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C A N A DA ’ S N AT I O N A L N E W S PA P E R • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 • globeandmail.com

Macron, Le Pen to face off in final French vote


Centrist ex-banker comes out on top in first round of election and is now clear front-runner to defeat National Front leader
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

The campaigns of Emmanuel PAUL WALDIE in the country’s presidential elec- relief for EU backers. deal another blow to establish-
Macron, left and Marine Le Pen will ERIC REGULY PARIS tion and he’s now the clear front- It comes only a few weeks after ment politics, after Brexit and
be a clash of visions for the country ................................................................ runner to defeat the National voters in the Netherlands turned the election of Mr. Trump in the
over the next two weeks. French voters have handed the Front’s Marine Le Pen in a runoff away from an anti-immigrant United States. The candidates for
LEFT: CHRISTOPHE ENA/ASSOCIATED PRESS; European Union a badly needed on May 7. movement and re-elected a pro- the traditional parties on the
RIGHT: MICHEL SPRINGLER/ASSOCIATED PRESS boost, making centrist Emma- Their campaigns over the next EU government, although with a right and left – François Fillon of
nuel Macron the favourite to two weeks will be a clash of vi- smaller mandate. And it will bol- the Republicans and Socialist
become the country’s next presi- sions for the country, pitting Ms. ster the EU as it begins negotiat- Benoît Hamon – could do no bet-
dent and forcing the far right Le Pen’s Donald Trump-style pro- ing Britain’s departure with ter than third and fifth respec-
anti-globalist National Front to tectionism against Mr. Macron’s Prime Minister Theresa May, who tively, as voters appeared fed up
regroup. endorsement of a pro-EU, more is expected to win a substantial with the status quo and opted for
Mr. Macron came out on top in open economy. mandate in an election on June 8. untested leadership.
the first round of voting Sunday His victory on Sunday will be a However, Sunday’s results did France, Page 5

After years of inconsistency, families of military suicides hope for answers Ottawa eager
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
to conclude
RENATA D’ALIESIO WINNIPEG
................................................................
looking forward to spending time
with his family, and had even
swers. The family heard plenty of
rumours, but the military never
ended his own life,” an
anguished Ms. Cenerini said at
China trade
G rant Palmer had a special
Mother’s Day planned for his
been scheming to play a prank
on his mom.
provided them with an official
record of events.
her Winnipeg home. She chokes
on the word truth and breaks deal within
wife, Anita Cenerini. He organiz- Around 3 p.m. the next day, Pte. It also didn’t hold a board of into sobs. Her son’s suicide has
ed a weekend in Thunder Bay Welch’s family was waiting for inquiry to uncover what hap- left a deep void in the family and two years
with all her children: three-year- him to arrive at the baggage car- pened to the young soldier and the lack of answers from the Ca-
old Jacob, the youngest, who ousel when they were called to whether his experiences in Af- nadian Armed Forces has stunted
................................................................
lived with the couple in Winni- the WestJet counter and led ghanistan contributed to his their healing.
peg; Michelle, who was finishing upstairs to a small chapel. What downward spiral, even though, as The case exemplifies the debil- NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE BEIJING
her last year of high school in was going on, they nervously a Globe and Mail investigation itating distress endured by fami- ................................................................

Marathon, Ont.; and 22-year-old wondered. Two military workers discovered, Pte. Welch was the lies when they’re left in the dark. The Justin Trudeau government
Thomas, the eldest, an infantry broke the devastating news to first Canadian soldier to kill him- On Monday, military ombuds- intends to push forward trade
soldier nicknamed L’il Trooper them: Pte. Welch had taken his self after serving in the volatile man Gary Walbourne will release with China during the next
who had recently returned from own life at the Petawawa base. operation. He died by suicide on recommendations from a collab- two years, saying it is urgent
the Afghanistan war. His mother and sister crumpled May 8, 2004, just three months orative review with the Forces that Canada do more with
Private Thomas Welch sounded to the floor in tears. What hap- after returning from the war that call for improving how the the world’s second-largest econ-
upbeat when he talked with his pened at the base? What went zone. military deals with bereaved fam- omy.
mother over the phone the night wrong, Ms. Cenerini angrily “I don’t know any truth about ilies and for enhancing the board Canada has yet to formally
before his flight to Thunder Bay asked. More than a dozen years his death. I don’t know what of inquiry system. launch free-trade negotiations
from Ottawa. He said he was later, she is still waiting for an- went so terribly wrong that he Military, Page 8 with China. A second round of
exploratory talks will take place
this week in Ottawa.
Other Western countries have
RCMP labour trial to highlight concerns over wages, safety taken as long as a decade to
conclude free-trade pacts with
Beijing.
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
But Ottawa is now indicating
COLIN FREEZE The subtle but significant show lines have started to fade. Stoi- Moncton on Monday. The federal it expects to move quickly.
................................................................ of Mountie disgruntlement is in- cism, discipline and deference to labour department’s law-enforce- The Liberal government wants
Early this month, RCMP Sergeant tended to draw attention to wages the chain of command have ment wing has charged its police- to “demonstrate progress in our
Chris Backus and his colleagues and working conditions in the always characterized the RCMP force cousin with four counts of first mandate,” Finance Minister
purchased some neon pink and national police force. Pay for po- rank-and-file. having failed to provide patrol of- Bill Morneau said in an inter-
orange duct tape. The West Coast lice officers has stagnated in the Yet this is changing as Canada’s ficers with sufficient skills, equip- view.
Mounties stuck it on top of the RCMP, even as paycheques in big- biggest police force wrestles with ment or weaponry to defend “That’s certainly the kind of
traditional yellow pant stripes city forces have ballooned. stalled salaries, the looming pros- against a gunman who shot three urgency we bring to these dis-
running the length of their legs. In those cities, it is not unheard pect of a police labour union and Mounties dead in 2014. Should cussions.”
With that, they helped kick-start a of for police to alter their uni- ongoing officer-safety issues star- the RCMP be convicted of this it Though Canada’s fixed elec-
workplace protest that spread like forms when they want to make a kly highlighted by a Labour Code could pay millions of dollars in tion dates can be overruled by
wildfire among uniform-wearing statement. But for Mounties, it’s prosecution. fines. the Prime Minister, the next
Mounties from coast to coast. only recently that long-standing The RCMP will be put on trial in RCMP, Page 13 election would normally be
expected in 2019.
Mr. Morneau declined to
INSIDE define what “progress” might
look like. Canada and China
2017 Stanley have agreed to double trade by
2025, but Mr. Morneau said
Cup Playoffs Ottawa is not wedded to the
................................................................ idea of a single, sweeping trade
Ottawa advances The Globe’s SecureDrop service deal.
with overtime victory provides a way to securely share Some Canadian academics and
The Ottawa Senators head to information with our journalists. business leaders have suggested
Round 2 after beating the tgam.ca/securedrop Ottawa may be better to pursue
Boston Bruins 3-2 in overtime. a series of sector-by-sector
Roy MacGregor reports. agreements that could be more
Globe Sports quickly set in place.
“That is exactly what the
discussion at the exploratory
level is considering. So we’re
looking at those alternatives in
terms of approach,” Mr. Mor-
neau said.
China, Page 6

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A2 O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

MOMENT IN TIME CANADA 150

Toronto addresses
underweight bread scandal

TORONTO PUBLIC LIBRARY

April 24, 1867 6 In a consumer-friendly crackdown, Toronto’s inspector of


weights and measures raided shops, bakeries and delivery trucks and confis-
cated 564 loaves of bread that were below the standard weight. The Globe
declared that the seizure made it obvious “the habit of giving light weight is of
common occurrence” with some bakers in the city. “The widow and orphan
whose utmost energies are scarcely able to sustain life with bread at its present
rate, have a right to demand that they at least receive the equivalent of their
money. The mechanic and labourer have equal reason to complain at such
robbery.” Even a rich man who can afford to pay “has equal right to honest
dealing,” the paper said, “though in his case the act may not look quite so
mean.” The underweight bread was taken to a police station, and most was lat-
er distributed to charitable institutions. – Richard Blackwell

TODAY’S COLUMNISTS
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

Iris

Cambio KONRAD YAKABUSKI BARRIE McKENNA SANDRA MARTIN

Marc Cain ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................

Most school boards today can’t More duty-free cheese is coming When it comes to assisted dying,
Marie Saint Pierre even govern themselves, let to Canada. But this isn’t about we must recognize that not all
alone students in their charge. cheaper slices of Camembert. suffering is physical.
Opinion, Page 11 Report on Business, Page 1 Life & Arts, Page 1
Sarah Pacini
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

Raffaelo Rossi INSIDE


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QUEBEC

Troubled waters
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

A man drives an ATV through a


flooded residential area in the town
of Rigaud, Que., west of Montreal,
Sunday following serious flooding in
the region.
GRAHAM HUGHES/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Top court asked to soften ruling on delay


Supreme Court hearing for accused drug trafficker to include appeal from federal prosecutors for tolerance in some delayed cases
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

