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Instructional Plan

Brenna Christopoulos

Grand Valley State University


College of Education
Winter 2018
Table of Contents
Learning Environment 3
Location 3
Student Population and Program Information 3
Language, Level Taught, and Learner Specifics 3

Overview of Unit 4
Title, Duration, and Theme 4
Unit Objectives 4
Content Objectives 4
Language Objectives 4
Standards Addressed 5
ACTFL Standards 5
ISTE Standards 6
Critical Thinking Skills 7
High Leverage Teaching Practices 7
Facilitating Target Language Comprehensibility 7
Building a Classroom Discourse Community 7
Guiding Learners to Interpret and Discuss Authentic Texts 8
Providing Oral Corrective Feedback to Improve Learner Performance 8
Leading a Group Discussion 9
Authentic Materials, Adaptations, and Cultural Connections 9
Technology Integration 10
Materials Used 10
Pre-assessment 11
LESSON PLAN #1 16
LESSON PLAN #2 23
LESSON PLAN #3 29
Can-Do Statements 34
Formative Assessment 36
Summative Assessment 43
Post-assessment 45
Student Survey 46

Post Instructional Plan/Reflection 50


Learning Environment

Location
This thematic unit was designed for a group of students at East Kentwood Freshman Campus
and East Kentwood High School in West Michigan. While the majority of students are
Freshman, the course is technically a high school course, so the following statistics are taken
from East Kentwood High School.

Student Population and Program Information


The student body is very diverse, consisting of a 61% minority enrollment (31% Black, 15%
Asian, 11% Hispanic, 4% two or more races), which is significantly higher than the state
average of 32%. While the school is very linguistically diverse, welcoming refugee and migrant
students as well as students whose home language is one other than English, the language
program is rather limited. There are nine Spanish teachers at the school, but only one French
teacher, one German teacher, and one Latin teacher. This limits the program size for languages
such as French, as only French I and French II are offered. Additional information regarding the
student population includes a student-teacher ratio of 21:1, a total economically disadvantaged
enrollment of 56%, a graduation rate of 86%, and an equal female-male ratio.

Language, Level Taught, and Learner Specifics


This unit was designed for three sections of French I (55 students). The majority of the students
are Freshman; however, there are approximately 8 students who hold Sophomore or Junior
status. At this point in their French education, students have been exposed to basic phrases
and vocabulary and the present tense. While most of the class has little to no experience with
the content, they are very comfortable with each other and willing to explore topics through both
large and small group discussion. These students bring many unique attributes into the
classroom. While their proficiency in French remains around novice-mid (written) and novice-low
(oral), their cultural and proficiency is quite advanced. Home languages of the students include
English, Vietnamese, Spanish, French, Bosnian, Burmese, Swahili, Kinyarwanda, Dinka, Nepali,
and Arabic. As some of these students are refugees/from refugee families, migrants, ESL
students, and heritage learners, the perspectives they bring to instruction are incredible. They
are assets to conversations about cultural differences and they are able to make comparisons
between languages on their own. Additional special populations include students with IEPs that
require the following: additional time on written assignments, clarification of instructions,
additional comprehension checks, seating near instruction or near projector, extended time or
graphic organizers for writing assignments, frustration/anxiety breaks, opportunity to provide
oral responses before written responses on assessments, access to at least size 14 font,
access to iPad for magnification and notetaking.
Overview of Unit

Title, Duration, and Theme


This two-week unit is titled “Bon appétit!” in reference to the theme of French cuisine and the
similarities and differences that exist between French and American foods as well as customs
related to dining.
● Vocabulary: food, meals, phrases for dining
● Grammar: verbs ​boire, finir, prendre, ​and ​vouloir ​in the present tense
● Culture: traditional French meals, meal times, views of food, dining practices

Unit Objectives

Content Objectives
● Students will be able to define the food unit vocabulary words by identifying cognates
and by interpreting authentic French recipes.
● Students will be able to discuss their personal preferences regarding meals and food by
applying the unit vocabulary to their background information.
● Students will be able to compare and contrast American and French products and
perspectives by interpreting and reflecting on authentic videos and presentations.
● Students will be able to compare and contrast American and French practices and
perspectives by interpreting oral and written material and completing the Venn Diagram.
● Students will be able to create a presentational skit by applying the unit vocabulary and
cultural information to a new context, incorporating the French point of view.
● Students will be able to share their opinions and preferences related to food by engaging
in conversation.

Language Objectives
● Students will listen to and watch a video in French about fast food in France and answer
comprehension questions.
● Students will be able to write a recipe in French by using the unit vocabulary.
● Students will be able to read authentic French recipes to identify vocabulary and make
inferences about the products of the French culture.
● Students will be able to orally demonstrate their understanding of the French dining
experience by performing a skit with a group.
● Students will be able to listen to their classmates skits in order to interpret information in
the target language.
● Students will be able to orally demonstrate their ability to communicate in the target
language by asking and responding to rehearsed and non-rehearsed questions.
Standards Addressed

ACTFL Standards
1.1 Interpersonal Communication
Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and
emotions, and exchange opinions.
● 1.1.N.SL.j Share likes and dislikes in the target language with a classmate
● 1.1.N.SL.k Share opinions and preferences in the target language with their classmates

1.2 Interpretive Communication


Students understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.
● 1.2.N.L.a Demonstrate understanding of oral classroom language in the target language
including directions, commands, and requests
● 1.2.N.L.c Understand main idea of a visual media or live presentation (film/DVD, TV
shows and commercials, theatre and musical production)
● 1.2.N.R.b Understand main idea of simple accessible written materials in the target
language such as, textbook passages, age- appropriate magazine and newspaper
articles/ads, websites/internet, poetry or stories

1.3 Presentational Communication


Students present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a
variety of topics.
● 1.3.N.S.b Present brief personal descriptions on familiar topics in target language such
as self, friends, family, home and school
● 1.3.N.S.c Record materials in the target language, such as a puppet show, fashion
show, or weather report

2.1 Practices and Perspectives


Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices and
perspectives of the culture studied.
● 2.1.N.T.a Describe a daily schedule in the target culture (breakfast, lunch, dinner, hours
for work, store/office hours)

2.2 Products and Perspectives


Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and
perspectives of the culture studied.
● 2.2.N.G.a Identify indigenous foods products and beverages
● 2.2.N.F.a Identify what foods and beverages are routinely consumed at each meal in the
target culture
● 2.2.N.F.b Identify the types of places where foods and beverages may be purchased in
the target culture
● 2.2.N.F.c Identify the types of places where foods and beverages may be consumed
outside the home in the target culture

3.2 Point of View


Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available
through the target language and its cultures.
● 3.2.N.a Use audio, visual and/or print materials available only in the target language to
recognize that a topic or situation may be viewed differently in one’s own culture than in
the target culture

4.1 Comparing Cultures


Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the
cultures studied and their own.
● 4.1.N.a Identify basic target culture practices and compare them to one’s own
● 4.1.N.b Identify basic target culture products and compare them to one’s own

4.2​ ​Comparing Languages


Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the
language studies and their own.
● 4.2.N.a Identify basic differences and similarities in vocabulary between one’s own
language and the target language (cognates and borrowed words)
● 4.2.N.b Identify basic differences and similarities in grammatical structures between
one’s own language and the target language

5.2 Personal Enrichment


Students show evidence of becoming lifelong learners by using the language for personal
enjoyment and enrichment.
● 5.2.N.a Willingly use the target language within the classroom setting

ISTE Standards
Empowered Learner
Students leverage technology to take an active role in choosing, achieving and demonstrating
competency in their learning goals, informed by the learning sciences.
Knowledge Constructor
Students critically curate a variety of resources using digital tools to construct knowledge,
produce creative artifacts and make meaningful learning experiences for themselves and
others.

Critical Thinking Skills


Learners will develop critical thinking skills throughout this unit by interpreting authentic texts
and having conversation that expands beyond the information that was portrayed in the text. For
example, students will watch two videos, one in French and one in English. These videos
display fast food and school lunches in France. Once students are presented with the
information, their job is to use it to hypothesize what it implies about French culture and the
French view of food and dining. Students will draw examples from their own culture and use
them to think about food and dining from a new perspective. While Americans are go, go, go
when it comes to food, the French slow things down and spend hours per day dining. Students
will push beyond the videos to discuss how these different views of food may impact issues
such as body image, priorities, etc. Students will also move beyond memorizing vocabulary and
phrases; they will apply what they have learned to create original material in the form of skits
and conversations, which requires students to critically think about the how to use words and
phrases in various contexts and forms and from various perspectives.

