severely:
A ship there is, and she sails the sea, Prove e’er you deny me, For all your glory, But let him bang his bellyful
She’s loaded deep as deep can be, If you cast me off For fear of another day I’ll bear it all for Sally;
But not so deep as the love I’m in; You blast me never more to love. And another story. She is the darling of my heart,
I know not if I sink or swim. If the world on you should frown And lives in our alley.
Pray Goody.. Your topknot must come down
O, love is handsome and love is fine, To a Lindsey-woolsey gown. My master carries me to Church
And love’s a jewel while it is new, Volume 5: British Isles Where is then your glory?’ And often I am blamed
But when it is old, it groweth cold, Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Because I leave him in the lurch
And fades away like morning dew. Publishers Limited At last there came that way As soon as text is named;
A sooty collier, I leave the Church in sermon-time
& Come you not from Newcastle? ( The Brisk Young Widow With his hat bent down all round, And slink away to Sally;
Hullah’s Song-Book (English) Words and Melody collected by He soon did gain her She is the darling of my heart
Cecil Sharp Whereat the farmer swore; And lives in our alley.
Come you not from Newcastle? ‘The widow’s mazed, I’m sure.
Come you not there away? In Chester town there liv’d I’ll never court no more My master and the neighbours all
O met you not my true love, A brisk young widow, A brisk young widow!’ Make game of me and Sally,
Riding on a bonny bay? For beauty and fine clothes And, but for her, I’d better be
None could excel her, ) Sally in our Alley A slave and row a galley;
Why should I not love my love? She was proper stout and tall, Words by Henry Carey But when my seven long years are out,
Why should not my love love me? Her fingers long and small, O then I’ll marry Sally;
Why should I not speed after him, She’s a comely dame withall, Of all the girls that are so smart O then we’ll wed and then we’ll bed,
Since love to all is free? She’s a brisk young widow. There’s none like Pretty Sally; But not in our alley.
She is the darling of my heart
A lover soon there came, And lives in our alley.

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¡ The Lincolnshire Poacher Bad luck to every gamekeeper that will not And closed that eye alone could charm. Then push, push, push the bowl, my boys,
sell his deer, and pass it round to me,
When I was bound apprentice in famous O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the # Sweet Polly Oliver The longer we sit here and drink, the
Lincolnshire, season of the year. Old English Tune merrier we shall be’.
Full well I served my master for more than
seven year ™ Early one morning As sweet Polly Oliver lay musing in bed, So sang the jolly miller who lived on the river Dee;
Till I took up to poaching as you will A sudden strange fancy came in to her head. He worked and sung from morn till night, no lark
quickly hear; Early one morning, just as the sun was rising, ‘Nor father nor mother shall make me false prove, more blithe than he.
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the I heard a maid sing in the valley below; I’ll’list as a soldier, and follow my love.’ And this the burden of his song for ever used to be.
season of the year. ‘O don’t deceive me, O never leave me! ‘I care for nobody, no, not I, since nobody cares for me.’
How could you use a poor maiden so?’ So early next morning she softly arose,
As me and my companions were setting And dressed herself up in her dead brother’s clothes. % The foggy, foggy dew
of a snare, ‘O gay is the garland, fresh are the roses She cut her hair close, and she stained her face brown, From Suffolk
’Twas there we spied the gamekeeper, for I’ve culled from the garden to bind on thy brow. And went for a soldier to fair London Town.
him we did not care, O don’t deceive me, O do not leave me! When I was a bachelor I lived all alone, and
For we can wrestle and fight, my boys, and How could you use a poor maiden so? Then up spoke the sergeant one day at his drill: worked at the weaver’s trade
jump o’er anywhere; ‘Now who’s good for nursing? A captain, he’s ill.’ And the only, only thing that I ever did wrong, was
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the Remember the vows that you made, to your Mary, ‘I’m ready’, said Polly to nurse him she’s gone, to woo a fair young maid.
season of the year. Remember the bow’r where you vow’d to be true And finds it’s her true love all wasted and wan. I wooed her in the winter time, and in the summer too.
O don’t deceive me, O never leave me! And the only, only thing I did that was wrong,
As me and my companions were setting How could you use a poor maiden so?’ The first week the doctor kept shaking his head, was to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew.
four or five ‘No nursing, young fellow, can save him,’ he said.
And taking on ’em up again, we caught a Thus sung the poor maiden, her sorrow bewailing, But when Polly Oliver had nursed him back to life One night she came to my bedside when I
hare alive, Thus sung the poor maid in the valley below; He cried, ‘You have cherished him as if you lay fast asleep.
We took the hare alive, my boys, and thro’ ‘O don’t deceive me! O do not leave me! were his wife.’ She laid her head upon my bed and she
the woods did steer, How could you use a poor maiden so?’ began to weep.
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the O then Polly Oliver, she burst into tears She sighed, she cried, she damn’ near died,
season of the year. £ Ca’ the yowes And told the good doctor her hopes and her fears she said: ‘What shall I do?’
Words by Robert Burns And very shortly after, for better or for worse, So I hauled her into bed and I covered up her head,
I threw him on my shouldier, and then we The captain took joyfully his pretty soldier nurse. just to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew.
trudged home, Ca’ the yowes to the knowes,
We took him to a neighbour’s house and Ca’ them where the heather growes, $ The Miller of Dee Oh I am a bachelor and I live with my son,
sold him for a crown, Ca’ them where the burnie rowes, Hullah’s Song-Book (English) and we work at the weaver’s trade
We sold him for a crown, my boys, but I did My bonnie dearie. And ev’ry single time that I look into his eyes,
not tell you where, There was a jolly miller once lived on the river Dee; he reminds me of the fair young maid.
O ’tis my delight on a shining night, in the Hark the mavis evening sang, He worked and sung from morn till night, no lark He reminds me of the winter time, and of the
season of the year. Sounden Clouden’s woods amang; more blithe than he. summer too,
Then a-folding let us gang, And this the burden of his song for ever used to be, And of the many, many times that I held her in my
Success to every gentleman that lives in My bonnie dearie. ‘I care for nobody, no, not I, since nobody cares for me. arms, just to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew.
Lincolnshire,
Success to every poacher that wants to sell Ca’ the yowes to the knowes … I love my mill, she is to me like parent, child, and wife,
a hare, I would not change my station for any other in life.

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But I ran down his throat d’ye see’ Volume 3: British Isles We’ll gang down by Clouden side, The holly bears a colour
And that’s the way I tricked him. Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Through the hazels, spreading wide As green as any tree;
Publishers Limited O’er the waves that sweetly glide, And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... To the moon sae clearly. To set poor sinners free.
! The Plough Boy
I travelled on for a month or two, Tune by W. Shield Ca’ the yowes to the knowes … The rising of the sun...
Till I got into his maw,
Where I found of rum kegs not a few, A flaxen-headed cowboy, as simple as may be, Fair and lovely as thou art, The holly bears a berry
And a thousand fat bullocks in store. And next a merry plough-boy, I whistled o’er the lea; Thou hast stol’n my very heart; As red as any blood,
Of life I banished all my care, But now a saucy footman, I strut in worsted lace, I can die but canna part, And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
For of food I was not stinted. And soon I’ll be a butler, and whey my jolly face. My bonnie dearie. To do poor sinners good.
And in this crocodile I lived ten years
And very well contented. When steward I’m promoted, I’ll snip the trademen’s bill, Ca’ the yowes to the knowes … The rising of the sun...
My master’s coffers empty, my pockets for to fill.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... When lolling in my chariot, so great a man I’ll be, Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements The holly bears a prickle
You’ll forget the little plough-boy who Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers As sharp as any thorn;
This crocodile being very old, whistled o’er the lea. Limited And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
One day alas he died. At Christmas day in the morn.
He was ten long years a-getting old I’ll buy votes at elections, and when I’ve made the pelf, ¢ The Holly and the Ivy
He was so long and wide. I’ll stand poll for the parliament, and then vote in myself. Traditional Folk Song The rising of the sun...
His skin was eight miles thick Whatever’s good for me, sir, I never will oppose: Words and melody collected by Cecil Sharp
I’m sure or very near about. When all my ayes are sold off, why then I sell my noes. © The Britten Estate Limited ∞ Soldier, won’t you marry me?
For I was full ten years or more Words reproduced by permission of Appalachian Folk Song
A-cutting my way out. I’ll joke, harangue and paragraph, with speeches The Britten Estate Limited Words and melody collected by Cecil Sharp
charm the ear, © The Britten Estate Limited.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... And when I’m tired on my legs, then I’ll The holly and the ivy Words reproduced by permission of
sit down a peer. Are trees that’s both well known; The Britten Estate Limited
And now I am once more got on earth In court or city honour so great a man I’ll be, Of all the trees that grows in woods,
I’ve vowed no more to roam, You’ll forget the little plough-boy who The holly bears the crown. ‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me?
In a ship that passed I got a berth, whistled o’er the lea. It’s O a fife and drum.’
And now I’m safe at home. The rising of the sun, ‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you
And if my story you should doubt, @ There’s none to soothe The running of the deer, When I’ve got no hat to put on?’
Should you ever travel the Nile, Hullah’s Song-Book (Scottish) The playing of the merry harp
It’s ten to one you’ll find the shell Sweet singing in the choir. Off to the hat shop she did go
Of the wonderful crocodile. There’s none to soothe my soul to rest, As hard as she could run,
There’s none my load of grief to share The holly bears a blossom, Brought him back the finest that was there.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!... Or wake to joy this lonely breast, As white as any flower; Now soldier put it on.
Or light the gloom of dark despair. And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To be our sweet Saviour. ‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me?
The voice of joy no more can cheer, It’s O a fife and drum.’
The look of love no more can warm The rising of the sun…. ‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you
Since mute for aye’s that voice so dear, When I’ve got no coat to put on?’