SEAN FINE JUSTICE WRITER Supreme Court’s new time limit courts and dismissed cases. It is statement of facts contained cutors can set trial dates in supe-
................................................................ is exactly half that – 30 months, unlikely that a ruling will be errors, and so did a judge’s pre- rior court, the cases are already
Less than a year after it set new from charge to completion, for made in time to influence discus- trial ruling. Based on those beyond the 30-month time limits.
time limits for criminal trials, the trials in Superior Court. But the sions in that meeting, though the errors, Mr. Cody’s defence coun- Ontario and Manitoba are trying
Supreme Court of Canada is court also said it would be unfair court occasionally rules on the sel fought an extended battle to to persuade Ottawa to drop most
being asked by federal prosecut- to apply the new rules to cases same day as the hearing. have the charges thrown out. or all preliminary inquiries.
ors and several provinces to soft- that were already well under way; For the court, the Cody case is a The case shows the difficulty The situation in the Cody case
en a ruling that has resulted in it provided for a blend of new test of its resolve to transform the judges are having in interpreting echoes that of the Supreme
four charges of murder being and old rules. justice system. In Jordan, the the Supreme Court’s rules for Court’s last major attempt to
thrown out for unreasonable Two months before Mr. Cody’s court’s majority in the 5-4 ruling cases in the system before Jordan. crack down on court delay. In
delays. trial was to begin, he applied to was scathing about a “culture of Two appeal court judges said the 1990, it set time guidelines in R v.
At a hearing Tuesday in the case the judge for a stay, saying his complacency and delay” in the actual delay had been just 16 Askov, resulting in nearly 50,000
of James Cody, an accused drug right to a timely trial had been justice system, and said judges, months, after subtracting for criminal charges being thrown
trafficker from Newfoundland violated. The trial judge agreed defence lawyers, prosecutors and delay that was permitted under out in Ontario alone; then in R v.
and Labrador, the court will hear and dismissed the charges. But government all bore responsibil- the old rules, and delay caused by Morin, 18 months later, the court
a plea from the federal prosecu- the Newfoundland and Labrador ity. the defence. By contrast, a dis- eased off, allowing for more flex-
tion service for tolerance of slow- Court of Appeal, in a 2-1 decision, “Unless you admit a case has senting judge found there were ibility. And the court was clear in
moving cases that entered the said the delay was reasonable been in the system too long, you 39 months of delay. (The trial Jordan that it did not wish to see
system before the ruling last July and ordered a new trial. Mr. Cody will never get past the ‘culture of judge ruled before Jordan. The a repeat of the chaos caused by
– in a case known as R v. Jordan – appealed to the Supreme Court to complacency,’ ” said Ottawa law- appeal court ruled after Jordan, Askov, which is why it allowed for
created the new limits. restore the trial judge’s ruling. yer Michael Crystal, who is repre- and called the defence and the old rules still to be in force to
Five provinces are intervening The federal prosecution service senting Mr. Cody before the Crown lawyers in to make argu- some extent.
in the case in support of a more argues that five years was reason- Supreme Court. “It’s only when ments about how to apply Jor- But the Criminal Lawyers’ Asso-
permissive view of delay. Three of able in Mr. Cody’s case, under the you say too long is too long – five dan.) ciation is urging the Supreme
them – Ontario, Alberta and Que- old rules. years is too long – that you will be The Jordan ruling sparked an Court to stay the course, saying
bec – have seen judges throw out “If the Crown had known that uncomfortable. It’s only when uproar. In Alberta, prosecutors that governments and the media
murder charges over delay, in- the law was going to be changed, you have a target of 30 months dropped 200 cases – including have exaggerated the fallout
cluding a first-degree murder it might have acted differently; it that you become uncomfortable drunk driving and assaulting-po- from Jordan, and that what is
charge against a Montreal man cannot now go back and change and you have to become more lice charges – saying that they did happening is stimulating the
dismissed on Friday, and a sec- behaviour that was reasonable efficient.” not have enough prosecutors to change sought by the court.
ond-degree murder charge under the former law,” federal Mr. Cody was charged in Janu- handle them all, and had to save “The ‘problem’ underlying
against another Montreal man prosecutors, who handle drug ary, 2010, one of 13 people their resources for serious cases. government calls for flexibility
whose wife died when her throat cases, said in a legal filing to the accused of being part of an al- In Quebec, where the govern- does not exist,” the group says in
was slit. Manitoba and British Co- Supreme Court. leged drug-trafficking ring be- ment is spending an extra $175- a legal filing. “The early evidence
lumbia are the other two prov- The hearing in the Cody case tween British Columbia and million over four years to hire is that Jordan is working the way
inces intervening. comes as the federal and provin- Newfoundland and Labrador. more judges, prosecutors and it was supposed to – as a vehicle
The Cody case was scheduled, cial justice ministers prepare for Complications arose during pro- court workers, Justice Minister for measured change. It started a
after multiple delays, to take five an emergency meeting on Friday ceedings. His initial lawyer was Stéphanie Vallée told The Globe conversation about delay without
years to come to trial. The to look for solutions to clogged named to the bench. An agreed and Mail that by the time prose- drastic results.”

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Study finds gender imbalance in births


Analysis shows preference for boys among Indo-Canadian women does not diminish, regardless of how long they’ve lived in Canada
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

KAREN HOWLETT 2014, and who immigrated to


................................................................ Canada between 1985 and 2012.
Fewer girls than boys are born to Mothers who gave birth to twins
Indian women who immigrate to or triplets were excluded. The
Canada, a skewed pattern driven study also looked at the mother’s
by families whose mother tongue birth place, her mother tongue
is Punjabi, according to a new and how long she had been in
study. Canada.
One of the most surprising find- Among all the mothers having
ings of the study, to be published their third child, nearly twice as
Monday in the Journal of Obstet- many males were born compared
rics and Gynecology Canada, is with females if the previous two
that the preference for boys does children were girls. The ratio was
not diminish, regardless of how even higher among women
long women from India have whose mother tongue was Punja-
lived in Canada. bi: 240 boys to 100 girls. The ratio
“It’s counterintuitive,” said Mar- of males to females did not differ
celo Urquia, a research scientist according to when women
at the University of Manitoba’s arrived in Canada.
Centre for Health Policy and lead In India, the ratio of male to
author of the study. “We know female newborns varies consid-
that the longer immigrants are in erably, with several northern
Canada, the more likely they are states consistently showing num-
to align to the host country.” bers that favour boys, the study
But for many Indian immi- says. The practice of sex selection
grants who express a strong is not widespread across India
desire for sons, the study found, but it is prevalent, said Kripa Sek-
the practice of sex selection re- har, executive director of the
mains entrenched. Women who School girls listen to a speaker during a rally in New Delhi. The practice of sex selection is not widespread across South Asian Women’s Centre in
already have two female children India, said Kripa Sekhar, of the South Asian Women’s Centre in Toronto. PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/GETTY IMAGES Toronto. “Many members of the
are most at risk for abortions in community welcome a girl child,”
the second trimester, when par- Urquia said. Across the globe, by India’s Punjab province, where customs and celebrate the birth she said. “It’s a small minority of
ents can learn the sex of the comparison, the odds of having a she grew up, but she was sur- of girls. In Brampton, Ont., where the community in Canada that
fetus. The study builds on pre- boy over a girl are slightly higher: prised to learn that it also hap- 40 per cent of the population is still practises this.”
vious research led by Dr. Urquia 107 boys for every 100 girls. pens in Canada. South Asian, one hospital has A woman has a fundamental
that found a deficit in Canada of The preference for boys among Ms. Brar, who immigrated to started handing out Ladoos, a right in Canada to decide wheth-
more than 4,400 girls over two many Indian immigrants reveals Canada with her family when she sugary Indian sweet, when a baby er to have an abortion, and
decades. underlying gender inequities and was 14, remembers the traditional girl is born, Ms. Brar said. Tradi- should not come under pressure
The latest study shows that will not change without interven- celebration called a Lohri in India tionally in India, Ladoos were just from a spouse or other family
women born in India who al- tion, Dr. Urquia said. for celebrating the birth of a boy. for moms who delivered boys. members to deliver a male child,
ready have two daughters gave Amanpreet Brar, a third-year “It was rare to hear about a The study analyzed 46,834 birth Ms. Sekhar said.
birth to 192 baby boys in Ontario medical student at the University girl’s birth being celebrated,” she records for Indian-born mothers “This is an issue of choice that
for every 100 girls. The sex ratios of Toronto who worked on the said. who delivered up to three live is taken away from a woman,”
are so distorted, they cannot be study, said gender-selection abor- But some steps have been taken births in Ontario hospitals be- she said. “In many ways it is very
explained by natural causes, Dr. tion was talked about openly in in Canada to end gender-based tween April, 1993, and March, abusive.”