High Leverage Teaching Practices

Facilitating Target Language Comprehensibility


Throughout this two-week unit plan, there are innumerable opportunities for students to improve
their French comprehensibility. Focusing on the attached lesson plans, students will have
receive input from the instructor during class instruction as well as during the interactive
presentation that focuses on cultural differences between customs in France and the United
States. This input is made comprehensible by including keywords when necessary as well as
images that relate to the knowledge presented. The comprehension checks that take place
throughout the presentation ensure that students’ attention is drawn to the most important
information. Additionally, the short video that is shown in French has the most important
information displayed in written French on the screen so that students are able to receive oral
and written input, which will allow them to better comprehend the message of the video. Another
form of heightened comprehensibility comes from identifying cognates at the start of the unit,
before students begin to identify new vocabulary on their own using the French cooking
websites. By identifying cognates, students will have an easier time understanding what they
are reading in recipes and instructions. The images on the website also increase
comprehensibility. Lastly, slow and clear speech will be key in facilitating target language
comprehensibility, as the students are only in their second semester of studying French. During
speaking quizzes especially, I will ensure that my speech is clear enough for students to
comprehend.

Building a Classroom Discourse Community


Throughout this unit as well as all units in my classroom, I build up the speaking to increase
student comfortability and willingness to participate. At the start of the unit, I have students do
“écoutez et répétez” (“listen and repeat”), which offers students a chance to say new vocabulary
words out loud for the first time. This is very low-risk, as it is a choral response exercise, so
students will not feel singled out or embarrassed. Students begin practice speaking questions
that get them used to using the vocabulary but still in a rehearsed setting. This is a very low-risk
activity, as they have the questions prepared as well as a few potential responses in mind.
Practicing this vocabulary with various partners daily at the start of the unit creates a safe
discourse community and prepares students for more in-depth discussion about the topic. The
students eventually speak with most of the students in the class individually. This builds into
them being comfortable enough with the content to answer questions in front of the class when
called on. This transitions into think-pair-share activities that allow students time to think about a
topic, share their ideas with a friend, and then share them in front of the class. The final
assessments for this unit are participating in speaking quizzes and performing a skit in front of
the class. These assessments take place with ease, as the students understand that they are
part of a language learning community. They are already comfortable with using the new
content in the target language, so although a performance in the target language seems like a
high-risk task, they are comfortable with doing it.

Guiding Learners to Interpret and Discuss Authentic Texts


This takes place in many different ways throughout the unit. On the first day of the unit, students
are required to examine French recipes or Instagram accounts to discover their new vocabulary.
For the most part, the language in these recipes is rather simple. There are minimal words, or
rather only short sentence fragments, so students are not overwhelmed by a large text. By
providing them with time to explore the sites, students are able to work together to identify
vocabulary. If necessary, I will provide students with a few additional keywords that are not part
of their vocabulary such as the verbs to mix, to add, to bake, etc., which will aid in their
comprehension of the recipes. The Instagram accounts are very straightforward with providing a
photo of a dish and including its name in the caption. For any audio authentic text that is
presented to students, for example, the History of McDonalds in France video, I will provide
students with comprehension questions that highlight the most important information from the
text. This directs students focus to what they need in order to understand the text. This sets
students up for success when it is time to discuss the texts.

Providing Oral Corrective Feedback to Improve Learner Performance


During class, students will partake in many different speaking activities that help them practice
vocabulary and asking and answering questions. Through observation, I will directly help
students who are having individual issues with pronunciation or word use, and I will be able to
address the class as a whole regarding common errors. This live feedback will help students
recognize their mistakes in the moment so that they can correct it right away. Feedback to
individual speaking questions will be provided live as well, which ensures that students are
prepared to ask and answer questions with few mistakes.

Leading a Group Discussion


I will facilitate many small and large group discussions following presentations and videos. This
allows students to work together on the specific content and to use each other’s ideas as
resources in furthering their understanding of the material. This way, students are building
collective knowledge as a learning community, which makes their learning more meaningful.
This allows students to practice speaking, listening, and interpreting, while demonstrating what
students are learning from the class activities, allowing me to respond to students, giving them
feedback when necessary.

Authentic Materials, Adaptations, and Cultural Connections


Authentic materials included in the unit are the French cooking websites and Instagram
accounts of French chefs. I will also include a magazine to provide a hard copy of authentic food
language for students who do not want to use a phone or a computer. Students are also
exposed to authentic video materials in the ​History of McDonalds in France video. While the
France’s Gourmet School Lunches video is in English, students are exposed to life in France
and hear directly from French school employees, so it is culturally authentic. By viewing these
authentic materials with the assistance of the Venn Diagram, students are gaining an
understanding of French culture as well as how it relates to American culture. Many of the
dishes students will view on the sites are traditional French dishes that are less common in the
United States, which exposes students to new products. By watching the video about
McDonalds, students will begin to recognize stereotypes related to food about both France and
the United States, which exposes them to new perspectives. They will see what lunches are like
in high schools in France and how they are so different from their school lunch at East
Kentwood, which exposes them to new practices. Both of these videos will lead into discussions
of cultural differences as well as differences in values related to food and dining norms in both
countries. Students will discover the different ways that French and American cultures view this
topic and what it implies about the two societies. As the students are level one learners, some of
the materials may present themselves as “impossible to understand.” For this reason, I will
provide students with key vocabulary words that are related to the content (aside from the unit
vocabulary), that will help them understand the materials. For example, in order to fully
comprehend French recipes, students will need to know words like “mix,” “add,” “stir,” “cook,”
etc. The adaptation of this resource allows students to meet the goal of interpretive
communication. Materials will be adapted for special populations, including my English
Language Learners. For those who benefit from it, Venn Diagrams will have key words already
written to assist the student in filling out the most important and appropriate information. For
students who do not have a cell phone or who do not want to use a class computer, I will have a
magazine that they can look through for recipes and other food related vocabulary.
For Integrated Performance Assessments, two authentic infographics related to French
food culture are used as interpretive communication pieces.

Technology Integration
In this unit, technology is mainly integrated as a way to engage students and to allow them to
experience authentic materials. During the presentation, students will use their cell-phones to
respond to comprehension questions. The results of the questions will be recorded and
displayed on the projector for the class to see. This will help to ensure that students are
engaged and understanding the material. If the results of the questions appear unclear, further
discussion will take place before moving on. Technology is also the key for students to discover
authentic French recipes and foods by looking online at recipes and the Instagram accounts of
famous French chefs. The ability to access the Instagram accounts of chefs in France provides
students with an extended language learning community and a exposure to authentic French
language and culture. This technology is allowing students the opportunity to extend their
language learning experience beyond the classroom and into their personal lives. Social media
is a great way to gain exposure to authentic material. Technology also provides access to
videos that portray life in France, which is beneficial for students who are living in the United
States and who may have never been exposed to a different culture. Through technology,
students have access to authentic language and culture that they otherwise would not hear, as I
am not a native speaker. The technology in this unit helps students compare and contrast
languages and cultures and it is a helpful tool for exposing students to a new point of view. This
technology is a tool that helps students develop cultural understandings.

Materials Used
Websites
http://allrecipes.fr
http://cuisine.journaldesfemmes.com
http://www.elle.fr/Elle-a-Table/Fiches-cuisine/Tous-les-themes/Recettes-classiques#
https://cuisine-facile.com/divers/recette-gratin-pommes-terre.html
http://www.cuisinealafrancaise.com/fr/recettes

Instagram accounts
@Giraudfabrice
@Alexandre_dufeu
@Chef_laurent_andre

YouTube Videos
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovO18E-hgew
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCBqcjprBqI
Pre-/post- assessment
Integrated Performance Assessment
French I – Bon appétit!

Standards addressed:
1.2 Interpretive Communication
2.1 Practices and Perspectives
2.1 Products and Perspectives
3.1 Knowledge
4.1 Comparing Cultures
4.2 Comparing Languages

A. Key Word Recognition.​ Find in the infographic the word/phrase in the target language that
best expresses the meaning of each of the following English words/phrases:

Eating and drinking Shared meals


Meals To cook
Obesity To eat/have breakfast/lunch/dinner
To snack Eating/dietary habits
Home deliveries Fast food

B. Main Idea(s).​ Using information from the infographic, provide the main idea(s) of the
infographic in English.
____________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

C. Supporting Details.

1. Circle the letter of each detail that is mentioned in the infographic (not all are included!).
2. Write the letter of the detail next to where it appears in the text.
3. Write the information that is given in the infographic in the space provided next to the detail
below.
A – the percent of French people who snack often between meals ________
B – the percent of French people who eat dinner ________
C – the percent of people who eat one meal per week in a restaurant ________
D – the number of food deliveries to homes each year in France ________
E – the percent of French youth who snack often between meals ________
F – the ratio of French people who watch TV while eating lunch ________
G – the percent of French people who enjoy eating meals together ________
H – the percent of men who are considered obese in France ________

D. Guessing Meaning from Context.​ Based on the infographic, write what the following three
underlined words/expressions probably mean in English.