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Off to the tailor she did go § The Deaf Woman’s Courtship Your love and goodwill for to gain. Now listen you landsmen unto me,
As hard as she could run, Appalachian Folk Song To tell you the truth I’m bound,
Brought him back the finest that was there. Words and melody collected by Cecil Sharp Greensleeves was all my joy, What happened to me by going to sea,
Now soldier put it on. © The Britten Estate Limited Greensleeves was my delight. And the wonders that I found:
Words reproduced by permission of Greensleeves was my heart of gold, Shipwreck’d I was once off Perouse,
‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me? The Britten Estate Limited And who but my lady Greensleeves? And cast upon the shore,
It’s O a fife and drum.’ So then I did resolve to roam,
‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you ‘Old woman, old woman, The country to explore.
When I’ve got no shoes to put on?’ Are you fond of smoking?’ 9 I wonder as I wander
‘Speak a little louder, sir, From Songs of the Hill Folk To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!
Off to the shoe shop she did go I’m rather fond of hearing.’ Words and melody collected by John Jacob Niles To my rit fal lal li dee!
As hard as she could run, © 1934 (Renewed) by G. Schirmer Inc. (ASCAP) To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!
Brought him back the finest that was there. ‘Old woman, old woman, International Copyright Secured. To my rit fal lal li dee!
Now soldier put them on. Are you fond of knitting?’ All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by permission.
‘Speak a little louder, sir, ’Twas far I had not scouted out
‘Soldier, soldier won’t you marry me? I’m rather hard of hearing.’ I wonder as I wander out under the sky, When close alongside the ocean,
It’s O a fife and drum.’ How Jesus our Saviour did come for to die I saw something move which at first I thought
‘How can I marry such a pretty girl as you ‘Old woman, old woman, For poor or’n’ry people like you and like I, Was all the world in motion;
With a wife and baby at home?’ Will you let me court you?’ I wonder as I wander out under the sky. But steering up close alongside,
‘Speak a little louder, sir, I found ’twas a crocodile,
I just begin to hear you,’ When Mary birthed Jesus ’twas in a cow stall And from his nose to the tip of his tail
With wise men and shepherds and farmers and all, He measured five hundred mile.
‘Old woman, old woman, On high from God’s heaven the stars’ light did fall
Don’t you want to marry me?’ And the promise of ages it did then recall. To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!...
Lawks a mercy on you, sir,
I think that now I hear you.’ If Jesus had wanted for any wee thing, ’Twas a crocodile, I plainly could see,
A star in the sky or a bird on the wing He was not of a common race,
Or all of God’s angels in Heav’n for to sing, For I was obliged to climb a high tree
He surely could’ve had it ‘cause he was the King! Before I could see his face.
And when he lifted up his jaw,
I wonder as I wander out under the sky, Though perhaps you may think ’tis a lie,
How Jesus our Saviour did come for to die He reach’d above the clouds for miles three score,
For poor or’n’ry people like you and like I, And almost touch’d the sky.
I wonder as I wander out under the sky.
To my rit fal lal li bollem tit!...
0 The Crocodile
From English County Songs While up aloft the wind was high,
Words and melody collected by It blew a gale from the south.
L. Broadwood and J.A. Fuller Maitland I lost my hold and away did fly
© The Britten Estate Limited Right into the crocodile’s mouth.
Words reproduced by permission of He quickly closed his jaws on me,
The Britten Estate Limited And thought he got a victim,

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Cruel death soon put an end to his growing. Hee-haw – buried and dead, CD2 Through calm, through tempest, stop no more;
There grew an old apple tree over his head, Volume 4: Moore’s Irish Melodies The stormiest sea’s a resting place
And now my love is dead and in his grave Hee-haw – over his head. Publisher: Boosey and Hawkes Music Publishers To him who leaves such hearts on shore.
doth lie. Limited. Or, if some desert land we meet,
The green grass grows o’er him so very, The apples were ripe and ready to fall; Where never yet false-hearted men
very high. Hee-haw – ready to fall; 1 Avenging and bright Profaned a world, that else were sweet,
I’ll sit and I’ll mourn his fate until the There came an old woman to gather them all, (Crooghan a venee) Then rest thee, bark, but not till then.
day I die, Hee-haw – gather them all.
And I’ll watch all o’er his child while he’s growing. Avenging and bright fall the swift sword of Erin 3 How sweet the answer
Oliver rose and gave her a drop, On him who the brave sons of Usna betrayed! (The Wren)
6 The Ash Grove Hee-haw – gave her a drop, For ev’ry fond eye which he waken’d a tear in,
Welsh Tune Which made the old woman go hippety hop, A drop from his heart-wounds shall weep o’er her blade. How sweet the answer Echo makes
Hee-haw – hippety hop. To music at night;
Down yonder green valley where streamlets By the red cloud which hung over Conner’s When, rous’d by lute or horn, she wakes,
meander, The saddle and bridle, they lie on the shelf, dark dwelling, And far away, o’er lawns and lakes,
When twilight is fading, I pensively rove, Hee-haw – lie on the shelf, When Ulda’s three champions lay sleeping in gore – Goes answering light.
Or at the bright noontide in solitude wander If you want any more you can sing it yourself By the billows of war which so often high swelling,
Amid the dark shades of the lonely Ash-grove. Hee-haw – sing it yourself. Have wafted these heroes to victory’s shore! Yet love hath echoes truer far,
’Twas there while the blackbird was And far more sweet,
joyfully singing, Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements We swear to avenge them! – no joy shall be tasted, Than e’er beneath the moonlight’s star,
I first met my dear one, the joy of my heart; Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers The harp shall be silent, the maiden unwed, Of horn, or lute, or soft guitar,
Around us for gladness the bluebells Limited Our halls shall be mute, and our fields shall The songs repeat.
were ringing. lie wasted,
Ah! then little thought I how soon we should part. 8 Greensleeves Till vengeance be wreaked on the murderer’s head! ’Tis when the sigh, in youth sincere,
Traditional Folk Song Yes, monarch! though sweet are our home recollections, And only then –
Still glows the bright sunshine o’er valley © The Britten Estate Limited Though sweet are the tears that from tenderness fall; The sigh, that’s breath’d for one to hear,
and mountain, Words reproduced by permission of Though sweet are our friendships, our hope Is by that one, that only dear,
Still warbles the blackbird his note from The Britten Estate Limited and affections, Breath’d back again.
the tree; Revenge on a tyrant is sweetest of all.
Still trembles the moonbeam on streamlet Alas my love you do me wrong 4 The Minstrel Boy
and fountain, To cast me off discourteously; 2 Sail on, sail on (The Moreen)
But what are the beauties of nature to me. And I have loved you so long, (The humming of the Ban)
With sorrow, deep sorrow, my bosom is laden Rejoicing in your company. The Minstrel Boy to the war is gone
All day I go mourning in search of my love. Sail on, sail on, thou fearless bark, In the ranks of death you’ll find him;
Ye echoes, O tell me, where is the sweet maiden? Greensleeves was all my joy, Wherever blows the welcome wind; His father’s sword he has girded on,
She sleeps ’neath the green turf down by the Greensleeves was my delight. It cannot lead to scenes more dark, And his wild harp slung behind him.
Ash-grove. Greensleeves was my heart of gold, More sad than those we leave behind. ‘Land of Song’, said the warrior bard,
And who but my lady Greensleeves? Each smiling billow seems to say ‘Tho’ all the world betrays thee,
7 Oliver Cromwell ‘Tho’ death beneath our surface be, One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard
Nursery Rhyme from Suffolk I have been ready at your hand, Less cold we are, less false than they, One faithful harp shall praise thee.’
To grant whatever you did crave; Whose smiling wreck’d thy hopes and thee!
Oliver Cromwell lay buried and dead And I have waged both life and land, Sail on, sail on, through endless space, The Minstrel fell! but the foeman’s chain