Task force rejects calls for widespread hepatitis C-testing


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

KELLY GRANT HEALTH REPORTER last century, when the then- The task force’s study, pub- He was one of five experts Philpott, who assumed the port-
................................................................ unknown hepatitis-C virus lished Monday in the Canadian asked to review the draft recom- folio the following year when
Healthy baby boomers should spread via the reusable glass Medical Association Journal mendations who later withdrew her Liberal government was
not be tested for hepatitis C and metal syringes common in (CMAJ,) argues it would be their names in protest from the elected, said she supports the
unless they have risk factors the medical world at the time. wrong to test all baby boomers acknowledgments section of the task force’s guidelines.
such as a history of intravenous “It makes no sense to me. Why when plenty of them would ei- CMAJ paper. “They’re actually very much in
drug use, according to a federal wouldn’t you want to find carri- ther fail to qualify for publicly The Canadian Liver Founda- line with many other jurisdic-
task force whose new recom- ers of this virus?” said Michael funded treatment or die of other tion has been urging everyone tions, including the United King-
mendations are being excoriated Houghton, a hepatitis virologist causes before developing the born between 1945 and 1975 to dom,” she said in an interview
by liver doctors, including the at the University of Alberta and end-stage liver disease that be tested for hepatitis C since with The Globe. “They’re based
Canadian who discovered hepa- the leader of the team that iden- chronic hepatitis-C infection can shortly after the United States on what would be the best way
titis C. tified hepatitis C in 1989. “To cause. Centers for Disease Control and for us, given our Canadian con-
The Canadian Task Force on me, it’s a classic whitewash.” “In a publicly funded system Prevention (CDC) made a simi- text, to most rapidly identify
Preventive Health Care, an influ- The quarrel over hepatitis-C like ours in Canada, resource lar recommendation in 2012. people who are as yet undiag-
ential panel that crafts guide- screening is about more than use is an important considera- (The Canadian Liver Foundation nosed.”
lines for family physicians, on the ordering of a simple blood tion,” said Dr. Grad, also a pro- receives some funding from Since the 2014 draft was
Monday released its first-ever test. The fight is really about fessor at McGill University. companies that make direct-act- kiboshed, the true prices of
recommendations on screening how best to use the limited “Especially when you realize ing antivirals, but the charity direct-acting antivirals have
for hepatitis C, a virus that can money available in Canada’s that there are baby boomers in says the industry does not influ- dropped significantly, thanks to
lurk silently for decades before public health-care system. Canada who’ve already been ence its positions.) a confidential pricing deal that
wreaking serious damage on the Roland Grad, the Montreal identified as hepatitis-C positive Dr. Sherman said the Public the provincial, territorial and
liver. family doctor who led the task who have been waiting many Health Agency of Canada federal drug plans reached with
Most of the task force’s advice force’s working group, said the years for treatment that they do (PHAC), which funds the task three pharmaceutical companies
is uncontroversial: The panel panel decided against testing not qualify for. We already have force, was preparing to follow in February.
suggests that blood tests for baby boomers for two reasons: a backlog.” the CDC’s lead in 2014 when it The secret, cheaper prices have
hepatitis C be reserved for those the lack of high-quality evidence As many as 245,000 Canadians encountered resistance from already led two provinces, On-
at elevated risk of contracting for such screening in the med- have chronic hepatitis-C infec- provincial governments worried tario and British Columbia, to
the virus, namely people who ical literature; and the prospect tion; an estimated 44 per cent of about the high cost of the new say that by next year they will
have used injection drugs, spent that more screening would lead them don’t know it. direct-acting antivirals, which extend public coverage of direct-
time in prison, received blood to more demand for an expen- Morris Sherman, a hepatologist have a sticker price as high as acting antivirals to all hepati-
products before 1992 or immi- sive new generation of drugs at the University Health Net- $100,000 for a three-month tis-C patients, regardless of the
grated from countries where that can cure hepatitis C in up work in Toronto and the chair- course of curative treatment. severity of their disease.
hepatitis C is more prevalent to 95 per cent of cases. man of the Canadian Liver In a statement to The Globe Dr. Grad said that if more
than it is in Canada. Right now, provincial drug Foundation, called the task and Mail, PHAC confirmed a provinces move to cover direct-
But the task force rejected plans only cover the medica- force’s guidelines “a dreadful draft recommendation to test acting antivirals for all patients
calls from hepatologists to go tions, known as direct-acting an- document” that will hurt Cana- people born between 1950 and with chronic hepatitis-C infec-
further and screen all the baby tivirals, for chronic hepatitis-C da’s commitment to ending hep- 1970 was indeed circulated in tion, the task force may recon-
boomers who may have been patients with serious liver scar- atitis as a public-health threat 2014 and then withdrawn. sider its recommendations in
exposed in the middle of the ring. by 2030. Federal Health Minister Jane the future.

Stogran’s entry could shake up tame NDP leadership race


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

GLORIA GALLOWAY OTTAWA tary to Mr. Mulcair, said he Liberals in the coming election. “I
................................................................ expects Mr. Stogran to shake think there is a real sense that the
The collegial race to lead the fed- things up. NDP needs to find its way,” she
eral NDP received an injection of “His approach is counter to type said. But “if people are expecting
drama this week with the for an NDP candidate at this the same kind of dynamics as the
announcement that former veter- stage,” Mr. Belanger said. “He has Conservative race, I don’t think
ans ombudsman Pat Stogran is a no-nonsense approach, he they will find it here.”
now a candidate. comes from a military back- Mr. Caron, who says he has dis-
The New Democrats need ground, he’s been known to tinguished himself from the oth-
something to turn the eyes of Ca- speak his mind and he will not ers by proposing a basic
nadian voters their way as they hold back. That’s not his style. So minimum income for all Cana-
languish below 20 per cent in that might force some of the oth- dians, does believe the discussion
public opinion polls. And Mr. Sto- er candidates to take a clearer will get more heated. “I expect
gran, whose frenetic patterns of stand on some of the issues.” the next debates will be more
speech and apparent lack of inter- The four MPs who are in the robust, indeed more rough,” Mr.
est in sticking to the NDP script, race have mixed views about Caron said. But “we are all in this
could stir the placid waters. whether the gloves will come off together. We know what it means
The contest to succeed Tom before October. to be NDP, to be a social democrat
Mulcair is in a bit of a holding pat- Mr. Angus has been consulting and that is why there is so much
tern as the party waits for the with Canadians across the coun- agreement.”
British Columbia election on May try and says his campaign will There is a fifth candidate in the
9 and for the federal Conserva- Former veterans ombudsman Pat Stogran says he has joined the NDP focus on the “growing economic race named Ibrahim Bruno El-
tives to elect their leader on May leadership race to change the current system. SEAN KILPATRICK/THE CANADIAN PRESS divide.” The first debates were Khoury, a Montreal resident who
17. There is hope among New about establishing the ground is relatively unknown in NDP cir-
Democrats that, by the end of things?” seat as an MP, he said most politi- work, he said. Going forward, cles and who says he wants to
next month, their leadership The debates that were held in cians are “first followers” – sup- “there’s going to be a lot more make life better for Canadians.
fight will gain a national spot- Ottawa and Montreal saw the four porters whose job is to make a testing of ideas.” Mr. El-Khoury’s entry is unlikely
light. main contenders – MPs Charlie leader’s ideas credible. Mr. Julian says he has differen- to affect the established tone.
Other candidates are spending Angus, Niki Ashton, Guy Caron “I don’t want to be a first follow- tiated himself from the others by Mr. Strogran’s might.
this time quietly touring the and Peter Julian – chat congenial- er,” Mr. Stogran said. “I’ve got to taking a hard line against the Kin- And there is still time for other
country and trying to lock up sup- ly about social-democratic values be in charge because I want to der Morgan and Energy East pipe- leadership hopefuls to declare
port at the local level. But Mr. Sto- and offer many words of agree- break the system. I want to set the lines. “I know the other their intentions.
gran is eager to get into the fray. ment about each other’s policies conditions for success of the NDP candidates, I know how effective New Democrats pushed for a
“Did you see the two debates?” and positions. There were no so that there are no longer two they have been. So I think there is long campaign to encourage out-
he asked at a news conference hard hits like those dished out at parties [the Liberals and the Con- an enormous mutual respect that siders to jump in, said Mr. Belan-
last week to announce his candi- similar Conservative events. servatives] controlling the agen- is there, but there are clear issues ger. “There is one now. He is a
dacy. “This is one of the reasons Mr. Stogran is unlikely to adhere da.” that are different.” serious candidate. So it will be in-
why I actually made the plunge. I to that pattern. When asked why Karl Belanger, the former inter- Ms. Ashton says she has been teresting to see how all these peo-
actually reached out to the party he chose to run for the NDP im national director of the party the only candidate to say the NDP ple react now that their wish has
and said how can I interrupt leadership before trying to win a and the former principal secre- must stay well to the left of the been granted.”
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O NEWS • A5

FROM PAGE 1

France: The EU-backing Macron now has support of both Republicans and Socialists
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 Mr. Macron, a 39-year old


former banker, started his
political movement, called En
the EU are headed for change.
Mr. Macron has other advan-
tages heading into the second
nomic policies, where he has not
been specific about just how far
he would go in easing the coun-
Marche!, only a year ago but, round. The country’s economy is try’s rigid labour laws.
with a centre-right platform, he showing signs of turning around, Mr. Spiro said the fact Ms. Le
managed to draw support from something he is likely to exploit Pen and far-left candidate Jean-
disaffected voters on all sides. as he and others have painted Luc Mélenchon, who is also a
“In one year, we have changed Ms. Le Pen’s economic policies Euroskeptic, secured nearly 45
the face of French politics,” Mr. as reckless, particularly her call per cent of the vote “is a damn-
Macron told hundreds of sup- to pull France out of the euro. ing indictment of the European
porters in Paris. He added that And while Mr. Macron’s support project and bodes ill for the
he planned to campaign on a has remained largely steady dur- prospects for meaningful fiscal
message of optimism and hope ing the campaign, Ms. Le Pen and structural reform in France.”
“for our country and for has been slipping, falling from With Mr. Macron and his pro-
Europe.” He also railed against as high as 27 per cent just a few Europe agenda the winner in the
what he called 30 years of rule weeks ago. Last week’s terrorist first round, all eyes now to turn
by the two mainstream parties, attack in Paris, which saw one to Italy, the euro zone’s third
saying the country was ready for police officer killed and two oth- biggest economy, as the biggest
a change to something different. ers injured, also did not appear threat to the European project.
Mr. Macron certainly has the to boost Ms. Le Pen’s support as Italy is seeing its own populist
edge in the second round. Polls many had expected. surge. Its Five Star Movement
give him a big lead over Ms. Le However, Mr. Macron still faces (M5S), the main opposition par-
Pen and he now has the backing Supporters of Emmanuel Macron cheer the centrist’s lead in the first round some major challenges. France’s ty in parliament and the biggest
of the main parties as well as of French presidential voting on Sunday. THIBAULT CAMUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS economic recovery has been elected populist party in the EU,
Prime Minister Bernard Caze- meagre and unemployment re- is leading in the polls and could
neuve and one of the largest jected to get 23.7 per cent of the on me a huge responsibility to mains nearly 10 per cent, and far form the next government – an
trade unions. Investors also first-round vote by the pollster defend the French nation, its higher in many regions. There’s election must be held by this
expect him to win handily and Ifop-Fiducial; Ms. Le Pen was unity, its security, its culture, its also growing antagonism toward time next year. The latest polls
the value of the euro soared im- given 21.7 per cent. prosperity and its indepen- the EU and its many rules that put M5S at 31.5 per cent against
mediately after Sunday’s results. Ms. Le Pen has also already dence,” she told supporters in some say have made the econo- 25 per cent for the ruling Demo-
For the markets, “the election is won more votes in a presidential Lille. my worse. Ms. Le Pen has drawn cratic Party.
more or less over,” said Nicholas race than her father, party foun- She made it clear she will con- support in parts of the country For now, though, Mr. Macron’s
Spiro, a partner at London’s Lau- der Jean-Marie Le Pen, who took tinue to campaign on her hit hard by the economic down- supporters hailed his win as a
ressa Advisory. “This is the result 18 per cent of the vote in the France-first agenda that calls for turn, notably in the north. Mr. vote of confidence in Europe.
investors were expecting. Mar- second round in 2002. And her a halt to all immigration, a refer- Macron is also still largely They pointed out that, among
kets will rightly treat this as a success could translate into endum on France’s membership unknown to many voters. He the 11 presidential candidates, he
stark choice between the anti- more seats in June when the in the European Union and has never run for elective office has been the only one backing a
European far right and the pro- country holds parliamentary withdrawing the country from and has spent much of his stronger EU. “Victory for Mr. Ma-
European centre and will now elections. the euro. Mr. Macron will coun- career as an investment banker. cron will be a victory for
be even more convinced that She conceded nothing on Sun- ter with his liberal platform of Mr. Macron “is a mystery,” said Europe,” said Claude Posternak
Macron will win.” day, claiming victory and insist- economic reforms, open borders political scientist Dominique as he stood in the middle of a
But there are no guarantees ing that she was the only true and improvements to France’s Moïsi. “On the surface, he is the sea of people cheering and wav-
and Ms. Le Pen didn’t lose by anti-establishment candidate social safety net. But he, too, will best of the best. Everything you ing French and EU flags at Mr.
much on Sunday. In a race that who offers France “the great al- be calling for changes to the EU, want, he has it.” But his policies Macron’s campaign celebration.
was too close to call up to the ternative.” meaning that no matter who remain vague on many points, “It’s a victory for Europe, for a
last minute, Mr. Macron was pro- “This result is historic. It puts wins in two weeks, France and he added. That includes his eco- new Europe.”