1. « Le repas constitue pour les Français ​un des moments les plus agréables​ »
___________________________________
2. « La restauration rapide s’est​ fortement développée​ »
___________________________________
3. «​ L’obésité touche ​quant à elle 11% des hommes et 13% des femmes »
___________________________________

F. Inferences.​ “Read between the lines” to answer the following questions, using information
from the text.

1. Do you think that couples with a child spend more or less time in front of the TV during
meals?
__________________________________________________________________________
2. Who do you think enjoys meals with company more: women, young people, or old people?
__________________________________________________________________________
3. Do you think more people watch TV during breakfast or dinner?
__________________________________________________________________________
F. Comparing Cultural Perspectives.​ Answer the following questions:

• What are the cultural similarities and differences between meals in France and meals in the
US?
• How do the practices/products related to food in the infographic reflect French perspectives?
• What did you learn about French culture from this infographic?
• How would this infographic have been different if it were written for a US audience?

G. Personal Reaction to the Text. ​Using specific information from the text, describe your
personal reaction to the article, using the target language. Be sure to provide reasons that
support your reaction.

Here are some ideas to help you:


Est-ce que tu trouves les repas devant la télévision bizarre ?
Est-ce que tu aimes prendre le diner avec ta famille ?
Qu’est-ce que tu penses de la restauration rapide ?
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Self-Assessment.​ Evaluate your performance on this quiz by responding to the questions
honestly. Circle the answer that most accurately represents your thoughts and feelings.

On a scale of 1-5 (1 being not at all confident, 5 being very confident), how well do you think you
did at interpreting the written material:

1 2 3 4 5

1. What types of activities do you think you were most successful at on this assessment?
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
2. What is something you would change to be more successful on this assessment?
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
3. What do you feel you gained from this assessment?
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Rubric
Criteria Accomplished Strong Minimal Limited Comprehension
Comprehension Comprehension Comprehension

Word Identifies all key Identifies majority of Identifies half of Identifies a few key
Recognition words key words key words words appropriately
appropriately appropriately within appropriately within within context of the
within context of context of the text. context of the text. text.
the text.

Main idea Identifies the Identifies the key Identifies some part May identify some
detection complete main parts of the text but of the main idea(s) ideas from the text but
idea(s) of the text. misses some of the text. they do not represent
elements. the main idea(s).

Supporting Identifies all Identifies the Identifies some Identifies a few


detail supporting details majority of supporting details supporting details in the
detection in the text and supporting details in in the text and may text by may be unable
accurately the text and provide limited to provide information
provides accurately provides information from from the text to explain
information from information from the the text to explain these details.
the text to explain text to explain some these details.
these details. of these details.

Guessing Infers meaning of Infers meaning of Infers meaning of Inferences of meaning


meaning from unfamiliar words unfamiliar words and unfamiliar words of unfamiliar words and
context and phrases in the phrases in the text. and phrases in the phrases are largely
text. Inferences Most of the text. Most of the inaccurate or lacking.
are accurate. inferences are inferences are
plausible although plausible although
some may not be many are not
accurate. accurate.

Inferences Infers and Infers and interprets Makes a few Inferences and
interprets the the text’s meaning in plausible interpretations of the
text’s meaning in a partially complete inferences text’s meaning are
a highly plausible and/or partially regarding the text’s largely incomplete
manner. plausible manner. meaning. and/or not plausible.

Cultural Identifies cultural Identifies some Identifies some Identification of cultural


Perspectives perspectives or cultural perspectives cultural perspectives or norms
norms accurately. or norms accurately. perspectives or is mostly superficial or
Provides a Connects cultural norms accurately. lacking. And/or
detailed products or practices Provides a minimal connection of cultural
connection of to perspectives. connection of practices or products to
cultural products cultural products or perspectives is
or practices to practices to superficial or lacking.
perspectives. perspectives.
Reflection

This formative interpretive assessment allows students to show what they can do in a guided
manner. The task is aligned with the theme of the unit and reflects the student’s ability to
ultimately use the language in a realistic setting. This assessment is designed for novice
students and the language is comprehensible. Students are able to combine what they already
know prior to the unit starting with the new information. With the scoring rubric, students will be
able to rate their performance and self-reflect on what they are able to do or are not able to do. I
find this to be a better way of assessing student achievement than the pre- and post- test,
where students had to conjugate verbs and recall vocabulary in irrelevant contexts. This
assessment directly relates to the standards and incorporates culture and communication. The
main advantage of this assessment is that it is completely contextualized with an authentic
document. It is meaningful and real. A test like this also prevents students from filling in random
bubbles on a scantron. Students are more engaged in the material of the assessment and have
to create responses rather than randomly guess.
LESSON PLAN #1

Date: 2/13/18 Language and Grade French I, Grade 9-10


Level:

Total Number of 60 Targeted Proficiency Novice Mid


Minutes: Level:

STAGE 1
Setting the Stage

BIG IDEA
What is the topic/theme of your lesson? Note: Grammar structures cannot be the topic.

Les repas à la française

ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)
What provocative question(s) will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning?

What are the products and practices in the United States regarding food, meals, and
restaurants?
In what ways are the products and practices in France different from those in the United
States?

LEARNING GOALS
Which World Readiness Standards (ACTFL) does this lesson address?

1.2 Interpretive Communication


1.2.N.R.b Understand main idea of simple accessible written materials in the target
language such as, textbook passages, age- appropriate magazine and newspaper
articles/ads, websites/internet, poetry or stories
4.1 Comparing Languages
4.1.N.a. Identify basic target culture practices and compare them to one’s own.
4. 2 Comparing Cultures
4.2.N.a. Identify basic differences and similarities in vocabulary between one’s own
language and the target language (cognates and borrowed words)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
What will learners know and be able to do with what they know at the end of this lesson?
Are the objectives specific, measurable, and performance-based? Do they include all levels
of thinking?

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:


● read about and identify basic food vocabulary by looking at authentic French
recipes and sites.
● correctly repeat pronunciation of the vocabulary by participating in choral response.
● discuss the practices regarding food, meals, and restaurants in the United States by
participating in the think-pair-share (in English).
● apply their new vocabulary set to their personal life by writing their favorite recipe
ingredients in French.

STAGE 2
How will learners demonstrate what they can do with what they know by the end of this
episode?

PERFORMANCE TASKS
What performance tasks will students complete to demonstrate what they can do?

Students will write down the ingredients to their favorite recipes to show that they have
accomplished the task of identifying the words on their vocabulary sheet. This will briefly
show their ability to make connections with what they already know and what they have
just learned.

OTHER EVIDENCE
What other evidence will show that students have attained goals?

Students will repeat vocabulary after me using choral response to learn pronunciation.
Their participation in this activity will show if they have attained the goal of pronouncing the
food vocabulary correctly.
STAGE 3
What will prepare learners to demonstrate what they can do with what they know?
Are learning activities sequenced to allow students to move from input to shared/guided
practice and then to independent application of new learning?
● Do activities maximize the use of the TL by both teacher and students?
● Do activities provide opportunities for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational
communication?
● Do activities provide variety to address different learning styles and to enable a
lively pace for the lesson?

OPENING ACTIVITY
How will you capture the students’ energy and engage them in this lesson? This is the
hook!

Introduction to vocabulary TIME:


Students will receive a worksheet called “The Three Cs” as they enter the 10-15
classroom. The Cs stand for ​cognates, connections, ​and ​collectibles. ​Students minutes
will receive the new unit vocabulary and will have ten minutes to sort the new
vocabulary words into these three columns. They will identify cognates (words
that look the same in English and French), words that they can figure out based
on connections (part of the word looks familiar, so the word might be _____),
and collectibles (words that are completely new and unfamiliar that they will
need to learn).
This allows students to make connections between English and French, and for
some students, Spanish and other native languages. By starting with cognates,
students are solidifying their connections between languages, which is
enhancing their retention abilities and making the lengthy vocabulary list less
overwhelming. Students will identify the words that they will need to study and
practice with the most.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES
What tasks or activities will be used to ensure learners accomplish the learning objectives?
What will students be doing? What will you be doing?
Rationale Statements: ​What is your rationale for each step of the learning sequence?
Link rationale statements to Standards, objectives, HLTPs, theory, methods, and/or
essential questions. Please put rationale statements in italics or a different color font.
Vocabulary (Jigsaw Part I) 20
The vocabulary for this unit is organized by category of foods, including fruits, minutes
vegetables, meats, drinks, desserts, etc. Students will be divided into groups
and each group will be responsible for one of these categories. I will provide
each groups with links to French cooking websites, French recipes, or the
Instagram accounts of famous French chefs that portray authentic French food.
Students will use the computers and their phones to skim through multiple
authentic French recipes and images using contextual clues and pictures to
understand unfamiliar words in the texts. Students will try to fill in as many of the
vocabulary words as they can from looking at these materials. After 15 minutes,
students are allowed to look up any remaining vocabulary in their category on
WordReference.