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Could not bring that proud soul under, So lone and lovely, thro’ this bleak way? Come soundin’ thru’ the toon. 5 The trees they grow so high
The harp he lov’d ne’er spoke again, Are Erin’s sons so good or so cold Somerset Folk Song
For he tore its chords asunder; As not to be tempted by woman or gold?’ O wae tae ye, Huntley,
And said ‘No chain shall sully thee, And wherefore did ye sae? The trees they grow so high and the leaves
Thou soul of love and brav’ry! ‘Sir Knight! I feel not the least alarm; I bade ye bring him wi’ you they do grow green,
Thy songs were made for the pure and free, No son of Erin will offer me harm; And forbade ye him to slay. And many a cold winter’s night my love
They shall never sound on slav’ry.’ For, tho’ they love woman and golden store, and I have seen.
Sir Knight, they love honour and virtue more!’ He was a braw gallant Of a cold winter’s night, my love, you and I
5 At the mid hour of night And he played at the glove; alone have been,
(Molly, my dear) On she went and her maiden smile And the bonnie Earl o’ Moray Whilst my bonny boy is young, he’s
In safety lighted her round the green isle; He was the Queen’s love! a-growing.
At the mid hour of night when stars are And blest for ever was she who relied
weeping, I fly Upon Erin’s honour and Erin’s pride! O lang will his Lady O father, dearest father, you’ve done to me
To the lone vale we lov’d when life shone Look frae the Castle Doune, great wrong,
warm in thine eye; 7 Dear Harp of my Country! Ere she see the Earl o’ Moray You’ve tied me to a boy when you know he
And I think that if spirits can steal from the (Kate Tyrrel) Come soundin’ thru’ the toon. is too young.
region of air, O daughter, dearest daughter, if you wait
To revisit past scenes of delight, thou wilt Dear Harp of my Country! in darkness I found thee, 4 O can ye sew cushions? a little while,
come to me there, The cold chain of silence had hung o’er thee long; Scottish Tune A lady you shall be while he’s growing.
And tell me our love is remembered e’en in When proudly, my own Island Harp! I unbound thee,
the sky. And gave all thy chords to light, freedom, and song! O can ye sew cushions and can ye sew sheets I’ll send your love to college all for a year
The warm lay of love and the light tone of gladness And can ye sing ballulow when the bairn greets? or two,
Then I’ll sing the wild song, which once Have waken’d thy fondest, thy liveliest thrill; And hie and baw, birdie, and hie and baw lamb, And then in the meantime he will do
’twas rapture to hear, But so oft hast thou echo’d the deep sigh of sadness, And hee and baw birdie, my bonnie wee lamb. for you;
When our voices, both mingling, breathed That e’en in thy mirth it will steal from thee still. I’ll buy him white ribbons, tie them round
like one on the ear, Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? his bonny waist
And, as Echo far off thro’ the vale my sad Dear Harp of my Country! farewell to thy numbers, Black’s the life that I lead wi’ ye To let the ladies know that he’s married.
orison rolls, This sweet wreath of song is the last we shall twine; Many o’ you, little for to gi’ ye,
I think, oh my Love! ’tis they voice from the Go, sleep with the sunshine of Fame on thy slumbers, Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? I went up to the college and I looked over
kingdom of souls Till touch’d by some hand less unworthy than mine. the wall,
Faintly answering still the notes which If the pulse of the patriot, soldier, or lover, I’ve placed my cradle on yon hilly top Saw four and twenty gentlemen playing at
once were so dear! Have throbb’d at our lay, ’tis thy glory alone; And aye as the wind blew my cradle did rock. bat and ball.
I was but as the wind, passing heedlessly over, O hush-a-by, babie, O baw lily loo, I called for my true love, but they would
6 Rich and rare And all the wild sweetness I waked was thy own! And hee and baw birdie, my bonnie wee doo. not let him come,
(The summer is coming) All because he was a young boy and
8 Oft in the stilly night Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? growing.
Rich and rare were the gems she wore, Black’s the life that I lead wi’ ye
And a bright gold ring on her wand she bore; Oft in the stilly night Many o’ you, little for to gi’ ye, At the age of sixteen, he was a married man
But O her beauty was far beyond Ere slumber’s chain has bound me, Hie-o wie-o what will I do wi’ ye? And at the age of seventeen he was father
Her sparkling gems and her snow-white wand. Fond mem’ry brings the light to a son.
Of other days around me: And at the age of eighteen the grass grew
‘Lady! dost thou not fear to stray, The smiles, the tears of boyhood’s years, over him,

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CD1 He is with the little schoolfellows out on The words of love then spoken; Lie senseless and dead.
Volume 1: British Isles the green. The eyes that shone,
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Playing some pretty play’. Now dimm’d and gone, So soon may I follow,
Publishers Limited The cheerful hearts now broken! When friendships decay,
Mamma went to the Boyne water Thus in the stilly night And from love’s shining circle
1 The Salley Gardens That is so wide and deep, Ere slumber’s chain has bound me, The gems drop away!
Irish Tune, words by W.B. Yeats Saying, ‘Little Sir William, if you are there, Sad Mem’ry brings the light When true hearts lie wither’d,
Oh pity your mother’s weep’. Of other days around me. And fond ones are flown,
Down by the Salley gardens my love and I Oh! who would inhabit
did meet, ‘How can I pity your weep, mother, When I remember all This bleak world alone!
She passed the Salley gardens with little And I so long in pain? The friends, so link’d together,
snow-white feet. For the little pen knife sticks close to I’ve seen around me fall 0 O the sight entrancing
She bid me take love easy, as the leaves my heart like leaves in wintry weather, (Planxty Sudley)
grow on the tree, And the School wife hath me slain. I feel like one who treads alone
But I being young and foolish with her did Some banquet hall deserted, O the sight entrancing,
not agree. Go home, go home my mother dear Whose lights are fled, whose garlands dead, When morning’s beam is glancing.
And prepare my winding sheet, And all but he departed! O’er files array’d
In a field by the river my love and I For tomorrow morning before 8 o’clock, Thus in the stilly night With helm and blade,
did stand, You with my body shall meet. Ere slumber’s chain has bound me, And plumes in the gay wind dancing.
And on my leaning shoulder she laid her Sad Mem’ry brings the light
snow-white hand; And lay my Prayer Book at my head, Of other days around me. When hearts are all high beating,
She bid me take life easy as the grass grows And my grammar at my feet, And the trumpet’s voice repeating
on the weirs, That all the little schoolfellows as 9 The last rose of summer That song whose breath
But I was young and foolish, and now am they pass by (Groves of Blarney) May lead to death,
full of tears. May read them for my sake.’ But never to retreating.
’Tis the last rose of summer Then if a cloud comes over
2 Little Sir William 3 The Bonny Earl o’ Moray Left blooming alone; The brow of sire or lover,
Somerset Folk Song Scottish Tune All her lovely companions Think ’tis the shade
Are faded and gone; By vict’ry made,
Easter day was a holiday Ye Hielands and ye Lowlands, No flow’r of her kindred, Whose wings right o’er us hover.
Of all days in the year, O where hae ye been? No rosebud is nigh
And all the little schoolfellows went out They hae slain the Earl o’ Moray, To reflect her blushes, O the sight entrancing …
to play, And laid him on the green. Or give sigh for sigh.
But Sir William was not there. Yet ’tis not helm or feather –
He was a braw gallant I’ll not leave thee, thou lone one, For ask yon despot whether
Mamma went to the School wife house And he rade at the ring; To pine on the stem; His pluméd bands could bring such hands
And knockèd at the ring, And the bonnie Earl o’ Moray Since the lovely are sleeping, And heart as ours together.
Saying, ‘Little Sir William if you are there, He might hae been a King. Go, sleep thou with them; Leave pomps to those who need ’em –
Pray let your mother in’. Thus kindly I scatter Adorn but man with freedom,
O lang will his Lady Thy leaves o’er the bed And proud he braves
The School wife open’d the door and said: Look frae the Castle Doune, Where thy mates of the garden The gaudiest slaves
‘He is not here today. Ere she see the Earl o’ Moray

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That crawl where monarchs lead ’em. fentlicht. Darin sind Lieder für hohe Singstimme und enthält Lieder, die zu Lebzeiten des Komponisten zum
The sword may pierce the beaver, Gitarre enthalten, die Peter Pears mit dem Gitarristen Teil deshalb nicht erschienen, weil es urheberrechtliche
Stone walls in time may sever, Julian Bream aufgeführt hat [CD2, (-¢]. Die dahin- Probleme mit den jeweiligen Melodiensammlern und
’Tis mind alone, eilende Begleitung in I will give my love an apple, einem ihren Verlegern gab. Greensleeves, I wonder as I wander
Worth steel and stone, Volkslied aus Dorset, bewegt sich ganz und gar im Idiom und das Seemannsgarn The Crocodile [CD1, 8-0] ent-
That keeps men free forever! der Gitarre. Charakteristisch für den anschließenden Sailor- standen 1940-41, Pray Goody [CD1, *] datiert aus den
boy aus den Appalachen und seinen „maritimen“ An- Jahren 1945-46. Soldier, won’t you marry me und The Deaf
O the sight entrancing… strich ist der Gebrauch von großem und kleinem Barré. Woman’s Courtship [CD1, ∞-§] waren offensichtlich
Eine graziöse Akkordbegleitung hören wir in Master für Recitals von Peter Pears und der Altistin Norma
Kilby, wo zum Schluss die verschiedenen Gitarrentimbres Procter in den fünfziger Jahren gedacht. Das Ent-
erkundet werden. Eine Figur aus aufsteigenden Terzen stehungsdatum von The Holly and the Ivy [CD1, ¢]
Volume 2: France markiert The Soldier and the Sailor, und das Bonny at lässt sich nicht bestimmen. The Stream in the Valley (Da
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Publisher Ltd. Morn aus North Country verwendet verschiedene Arten unten im Tale) [CD2, ∞] war 1946 zum ersten Mal mit
von Arpeggios, die – wie auch in anderen Stücken – die dem Cellisten Maurice Gendron im Rundfunk zu hören.
! La Noël passée The Orphan and King Henry der traditionellen Gitarrenstimmung innewohnenden Es war das erste Lied eines geplanten Zyklus deutscher
Harmonien erkunden. Das Schlusslied ist The Shooting Volkslied-Arrangements. Enthalten ist auch die Bear-
La Noël passée, One Christmas I’m starving, of his Dear, in der wieder charakteristische Gitarrenhar- beitung eines nicht identifizierten Volksliedes, das hier in
Povret orphelin. The orphan child said, monien erscheinen. Ermangelung des Textes von einem Cello gespielt wird.
Ma goule affamée, And never a farthing, Die Kollektion Tom Bowling and Other Song Arr- [CD2, §].
N’avait plus de pain. To buy me some bread. angements erschien im Jahre 2001 mit einer hilfreichen Keith Anderson
M’en fus sous fenestre I went to the castle Einführung ihres Herausgebers Paul Kildea. Der Band Deutsche Fassung: Cris Posslac
Du bon Roy Henry, Of good King Henry,
Et lui dis ‘Mon Maistre, And said: ‘O my master
Oyez bien ce-ci.’ pray listen to me.’
Prenez vos musettes, Come set your pipes ringing,
Et vos épinettes. Your spinet a-jingling,
Jésus, cette nuit, For Jesus’ birthday
S’est fait tout petit. We’ll sing and we’ll play.