WORLD DIGEST

FINAL DAYS TO SAVE


................................................................

N. Korea threatens
to sink U.S. carrier
................................................................

Seoul – North Korea said on Sun-


day it was ready to sink a U.S. air-
ENDS THURSDAY, APRIL 27, 2017
craft carrier to demonstrate its
military might, as two Japanese
navy ships joined a U.S. carrier
group for exercises in the west-
ern Pacific.
U.S. President Donald Trump
ordered the USS Carl Vinson car-
rier strike group to sail to waters
off the Korean peninsula in re-
sponse to rising tension over the
North’s nuclear and missile tests,
and its threats to attack the Unit-
ed States and its Asian allies. OUR
“Our revolutionary forces are
combat-ready to sink a U.S. LOWEST
nuclear-powered aircraft carrier
with a single strike,” the Rodong PRICES
Sinmun, the newspaper of the
North’s ruling Workers’ Party, OF THE
said in a commentary. – Reuters
................................................................ SEASON
Mexico will pay for
wall ‘later’: Trump
................................................................

Washington – U.S. President


Donald Trump said on Sunday he
expected Mexico to pay for the
wall he promised to build along
the southern border, reviving a
campaign promise that roiled
U.S. relations with Mexico in the
first week of his presidency.
“Eventually, but at a later date
so we can get started early, Mexi-
co will be paying, in some form,
for the badly needed border
wall,” Mr. Trump said in a Twitter

TUESDAY, APRIL 25:


post.
Mr. Trump returned to his Mex-
ico demand on a morning in

BONUS SENIORS DAY


which he simultaneously tried to
pressure congressional Demo-
crats to include funding for the
border wall in must-pass spend-

SENIORS 60+ SAVE AN


ing legislation needed to keep
the U.S. government open
beyond Friday.
In Mexico City, a spokesman for

EXTRA15%
the foreign ministry had no com-
ment on Mr. Trump’s wall pay-
ment tweet. – Reuters
................................................................

Prosecutor probes
NGO-smuggler links
................................................................

Rome – An investigation of hu-


manitarian groups operating
migrant rescue ships in the Medi-
terranean has turned up evi-
dence of contacts between some
NGOs and Libyan-based human
smugglers, a prosecutor based in
on regular, sale and clearance prices.
Exclusions apply. See store for details.
Sicily said in comments pub-
lished Sunday.
Anti-migrant politicians imme-
diately demanded to know who Shop thebay.com with code: SAVE
finances rescue ships run by
NGOs.
Catania chief prosecutor Car-
melo Zuccaro was quoted as say-
ing in an interview with La
Stampa newspaper that his
office’s probe has revealed “evi-
dence that there are direct con-
tacts between some NGOs and
human traffickers in Libya.”
– Associated Press
A6 • NEWS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

OPINION

Juggling giants is Trudeau’s task on trade


When it comes to negotiations, PM must first land an agreement with unpredictable U.S. while keeping a restless China interested
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

with China to try to reach a deal


in say, five or six years. The prob-
lem will come if Beijing is impa-
tient for a quicker deal.
Politically, it might be tricky for
Canada to move to close a deal
CAMPBELL CLARK with China before it has one with
cclark@globeandmail.com Mr. Trump, whose administration
has claimed that NAFTA creates a
................................................................
back door for goods from China.

C hinese officials are back in


Ottawa this week to resume
exploratory talks on free trade.
The two sets of talks could leak
into each other. Mr. Trump’s
Commerce Secretary, Wilbur
But the challenge of Donald Ross, said the United States would
Trump means that, when it like to see NAFTA’s rules of origin
comes to trade negotiations, it’s tightened so that cars made in
America first. Canada and Mexico cannot have
There’s a lot of push and pull on such a high percentage of parts
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and materials made elsewhere – a
over trade, and not only from Mr. hint at the Trump administra-
Trump’s vague complaints last tion’s desire to squeeze out Chi-
week about Canada acting unfair- nese steel and other materials
ly on dairy, lumber and energy. used in North American cars.
China’s ambassador to Canada, But above all, Mr. Trudeau’s
Lu Shaye, was also talking about government just can’t devote its
what his country wants – speed- It might be politically tricky for Ottawa to close a trade deal with Beijing before it has one with Washington, as the political capital to closing a deal
ing up exploratory talks to get to a Trump administration has claimed that NAFTA creates a back door for goods from China. KEVIN FRAYER/GETTY IMAGES with China until U.S. trade is rela-
trade deal faster. tively secure. A trade deal with
While Mr. Trump is making trick in juggling the world’s two of U.S. trade, he created a cabinet to hold off on investment. Cana- China is a big sell, and the Liberals
countries wonder about how the biggest economies is keeping the committee on U.S. relations and dian business wants that uncer- would have to overcome a mixed
United States might disrupt trade, focus on the United States with- dispatched ministers to meet po- tainty dispelled. bag of public fears – lost jobs, Chi-
the Chinese see an opportunity, out dropping China. litical players across the United But Beijing expects attention, nese state corporations buying
portraying themselves as the new If it wasn’t for Mr. Trump, Mr. States. Nothing is bigger in Otta- too. Canada apparently has an op- Canadian assets, spying in sensi-
anti-protectionists, and seeking Trudeau’s government might be wa. portunity to gain better access to tive industries and just agreeing
to lock up some trading arrange- strategizing right now about sell- For Canadian business, the Unit- a major growth market, and the to anything with a big, authoritar-
ments. They have a trade agree- ing a coming trade deal with Chi- ed States is the undeniable priori- business community doesn’t ian state. The Liberals are con-
ment with Australia, and deals na to the ambivalent Canadian ty. U.S. trade barriers could want Mr. Trudeau’s government sumed now with the present
with other Western countries, electorate. But Ottawa’s political devastate exports. They’d under- to spurn it. danger of a U.S. trade disruption.
such as Canada, would send a sig- focus has been the all-consuming mine the decades-old Canadian The good news is there’s no real That’s why Mr. Trudeau will
nal to the world. Mr. Lu made it question of dealing with Mr. pitch to investors that setting up a conflict between the two sets of have to employ some diplomatic
sound like Beijing is in a hurry. Trump and his potential threat to business in this country provides talks at this stage. Exploratory arts to keep the Chinese interest-
Canada can talk to both the Canadian access to the U.S. mar- access to a big North American talks with China are about what ed, perhaps with interim agree-
United States and China at the ket. market. Bank of Canada senior sort of things will be on the table. ments, if Beijing is really in a rush
same time, of course. But when it Mr. Trudeau shuffled his cabinet deputy governor Carolyn Wilkins If that continues for a couple of – he’ll need to rag the puck with
comes to closing a deal, the Unit- to put a new Foreign Affairs Min- has suggested the uncertainty years, Ottawa can try to conclude China while he closes a deal with
ed States must come first. So the ister, Chrystia Freeland, in charge over trade is leading some firms a U.S. deal, then start full talks Mr. Trump.
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

FROM PAGE 1

China: Beijing has pushed for Ottawa to move quickly on free-trade talks
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 His government wants ways


“to deepen the relationship,
focused on how we can build
Morneau himself was in Washing-
ton late last week to speak with
the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
the two countries.
Beijing has pushed for Ottawa
to move quickly. China’s ambas-
That request involved a Chi-
nese desire to buy Canadian com-
panies, Mr. Morneau said.
But its demands for entrance into
other countries come as it con-
tinues to maintain its own heavy
more jobs – in both places, of But, he said, Canada is also sador in Ottawa, Lu Shaye, said “There have been a number of barriers to foreign companies,
course – and that will mean that “moving ahead” with China. last week, “we hope to speed up” acquisition opportunities from who are either barred from
we are going to be looking at Mr. Morneau and International exploratory talks, even as his China to Canada, and they are investing in many sectors, or
places in our economy where we Trade Minister François-Philippe government lays a list of just stating that they are interest- kept away by prejudicial treat-
can have the biggest impact.” Champagne will both fly to Bei- demands at Canada’s feet. China ed in that sector,” he said. ment.
He did not rule out a full- jing this week for the first round wants Ottawa to drop national- Canada’s response: “We always In January, the American
fledged comprehensive trade of a new Canada-China economic security tests for takeovers by its have to look out for our own best Chamber of Commerce in China
deal, but said he wants to be and financial strategic dialogue, companies, and give its state interests, especially in national released an annual survey of its
“practical” and move at a pace meeting with Chinese Vice-Pre- firms unfettered access to the Ca- security areas,” Mr. Morneau said. membership, which includes
that allows Ottawa to show some mier Wang Yang on Tuesday. The nadian economy. But, he added, “We are an open multinational giants who have
results. high-level meetings are expected Last week, Chinese Premier Li trading nation and are looking done business in China for dec-
The Trudeau government’s Chi- to recur annually, and though Keqiang directly asked Mr. Tru- for ways to create mutual advan- ades. More than 80 per cent of
na ambitions come at a time its they are not directly related to deau, in a phone call, to “relax tage.” those surveyed said they feel less
trade negotiators and diplomatic free-trade talks, they are expect- the restrictions on high-tech China has in recent months welcome in China than in the
leadership have been heavily ed to play a role in setting broad- exports to China,” Chinese state attempted to cast itself as a lead- past, citing rising protectionism
focused on the United States. Mr. er economic priorities between media reported. ing champion of globalization. as one of the reasons.