Websites:
http://allrecipes.fr
http://cuisine.journaldesfemmes.com
http://www.elle.fr/Elle-a-Table/Fiches-cuisine/Tous-les-themes/Recettes-classiq
ues#
https://cuisine-facile.com/divers/recette-gratin-pommes-terre.html

Instagram accounts:
Giraudfabrice
Alexandre_dufeu
Chef_laurent_andre

This part of the jigsaw activity allows students to practice an interpretive


communication strategy while focusing on a particular set of words that they
interpret from the authentic text. The list of vocabulary for the food unit is quite
extensive, so this is a good way for students to start learning the vocabulary in
“chunks” that will help them clump similar foods together. Students are not just
directly translating vocabulary, and by discovering the vocabulary in context,
they are more likely to retain it. Most importantly, the texts they are using are
authentic French materials.
*Accommodation: lower achieving students will be placed in groups with higher
achieving students to ensure that there are no groups who are completely lost
with empty vocabulary sheets. ELLs who share the same L1 will also be placed
in separate groups. The goal is for all students to be able to discover vocabulary
without direct translation. This cooperative learning keeps all students on task
and sets them up for success in the next part of the activity.

Vocabulary (Jigsaw Part II) 15


In this part of the jigsaw activity, representatives from each food group will be minutes
placed into new food groups, and each individual will share their new group the
vocab that they learned. By the end of the activity, the students should all have
completed vocabulary lists.
Students are saving time by not finding all of the words on their own, and they
are further solidifying the new vocabulary by teaching it to their classmates.
Wrap-up: Écoutez et répétez 5-10
At the end of the hour, I will read through the vocab list one word at a time. minutes
Students will listen to how I say each word and they will repeat after me. This
choral response is a basic introduction to the pronunciation of the words.
By circulating the room during this portion of the lesson, I will hear each student
participating and their ability to meet the objective of pronouncing the the words
correctly. This give me a preliminary idea of which words will be easy for
students and which words will need the most work throughout the unit. This is
also very low-risk for students, as it is choral response; they will not be singled
out if they pronounce something wrong. This way, each student has said each
word at least once without being afraid of messing up.

Exit Slip 5
Before students leave the classroom, they are responsible for filling out an exit minutes
slip. The prompt will be displayed on the projector screen. They must write out
the ingredients of their favorite recipe in French on a scrap piece of paper. It
must include at least five vocabulary words, and it must be accurate (i.e. if a
student writes pizza, they cannot include strawberries as one of their
ingredients). A good example would be macaroni and cheese. Ingredients would
include pasta, cheese, milk, butter, water. I will model this as an example before
students complete this task on their own.
This exit slip is minimal, but it is a quick way of checking knowledge of the
vocabulary on the first day as an informal formative assessment. It offers a brief
extension of the vocabulary so that students aren’t just memorizing words, but
also trying to put these words in context with their own lives. It is most important
for them to know their favorite foods in French, as these are the foods they will
talk about the most in future conversation. By modeling the task students are
aware of what is expected from them.
STAGE 4 - REFLECTION/NOTES TO SELF
Did all learners meet the learning goals of the lesson? What will you do to modify this
lesson in the future? What might you do in subsequent lessons?

After completing this lesson, I have made adjustments to the pacing of learning vocabulary.
It took students longer than expected to find all of the vocabulary words and complete their
lists, but they were still able to do it very successfully. All students ended up with complete
lists. The main adjustment that was made is that we had to do the choral response portion
of the lesson at the start of the next lesson, but it worked just as effectively as it was
planned and ended up being a good way to get students thinking about the vocabulary
again at the start of the next lesson. This method of teaching vocabulary worked very well
as my first attempt to change the way students are exposed to vocabulary, which is usually
just through copying lists on quizlet or looking through their books to identify words. The
fact that students were exposed to the vocabulary via authentic materials set them up for
success in the rest of the unit, as they were already thinking of the vocabulary in the
context of French. In the future, I will try to find similar activities to introduce vocabulary
using authentic texts rather than direct translation. In the future, it might also be a good
idea to do the choral response at the end of the lesson and then turn the exit slip into a
warm-up or an activity for the next lesson so that students have more time to expand on
the activity rather than writing down a few ingredients and never thinking about it again. I
could have students write down their favorite recipes in French and then do some sort of
activity where students have to “speed date” and try to guess what recipe their partner is
reading. This gets students using the vocabulary while speaking and listening to French.
Nom _____________________________
Heure_______
La Vocabulaire - Les Trois C’s

Directions: ​Remplis tous les blancs. Utilisez beaucoup de mots de ta liste de vocabulaire.

Cognates​ (Words that look the Connections​ (You discover Collectibles ​(Words that you do
same and mean the same as their these through connections with not yet know and need to be
English counterparts): what you already know:) collected into your vocab):
Ex: Un taxi = a taxi. Ex: I know “les haricots verts” are Ex: “Saignant”. I have yet to
green beans b/c vert = green. make connections to this.
LESSON PLAN #2

Date: 2/14/18 Language and Grade French I, Grade 9-10


Level:

Total Number of 60 Targeted Proficiency Novice Mid


Minutes: Level:

STAGE 1
Setting the Stage

BIG IDEA
What is the ​topic​/theme of your lesson? ​Note​: Grammar structures cannot be the topic.

Sharing favorite recipes

ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)
What provocative question(s) will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning?

How can I tell someone how to make my favorite food in French?


How can I exchange information about food in the target language?

LEARNING GOALS
Which ​World Readiness Standards​ (ACTFL) does this lesson address?

1.1 Interpersonal Communication


1.1.N.SL.h. Exchange information in the target language on familiar topics such as
personal interests, memorable experiences, school activities, and family life
1.2 Interpretive Communication
1.2.N.L.a. Demonstrate understanding of oral classroom language in the target
language including directions, commands, and requests
1.2.N.L.c. Understand main idea of a visual media or live presentation
4.2 Comparing Languages
4.2.N.b. Identify basic differences and similarities in grammatical structures between
one’s own language and the target language
5.2 Personal Enrichment
5.2.N.a. Willingly use the target language within the classroom setting

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
What will learners know and be able to do with what they know at the end of this lesson?
Are the objectives specific, measurable, and performance-based? Do they include all levels
of thinking?
At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
● interpret the meaning and grammatical features of an authentic French text.
● communicate meaning both written and orally using the imperative mood in French.
● apply the unit vocabulary and the newly acquired grammar structure to their
personal lives by writing and sharing their favorite recipe in French.
● compare two languages by writing their favorite recipe in French.
● use a common French expression outside of the classroom.

STAGE 2
How will learners demonstrate what they can do with what they know by the end of this
episode?

PERFORMANCE TASKS
What performance tasks will students complete to demonstrate what they can do?

Students will write and verbally share a French recipe to demonstrate that they can use the
imperative mood and the unit vocabulary in a meaningful context.

OTHER EVIDENCE
What other evidence will show that students have attained goals?

The exit slip will show retention of the imperative mood in French. Their use of the
expression du jour over time will show their ability to use French inside and outside of the
classroom.

STAGE 3
What will prepare learners to demonstrate what they can do with what they know?
Are learning activities sequenced to allow students to move from ​input​ to ​shared/guided
practice​ and then ​to independent application of new learning​?
● Do activities maximize the use of the TL by both teacher and students?
● Do activities provide opportunities for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational
communication?
● Do activities provide variety to address different learning styles and to enable a
lively pace for the lesson?