En cette nuitée, For this very evening


Au vieux temps jadis. In days long gone by,
Naquit en Judée, Sweet Mary was bearing
Un de mes amis. A child such as I.
Avait pour couchette He lay in a manger,
Une crèche en bois, His cradle of wood,
Et dans la povrette To guard Him from danger
Des ramas de pois An ox by Him stood.
Prenez vos musettes, Come set your pipes ringing,
Et vos épinettes Your spinet a-jingling,
Jésus, cette nuit For Jesus’ birthday
S’est fait tout petit. We’ll sing and we’ll play.

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gewidmet, dem Vater der Familie, die Britten und Pears Erzählung von Sweet Polly Oliver, in der Britten zu Et de sa chambrette, The King robed in glory
aufnahmen; dabei handelt es sich um eine Ballade, deren seiner Lieblingstechnik des Kanons zurückkehrt, dann Oyant mon récit, Heard tell of this child,
Text für die Publikation leicht abgeändert wurde, um The Miller of Dee, bei dem sich die Windmühle gebüh- Avecque amourette For joy of my story
den herkömmlichen Antisemitismus der Worte rend dreht, und endlich die sündhafte Anzüglichkeit des Le bon Roy sourit. The good King he smiled;
auszumerzen. Die eindringliche schottische Klage um The foggy, foggy dew. Im Kontrast dazu steht O Waly, Prit en sa cassette He took from a casket
den Bonny Earl o’ Moray hat Britten der Psychiaterin Waly, und die Sammlung schließt mit Come you not Deux écus dorés; A big golden crown,
Mildred Titley gewidmet. Sie war die Frau des Leiters from Newcastle? über einem in wechselnde Harmonien De sa main doucette And into my jacket
von Long Island Home, wo William Mayer als medizin- gekleideten Ostinato-Bass. Me les a donnés He dropped it down.
ischer Direktor arbeitete. Das schottische Schlaflied Erst 1960 kam ein vierter Band mit Volkslied- Prenez vos musettes, Come set your pipes ringing,
O can ye sew cushions? ist Clytie Mundys Tochter Meg Arrangements heraus, dieses Mal mit einer Gruppe von Et vos épinettes Your spinet a-jingling,
gewidmet, die wie ihre Mutter Sängerin war, und das Moore’s Irish Melodies [CD2, 1-0], von denen einige Jésus, cette nuit, For Jesus’ birthday
bewegende The trees they grow so high aus der Graf- wiederum in früheren Recitals aufgeführt worden wa- S’est fait tout petit. We’ll sing and we’ll play.
schaft Somerset mit seiner nach und nach sich ent- ren. Der erste Titel, Avenging and bright, mit der An-
wickelnden und dann wieder zurückfallenden Be- weisung Fast and fierce, erinnert zunächst an munter ge- Disant: ‘Petit ange, He said: ‘Little angel,
gleitung ist Bobby Rothman zugeeignet, dem Sohn eines zupfte Harfenakkorde, bevor es in der dritten Strophe Je suis moult content, Here’s silver and gold,
Freundes, den Britten durch die Familie Mayer kennen unheilvoll im Bass grollt. Sail on, sail on ist ein zum Afin si tu manges, Thou shalt not go hungry,
lernte. Das walisische The Ash Grove mit seiner fein ein- leisen Schwanken des Bootes gesungenes Abschiedslied. Voilà de l’argent. Thou shalt not go cold.
gesetzten Kanontechnik, einer bevorzugten Technik von In How sweet the answer hört man dem Titel entspre- Pour la doulce France For France and King Henry
Britten, ist William und Elisabeth Mayers Tochter Beata, chend ein fragmentarisches Echo; die wilde Harfe des Et son Roy Henry, This gold thou shalt spend,
das lebhafte Kinderlied Oliver Cromwell aus Suffolk Minstrel Boy ertönt mit trefflicher Wirkung, worauf das Prie avec que instance In honour and glory
hingegen ihrem Sohn Christopher gewidmet. nächtliche At the mid hour of night mit seinem Dudel- Ton petit amy!’ To thy little friend!’
Der zweite Band mit Arrangements [CD2, !-*] sackbass folgt. Rich and rare steht wieder im Zeichen Prenez vos musettes, Come set your pipes ringing,
erschien 1946. Britten widmete die Stücke seinem Pa- der Kanontechnik; Dear Harp of my Country! enthält Et vos épinettes Your spinet a-jingling,
tenkind Humphrey Gyde und dessen Bruder Arnold, deren harfenartige Figurationen; Oft in the stilly night entfaltet Jésus, cette nuit For Jesus’ birthday
Mutter, die Sängerin Sophie Wyss, die Illuminations ur- sich über einer repetitiven Bassfigur, die späterhin um- S’est fait tout petit. We’ll sing and we’ll play.
aufführte. Der Verfasser erinnert sich, einige dieser Lie- gekehrt wird. Das wohlbekannte The last rose of
der und andere bereits einige Jahre vorher gehört zu haben. summer wird nostalgisch von Harfenarpeggien begleitet, @ Voici le Printemps Hear the Voice of Spring
Die Publikation enthält ein Weihnachtslied, eine Früh- und das Album endet mit dem patriotischen Ostinato
lingsfeier, das Spinnlied Fileuse mit den entsprechenden von O the sight entrancing. Voici le printemps qui passe; Hear the voice of Spring who passeth:
Begleitfiguren und ein Jagdlied, das, wie’s sich gehört, Der fünfte Band enthält wiederum Lieder von den ‘Bonjour, tisserand bonjour! ‘Master Weaver, here’s good-day!
an Jagdhörner erinnert. Ferner gibt es ein Schäfer-Idyll, britischen Inseln, deren Arrangements in dem Jahrzehnt Ami, cède moi ta place, May I take thy place’, she asketh,
ein ernsteres Spinnlied mit repetitiven Bassfiguren und vor der Veröffentlichung (1961) entstanden [CD1, (-£]. ‘J’en ai besoin pour un jour. ‘For I need it just one day.
ein pastorales Liebeslied. Den Abschluss bildet die Ein weiteres Mal greift Britten in der lebendigen Er- C’est moi qui fait la toilette. I must clothe the woods in splendour,
traurige Geschichte von einem Hirtenknaben mit einem zählung The Brisk Young Widow zur Kanontechnik, und Des bois, des prés et des fleurs Deck the fields with flowers gay.
Refrain, der einen nicht mehr loslässt. kunstvoll verwendet er bei Sally in our Alley das auf den Donne vite ta navette Lend me quick thy tool, o weaver,
Der dritte Band mit Liedern der Britischen Inseln Namen des Mädchens aufsteigende Intervall. The Lin- Tu sais qu’on m’attend ailleurs.’ For thou know’st I cannot stay.’
kam 1947 heraus. Auch er enthält Lieder, die schon vor- colnshire Poacher bietet weitere kanonische Mög-
her im Konzertrepertoire von Pears und Britten zu lichkeiten, mit denen Early one morning auf zarte Weise Voici le printemps qui passe; Hear the voice of Spring who passeth:
finden waren [CD1, !-&]. Die Sammlung beginnt mit kontrastiert. Der Band schließt mit Robert Burns’ Ca’the ‘Bonjour, mon peintre, bonjour! ‘Master Painter, here’s good-day!
The Plough Boy, den man in den ersten Takten lebhaft yowes, dessen Melodie in verminderten Notenwerten als Ta main s’obstine et se lasse, Thine the cunning hand that painteth
übers weite Feld pfeifen hört. Dem traurigen There’s Quelle eines Kanons benutzt wird. A faire un semblant du jour. All the beauties of the day.
none to soothe aus Schottland folgen die lebendige Der sechste Band wurde wie der vorige 1961 veröf-