CJF J-TALKS: JOURNALISM MATTERS. #CJFjtalk Party-girl stereotype may have


THE MEDIA AS OPPOSITION: led to man’s acquittal: review
COVERING TRUMP IN A POST-TRUTH ERA In .....................................................................................................................................

They are among the world’s most unrelenting truth Partnership


with ADINA BRESGE HALIFAX and the woman’s legs were rest-
seekers. In their first live joint appearance, these renowned, ................................................................ ing on the back of the front buck-
award-winning journalists and authors will discuss the The stereotype of the “promiscu- et seats.
pressing need to apply constant, critical pressure on an ous party girl” may have factored Mr. Al-Rawi’s pants were
American president who threatens the very fabric of ONE EVENING into the acquittal of a Halifax cab undone at the waist and his zip-
democracy, journalism, civil society and the truth. TWO TALKS driver accused of sexually
assaulting a woman in his car, a
per was down a couple of inches,
the officer said. Evidence of the
review of the case suggests. woman’s DNA was found on Mr.
In a draft paper submitted to Al-Rawi’s upper lip, but the ori-
Canadian Bar Review, Dalhousie gin of the bodily fluid couldn’t be
law professor Elaine Craig says identified.
Justice Gregory Lenehan de- Prof. Craig suggests the judge
served much of the widespread may have been influenced by
backlash he received following defence lawyer Luke Craggs’s sug-
the acquittal of taxi driver Bas- gestion that the woman becomes
sam Al-Rawi in March. a different “type of person” when
While falling short of judicial she consumes large quantities of
misconduct, Prof. Craig contends alcohol, including invoking Jekyll
the Nova Scotia provincial judge and Hyde to contrast the wom-
GLENN GREENWALD NAOMI KLEIN AMY GOODMAN JEREMY SCAHILL erred in his assessment of the an’s behaviour in her drunk and
case, but also suggests that the sober states.
In this two-part Toronto event, our first discussion features Crown and defence lawyers may “The inference [Mr. Craggs] in-
Amy Goodman, host and executive producer of Democracy share responsibility for allowing vited Judge Lenehan to draw was
“legally rejected” stereotypes to that the complainant is a woman
Now! ; Naomi Klein, journalist and syndicated columnist; seep into the courtroom unchal- transformed by the consumption
Glenn Greenwald, Pulitzer-prize winner and co-founder lenged. of alcohol into an irrational, un-
of The Intercept ; and Jeremy Scahill, war correspondent Mr. Al-Rawi, 40, was charged inhibited person, who might
and co-founder of The Intercept . Their conversation will be after police found the woman, in quite imaginably enter the taxi of
HANNAH SUNG
moderated by Hannah Sung, video and podcast producer her 20s, passed out and partially an unknown man, and immedi-
MODERATOR for The Globe and Mail . naked in his car in the early ately [or almost] remove her
hours of May 23, 2015. clothing, throw her shoes, urine-
ROY T I CK E T S : “It is difficult not to question soaked pants and underwear at
TORONTO THOMSON HALL VISIT THE ROY THOMSON HALL BOX
whether Judge Lenehan’s specu-
lation, implausible conclusions
him, and perhaps kiss or lick his
face,” Prof. Craig said. “The logic
MAY 24, 6:30PM 60 SIMCOE STREET
OFFICE, ROYTHOMSONHALL.COM
OR CALL 416-872-HALL
and legally incorrect reasoning of this stereotype turns on the
were informed by the stereotype assumption that drunk women
that unchaste women, or promis- will have sex with anyone, any-
The second discussion features cuous party girls, will consent to where, any time.”
Matt Taibbi, author of the recently sex with anyone,” Prof. Craig Mr. Craggs submitted evidence
published Insane Clown President: wrote. “How could such a porno- at trial suggesting the woman
Dispatches from the 2016 Circus and graphic, hypersexualized account was acting flirtatious at a bar
contributing editor to Rolling Stone, of human female behaviour arise before the alleged incident took
in conversation with David Walmsley, in a legal proceeding in 2017?” place, which Prof. Craig said
editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, on Prof. Craig said Justice Lenehan should have been ruled inadmis-
journalism’s response to this ongoing overlooked substantial circum- sible under a section of Canada’s
circus and chaotic presidency. stantial evidence suggesting that Criminal Code that bans using a
the woman did not consent to person’s sexual history to draw
DAVID WALMSLEY Taibbi’s book, along with the latest books from our other
MATT TAIBBI MODERATOR speakers, will be available for purchase at the event.
sexual activity with Mr. Al-Rawi. inferences about his or her will-
During Mr. Al-Rawi’s trial in ingness to consent. The evidence
December and January, a police was not flagged by the judge or
www.cjf-fjc.ca | info@cjf-fjc.ca constable testified that she saw Crown, Prof. Craig said.
Mr. Al-Rawi shoving the woman’s Prof. Craig suggested reforms
urine-soaked pants and under- such as mandatory sexual-assault
WITH THANKS TO: The Lavin Agency wear between the front seats. training for judges.
................................................................
At the time of his arrest, Mr. Al-
Rawi’s seat was partially reclined The Canadian Press
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BlackBerry Classic, Sony Xperia Z3, Sony Xperia Z5, Sony Xperia Z5 Premium, Sony Xperia XA, Sony Xperia X Performance, Moto X Play, Moto Z. Amount of rebate depends on the value of the phone. Device must power on and be functional. See bell.ca/tradein for details. (3) This device has been tested and received an IP (Ingress Protection)
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A8 • NEWS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

Folio: The Unremembered

Anita Cenerini holds a portrait of her


son Private Thomas Welch, with Pte.
Welch’s stepfather, Grant Palmer,
left, and brother, Jacob Cenerini-
Palmer, at their Winnipeg home in
October, 2016. Pte. Welch died by
suicide in May, 2004, three months
after returning from Afghanistan.
LYLE STAFFORD/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

FROM PAGE 1

Military: Soldier’s mother knew a military investigation had taken place, but was never told
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 “Having these boards of


inquiry, especially when
there is a death of a military
Several families of soldiers lost
to suicide have told The Globe
they felt marginalized by the
man with a cool head. He
worked hard and rarely com-
plained, even when performing
his term expired on Aug. 27,
2004.
But he felt pressure to stay
member, can at the end of the inquiry process – and even tar- I would hear one thing and mundane tasks, his military and was torn by the decision he
day save lives. There are lessons geted for blame in some cases. then go to another person mates said after his death. Small had to make. In fact, paperwork
learned. They are incredibly Unlike a provincial coroner’s in stature, he was the L’il Troop- recommending his military con-
important,” he said. inquest, military inquiries are and hear something else. It er with a big heart and subtle tract be extended was presented
Ms. Cenerini suspects her son closed to the public and media. just made it unbearable. sense of humour. He often to him in Afghanistan. A memo
................................................................
was struggling with post-trau- played with the Afghan children dated Nov. 6, 2003, states: “Pte.
matic stress disorder. He was Pte. Welch grew up in Manitou- Anita Cenerini who trailed behind the soldiers Welch is a very good soldier and
constantly angry and agitated wadge, a remote northwestern Private Thomas Welch’s mother during patrols of Kabul. He gave valued member of his platoon.
after his return from Afghani- Ontario township surrounded by the kids Werther’s caramels and He is [a] team player who goes
stan and was haunted by night- vast forests speckled with lakes. other candies that his mom out of his way to ensure that
mares. His relationship with his A gold rush surged through the sent in a steady stream of care platoon morale is high. He has
girlfriend was also floundering, region in the 1980s, drawing packages. proven himself a solid and de-
and he was drinking a lot. miners such as his father, Dan- Back at home, though, his pendable soldier … Pte. Welch is
A military inquiry could have iel Welch. family noticed troubling signs. recommended for re-engage-
uncovered what factors contri- With the wilderness at his During his two-week leave in ment.”
buted to Pte. Welch’s suicide doorstep, Pte. Welch developed the fall, he was sullen and with- Military documents that Ms.
and whether there were some a love for the outdoors, often drawn. Two soldiers from his Cenerini kept show that her son
early key lessons for Canada on hiking, camping and fishing battalion were killed during his refused to extend his army con-
caring for soldiers after their Af- with his younger sister, break, but he didn’t want to tract on April 7, 2004. But in
ghanistan tours – deployments Michelle. “We were always close. talk about it. He just wanted to the call before the Mother’s Day
that continued for a decade He was a protective older broth- go out, get drunk and forget. weekend in Thunder Bay, he
after the private’s death. er,” she said. “He was a completely different told her that he’d changed his
Yet, the Forces confirmed last Pte. Welch wanted to make a person,” his sister recalled, the mind and re-signed with the
week that no board of inquiry career out of protecting others. memory bringing her to tears. military that very day. He said
ever took place. Only a lesser He had plans to become a po- “He didn’t have any emotions. he had a car to pay for and
summary investigation was con- lice officer and thought military He was very angry. He acted like talked about wanting to get
ducted, and its findings were experience would help him. He he didn’t care about us and he married and have kids some
never divulged to Pte. Welch’s signed up for the army on Aug. was drinking heavily.” day.
family. 27, 2001. Fifteen days later, the He grew more distant in His mother and stepfather
The investigation report, world changed. phone conversations after were uneasy with his decision
which the military has retrieved The recent high-school gradu- returning to Afghanistan. A Ca- and didn’t know what to make
from the government’s Library ate was with his mother and nadian solider attempted to kill of his change of mind. It was
and Archives Canada after The baby brother when the smoul- ................................................................ himself during the deployment, the last time they heard from
Globe made several inquiries dering World Trade Center tow- which angered Pte. Welch, his him.
last year, will soon be presented ers appeared on their television mother said. Then, on Jan. 27, “We replay the conversation
to the family, a military spokes- screen. Nearly 3,000 people 2004, Corporal Jamie Murphy over and over again,” Mr. Pal-
person said. Major Giselle Hol- were killed in the al-Qaeda- was killed and three other Ca- mer said.
................................................................
land said the army will “do our orchestrated attack. nadian soldiers were wounded
utmost to answer any questions “I’m going to have to go to by a suicide bomber while on Nearly a year after her son’s sui-
they might have.” war, mom,” his mother recalled patrol. Pte. Welch was in tears cide, Ms. Cenerini sent a note to
Boards of inquiry into military him saying. She began crying on the phone the next day: “He the only e-mail address in his
suicides were not mandatory in and pleaded with him to drop said that should have been me, Yahoo account that didn’t
2004, but had been carried out out of the military. “They need mom. That should have been belong to a family member. She
in other cases. Rules were me now more than ever, mom,” me.” found the account on his com-
changed in August, 2008, mak- he told her, draping his arm Pte. Welch and Cpl. Murphy puter, which she’d finally
ing inquiries the standard in over her shoulder. were both rear gunners, he received back from the military.
deaths by suicide. But practices In August, 2003, the fresh- explained. Pte. Welch’s platoon “I don’t know who you are –
remain inconsistent and the faced soldier deployed to Kabul was supposed to be on that but I wonder if you could share
robustness of the internal prob- with the 3rd Battalion of the fateful patrol, but the schedule with me what kind of relation-
es varies. Royal Canadian Regiment, part changed. She tried to comfort ship you had with Thomas,” she
More than 70 Afghanistan war of Canada’s contribution to the her son, but he was devastated. wrote. “Thomas took his own
veterans have killed themselves NATO mission formed after a She could feel him slipping life. If there is anything you can
after serving in the mission, The U.S.-led invasion removed the away. share with me to help me put
Globe’s continuing probe of mil- Taliban government from power. Pte. Welch never planned to the pieces together I would cer-
itary suicides has found. Many Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaeda or- be in the army beyond his ini- tainly be incredibly grateful. Sor-
were dealing with PTSD or other ganization had been based in tial three-year contract. A 2002 ry, if this news is a shock to
mental illnesses connected to Afghanistan. work evaluation notes that he you.”
their deployments. Pte. Welch was a trusted rifle- wanted to go to college when She was searching for answers
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O NEWS • A9