OPENING ACTIVITY
How will you capture the students’ energy and engage them in this lesson? This is the
hook!
Expression du jour TIME:​ 3
“J’ai une faim de loup” is the expression of the day that is displayed on the minutes
projector screen as students enter the classroom. This is equivalent to the
English saying “I’m so hungry I could eat a horse.” In other words, “I’m very
hungry!” I will give students a few examples of contexts in which this phrase
could be used.
Students learn a new expression everyday and this is a fun and relevant
expression related to the food unit. Students get a point of extra credit for using
French expressions inside and outside of French class. This is an easy
expression that can be used in class, at school, at home, etc. This encourages
students to use French beyond the classroom.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES
What tasks or activities will be used to ensure learners accomplish the learning objectives?
What will students be doing? What will you be doing?
Rationale Statements: ​What is your rationale for each step of the learning sequence?
Link rationale statements to Standards, objectives, HLTPs, theory, methods, and/or
essential questions. Please put rationale statements in italics or a different color font.

Warm-up TIME:​ 7
For the opening activity, students will watch a​ ​video​ of a woman making a minutes
chocolate cake. There are instructions in French written at the bottom of the
screen throughout the video. Students will answer the questions in French:
● Qu’est-ce que la femme fait? (What is the woman doing/making?)
● Quels sont les ingrédients? (What are the ingredients?)
● Est-ce que le gâteau est facile ou difficile à faire? (Is the cake easy or
hard to make?)
● Combien de minutes faut-il pour faire? (How many minutes does it take
to make?)
When students are done answering the questions, we will go over the answers
as a class by randomly calling on students (drawing popsicle sticks).
This warm-up activity exposes students to the central text of today's lesson
without focusing on specific grammar details. Students are seeking to answer
comprehension questions in the target language based on their ability to
comprehend the meaning of an authentic text. These questions are relatively
simple and do not require complex responses. It is necessary for students to
understand the text in order to be introduced to a new grammar structure in
context.
Presentation 5
I will display the written​ ​recipe​ on the projector screen for students to read minutes
through. They are already familiar with French recipes, as they used them to
learn their vocab in the previous lesson. I will have students try to identify
unknown verbs and vocabulary to scaffold their comprehension of the recipe. I
will ask students to read the recipe and think about what each step of the recipe
is telling the person who is cooking to do.
This gives students the chance to view the authentic recipe as a whole before
breaking apart the grammar structure. They will determine that it is a recipe for
chocolate cake and focus on the meaning of the recipe. I will do frequent
comprehension checks at each step of the recipe to ensure that students are
following. This activity gives them exposure to new verbs related to cooking that
they will be able to use when writing their own recipes.

Attention 5
Now, I will ask students to focus on the verbs in the recipe and notice how they minutes
are conjugated. I will do this by highlighting the verbs. Students will notice that
there is no subject before the conjugated verbs. I have copied and pasted the
recipe into a document and changed all of the verbs that are conjugated in the
vous ​form to be conjugated into the ​tu ​form. Students will look at the two recipes
side by side and notice how the verb conjugations are different and why they are
different. One is formal and one is informal.
This gives students the chance to notice a new grammar form. They will
compare the conjugations of the verbs and notice that they are conjugated for
the most part as the tu and vous form of present tense verbs. By highlighting the
fact that there is no subject before or after the verb, students are able to make
their own inferences about the grammar rule and how it is used.
Co-construction of Explanation 10
Now that students have recognized that these verb forms are in the imperative minutes
form (commands), we will co-construct an explanation for the grammatical
structure. I will ask questions along the way, including “how do we conjugate
commands?” (just like in the present tenses), “what subjects can we conjugate
for the imperative mood?” (​tu, nous, ​and v​ ous​), and “what do you notice about
the ​tu​ form in the imperative mood? (there is no ​s​ at the end of conjugated -er
verbs like there is in the normal present tense). Students will write down their
own grammar rules based from this co-construction, which makes sure they end
up with an appropriate explanation even though they came up with the rules on
their own.
By co-constructing the grammar explanation, students are engaging with each
other and with me in order to understand the new rule. By asking guiding
questions, I am prompting students to come to a conclusion without directly
telling them the rule. This makes their learning more memorable and important
rather than just listening to me tell them the rule; it would go in one ear and out
the other. My guiding questions ensure that students are making appropriate
assumptions and creating accurate explanations. This process will take place in
English due to the novice level of my students. It is important that they have a
solid foundation of the structure in order to begin trying it on their own in French.

Extension Activity 10
Now that the students have established what the imperative mood is and how to minutes
form it, they will participate in an activity that allows them to practice it. They will writing
write their favorite recipe in French using verbs that I introduce to them to help 15
them (i.e. cut, mix, add, bake, etc.). I will write the verbs on the whiteboard. All of minutes
the verbs are regular –er verbs or verbs that they have already learned to partner
conjugate. Students will finish their recipes and then do a speed dating activity in work
which they rotate around the room and read their recipes to various partners.
They will guess which dish their partner is describing and then switch. I will
model this activity with my cooperating teacher before the students do it on their
own. We will use the recipes for the croque monsieur sandwich and chocolate
chip cookies as examples.
Students are solidifying their knowledge of the newly acquired grammar
structure by using it to write their favorite recipe. In doing this, they are also
practicing their new food vocabulary set. This information gap activity allows
students to remain communicative in practicing the new vocabulary and
grammar structure. This activity allows students to speak with numerous
classmates, which exercises their listening comprehension as well as their
speaking competencies. Because they are using their favorite recipe, there are
more likely to retain the vocabulary and verbs (related to food) that are most
important in their life. Students have to actually listen to each other and practice
pronunciation, as they have to guess which recipe their partner is saying rather
than just saying it as quick as possible then switching partners. By modeling the
activity, students understand what is expected from them during this activity.
Exit Slip ​5
Before leaving class, students will write down the rules for forming the minutes
imperative mood and they will write three examples of the imperative mood used
in a sentence (one each for the ​tu, nous, ​and ​vous ​form).
This is an informal formative assessment that allows me to see whether or not
all of my students have met the objective of recognizing and interpreting the
imperative mood.

STAGE 4 - REFLECTION/NOTES TO SELF


Did all learners meet the learning goals of the lesson? What will you do to modify this
lesson in the future? What might you do in subsequent lessons?

I am so pleased with how this lesson turned out. I was worried that students would not be
able to discover the imperative form on their own, but all three sections of French I did this
successfully. In two separate sections of French I, a few of the Spanish speakers identified
that these sentences are commands and made comparisons to their native language,
which prompted the rest of the class to catch on to the rule. In the other class, students who
are native speakers of English were able to discover the rule on their own. Students were
successful in verbally communicating meaning and they were able to apply their new
vocabulary and grammar knowledge to their own preferences. When I asked them,
students reported that they enjoyed using the PACE model to learn this rule and when we
used the imperative again a few days later, the students led the review and I didn’t have to
reteach anything. Student engagement and participation is often an issue in two of these
three classes, and I was pleased to see that nearly all students participated in the recipe
sharing activity. The two students who were distracted during the activity in one of the
classes were able to get on track after I worked with them individually and modeled the task
an extra time for them. In the future, I will continue using the PACE model for introducing
new grammar structures.
LESSON PLAN #3

Date: 2/15/18 Language and Grade French I, Grade 9-10


Level:

Total Number 60 Targeted Proficiency Novice Mid


of Minutes: Level:

STAGE 1
Setting the Stage

BIG IDEA
What is the topic/theme of your lesson? Note: Grammar structures cannot be the topic.

French food and culture: comparing two languages and two cultures as they relate to food​.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)
What provocative question(s) will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning?

What are the products and practices in the United States regarding food, meals, and
restaurants?
In what ways are the products and practices in France different from those in the United
States?

LEARNING GOALS
Which World Readiness Standards (ACTFL) does this lesson address?

1.1 Interpersonal Communication


1.1.N.SL.i. Ask for and obtain information in everyday situations in the target language
about time, place, price, size, relating to restaurants, stores, transportation, and
services
1.2 Interpretive Communication
1.2.N.L.b. Understand interpersonal communication on topics of personal interest such
as preferences, family life, friends, leisure and school activities, and everyday
occurrences.
2.1 Practices and Perspectives
2.1.N.T.a. Describe a daily schedule in the target culture (breakfast, lunch, dinner,
hours for work, store/office hours)
2.2 Products and Perspectives
2.2.N.F.a. Identify what foods and beverages are routinely consumed at each meal in
the target culture
2.2.N.F.b. Identify the types of places where foods and beverages may be purchased in
the target culture
2.2.N.F.c. Identify the types of places where foods and beverages may be consumed
outside the home in the target culture
3.2 Point of View
4.1 Comparing Cultures
4.1.N.a. Identify basic target culture practices and compare them to one’s own
4.1.N.b. Identify basic target culture products and compare them to one’s own

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
What will learners know and be able to do with what they know at the end of this lesson?
Are the objectives specific, measurable, and performance-based? Do they include all levels
of thinking?