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Donne vite ta palette, Give me quick thy box of colour, Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
Ta palette et ton pinceau. Only painter’s brush will do, Volkslied-Arrangements
Tu vas voir le ciel en fête Thou shalt see the sky in splendour
Rajeunir dans mon tableau.’ Painted with the brightest blue.’ In der englischen Musik des 20. Jahrhunderts nimmt die Exzesse des Nationalsozialismus und das Leid, das
Benjamin Britten einen konkurrenzlosen Platz ein, und der Krieg mit sich brachte. Britten sehnte sich nach sei-
Voici le printemps qui passe; Hear the voice of Spring who passeth: darüber hinaus ist er auch in der internationalen Musik- nem Land und der heimischen Region, und so kehrten
‘Bonjour, fillettes, bonjour! ‘Little maidens, here’s good-day! welt von größter Bedeutung. Während Elgar in mancher die beiden 1942 nach England zurück. Hier lehnten sie
Donnez vos fuseaux, de grâce, Spindles I must have’, she calleth, Hinsicht der spätromantischen deutschen Tradition des die einfache Lösung ab, als Musiker in Uniform ihren
Que je travaille à mon tour. ‘Let me have them just one day. späten 19. Jahrhunderts verpflichtet war, trat Britten Militärdienst abzuleisten, konnten aber trotz ihres offen-
J’ai promis sous les charmilles Finest wool I’ll give my swallows, nicht in die Falle, die der musikalische Nationalismus kundigen Pazifismus – wenngleich oft unter schwierigen
Ma laine aux nids d’alentour. Building in the eaves above, und die von älteren Komponisten eingelöste Ver- Umständen – Konzerte und Recitals veranstalten, die
Je vous dirai jeunes filles. Maidens, drop your work and follow, pflichtung gegenüber der insularen Volksmusik auf- den Zuhörern Mut machten. Mit der Wiedereröffnung
Où se niche aussi l’amour.’ You shall find the nest of love.’ gestellt hatten. Zugleich profitierte er von dieser Tra- von Sadler’s Wells und der Inszenierung von Brittens
dition allerdings in einem größeren europäischen Peter Grimes begann eine neue Ära der englischen
# Fileuse Fileuse Kontext. In gewissem Maße beschritt er damit einen Weg, Operngeschichte. Es entstand die English Opera Group,
den Mahler vorgezeichnet hatte. Britten verfügte über und es folgten etliche Kammeropern sowie größer
Lorsque j’étais jeunette, je gardais les moutons, When I was young and pretty, I watched over my flock, eine besondere Begabung für die Vertonung von Texten angelegte Werke, die Brittens Ruf als Komponist höch-
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou, und für die Vokalmusik. Diese Gewandtheit, die einst sten Ranges etablierten, ein Rang, der kurz vor seinem
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule. auch Purcell gezeigt hatte, wurde zur Grundlage einer frühen Tod dadurch eine besondere Anerkennung fand,
bemerkenswerten Serie von Bühnenwerken, mit denen dass ihm als erstem englischen Komponisten überhaupt
N’étais jamais seulette à songer par les monts, I never wandered lonely o’er the mountains and rocks, die englische Oper erstmals ins internationale Repertoire die Würde eines Peers zuteil wurde.
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou, gelangte. Er befleißigte sich einer tonalen Musiksprache Es war in mancher Hinsicht eine gewisse Nostalgie,
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule. und wusste erfindungsreich, fantasievoll und vor allem die Brittens zahlreichen Folksong-Arrangements zu-
musikalisch mit Techniken umzugehen, die in den grunde lag. Er verfügte über die spezielle Fähigkeit,
Mais d’autres bergerettes avec moi devisaient But we did gossip blithely, maidens silly and gay. Händen anderer oft reizlos und trocken erschienen. Viel melodische und textliche Besonderheiten herauszu-
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou, verdankt sein Schaffen der Freundschaft und lebenslangen streichen, eine Fertigkeit, die er mit wunderbarem Effekt
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule. Partnerschaft mit dem Sänger Peter Pears, für den er in seiner Fassung der Beggar’s Opera demonstrierte.
viele Hauptpartien seiner Opern schuf und der mit seiner Die erste Sammlung mit Liedern von den Britischen
Parfois de sa musette un berger nous charmait. With songs a shepherd laddie stole our young hearts away. Stimme und seiner Intelligenz eindeutig auf Brittens Inseln erschien 1943. Die sieben Bearbeitungen waren
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou, vokale Schreibweise einwirkte. allerdings schon in Amerika entstanden und bildeten
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule. Benjamin Britten wurde 1913 in der Seestadt einen Teil der Recital-Programme, die Britten und Pears
Lowestoft, East Suffolk, geboren und verriet schon früh dort veranstalteten [CD1, 1-7]. Ralph Vaughan Wil-
Il nous faisait des rondes, joli’ rondes d’amour He’d pipe a jolly ditty and of love sing a song. kompositorische Fähigkeiten. Er studierte zunächst bei liams schrieb großzügigerweise eine Rezension zu
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou, Frank Bridge, bevor er eine weniger ergiebige Zeit am dieser Veröffentlichung und ließ dabei bescheiden
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule. Royal College of Music in London zubrachte. Seine Be- seinen völlig anderen Umgang mit folkloristischem
ziehung zu dem Dichter W.H. Auden, mit dem er mehr- Material in den Hintergrund treten.
Mais me voilà vieille, reste seule toujours. But now I’m old and ugly, and I’ve lain alone too long. fach zusammenarbeitete, war einer der Gründe dafür, Jedes Lied ist einem Freund oder einer Freundin in
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, Tiroulou, dass er 1939 mit Pears in die USA ging, wo sich – Amerika gewidmet. Den Anfang macht The Salley
Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule Tirouli, Tiroula, Tirouli, rouli, roule. abseits kleinlicher Eifersüchteleien und Beschränkungen Gardens für die australische Sängerin Clytie Mundy, bei
– bessere Möglichkeiten ergaben. Bei Kriegsausbruch der Pears in den USA Stunden genommen hatte – ein
entstanden neue Probleme. Britten und Pears waren irisches Lied mit folkloristischen Worten von W.B.
zwar überzeugte Pazifisten, doch zugleich entsetzten sie Yeats. Das zweite – Little Sir William – ist William Mayer

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Graham Johnson $ Le roi s’en va-t’en chasse The King is gone a-hunting
Graham Johnson is recognised as one of the world’s leading vocal accompanists. Born in Rhodesia, he came to
London to study in 1967. After he left the Royal Academy of Music, his teachers included Gerald Moore and Geoffrey Le roi s’en va-t’en chasse, The King is gone a-hunting
Parsons. In 1972 he was the official pianist at Peter Pears’ first master-classes at The Maltings, Snape, which brought Dans le bois des Bourbons Beneath the greenwood tree,
him into contact with Benjamin Britten, a link which strengthened his determination to accompany. In 1976 he formed Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
the Songmakers’ Almanac to explore neglected areas of piano-accompanied vocal music; the founder singers were Dans le bois des Bourbons Beneath the greenwood tree,
Dame Felicity Lott, Ann Murray, Anthony Rolfe Johnson and Richard Jackson, artists with whom he has Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.
established long and fruitful collaborations both on the concert platform and in the recording studio. Some two
hundred and fifty Songmakers’ programmes have been presented over the years. Graham Johnson has accompanied Ne trouve rien en chasse, He’s caught no bird a-hunting,
such distinguished singers as Sir Thomas Allen, Victoria de los Angeles, Elly Ameling, Arleen Auger, Brigitte Ni cailles, ni pigeons, No pigeon catcheth he,
Fassbaender, Matthias Goerne, Thomas Hampson, Simon Keenlyside, Philip Langridge, Serge Leiferkus, Edith Mathis, Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
Lucia Popp, Christoph Prégardien, Dame Margaret Price, Dorothea Röschmann, Peter Schreier, Dame Elisabeth Ni cailles, ni pigeons, No pigeon catcheth he,
Schwarzkopf, and Sarah Walker. His relationship with the Wigmore Hall is a special one. He devised and accompanied Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.
concerts in the hall’s re-opening series in 1994, and in its centenary celebrations in 2001. He has been chairman of the
jury for the Wigmore Hall Song Competition since its inception. He is Senior Professor of Accompaniment at the Rencontre une bergère But he’s found a shepherd maiden
Guildhall School of Music and has led a biennial scheme for Young Songmakers since 1985. His achievements Qui dormait dans les joncs, Asleep beneath a tree,
include the devising and accompaniment of a set of complete Schubert Lieder on 37 discs for Hyperion Records, to Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
be followed by a complete Schumann series, and there is an ongoing French song series to include the complete Qui dormait dans les joncs, Asleep beneath a tree,
songs of such composers as Chausson, Chabrier and Fauré. All these discs are issued with Graham Johnson’s own Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.
programme notes. He has also recorded for Sony, BMG, Harmonia Mundi, Forlane, EMI and DGG. Awards include
the Gramophone solo vocal award in 1989 (with Dame Janet Baker), 1996 (Die schöne Müllerin with Ian Bostridge), ‘Voulez vous être reine, ‘And wilt thou be my queen-a,
1997 (for the inauguration of the Schumann series with Christine Schäfer), and 2001 (with Magdalena Kožená). He Dedans mes beaux donjons, And live in state with me,
was The Royal Philharmonic Society’s Instrumentalist of the Year in 1998; in June 2000 he was elected a member of Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
the Royal Swedish Academy of Music. He is author of The Songmakers’ Almanac; Twenty years of recitals in London Dedans mes beaux donjons, And live in state with me,
and The French Song Companion for Oxford University Press. He was made an OBE in the 1994 Queen’s Birthday Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.’
Honours list, and in 2002 he was created Chevalier in the Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the French Government.
‘Vous aurez des carrosses ‘Oh thou shalt have a carriage
Carlos Bonell Et de l’or à foison, And gold in quantity,
Carlos Bonell has enjoyed an immensely varied career. His activities include television, film and CD recordings, Mon aimable bergère. My adorable maiden.
international tours, concertos with the major orchestras and concerts with his own ensemble. He can be heard on the Et de l’or à foison, And gold in quantity,
soundtracks of the Hollywood films City of Angels and The Honest Courtesan and on the television films Inspector Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.’
Morse and The Politician’s Wife. Carlos Bonell first gained prominence through his critically acclaimed Decca
recording of Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra and Charles Dutoit, which ‘Et cour de grandes dames, ‘At court I’ve stately ladies,
was awarded a coveted rosette by the Penguin CD guide. He has appeared in concert with a wide variety of musicians De ducs et de barons, Two barons one grandee,
including guitarists John Williams, Paco Peña, Juan Martin and Martin Taylor, violinists Salvatore Accardo, Pinchas Mon aimable bergére. My adorable maiden.
Zukerman and Levon Chilingirian, and singers Patricia Rozario, Teresa Berganza, Cleo Laine and Philip Langridge. De ducs et de barons, Two barons one grandee,
Bergère Nanon. Sweet maiden Marie.’

‘Merci, merci, beau Sire, ‘I thank you, Sir, most kindly,


Mais j’aime un pauv’ garcon, I love a lad,’ said she,
Qui aime sa bergère My adorable maiden.