Anita Cenerini holds her late


son’s beret. Ms. Cenerini
suspects Private Thomas Welch
was struggling with post-
traumatic stress disorder. He
was constantly agitated after
his return from Afghanistan and
was haunted by nightmares.
LYLE STAFFORD/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

d of its results and didn’t receive a copy of the coroner’s report


........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

because she had received scant seen as trivializing the impor- 2005. “I will understand if you arrived in Ms. Cenerini’s inbox
information from the military. tance of the event, an event feel this is ‘too little, too late,’ the day after she wrote to the
Pte. Welch hanged himself that will invariably be of but I hope you will agree that if stranger. He said he’d been
inside his room at the Petawa- In terms of optics, choosing a momentous consequence to the we discover even a small piece transferred to Pte. Welch’s sec-
wa base, northwest of Ottawa. Summary Investigation over families of the deceased and to of the puzzle that helps us in- tion and served with him in Af-
In the days after his death, con- the military community,” Mr. tervene and prevent a recur- ghanistan. They patrolled
flicting stories and rumours the more concerted effort Marin wrote in his 2004 report. rence of this kind of tragedy in together almost every day and
swirled about what happened involved in a Board of Ms. Cenerini kept trying to get the future, it has to be benefi- night. In quiet times, he said,
the night he died. His parents Inquiry can be seen as at the truth – a pursuit that cial.” Pte. Welch talked about how
heard their son had been drink- eventually wore her down. On Pieces of a puzzle that a board smart his younger brother was
ing and was upset with his ex- trivializing the importance of Feb. 16, 2005, she wrote to then- of inquiry could have put and shared stories about his sis-
girlfriend and some friends. An- the event, an event that will Lieutenant-Colonel Donald together, if one had been called. ter. He also talked about leaving
other story suggested he was Denne, the commanding officer Mr. Denne declined an inter- the army and going back to
instead pining over an old love. invariably be of momentous of her son’s battalion, to express view request to talk about why school.
A military chaplain told them consequence to the families concerns about her son’s mental a summary investigation was “Thom was an ideal soldier
one thing, and another told of the deceased and to the health and depressive state in ordered instead of an inquiry. but an even better person,” he
them something else. When Afghanistan. He said the military should told Ms. Cenerini. “I knew right
they got his computer back military community. It’s clear from his response to have all the pertinent records. away that he would be a
from the military, they found a her that not much effort had “For me to try to remember genuine friend in an organiza-
loving letter to his ex-girlfriend, André Marin been made to talk with Pte. the factors that led to a decision tion where friendships were
but it appeared to have been Former military ombudsman, Welch’s family or friends about that long ago would be conjec- often not so sincere. I turned
edited after he died, Ms. Ceneri- in a 2004 report his mental state. The comman- ture at best,” he wrote. “I sin- out to be correct.”
ni said. der promised to send a copy of cerely hope that Private Welch’s He said Pte. Welch’s suicide
They even heard speculation Ms. Cenerini’s letter to the new family, some of whom I met in was a shock to everyone. He
that Pte. Welch had been killed. commanding officer of the 3rd Winnipeg with my RSM [regi- regretted not inquiring more
“I would hear one thing and Battalion of the Royal Canadian mental sergeant major] before I forcefully about what had hap-
then go to another person and Regiment. relinquished command of the pened to his friend.
hear something else,” Ms. Cene- “I hope you know that had I battalion, can find closure “Don’t stop asking questions if
rini said. “It just made it known of his state of mind, I through communication with you need answers,” he implored
unbearable.” would have brought considera- the Department of National Ms. Cenerini.
She knew a military investiga- ble influence to bear to ensure Defence.” Nearly 13 years after her son’s
tion had taken place, but was proper treatment was provided,” An e-mail from Pte. Welch’s suicide, she hopes those an-
never told of its results, nor did the Lt.-Col. wrote on March 30, mysterious Yahoo contact swers are finally near.
she receive a copy of the coro-
ner’s report. No one talked to
her about holding a board of ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

inquiry. In August, 2003, Private Thomas


Inquiries into military deaths Welch deployed to Kabul with the
by suicide were not mandatory 3rd Battalion of the Royal Canadian
then, but were often carried out Regiment, part of Canada’s
to identify gaps and measures contribution to the NATO mission
that could help prevent other formed after a U.S.-led invasion
deaths. Indeed, boards of inqui- removed the Taliban government
ry had been held for much less from power. COURTESY OF ANITA CENERINI
serious incidents, such as the
case of a missing parachute, for-
mer military ombudsman André
Marin noted in a rebuke of the
inquiry system in December,
2004.
For Mr. Marin, a summary
investigation – the probe chosen
for Pte. Welch’s death – was not
an adequate substitute for a
board of inquiry, which has the
power to gather evidence and
hear from witnesses.
“In terms of optics, choosing a
Summary Investigation over the
more concerted effort involved
in a Board of Inquiry can be
A10 • OPINION O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

The subject who is truly loyal to the chief magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures — JUNIUS

PHILLIP CRAWLEY, PUBLISHER AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


DAVID WALMSLEY, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

SINCLAIR STEWART, DEPUTY EDITOR

DEREK DeCLOET, EXECUTIVE EDITOR • EDITOR, REPORT ON BUSINESS


KEVIN SIU, HEAD OF EXPERIENCE
CYNTHIA YOUNG, HEAD OF AUDIENCE

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

FREE TRADE

Trump milks
Canada’s sacred cow
................................................................................................................................

A merican President Donald Trump’s repeated outbursts last


week about Canada’s “very unfair” treatment of Wisconsin
dairy farmers is simple to explain: Someone waved a press release
from the U.S. dairy lobby under his nose and gave him a whiff of
something he could grandstand on.
Typical Trumpian bombast? Sure. But here’s the thing: While Mr.
Trump probably has little idea of the details of the case, the issue
he raised is legitimate. And on this issue, Mr. Trump is more right
than wrong.
Dairy farmers in Wisconsin and New York State sent a letter to
the White House earlier this month, complaining that they have
been hurt by an unfair price-fixing decision from Canada’s all-pow-
erful and highly protected milk cartel.
They have a case. The cartel’s decision, as with all its moves, ben-
efits dairy farmers at the expense of everyone else – Canadian con-
sumers, in particular.
The story goes like this: The Canadian Dairy Commission and
provincial marketing boards set prices for milk and milk products
based on production costs that aren’t grounded in market reality.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Milk production is strictly controlled by quotas that guarantee ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