At the end of the lesson, students will be able to:


● recall specific information related to French food culture by completing
comprehension questions throughout the presentation.
● compare and contrast the products, perspectives, and practices related to food
culture in the United States and in France by filling in a Venn Diagram.
● infer the viewpoints of the French regarding the value of cuisine by critically thinking
and discussing the school lunch video.
● assess their comprehension of the cultural material by filling out an exit slip.
● use French to discuss cultural differences between the US and France.

STAGE 2
How will learners demonstrate what they can do with what they know by the end of this
episode?

PERFORMANCE TASKS
What performance tasks will students complete to demonstrate what they can do?

Students will fill in their Venn Diagrams to demonstrate that they can compare and contrast
the two cultures. They will share the contents of their Venn Diagram with classmates in
French.

OTHER EVIDENCE
What other evidence will show that students have attained goals?

Students will participate in discussions​ ​to demonstrate that they can communicate as well
as comprehend information that is presented to them. The final class discussion will
demonstrate that students have acquired a new point of view and a new way of thinking
about food and cultural ideals. Students will also complete an exit ticket at the end of the
hour to show what they have learned from this lesson. They will write down three of the
most important things they learned from the class PowerPoint and discussion or from the
video about school lunches.
STAGE 3
What will prepare learners to demonstrate what they can do with what they know?
Are learning activities sequenced to allow students to move from input to shared/guided
practice and then to independent application of new learning?
● Do activities maximize the use of the TL by both teacher and students?
● Do activities provide opportunities for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational
communication?
● Do activities provide variety to address different learning styles and to enable a
lively pace for the lesson?

OPENING ACTIVITY
How will you capture the students’ energy and engage them in this lesson? This is the
hook!

Warm-up: L’histoire de McDonald’s en France TIME:


Class starts by watching a quick three-minute​ video​ (in French) about the history 10
of McDonald’s in France. They must answer three questions that will be minutes
displayed on the projector.
● La date d’ouverture officielle du premier McDonald’s en France est quoi?
(What is the official opening date of the first McDonald’s in France?)
● Où était le premier McDo en France? (Where was the first McDonald’s in
France?)
● Combien de hamburgers ont été vendus en France en 2015? (How many
hamburgers were sold in France in 2015?)
● Est-ce que tu penses que les français mangent plus ou moins de
hamburgers que les américaines? (Do you think the French eat more or
less hamburgers than Americans?)
After the video, students respond to the question, “what stereotypes do you
know about French and American cultures that are related to food?”
Showing this video is a fun way to get started with a lesson about French
restaurants, products, and practices. It also shows students the difference
between fast food in both countries. This prompts them to think about
stereotypes of the eating habits of both countries.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES
What tasks or activities will be used to ensure learners accomplish the learning objectives?
What will students be doing? What will you be doing?
Rationale Statements:​ What is your rationale for each step of the learning sequence? Link
rationale statements to Standards, objectives, HLTPs, theory, methods, and/or essential
questions. Please put rationale statements in italics or a different color font.

Venn Diagram 5
Transitioning back into the unit theme, students will begin to fill out a Venn minutes
Diagram that compares American and French cultures relating to food. At this
point, their main focus is on American culture, as it is what they already know.
This Venn Diagram is a tool for students to use throughout the unit. They should
continue adding to it as they learn more about French food culture and the
differences and similarities between the two cultures. This tool is helpful for
students as they will be able to have a visual representation and a place to write
down everything they learn about cultural similarities and differences.
*Students who come from different countries or who identify with a different
culture will be able to compare France with the country/culture of their choice
and their home practices. There are thirteen languages represented throughout
my classes, and most of these students participate in the practices of their
heritage culture.

Presentation & Discussion TIME:


At this time, I will begin a ​presentation​ on French food culture. In this 25
presentation and discussion, we talk about mealtimes in France (typically later minutes
than in the US), restaurant styles (seating on the sidewalks, tipping policy, etc.),
sandwich/crêpe stands, and the difference between boulangeries and
patisseries and what you can find at both places. We also discuss some
traditional French meals, such as la salade Niçoise. The PowerPoint is picture
based (0-1 word per slide). Students will use their phones to text Poll
Everywhere in order to provide responses to comprehension questions
throughout the presentation.
Because there are no words on the PowerPoint, students are exercising
interpretive communication as well as interpersonal communication; they must
listen very carefully to what I say and use the pictures as clues. I will write any
difficult words on the whiteboard to increase comprehension (cognates). They
also must participate in the presentation, meaning they are actively responding
to the polls on their phones and verbally comparing and contrasting the
information from the PowerPoint with typical American customs. They are to do
this in French to the best of their ability. The comprehension checks allow me to
make my students thinking visible and to see who is present in the discussion
and who needs to refocus. It allows me to assess how well the students are
comprehending the language allows me to make adjustments in my
comprehensibility as needed.
Video 10
To end the lesson, students watch a​ video​ (in English) about the gourmet school minutes
lunches in France. During the video, students should take notes on the
differences between school lunches in the US and in France as well as the way
French people think about food. I suggest that they use a T-chart or a Venn
Diagram. After the video, students will discuss in French what they learned with
a partner and then as a class. I will write sentence frames on the whiteboard for
students to use as guidance when having a discussion.
The cultural information presented in this video is authentic. Students will take
notes during the video and continue adding to their Venn Diagram, which will
further their ability to compare and contrast French culture in the school lunch
setting with their existing knowledge of the American school lunch setting. This
discussion leads into the topic of cultural viewpoints surrounding the topic of
food, which stretches student thinking beyond what is in the video.
*Students from various cultures will have the opportunity to represent their
culture’s viewpoints related to food; however, these students all have knowledge
of school lunches in the US, regardless of their background.

Wrap-up: Exit Slip 5


Students will fill out an exit slip at the end of class to show their understanding of minutes
the subject matter on paper. Students will write down two takeaways from
today’s lesson (from either the presentation, video, or discussion) and one
question that they still have about the topic, which will be revisited at a later
date. This will count as a 3-point grade based on the quality and quantity of
responses (1/3 means the student only wrote one takeaway, 2/3 means they
were missing either a question or a takeaway, 3/3 means their response was
sufficient and complete).
This exit slip is a simple way for me to make my students’ thinking visible. I want
to know what each individual student feels that they have learned and I want to
know how I can help expand their thinking. Knowing that there is an exit slip at
the end of the hour also helps the students stay focused during the lesson. This
also allows students to assess their own comprehension of the activities done in
class.

STAGE 4 - REFLECTION/NOTES TO SELF


Did all learners meet the learning goals of the lesson? What will you do to modify this
lesson in the future? What might you do in subsequent lessons?

This lesson went generally well. Due to timing with added activities in previous lessons, this
lesson ended up spilling over into the next day of instruction. We began the next lesson by
watching the video and discussing the differences. Students were still able to complete the
exit slip based on what they learned and discussed during the presentation. The exit slips
revealed that most students took away enough key information from the lesson; however,
there were still a few students who did not write much of a response for their exit slip, even
though they seemed to understand throughout the lesson. This tells me that I might need to
build up the students writing skills in French by increasing the number of writing activities in
class and as homework as well as by scaffolding their responses or giving them tools to
better be able to write a legitimate response. These students are not failing at the content;
they just have the roadblock of writing in a foreign language. Perhaps guided notes or
another format of an exit slip would be a better judgment of what my students learned. For
future culture discussions, I think some sort of graphic organizer would be a good way for
all students to stay organized and to find the most important information from the
text/presentation.
Can-Do Statements
Can-Do Statements
French I – Bon appétit!

Interpretive

I can identify some basic facts from memorized words and phrases when they are supported by
visuals in informational texts.
● I can identify ingredients and foods in recipes.
● I can understand directions for following a recipe.

Interpersonal

I can request and provide information by asking and answering a few simple questions on very
familiar and everyday topics, using a mixture of practiced or memorized words, phrases, and
simple sentences.
● I can contribute to a conversation about food and food culture by giving examples of my
eating habits and routines.
● I can say that I am hungry or thirsty.
● I can ask and answer simple questions necessary for dining at a restaurant.
● I can share how to make my favorite recipe.

Presentational

I can express my likes and dislikes on very familiar and everyday topics of interest using a
mixture of practiced or memorized words, phrases and simple sentences.
● I can tell how much I like or don’t like certain foods.
● I can write a recipe.
● I can tell someone about my daily eating and drinking habits/preferences.