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Mais j’aime un pauv’ garcon, ‘I love a lad,’ said she, Felicity Lott
Qui aime Nanon! ‘And he loves Marie!’ Felicity Lott was born and educated in Cheltenham, read French at Royal Holloway College, of which she is now an
Honorary Fellow, and singing at the Royal Academy of Music, of which she is a Fellow. Her operatic repertoire
% La belle est au jardin d’amour Beauty in love’s garden ranges from Handel to Stravinsky, but she has built up her formidable international reputation as an interpreter of
the great rôles of Mozart and Strauss. At the Royal Opera House she has sung Anne Trulove, Blanche, Ellen Orford,
La belle est au jardin d’amour Beauty in love’s garden is bound, Eva, Countess Almaviva and under Mackerras, Tate, Davis and Haitink, the Marschallin. At the Glyndebourne
La belle est au jardin d’amour Beauty in love’s garden is bound. Festival her rôles include Anne Trulove, Pamina, Donna Elvira, Octavian, Christine (Intermezzo), Countess
Il y’a un mois ou cinq semaines. Full thirty nights and many a morning. Madeleine (Capriccio) and the title-rôle in Arabella; in Paris at the Opéra Bastille, Opéra Comique, Châtelet and
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. Palais Garnier she has sung Cleopatra, Donna Elvira, Fiordiligi, Countess Madeleine, the title-rôle in La belle
Hélène, La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein and the Marschallin. At the Metropolitan Opera, New York, she sang
Son père la cherche partout, Father is searching all around, the Marschallin under Carlos Kleiber and Countess Almaviva under James Levine. She has sung with the Berlin and
Son père la cherche partout, Father is searching all around. Vienna Philharmonic and Chicago Symphony Orchestras under Solti, the Munich Philharmonic under Mehta, the
Son amoureux qui est en peine. And Colin weepeth for his darling. London Philharmonic under Haitink, Welser-Möst and Masur, the Concertgebouw Orchestra under Masur, the
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. Boston Symphony under Previn, the New York Philharmonic under Previn and Masur, the BBC Symphony
Orchestra with Sir Andrew Davis in London, Sydney and New York and the Cleveland Orchestra under Welser-
‘Berger, berger, n’as tu point vu, ‘Shepherd say where can she be found, Möst in Cleveland and Carnegie Hall. A founder member of The Songmakers’ Almanac, Felicity Lott has appeared
Berger, berger, n’as tu point vu, Shepherd say where can she be found. on the major recital platforms of the world, including the Salzburg, Prague, Bergen, Aldeburgh, Edinburgh and
Passer ici celle que j’aime?’ Hast thou not seen my dear a-passing?’ Munich Festivals, the Musikverein and Konzerthaus in Vienna and the Salle Gaveau, Musée d’Orsay, Opéra
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down hey down a-downing. Comique, Châtelet and Théâtre des Champs Elysées in Paris. She has a particularly close association with the
‘Elle est là bas dans ce vallon, ‘She’s by the fountain down below, Wigmore Hall. Her many awards include honorary doctorates at the Universities of Oxford, Loughborough,
Elle est là bas dans ce vallon, She’s by the fountain down below. Leicester, London and Sussex and the Royal Academy of Music and Drama Glasgow. She was made a CBE in the
A un oiseau conte ses peines.’ And to her dove she is complaining.’ 1990 New Year Honours and in 1996 was created a Dame Commander of the British Empire. In February 2003 she
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. was awarded the title of Bayerische Kammersängerin. She has also been awarded the titles Officier de l’Ordre des
Arts et des Lettres and Chevalier de l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur by the French Government.
Le bel oiseau s’est envolé, The pretty bird hath ta’en her woe,
Le bel oiseau s’est envolé, The pretty bird hath ta’en her woe, Philip Langridge
Et le chagrin bien loin emmène. And with its far away he’s flying. Philip Langridge was born in Kent and studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He is one of the world’s
Laridondon, laridondaine. Hey derry down, hey down a-downing. most distinguished singers, whose musical and dramatic qualities ensure that he is in constant demand throughout
Europe, the United States and Japan. In recognition of these qualities, he was made a Commander of the British
^ Il est quelqu’un sur terre There’s someone in my fancy Empire in the Queen’s Birthday Honours of 1994. He has also received a number of other awards, including the
prestigious Olivier Award for Osud, the Singer of the Year Award from the Royal Philharmonic Society and The
Il est quelqu’un sur terre There’s someone in my fancy, Worshipful Company of Musicians’ Santay Award. He was awarded the NFMS/Charles Groves Prize 2001 for his
Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel! outstanding contribution to British Music. His remarkable versatility and command of a wide variety of styles is
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along, reflected in his extensive discography, ranging from the early classical period to the present day. These recordings
et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song. have gained him two Grammy Awards (Moses und Aron, and Peter Grimes), the Gramophone Award (War
Il est quelqu’un sur terre There’s someone in my fancy, Requiem) and a Classic CD Award (The Turn of the Screw). On video he can be seen in Peter Grimes, Billy Budd,
Vers qui mes rêves vont. To him my thoughts do stray. Idomeneo, La Clemenza di Tito, From the House of the Dead, Wozzeck, Oberon, Jenůfa and Oedipus Rex, which
won the Classical Music Award. International festivals and opera houses with which he is particularly closely
Il est dans la vallée. And down there in the valley, associated include Salzburg, the Metropolitan Opera New York, La Scala, Milan, Bayerische Staatsoper, Munich,
Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel! the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Glyndebourne, Edinburgh, and the English National Opera. In concert
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along, Philip Langridge has worked with the world’s leading conductors including Abbado, Barenboim, Gergiev, Haitink,
Harnoncourt, Levine, Ozawa, Previn, Rattle and Solti, and appeared with the world’s major orchestras.

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The collection Tom Bowling and Other Song Pears and the contralto Norma Procter from the 1950s. et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
Arrangements was published in 2001, edited, with a The Holly and the Ivy [CD1, ¢] has not been dated, and Il est dans la vallée. And down there in the valley’s
useful introduction, by Paul Kildea. It brings together The Stream in the Valley (Da unten im Tale) [CD2, ∞] Un moulin près du pont. A mill where love doth stay.
songs performed but not published during the was first broadcast in 1946 with the cellist Maurice
composer’s lifetime, some of them held back through Gendron, the first song in a projected set of German L’amour y moud’ sa graine, There love shall grind the barley,
copyright problems with collectors of the melodies and folk-song arrangements. Also included is an Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel!
their publishers. Greensleeves, I wonder as I wander unidentified folk-song setting, here, in the absence of Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along,
and the sailor’s yarn The Crocodile [CD1, 8-0] date words, given to the cello [CD2, §]. et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
from 1940-41, Pray Goody, [CD1, *] from 1945-46, and L’amour y moud’ sa graine, There love shall grind the barley
Soldier, won’t you marry me and The Deaf Woman’s Tant que le jour est long. All through the live-long day.
Courtship [CD1, ∞-§] apparently for recitals by Peter Keith Anderson
La nuit vers les étoiles. To stars that shine above me,
Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel!
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along,
et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
La nuit vers les étoiles. To stars that shine above me,
Soupire sa chanson. The night shall sing her lay.

La rou’ s’y est brisée. A broken wheel’s my story,


Va, mon rouet! Turn little wheel!
Docile, tourne, va ton train, So sweetly turning, spin along,
et dis, tout bas, ton doux refrain And hum to me thy busy song.
La rou’ s’y est brisée. A broken wheel’s my story,
Finie est la chanson. And finished is my lay.

& Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho!

Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho!


Les agneaux vont aux plaines. Keep your lambs in the valley.
Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho! Eho!
Et les loups vont aux bois. For the wolf’s in the wood.

Tant qu’aux bords des fontaines The white lambs they do dally,
Ou dans les frais ruisseaux, By the fountain and spring,
Les blancs moutons s’y baignent, As they bathe and skip gladly,
Y dansant au préau All around in a ring

Eho! Eho! Eho! … Eho! Eho! Eho! …

Mais queuqu’fois par vingtaine But perchance there are twenty,


Y s’éloign’ des troupeaux, From the flock far will stray,
Pour aller sous les chênes, As they search for new country,