farmers an annual income. At the same time, steep tariffs restrict Housing: A, B, see? eral thousand housing units cerned about their safety, like
where people want to live and Ibrahim Hindy, an imam in Miss-
the import of competing dairy products from outside Canada. This
help bring down pricing. issauga, simply because of sug-
................................................................
means there is limited market incentive to be as efficient as possi- Is that possible? Of course not: gesting an opportunity to have
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, We can’t imagine the government equal accommodations for all
ble.
like B.C. Premier Christy Clark, expropriating land on that scale students. It seems that critics are
The supply-management system is hugely beneficial to a relative- continues to pussyfoot around to increase density. Hence, our not only against the idea of reli-
the issue of housing affordability, resorting to plowing under more gious accommodations in the
ly small number of farmers, but it raises costs for millions of con-
while doing nothing to address farmland in the outer suburbs. Peel District School Board, but
sumers. A C.D. Howe Institute study found that, between 2005 and the real problem. Scapegoating – Emile van Nispen, Toronto they are contributing to the anti-
................................................................
foreign investors is easy, because Muslim hate.
2011, the price differential between Canada and the U.S. for milk,
they can’t vote. But they are also Religious accommodations are
eggs and cheese ranged from 29 to 77 per cent. not necessarily the problem. Stop dithering already present in the school cal-
What is the problem, is real endar as we receive days off for
The higher prices also hurt processing companies that produce
estate speculators, foreign and Good Friday and Christmas, and
domestic, driving up home prices ................................................................
dairy-based products like cheese, frozen pizza and yogurt. They’re no one seems to be against that.
while the rest of us and our kids Re Criminal-Pardon Fee A ‘Signif- However, as soon as we look for
saddled with artificially high prices for their basic ingredients.
get stuck with the costs. The icant’ Barrier (April 21): Public other accommodations, people
But then one day these processing companies found a loophole direct way to deal with this is a Safety Minister Ralph Goodale are using this issue to step up the
tax on speculative capital gains was briefed by officials in Septem- anti-Muslim rhetoric, which is
in the North American free-trade agreement that allowed them to
on real estate from short-term ber, 2016, that the pardon fee is becoming a great concern to the
import skim-milk solids and ultra-filtered milk “ingredients” from flipping: 100 per cent for less than “an insurmountable financial Muslim communities.
a year, 95 per cent for less than burden.” Seven months later, the – Fuad Khayer, Toronto
the U.S. at prices below those set by Canadian marketing boards. ................................................................
two years, and so on, until the parole board is “exploring …
Suddenly, New York and Wisconsin farmers had a new market in activity stops, and the economy is options.” What a sparkling dem-
Canada that today is estimated to be worth as much as $150-mil-
brought back to stability. onstration of the pathetically gla- A grateful vet
Premiers Clark and Wynne are cial pace at which government
lion (U.S.) a year. so busy protecting those who bureaucrats operate. If I did my
profit from flipping that their job this slowly, I wouldn’t have ................................................................
So what did the marketing boards do? Starting last year, in a
supposed measures are complete- one. Stop dithering and help poor Re Family Seeks To Reclaim Veter-
move that began in Ontario and has spread across the country, ly ineffective. If the provincial people improve their lives. an’s Medal (April 18): I was de-
premiers don’t have the guts to – Christopher Price, Toronto lighted to read about the family
provincial marketing boards are now letting dairy farmers sell ................................................................
do it, where are Vancouver Mayor seeking to reclaim a veteran’s
these ingredients at the lowest available international market Gregor Robertson and Toronto medal after its loss 40 years ago. I
price.
Mayor John Tory when they could Milk, markets had a similar experience with my
be doing more? two British Army service medals,
The upshot for farmers in Mr. Trump’s country is that they have – Malcolm McSporran, Vancouver which were stolen when our
................................................................ ................................................................ home was broken into while we
seen lucrative contracts with Canadian processing companies dis-
I am confused. Ontario’s “multi- The price of milk in the United were at the Santa Claus Parade.
appear overnight. pronged” attack on the housing States has plummeted 40 per Forty years later, I, too, spotted
problem includes: cent, and American producers them on an auction site. A repre-
For Canadians consumers, however, this price-fixing adds insult
a) A five-year, $125-million plan need a place to move it. Read: sentative of the auction house in
to the injury already caused by supply management. Now the only to “encourage construction of dump it (U.S. Farmers Sour On London, Ont., was most helpful in
new rental buildings” and Canadian Dairy: The Final Nail In retrieving them from the last pur-
people in this country who are allowed to purchase dairy products
b) imposing rent control on all Supply Management’s Coffin? – chaser, who I am sure did not
at actual market prices are those in the dairy industry. The rest of rental units. Report on Business, April 21). want to possess stolen goods.
I looked in my old Economics So, let’s get on board with the I am still grateful for the won-
us are stuck with artificially inflated prices for the milk that we put
101 text to figure out how “b” Americans, and have an up-and- derful efficiency of yet another of
in our coffee before going to work at jobs that aren’t conveniently could encourage “a” without suc- down, now-collapsing, now-high- our auction houses.
cess. I’ll have to check my grand- flying milk market that puts – Rodney Travers-Griffin, Toronto
located behind impregnable walls of market protection. ................................................................
son’s more advanced literature. farmers on the sidelines and of-
Canada’s ambassador to the U.S., David MacNaughton, fired off a – Andrzej Derkowski, professional fers consumers erratic pricing?
letter of protest to the governors of Wisconsin and New York on
urban planner (retired), Oakville, Let’s accept milk that contains History: ins and outs
Ont. highly questionable growth hor-
................................................................
Wednesday that squarely placed the plight of their farmers on U.S. mones. Let’s put Canadian milk
producers out of work. Let’s join ................................................................
I am delighted to see rent control
policies. He accused U.S. farmers of overproduction that has contri-
expanded. It’s hard enough trying the world of oversupply with the Writing about the reaction to the
buted to lower prices, a claim that has some truth in it. to make the rent without worry- Americans, Australians and New CBC series, Canada: The Story of
ing about double-digit hikes, Zealanders. Let’s turn our back on Us, Mark Kingwell rightly com-
It’s also true that New York and Wisconsin’s biggest trading part-
especially after going through a an industry that has consistently plains about the presumption
ner is Canada. The two states export about $20-billion worth of pa- bidding war where we “offered” provided Canadians with excel- that, in speaking or writing, one
(it felt more like extortion!) over lent quality milk, produced close should not leave anything out
per products, plastics, car parts, aluminum and other things to our
the posted rent to get the place by your neighbourhood, by indi- (The Real Story Of Us: We Can’t
country every year. The milk ingredients market is a very small after losing out on two others. viduals who raise families, and Agree On Anything, April 20).
– Nancy Saunders, Toronto pay taxes that help all of us. Gertrude Stein made the same
part of that; this is not exactly the smartest issue for Mr. Trump to ................................................................
Let’s further support the empty- point decades ago. She had been
start a trade war over. Having lived in several European ing of our rural communities. invited to give a lecture at Oxford
countries has allowed us to see – Peter McAuslan, Sutton, Que. on contemporary literature, and
But Mr. MacNaughton did not address the fact that Canada has ................................................................
how different societies handle the first question when she fin-
proved to be an undependable NAFTA partner by allowing its dairy housing issues. Here, it seems ished was, “What about the wom-
marketing boards to adjust prices at a whim in order to stem com-
that in our urban planning, we Anti-Muslim talk an question?” Stein’s reply, as
are handcuffed within a box of related by historian Tony Judt,
petition from the U.S. our own making. should be posted on every college
................................................................ notice board: “Not everything can
For example, in the unlikely
The U.S. dairy lobby has been calling on Washington to respond.
event of a downtown subway re- Re School’s Muslim Support be about everything.”
Two other Canadian trading partners also fed up with Canada’s lief line going ahead (say along a Sparks Death Threat (April 19): Time to chill, I think.
significant portion of Pape Ave- I am a student in the Toronto Dis- – Hamar Foster, Victoria
milk cartel – Australia and New Zealand – say they will support the ................................................................
nue), would it be possible to ex- trict School Board. I am from a
U.S. if it takes its complaint to the World Trade Organization. propriate the land on both sides Muslim family and I am becom- Letters to the Editor should be
of the street, give owners a fair ing increasingly concerned about exclusive to The Globe and Mail.
Mr. Trump is no free-trader. His only answer to the challenges of
premium over market value and the acceptance of different Include name, address and daytime
a globalized world is to build walls, regulatory and literal. It is very rebuild with five- to six-storey, religions after hearing about phone number. Keep letters under
mixed-use buildings of retail, some of the threats associated 150 words. Letters may be edited
hard to sympathize with him on anything, let alone on trade.
condo, rental and subsidized with Islamophobia. for length and clarity.
But as anti-liberal and self-serving as he is, he’s got nothing on housing? That would provide sev- No one deserves to feel con- E-mail: letters@globeandmail.com
Canada’s milk cartel. Were he to imagine his perfect business ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

model, it would no doubt look very much like our dairy industry. If EDITORIAL MASTHEAD
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................
his trade policies in some way help to end supply management, he
GABE GONDA, HEAD OF FEATURES, OPINION AND SPORTS ANGELA PACIENZA, HEAD OF NEWSROOM DEVELOPMENT
will be doing Canadians a favour. NATASHA HASSAN, OPINION EDITOR DEVIN SLATER, HEAD OF EDITORIAL DESIGN
TONY KELLER, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR SYLVIA STEAD, PUBLIC EDITOR
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O OPINION • A11

OPINION
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

THE GLOBE WAS FOUNDED IN 1844. THE MAIL WAS FOUNDED IN 1872.