Intercultural

In my own and other cultures I can identify some typical products related to familiar everyday
life.
● In my own and other cultures I can identify some food products that reveal a stereotype
or exaggerated view of a culture.
● In my own and other cultures I can identify some traditional meals and food items.

In my own and other cultures I can identify some typical practices related to familiar everyday
life.
● In my own and other cultures I can identify the elements of the dining-out process.
● In my own and other cultures I can interpret daily routines and consider how people think
about food.
● In my own and other cultures I can identify how, what and why people eat what they do.
Reflection

I evaluated student achievement of the can-do statements based on the results of daily
assignments and activities as well as formative and summative assessments. At the beginning
of the unit, students were faced with these statements and determined whether or not each
statement was a goal, something they can do with help, or something they can do consistently.
At the end of the unit, students self-reflected on the same statements and were able to edit their
responses. These responses determined that most students were able to achieve all of the
can-do statements. This shows that my instruction was successful in providing students with
opportunities to use the French language and to learn about French culture in relation to food. I
feel that the activities in this unit directly impacted student ability to fulfill these can-do
statements; however, these statements positively influenced my instruction, as I was able to
keep a direct focus on what exactly I was teaching in order to get students to achieve these
tasks.

There were some students who still rated a few statements as goals or things they can do with
help, and their assignment and assessment results show that this is accurate. This shows me
that I may have rushed through certain topics or activities or that I need to better differentiate my
instruction. As this was the end of the unit and we must move on to a new unit, my intention is to
incorporate certain topics from this unit into the new unit. It is important that I do not let students
remain in the “goal” category rather than the “I can do this” category. As I do not have the
capability to reteach portions of this unit due to lack of time, incorporating these topics for further
review is the best move I can make. The new unit is about places in the city and the verb ​aller
(to go), so it is a great opportunity for me to incorporate food and restaurants without repeating
the same thing over and over.
Formative Assessment
French I – Qu’est-ce qu’on mange à la cantine?
Interpretive Assessment
Standards addressed:

● 1.1 Interpersonal Communication


● 1.2 Interpretive Communication
● 2.1 Practices and Perspectives
● 2.2 Products and Perspectives
● 3.2 Point of View
● 4.1 Comparing Languages
● 4.2 Comparing Cultures
● 5.1 Use of Language

Interpretive Communication

A. Key Word Recognition.​ Find in the infographic the word/phrase in the target language that
best expresses the meaning of each of the following English words/phrases:
The cafeteria Dairy products
Adapted portions Unlimited
Balanced meals More expensive
Main dish Delivery
Financial situation Everyday

B. Main Idea(s).​ Using information from the infographic, provide the main idea(s) of the
infographic in English.
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

C. Supporting Details.
1. Circle the letter of each detail that is mentioned in the infographic (not all are included!).
2. Write the letter of the detail next to where it appears in the text.
3. Write the information that is given in the infographic in the space provided next to the detail
below.

A – The minimum amount of time given for lunch in French schools.


_______________________________________________________

B – The meal that is served every Tuesday in French schools.


_______________________________________________________
C – The price families pay for school lunch.
_______________________________________________________

D – The countries where school lunch is very expensive.


_______________________________________________________

E – The four things a French school lunch must include.


_______________________________________________________

F – How much the kitchen personnel get paid.


_______________________________________________________

G – The cost of delivery for French school lunches.


_______________________________________________________

H – The actual cost of school lunch, including the delivery.


_______________________________________________________

D. Guessing Meaning from Context.​ Based on the infographic, write what the following three
underlined words/expressions probably mean in English.

1. « Les repas à la cantine ​sont gratuits​ pour tous les élèves » ________________

2. « des repas plus équilibrés que ​chez eux ​» ________________

3. « ​servis en fonction​ des plats » ________________

F. Inferences.​ “Read between the lines” to answer the following questions, using information
from the text.

1. How are lunch portions adapted in French schools?


_______________________________________________________

2. Which foods are unlimited for students?


_______________________________________________________

3. What does the cost of school lunch depend on?


_______________________________________________________

F. Comparing Cultural Perspectives.​ Answer the following questions:

● What are the cultural similarities and differences between school lunches in France and
school lunches at your school?
● How do the practices/products related to school lunches in the infographic reflect French
perspectives?
● What did you learn about French culture from this infographic?
● How would this infographic have been different if it were written for a US audience?

G. Personal Reaction to the Text.​ Using specific information from the text, describe your
personal reaction to the article, using the target language. Be sure to provide reasons that
support your reaction.

____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

Interpersonal Communication
On parle!

Partner 1:​ Congratulations! You are a ​French student​ who has been accepted to spend a year
as an exchange student in the United States. However, you are very nervous that the school
lunches at your new American school will be unhealthy and gross. Luckily, you are about to talk
to a student from the American school who will be able to answer your questions about the
school lunches.

● Introduce yourself
● Ask questions about school lunches at EKHS (what is offered, is it good, how much does
it cost, etc.)
● Answer questions about school lunches in France (what is offered, is it good, how much
does it cost, etc.

Partner 2:​ Congratulations! You are an ​American student ​who has been accepted to spend a
year as an exchange student in the United States. However, you are very nervous that you
won’t like the school lunches in France because you are a very picky eater. Luckily, you are
about to talk to a student from the French school who will be able to answer your questions
about the school lunches.

● Introduce yourself
● Ask questions about school lunches in France (what is offered, is it good, how much
does it cost, etc.)
● Answer questions about school lunches at EKHS (what is offered, is it good, how much
does it cost, etc.)
Self-Assessment:​ Evaluate your performance on this quiz by responding to the questions
honestly. Circle the answer that most accurately represents your thoughts and feelings.

On a scale of 1-5 (1 being not at all confident, 5 being very confident), how well do you think you
did at interpreting the written material:

1 2 3 4 5
1. What types of activities do you think you were most sussessful at on this assessment?

____________________________________________________________________________
2. What is something you would change to be more successful on this assessment?

____________________________________________________________________________
3. What do you feel you gained from this assessment?

____________________________________________________________________________
Rubric

Interpretive Communication
Accomplished Strong Minimal Limited
Criteria Comprehension Comprehension Comprehension Comprehension

Word Identifies all key Identifies majority of Identifies half of key Identifies a few key
Recognition words appropriately key words words appropriately words appropriately
within context of the appropriately within within context of the within context of the
text. context of the text. text. text.

Main idea Identifies the Identifies the key Identifies some part May identify some
detection complete main parts of the text but of the main idea(s) ideas from the text
idea(s) of the text. misses some of the text. but they do not
elements. represent the main
idea(s).

Supporting Identifies all Identifies the Identifies some Identifies a few


detail detection supporting details in majority of supporting details in supporting details in
the text and supporting details in the text and may the text by may be
accurately provides the text and provide limited unable to provide
information from the accurately provides information from the information from the
text to explain these information from the text to explain these text to explain these
details. text to explain some details. details.
of these details.

Guessing Infers meaning of Infers meaning of Infers meaning of Inferences of


meaning from unfamiliar words unfamiliar words and unfamiliar words meaning of
context and phrases in the phrases in the text. and phrases in the unfamiliar words
text. Inferences are Most of the text. Most of the and phrases are
accurate. inferences are inferences are largely inaccurate or
plausible although plausible although lacking.
some may not be many are not
accurate. accurate.

Inferences Infers and interprets Infers and interprets Makes a few Inferences and
the text’s meaning the text’s meaning in plausible inferences interpretations of
in a highly plausible a partially complete regarding the text’s the text’s meaning
manner. and/or partially meaning. are largely
plausible manner. incomplete and/or
not plausible.

Cultural Identifies cultural Identifies some Identifies some Identification of


Perspectives perspectives or cultural perspectives cultural cultural
norms accurately. or norms accurately. perspectives or perspectives or
Provides a detailed Connects cultural norms accurately. norms is mostly
connection of products or Provides a minimal superficial or
cultural products or practices to connection of lacking. And/or
practices to perspectives. cultural products or connection of
perspectives. practices to cultural practices or
perspectives. products to
perspectives is
superficial or
lacking.
Interpersonal Communication
Accomplished Strong Minimal Limited
Criteria

Language Creates with language Uses mostly Uses Has no real


Function by combining and memorized language memorized functional ability.
recombining known with some attempts to language
elements; is able to create. Handles a only, familiar
express personal limited number of language.
meaning in a basic uncomplicated
way. communicative tasks
involving topics related
to basic personal
information.

Text Type Uses simple sentences Uses some simple Uses words, Uses isolated
and some strings of sentences and phrases, words.
sentences. memorized phrases. chunks of
language,
and lists.