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Aux herbages nouveaux. Where a young lamb may play. developing then diminishing accompaniment, to Bobby harp-chord, briskly struck, before the more ominous
Rothman, the son of a friend introduced by the Meyers. growling bass of the third verse. Sail on, sail on is a song
Eho! Eho! Eho! …. Eho! Eho! Eho! … The Welsh The Ash Grove, with its fine use of canon, a of parting, as the boat gently rocks, while fragmentary
favourite device, has a dedication to Beata, daughter of echo is duly heard in How sweet the answer. The wild
Et les ombres lointaines, But this perilous country William and Elisabeth Mayer, and the lively Suffolk harp of The Minstrel Boy is heard to brave effect,
Leurz’y cach’ leurs bourreaux, Is the home of the foe, nursery-rhyme Oliver Cromwell to their son followed by the nocturnal At the mid hour of night, over
Malgré leurs plaintes vaines, And the wolf he is hungry Christopher. a drone-like bass. The device of canon is used once more
Les loups mang’ les agneaux. For this lamb white as snow. The second volume of arrangements [CD2, !-*] in Rich and rare, Dear Harp of my Country! has harp-
was published in 1946 and dedicated to Britten’s young like figuration, while Oft in the stilly night unwinds over
Eho! Eho! Eho! … Eho! Eho! Eho! … friends Arnold and Humphrey Gyde, the latter his repeated bass figuration, later inverted. The very
godson, the children of the singer Sophie Wyss, who familiar The last rose of summer is nostalgically
T’es mon agneau, ma reine Little lamb my sweet Chloe, gave the first performances of Les Illuminations. The accompanied by harp arpeggiations, and the album ends
Les grand’ vill’ c’est le bois, Do not stray far and wide, present writer remembers hearing some of these and with the patriotic ostinato of O the sight entrancing.
Par ainsi Madeleine, For the wolf’s in the city, other songs a few years earlier. They include a The fifth volume once more brings together songs
T’en vas pas loin de moi! Just you stay by my side! Christmas carol, a celebration of spring, a spinning- from the British Isles. It was published in 1961, but
song, Fileuse, with apt accompanying figuration, a represents songs written at least during the preceding
Eho! Eho! Eho! … Eho! Eho! Eho! … hunting-song, with the necessary suggestions of the decade [CD1, (-£]. Britten again uses canon in the
hunting-horns, a shepherd idyll, a sterner spinning-song, lively narrative of The Brisk Young Widow and subtle
* Quand j’étais chez mon père Heigh ho, heigh hi! with a repeated bass figure, a pastoral love-song, and a use of the rising interval on the girl’s name in Sally in
final sad tale from a shepherd-boy, with a haunting our Alley. The Lincolnshire Poacher presents further
Quand j’étais chez mon père Oh I lived with my daddy, refrain. opportunities for canonic writing, as it reaches its
Apprenti pastoureau, An apprentice was I, Published in 1947, bringing together further songs that climax, to which Early one morning offers a gentle
Il m’a mis dans la lande, Just a poor shepherd laddie had already formed part of concert repertoire for Peter contrast. The volume closes with the Robert Burns Ca’
Pour garder les troupiaux. To my sheep I did cry. Pears and the composer, the third volume [CD1, !-&], the yowes, the melody used as a source of canon in
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, devoted to songs from the British Isles, starts with The reduced note values.
Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many, Plough Boy, his whistling over the lea vividly first The sixth volume, also published in 1961, is for high
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, illustrated in the opening bars. The sad Scottish song voice and guitar, songs performed by Peter Pears and the
Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry. There’s none to soothe is followed by the lively guitarist Julian Bream [CD2, ( - ¢ ]. The running
narrative of Sweet Polly Oliver, in which Britten resorts accompaniment of the first song, I will give my love an
Mais je n’en avais guère Oh they weren’t very many, to his favourite device of canon, The Miller of Dee, with apple, a Dorset folk-song, is fully within the idiom of the
Je n’avais qu’ trois agneaux; And the lambs they did die, his mill-wheel duly turning, and the wicked guitar, a characteristic of the second cheerful
Et le loup de la plaine For the wolf swallowed daily suggestiveness of The foggy, foggy dew. To this O Waly, Appalachian Sailor-boy, with its nautical touches and
M’a mangé le plus biau. All the best and most spry. Waly offers a contrast, and the set ends with Come you uses of grand and petit barré. There is a graceful chordal
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, not from Newcastle?, over an ostinato bass variously accompaniment to Master Kilby, exploring in its
Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many, harmonized. conclusion the varied possibilities of guitar timbre. A
Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi, It was not until 1960 that a fourth volume of folk- pattern of ascending thirds marks The Soldier and the
Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry. song arrangements appeared, this time devoted to a Sailor, and the North Country Bonny at Morn uses
group of Moore’s Irish Melodies [CD2, 1-0]. Once varied arpeggiation, exploring, as elsewhere, the
Il était si vorace O the wolf was so greedy again some of these songs had been heard in much harmonies inherent in traditional guitar tuning. The final
N’a laissé que la piau, Only bones he let lie, earlier recitals. The first song, Avenging and bright, is song is The Shooting of his Dear, in which characteristic
N’a laissé que la queue, Only tails he did leave me, marked Fast and fierce, with opening suggestions of a guitar harmony again makes its appearance.

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Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) Pour mettre à mon chapeau ‘roun’ my hat for to tie.
Folk Song Arrangements Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many,
Benjamin Britten occupies an unrivalled position in and recitals, often in difficult circumstances, offering Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
English music of the twentieth century and a place of the encouragement to those who heard them. The re- Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry.
greatest importance in the wider musical world. While opening of Sadler’s Wells and the staging of Britten’s
Elgar was in some ways part of late nineteenth-century opera Peter Grimes started a new era in English opera. Mais des os de la bête So a pipe I did make me
German romantic tradition, Britten avoided the trap The English Opera Group was founded and a series of Me fis un chalumiau Of the bones white and dry,
offered by musical nationalism and the insular debt to chamber operas followed, with larger scale works that Pour jouer à la fête For to sing and make merry
folk-music of his older compatriots, while profiting from established Britten as a composer of the highest stature, A la fêt’ du hamiau. When the spring-time is nigh.
that tradition in a much wider European context. He may a position recognised shortly before his early death by Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
be seen as following in part a path mapped out by his elevation to the peerage, the first English composer Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many,
Mahler. He possessed a special gift for word-setting and ever to be so honoured. Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
vocal writing, a facility that Purcell had shown and that It was in some sense a certain nostalgia that lay Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry.
was the foundation of a remarkable series of operas that behind Britten’s many folk-song arrangements. He had a
brought English opera for the first time into international particular gift for bringing out the qualities implicit in a Pour fair’ danser l’ village, Then the young and the pretty,
repertoire. Tonal in his musical language, he knew well melody and text, something displayed to admirable Dessous le grand ormiau O, their skirts they let fly,
how to use inventively, imaginatively, and, above all, effect in his version of The Beggar’s Opera. The first set Et les jeun’s et les vieilles And the old and the ugly
musically, techniques that in other hands often seemed of songs from the British Isles was published in 1943, Les pieds dans les sabiots. For to dance they did try.
arid. His work owed much to the friendship and constant but the seven arrangements were made during Britten’s Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
companionship of the singer Peter Pears, for whom time in America and formed an element in recital Je n’en avais guère They weren’t very many,
Britten wrote many of his principal operatic rôles and programmes offered there by Pears and the composer Troupiaux, troupiaux, Heigh-ho, heigh-hi,
whose qualities of voice and intelligence clearly had a [CD1, 1-7]. It was generously reviewed by Vaughan Je n’en avais beaux. They weren’t very spry.
marked effect on his vocal writing. Williams, modestly decrying his own very different
Born in the East Anglian seaside town of Lowestoft approach to such material. Each song is dedicated to a Translations by Iris Rogers
in 1913, Britten showed early gifts as a composer, friend in America. The set starts with The Salley © 1946 by Hawkes & Son (London) Ltd.
studying with Frank Bridge before a less fruitful time at Gardens, dedicated to the Australian-born singer Clytie Reproduced by Permission of
the Royal College of Music in London. His association Mundy, with whom Pears took lessons in America, an Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.
with the poet W.H. Auden, with whom he undertook Irish song, with folk-style words by W.B. Yeats. The
various collaborations, was in part behind his departure second of the set, Little Sir William, dedicated to
with Pears in 1939 for the United States, where William Mayer, father of a family into which Pears and
opportunities seemed to offer, away from the petty Britten were welcomed in America, is a ballad, its words
jealousies and inhibitions of his own country. The slightly modified in publication to avoid the traditional
outbreak of war brought its own difficulties. Britten and anti-semitism of the text. The poignant Scottish lament
Pears were firmly pacifist in their views, but were for The Bonny Earl o’ Moray is dedicated to the
equally horrified at the excesses of National Socialism psychiatrist Mildred Titley, wife of the Superintendent
and sufferings that the war brought. Britten’s nostalgia of the Long Island Home, where William Mayer was
for his native country and region led to their return to Medical Director. A second Scottish tune O can ye sew
England in 1942, when they rejected the easy option of cushions? is a lullaby, dedicated to Clytie Mundy’s
nominal military service as musicians in uniform in daughter Meg, a singer, and the moving The trees they
favour of overt pacifism, but were able to give concerts grow so high, a Somerset folk-song, with its gradually

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Volume 6: England I would not be a blacksmith CD 2 67:03


Publisher: Boosey &Hawkes Music That smuts his nose and chin,
Publishers Limited. I’d rather be a sailor-boy Volume 4: Moore’s Irish Melodies Volume 6: England
That sails thro’ the wind. Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Carlos Bonell, Guitar
( I will give my love an apple Sailor-boy, sailor-boy, Graham Johnson, Piano
Folk Song from Dorset Sailor-boy for me, ( I will give my love an apple 2 1:16
Words and Melody from If I ever get married 1 Avenging and bright 2 1:34 ) Sailor-boy 2 1:54
“Folksongs for Schools” collected and arranged A sailor’s-wife she’ll be. 2 Sail on, sail on 1 2:26 ¡ Master Kilby 2 1:59
by H.E.D. Hammond and R. Vaughan Williams We go walking on the green grass
Thus, thus, thus
3 How sweet the answer 1 1:57 ™ The Soldier and the Sailor 2 2:39
I will give my love an apple without e’er a core We go walking on the green grass 4 The Minstrel Boy 2 2:23 £ Bonny at Morn 2 2:31
I will give my love a house without e’er a door Thus, thus, thus. 5 At the mid hour of night 2 2:46 ¢ The Shooting of his Dear 2 2:54
I will give my love a palace wherein she may be, 6 Rich and rare 1 3:06
And she may unlock it without any key. ¡ Master Kilby 7 Dear Harp of my Country! 2 2:26 Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements
Folk song from Somerset 8 Oft in the stilly night 1 2:47 Philip Langridge, Tenor
My head is the apple without e’er a core, Words and Melody from 9 The last rose of summer 1 3:45 Christopher Van Kampen, Cello
My mind is the house without e’er a door, “Folk Songs for Schools” 0 O the sight entrancing 2 2:09 Graham Johnson, Piano
My heart is the palace wherein she may be, collected and arranged by Cecil Sharp
And she may unlock it without any key. Volume 2: France ∞ German Folk Song:
In the heat of the day The Stream in the Valley 2:32
) Sailor-boy When the sun shines so freely,
Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2
Folk song from the Appalachian Mountains of There I met Master Kilby Graham Johnson, Piano
Kentucky. So fine and so gay. Unpublished folk song setting
Words and Melody from “Seventeen Nursery Songs ! La Noël passée 2 3:51 Christopher Van Kampen, Cello
from the Appalachian Mountains” (under the title Then I pull’d off my hat @ Voici le Printemps 1 1:46 Graham Johnson, Piano
‘Soldier boy’) collected and arranged by Cecil And I bowed to the ground # Fileuse 1 1:51
Sharp And I said: ‘Master Kilby, $ Le roi s’en va-t’en chasse 1 2:19 § Unidentified folk song setting 3:35
Pray where are you bound?’ % La belle est au jardin d’amour 1 3:12
We go walking on the green grass ^ Il est quelqu’un sur terre 1 4:56 Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements
Thus, thus, thus, ‘I am bound for the West, & Eho! Eho! 2 1:56 is published by Boosey & Hawkes, 2001
Come all you pretty fair maids There in hopes to find rest, * Quand j’étais chez mon père 2 2:00
Come walk along with us. And in Nancy’s soft bosom
So pretty and fair I will build a new nest.
As you take yourself to be,
I’ll choose you for a partner, And if I was the master
Come walk along with me. Of ten thousand pounds
We go walking on the green grass All in gay gold and silver
Thus, thus, thus Or in King William’s crowns.
We go walking on the green grass
Thus, thus, thus. I would part with it all
With my own heart so freely