Communication Responds to direct Responds to basic Responds to Is unable to


Strategies questions and requests direct questions and a limited participate in a
for information. Asks a requests for number of true
few appropriate information. Asks a formulaic conversational
questions, but is few formulaic questions. exchange.
primarily reactive. May questions but is May use
try to restate in the face primarily reactive. repetition or
of miscommunication. resort to
English.

Comprehensibility Is generally understood Is understood with Is Most of what is


by those accustomed to occasional difficulty by understood, said may be
interacting with those accustomed to although unintelligible or
non-natives, although interacting with often with understood only
repetition or rephrasing non-natives, although difficulty, by with repetition.
may be required. repetition or those
rephrasing may be accustomed
required. to interacting
with
non-natives.

Language Control Is most accurate when Is most accurate with Accuracy is Has little
producing simple memorized language, limited to accuracy even
sentences in present including phrases. memorized with memorized
time. Pronunciation, Accuracy decreases words. words.
vocabulary, and syntax when creating and Accuracy may
are strongly influenced trying to express decrease
by the native language. personal meaning. when
Accuracy decreases as attempting to
language becomes communicate
more complex. beyond the
word level.
Summative Assessment
Skit
French I - Bon appétit!
Faire un sketch...

Standards Addressed:
1.1​ ​Interpersonal Communication
Students are engaging in conversation and exchanging information and opinions
related to food during their skit (rehearsed), but they are asking unscripted
questions and providing answers in French, which is authentic language.
1.2​ ​Interpretive Communication
Audience members are understanding and interpreting spoken language related
to food.
1.3​ ​Presentational Communication
Students present information that they have acquired that is related to food to an
audience of listeners.
2.1 Practices and Perspectives
Students demonstrate that they have an understanding of the relationship
between food practices, including meal times, how to order, and the tipping norm,
and the perspectives of people within the French culture.
2.2 Products and Perspectives
Students demonstrate that they have un understanding of the relationship
between food products, including traditional meals, types of food, and places to
eat food, and the perspectives of people within the French culture.
3.2 Point of View
Students portray the information they have acquired related to the viewpoints of
French people related to food through the French language.
4.2 Comparing Cultures
Students show that they understand how French food culture (products and
practices) is similar and different from their home culture.
5.2 Personal Enrichment
Students show that they are using the language for personal enjoyment and
enrichment by putting in the effort to include information that is beyond the
contents of the classroom notes. They are not reading their skits from a script like
robots.
Directions:
To conclude the unit on food, you will get into groups of two or three to create an original skit
that shows the knowledge you gained during this unit as well as your existing knowledge of the
French language and culture.

Your skit must take place in either a French restaurant, café, boulangerie, or pâtisserie. You will
incorporate the unit vocabulary and phrases along with the verbs boire, finir, prendre, and
vouloir. You should also include French cultural information, including a culturally authentic text
(menu, recipe, or other document related to food). Your skit will be between 3-4 minutes long.
See the rubric for more details.

At the end of your skit, you will ask the audience two questions in French pertaining to your skit
to check for understanding. The audience will then have the opportunity to ask you questions
about your skit if they have any.

Your skit will be graded on mechanics, pronunciation, use of grammar concepts,


comprehension, cultural relevance, and creativity. See the rubric for details.

You have two class periods to create your skit. Anything that is not finished in these class
sessions must be prepared at home. You will turn in the transcript of your skit after you perform.
Skit Rubric
Category 4 3 2 1

Vocabulary Students can use at Students can use Students can use Students can use
least 15 vocabulary between 10-15 between 5-10 less than 5
words in context. vocabulary words vocabulary words in vocabulary words in
in context. context. context.

Phrases Students use at least Students use 7-9 Students use 5-7 Students use less
10 phrases. phrases. phrases. than 5 phrases.

Verbs Students can use all Students can use 3 Students use 2 unit Students use 1 unit
4 unit verbs in unit verbs in verbs or there is a lack verb or use no
context. context. of context. context.

Spelling & Students have Students have Students have Students have not
Proofreading proofread and edited proofread their skit, proofread their skit, but proofread or edited
their skit. There are but there are 5-10 have left more than 10 their skit.
less than 5 errors. errors. errors.

Preparedness & Students can perform Students can Students hesitate or Students are not
Pronunciation their skit with no perform their skit don’t know what to say prepared and
hesitation and are with little hesitation and have made butcher the
prepared with correct but have minimal effort to pronunciation of
pronunciation of mispronounced correct pronunciation. words in their skit.
words. some words. :(

Creativity & Students add at least Students include Students attempt to Students use only
Culture one piece of cultural some additional add humor and words and phrases
content in addition to content beyond additional content that were on their
the vocabulary and what is on their beyond what is on their vocabulary sheets
phrases (humor, vocabulary sheet, vocabulary sheet. and do not include
cultural info, menu) but there is room to any cultural info.
add more.

Time-Limit Skit is between 3-4 Skit is within 30 Skit is a minute too Skit is more than a
minutes long. seconds of the long/short. minute too
time range. long/short.

Questions Students can ask the N/a Students can ask the Students do not ask
audience 2 audience 1 the audience
comprehension comprehension comprehension
questions in French question in French questions or they
after their skit and after their skit and can cannot provide
can easily answer provide an answer to answers to
questions that are questions that are questions from the
asked by the asked by the audience. audience.
audience.

Score: ____/32 = ____%


Reflection

This assessment was evaluated using the attached rubric. Students were scored on mechanics,
pronunciation, use of grammar concepts, comprehension, cultural relevance, and creativity. I
was relatively pleased with the results of this summative assessment. However, I felt as though
it did not challenge the students enough (many students memorized and spit out each
sentence). Aside from this, students were successful in using presentational communication to
demonstrate their knowledge of the vocabulary, grammar, and culture related to the food unit.
Pronunciation was very strong across the board and groups were able to use a broad range of
cultural facts and tidbits that they learned throughout the unit. Students scores averaged
approximately 28/32.

After experiencing this skit as an assessment tool with my French I students, I have decided
that I will aim to make my future presentational assessments more challenging and relevant to
student lives. Students were successful, but I’m not sure that this task will have a lasting impact
on the students in their language development. I would like to move towards a more
individualized task to assess presentational communication, such as an individual “speaking
story” in which each student individually (and loosely) prepares a summary of their daily routine
related to the unit. This will give each student the chance to present something that is relevant
to their life and not so scripted. Although presentational communication is prepared, I think that
it loses its purpose if it is scripted word-by-word.
Student Survey
Inserted are the results of the Google Form student survey taken by French I and French II.
Data

Data for the student survey is objective due to the fact that the same survey was taken on
Google Forms by both French I students and French II students on a day that I was out of the
classroom (March 5th). The survey was taken by ninety-four students, while approximately half
of these are students in the French I courses. However, all students responses were similar and
in the comments there are a few direct references to the food unit.

Reflection

Some students did not take the survey seriously and left comments that are irrelevant or inside
jokes. I did not tell them that the university would be looking at their results, so some students
left less than helpful comments. However, there were some comments that I felt were very
helpful. Students ask that I speak French slower in class, which I need to improve on in order to
increase comprehensibility. However, I am glad to hear that the students like how much French
I speak in class and that they are eager for more vocabulary and French speaking opportunities.
They enjoy my enthusiasm and passion for teaching and for French. They like the different
activities I have introduced to them and the energy I bring into the classroom. Some students
left the comment that I am strict, while others left the comment that I need to work on controlling
the students in the class more when they are loud. This is a reflection of my classroom
management style and how it interacts with the management style previously put in place by my
cooperating teacher. It is hard to make adjustments based on student comments, as some of
the comments are complete opposites. For example, one particular student asked that I don’t
engage with some of the students “stupid comments,” while other students express that they
appreciate my ability to make the class funny and interactive. I will use this feedback to work on
my ability to blend seriousness and humor to create an engaging learning environment for all
students.

Post Instructional Plan/Reflection


After finishing this instructional plan, I feel accomplished for how organized my instruction is.
However, I realized after the fact that the textbook is a good way to keep pacing and it is also a
good guide for what content to teach in each unit. I created this unit without help from the
textbook nor the internet. For future units, I will use the textbook as a tool to help me with the
curriculum rather than trying to create the curriculum from scratch, as I did for this unit. Each
individual lesson has allowed me to assess my timing and how long it takes beginner students
to complete activities. As I am halfway through the next unit for both classes, I am feeling much
more confident about my teaching strategies and I am creating strong activities to allow
students to practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing while comparing cultures and still
learning the vocabulary and grammar structures required for their level.