8.557220-21 34 3 8.557220-21
557220-21bk USA 25/1/05 7:50 pm Page 2

CD 1 65:34 But it’s all for the sake For good liquor were sent us
Of my charming Nancy. Our spirits to cheer,
Volume 1: British Isles Volume 5: British Isles She’s the fairest of girls, And where we got one pot,
Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 She’s the choice of my own heart, I wish we had ten,
Graham Johnson, Piano Graham Johnson, Piano She is painted like waxwork And never want for liquor,’
In every part.’ Said the sailor: ‘Amen.’
1 The Salley Gardens 2 2:36 ( The Brisk Young Widow 2 2:07
2 Little Sir William 2 3:01 ) Sally in our Alley 2 4:09 ™ The Soldier and the Sailor £ Bonny at Morn
Folk Song from Oxfordshire Folk Song from Northumberland
3 The Bonny Earl o’ Moray 1 2:36 ¡ The Lincolnshire Poacher 2 2:09 Collected by Cecil Sharp Words and Melody from
4 O can ye sew cushions? 1 2:20 ™ Early one morning 1 3:18 in Oxfordshire, August 1909 “North Country Folk Songs” by W. G. Whittaker
5 The trees they grow so high 2 3:35 £ Ca’ the yowes 1 3:39
6 The Ash Grove 2 2:35 As the soldier and the sailor The sheep’s in the meadows,
7 Oliver Cromwell 2 0:45 Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements Was a-walking one day, The kye’s in the corn,
Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 Said the soldier to the sailor: Thou’s ower lang in thy bed,
Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements Graham Johnson, Piano ‘I’ve a mind for to pray.’ Bonny at morn.
Philip Langridge, Tenor 2 ‘Pray on then’, said the sailor,
Graham Johnson, Piano ¢ The Holly and the Ivy 1 2:25 ‘Pray on once again, Canny at night, bonny at morn,
∞ Soldier, won’t you marry me? 1 2 1:41 And whatever you do pray for, Thou’s ower lang in thy bed,
8 Greensleeves 2 1:56 § The Deaf Woman’s Courtship 1 2 1:19 I will answer Amen.’ Bonny at morn.
9 I wonder as I wander 2 3:59
‘Now the first thing I’ll pray for, The bird’s in the nest,
0 The Crocodile 2 4:45 I’ll pray for the Queen, The trout’s in the burn,
That she have peace and plenty Thou hinders thy mother
Volume 3: British Isles All the days of her reign, In many a turn.
Felicity Lott 1, Soprano Philip Langridge Tenor 2 And where she got one man
Graham Johnson, Piano I wish she had ten; Canny at night, bonny at morn…..
And never want for an Army.’
! The Plough Boy 2 1:57 Said the sailor ‘Amen.’ We’re all laid idle
@ There’s none to soothe 2 1:37 Wi’ keeping the bairn,
# Sweet Polly Oliver 2 2:15 ‘Now the next thing I’ll pray for, The lad winnot work
$ The Miller of Dee 2 1:56 I’ll pray for the Queen, And the lass winnot lairn.
That she may have peace and plenty
% The foggy, foggy dew 2 2:34 All the days of her reign. Canny at night, bonny at morn….
^ O Waly, Waly 1 4:03 And where she got one ship
& Come you not from Newcastle? 1 1:10 I wish she had ten;
And never want for a Navy.’
Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements Said the sailor: ‘Amen.’
Philip Langridge, Tenor Graham Johnson, Piano
‘Now the next thing I’ll pray for,
* Pray Goody 0:47 Is a pot of good beer,

8.557220-21 2 35 8.557220-21
557220-21bk USA 25/1/05 7:50 pm Page 36

¢ The Shooting of his Dear Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements DDD
Folk Song from Norfolk.
Words and Melody from
Publisher: Boosey and Hawkes Music Publishers
Limited.
The English Song Series • 10 8.557220-21
“Six Folk Songs from Norfolk”
∞ The Stream in the Valley
BRITTEN
Collected and arranged by E.J. Moeran

O come all you young fellows that


(Da unten im Tale) German Folk Song
Translation by Iris Rogers
2 CDs
carry a gun, © Copyright by The Iris Rogers Estate
I’d have you get home by the light of
the sun,
For young Jimmy was a fowler and
Reproduced by Permission of Boosey & Hawkes
Music Publishers Ltd.
© The Britten Estate Limited
Folk Song Arrangements
a-fowling alone,
When he shot his own true love in the room
of a swan.
The stream in the valley
Is troubled and sad,
Felicity Lott, Soprano • Philip Langridge, Tenor
Then home went young Jimmy with his dog
And it’s hard to be telling
How great is my love. Graham Johnson, Piano • Carlos Bonell, Guitar
and his gun,
Saying Uncle, dear Uncle, have you heard You tell me you love me,
what I’ve done? You tell me you’re true
Cursed be that old gunsmith that made my But a little deceiving
old gun Is surely there too.
For I’ve shot my own true love in the room
of a swan.’ If I tell you a thousand times
That I am true
Then out came bold uncle with his locks And if still you won’t heed me
hanging grey, Then I’ll go from you.
Saying, ‘Jimmy, dear Jimmy, don’t you
go away And I’ll thank you for loving me
Don’t leave your own country till the Though we must part,
trial come on, And I’ll wish you your happiness
For you never will be hanged for the Deep in my heart.
shooting of a swan.’

So the trial came on and pretty Polly


did appear,
Saying ‘Uncle, dear Uncle, let Jimmy
go clear,
For my apron was bound round me and he
took me for a swan,
And his poor heart lay bleeding for Polly
his own.’

8.557220-21 36
557220-21 inlay USA 17/1/05 3:06 pm Page 1

NAXOS
8.557220-21
Benjamin Britten was throughout his life drawn to folk-song, possessing a special gift for word-setting
and vocal writing. This release and its companion (Naxos 8.557222), previously available on Collins
Classics, present all the known folk-songs, in both their piano and orchestral arrangements, along
with the volumes for guitar and harp. The three discs include 10 world première recordings of folk-
song arrangements published as recently as 2001. DDD
Benjamin 8.557220-21
BRITTEN Playing Time

BRITTEN: Folk Song Arrangements


(1913-1976) 132:37
BRITTEN: Folk Song Arrangements

7
Folk Song Arrangements

47313 22202
CD1 65:34 CD2 67:03
1-7 Volume 1: British Isles 1 2 3 17:28 1-0 Volume 4:
23
8-0 Folk Songs (pub. posth.)* 10:39 Moore’s Irish Melodies 1 2 3 25:18
123 123
!-& Volume 3: British Isles 15:30 !-* Volume 2: France 21:52
23 24
* Pray Goody (pub. posth.)* 0:47 (-¢ Volume 6: England 13:14

5
123 23
(-£ Volume 5: British Isles 15:22 ∞ German Folk Song (pub. posth.)*
2:32

www.naxos.com
Made in the Canada
Sung texts (with translations) included
Booklet notes in English • Kommentar auf Deutsch
g 2005 Naxos Rights International Ltd.
h 1995 Lambourne Productions Ltd.
123 (Christopher Van Kampen, Cello)
¢-§ Folk Songs (pub. posth.)* 5:25
§ Unidentified folk song setting
(Christopher Van Kampen, Cello) 3:35
Felicity Lott, Soprano 1 • Philip Langridge, Tenor 2
Graham Johnson, Piano 3 • Carlos Bonell, Guitar 4
* From Tom Bowling and Other Song Arrangements (Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd., 2001)
Recorded in Association with The Britten Estate Ltd. • Please refer to pages 2 and 3 for a complete track list
Recorded at St Giles Church, Cripplegate, London on 20th and 21st March, 1995 (CD1 Tracks 1-8 and
10-24, CD2 Tracks 1-24), at St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge, London on 9th June, 1995 (CD1 Track 9)
and at Henry Wood Hall, London, on 25th March, 1995 (CD1 Tracks 25 and 26 and CD2 Tracks 25 and 26)

8.557220-21
Producer: John H. West and Stephen Johns (Vol. 6 only) • Engineer: Mike Hatch
Booklet Notes: Keith Anderson • Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.
NAXOS

Cover Picture: October Morning by Frederick Walter Osborne (1859-1903)


(Guildhall Art Gallery, Corporation of London / Bridgeman Art Library)
Originally released by Collins Classics in 1995