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

The jig is up for Canada’s school boards


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

tions that mobilizing your friends Yet, provincial governments nev- their individual and collective grown adults to act their age. So
and relatives to get to the polls is er seem to learn the lessons of judgement.” the solution is not more and
often enough to become a trustee. these fiascos. Of course, Ms. Hunter promised smaller school boards. It is zero
If you are strategic and win the The latest case of School Board a crackdown, issuing 22 directives school boards.
backing of a teachers’ union or Theatrics 101 involves the York and ordering the board to clean In today’s education system, in
church group, you are all but Region District School Board, up its act. Last week, the board which budgets, curriculum and
KONRAD YAKABUSKI guaranteed a board seat for life. whose trustees were described as dismissed the director of educa- teaching credentials are handled
kyakabuski@globeandmail.com That will allow you to travel to providing “far from strong and tion it was questioned for hiring at the provincial level, school
Europe on the taxpayers’ dime to ethical leadership” in a recent in the first place. Perhaps York boards are an anachronism and
................................................................
participate in “exploratory learn- provincially commissioned trustees can be publicly shamed have few substantive responsibil-

T he Ontario Public School


Boards Association has a
handy explainer on its website for
ing opportunities” no matter how
farcical that description. It will
allow you to throw your weight
review. That is an understatement
in itself, considering the board’s
inaction after one trustee
into behaving for a while. At least
until the media move on to the
train crash unfolding at some oth-
ities. Most of what they do could
be transferred to individual
school principals, parents’ com-
anyone wondering why these around, bully board staff and described a black parent in public er broken school board. mittees or the province.
archaic entities even exist in 2017. swear a blue streak at the office using the N-word. A 2015 advisory panel report on Not that abolishing them is easy
“School trustees play an indis- with relative impunity. “Rather than remaining focused the Toronto District School Board politics. Quebec’s current Liberal
pensable role in preserving our Sure, the pay’s not great. But on student achievement and well- led by former mayor Barbara Hall government tried, tabling legisla-
democratic heritage,” it says, ig- you can’t beat it for the free trips, being, the board continues to be recommended that if the TDSB tion in 2015 to replace the prov-
noring the elephant in the class- be they of the European or power consumed by infighting and per- continued on its dysfunctional ince’s 72 elected school boards
room. variety. sonal clashes, and even in the track, it be broken up into as with school councils made up of
The truth is that most school That is, until someone higher midst of this review, infighting many as three smaller boards. Yet, parents, principals, teachers and
boards offer a sorry spectacle of up clues in to the obvious: You continued,” reviewers Patrick it is far from clear that smaller community representatives. The
Canadian democracy in action. need adult supervision. The num- Case and Suzanne Herbert wrote boards are any less dysfunctional English boards protested that
They cannot even govern them- ber of cases of provincial educa- in their report this month to On- than bigger ones. they had a constitutional right to
selves, much less look out for the tion ministers being forced to tario Education Minister Mitzie The Waterloo Region District exist. The French boards lobbied
students in their charge. They are intervene directly in the manage- Hunter. “We found the lack of School Board is a fraction of the just as hard for their survival and
plagued by petty ideological bat- ment of dysfunctional school concern over the public reaction size of the TDSB. So is the English- the government abandoned its
tles, personality conflicts, incivili- boards, even firing entire slates of to their travel expenditures quite language Lester B. Pearson School bill within months, preferring to
ty and sheer incompetence. trustees, keeps growing. From astounding. There was no sense Board in suburban Montreal. Yet focus on less divisive topics.
So few Canadians actually turn Halifax to Vancouver, this pathet- that they appreciated the fact the they, too, have been plagued by But one lost opportunity should
out to vote in school board elec- ic pattern keeps repeating itself. public was seriously questioning the same apparent inability of not be the end of a good cause.

It’s more than a housing crisis


Lost in the hysteria over prices is urban inequality, and the loss of middle-class neighbourhoods that powered the Canadian Dream
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Montreal have the highest levels The problem has serious politi-
of income inequality and have cal repercussions, as well. The
seen the largest and fastest in- deepening geographic divides
creases over the past several dec- that define it are behind the rise
ades. But the key feature of the of populism in the form of Brexit
new crisis is the decline of the in Britain and Donald Trump’s
RICHARD FLORIDA middle class and of the once stur- rise in the United States. Cana-
Author of The New Urban Crisis dy middle-class neighbourhoods dians may rest easy with Justin
and director of cities at the Martin that were the platforms of the Ca- Trudeau as Prime Minister and a
Prosperity Institute at the nadian Dream. As the pioneering great crop of mayors. But remem-
University of Toronto’s Rotman research of my University of ber that Toronto was one of the
School of Management Toronto colleague David Hul- first places in the world to experi-
chanski documents, middle-class ence the populist backlash that
................................................................
neighbourhoods, which made up propelled Rob Ford into the may-

I n recent years, the young, edu-


cated and affluent have surged
back into cities, reversing decades
two-thirds of all Toronto neigh-
bourhoods in 1970, fell to fewer
than 30 per cent by 2005. The
or’s office.
It is imperative that Canada and
its major cities aggressively
of suburban flight and urban trend is similar in Vancouver and address this crisis. The federal
decline. And yet, all is not well. Montreal and across Canada. Liberals made reducing inequali-
The very same forces that power The crisis is shaped by a funda- ty and rebuilding the middle
the growth of our great cities On the basis of cost-to-income, Vancouver is the world’s third-least mental contradiction of today’s class, as well as infrastructure and
have generated a crisis of gentrifi- affordable city and Toronto is ninth. It is imperative that Canada address great cities. The clustering of affordable-housing investments,
cation, rising inequality and in- this crisis proactively and aggressively. JONATHAN HAYWARD/THE CANADIAN PRESS industry, economic activity and central to their campaign plat-
creasingly unaffordable urban talented people in cities, which is form. But Canada’s cities need to
housing. run you more than a million dol- phia housing-affordability survey, the fundamental engine of inno- take a more proactive role if they
The new urban crisis is different lars – $1.7-million in Greater Van- seven of Canada’s largest 40 met- vation and economic growth, hope to tackle the root of the
from the older urban crisis of the couver and $1.2-million in Greater ro areas are severely unafforda- also carves deep divides into our problem. Only by increasing den-
1960s and 70s. That previous cri- Toronto though it will set you ble, 10 are seriously unaffordable, cities and our society. As the sity and building affordable hous-
sis was defined by the economic back even more than $1.56-mil- 13 are moderately unaffordable affluent and advantaged return to ing, upgrading low-wage service
abandonment of cities and their lion in the city of Toronto proper. and 10 are unaffordable. cities, they colonize the best loca- work into family-supporting jobs,
loss of economic function. But Still, Canadians like to think This housing-cost squeeze hits tions – in and around the urban and investing in better transit in-
the new crisis is, in many ways, housing in their major cities is hardest at low-wage blue-collar centre, around transit, close to frastructure to connect more peo-
an outgrowth of urban success. more affordable than, say, Lon- and service workers who have knowledge institutions and ple and places to its centres of
The predicament can be seen in don or New York. And while an just $11,500 and $26,400 left over around amenities like parks and employment can our cities hope
the dramatic growth in housing apartment or townhouse in Man- after paying for housing com- waterfronts, while the less advan- to combat this crisis.
prices and the even more dramat- hattan or central London will pared to knowledge, professional taged are pushed out into the fur- Despite the challenges they
ic decline in housing affordability, cost more in dollars or pounds and creative workers who have ther reaches of the suburbs and face, Canada’s great cities remain
especially in cities like Toronto than one in Vancouver or Toron- $45,000 left over. exurbs or the disconnected and the country’s basic engines of
and Vancouver. In both, the to, both suffer from serious un- Inequality is another key disadvantaged areas of the city. innovation, wealth and progress.
median price of a detached sin- affordability based on the actual dimension of the problem. Cana- Canada’s major metropolitan Ultimately, the solution is more –
gle-family home will now set you incomes people make. On a hous- da ranks fifth of 15 advanced areas are fragmenting into a new not less – urbanism. Getting there
back easily over $1-million. ing-cost-to-income basis, Vancou- countries on income inequality. kind of patchwork metropolis, requires that we shift from the
In Vancouver, the average ver is the world’s third-least- The top 1 per cent earn more than with small areas of concentrated current lopsided and unequal
home costs $1.2-million dollars. affordable city, and Toronto is 10 times as much as the average advantage surrounded by much model of winner-take-all urban-
in Greater Toronto, it’s more than ninth. But this crisis extends Canadian. But inequality is even larger spans of concentrated dis- ism to fairer and fuller urbanism
$750,000. In both cities, a beyond just these two superstar worse in Canada’s cities and met- advantage that span city and sub- that all workers and residents can
detached single family home will cities. According to a Demogra- ro areas. Toronto, Vancouver and urbs alike. benefit from.

Why we need agenda-free science more than ever


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

TIMOTHY CAULFIELD ence-free noise. But now it seems will be counting on the science- it is a body of knowledge.” Science modernism, Thomas Kuhn and
Canada Research Chair in health more pervasive and persuasive informed craft to land safely at a is not a list of facts. It is not a Michel Foucault. I am fully aware
law and policy at the University of than ever before. A recent survey, science-informed airport.) building, an industry or a govern- that there have always been social
Alberta, a Trudeau Fellow and for example, found that 28 per Similarly, we probably all know ment department. It is not the forces, corporate interests and po-
author of Is Gwyneth Paltrow cent of Canadians still believe or someone who becomes enraged arrogant researcher who thinks litical agendas that twist how sci-
Wrong About Everything?: are uncertain about the 100-per- when people don’t accept the sci- he knows everything or the in- ence is done and how it is
When Celebrity Culture cent debunked link between vac- entific consensus on climate spiring one who seems to. And it represented. But these failings
And Science Clash cines and autism (no, no, and change but, at the same time, that is not a tool in service of a partic- should not be viewed as a con-
no!). individual will enthusiastically ular ideology. Science is a process. demnation of science. Rather,
................................................................
Despite these numbers, when reject the just-as-strong scientific It is a way of seeing the world. they should be viewed as a call to

W e need more science. We


need better science. We
need trustworthy science. We
asked, most people will say that
they do trust science. But, for
many, they trust only the science
consensus on the safety of GMOs.
And there often seems a kind of
willful blindness to the supernat-
Some studies have shown that
reinforcing scientific thinking –
such as explaining the basics of
action to protect science and to
make it better.
At the Edmonton March for Sci-
need agenda-free science. that fits their pre-existing beliefs. ural and evidence-free underpin- causation – can be an important ence, there were numerous post-
These are just some of the mes- More problematic, they find ways nings of many of the increasingly tool in the fight against pseudo- ers mocking Trump and
sages I heard again and again at to dismiss the science that popular (and, too frequently, science. Others have found that anti-vaxxers. Others heralded sci-
Edmonton’s March for Science on doesn’t. Indeed, a 2017 study government-sanctioned) alterna- fostering critical thinking, includ- ence’s big successes. And a few
Saturday. Even in Trumpless Can- found that humans are remarka- tive health practices. Do the peo- ing elucidation of the numerous called for governments to rely on
ada, there is a sense that these are bly skillful information avoiders. ple who endorse interventions forces that can twist science, can science-informed policy.
precarious times for science. This kind of unconscious cogni- like Reiki, to cite just one exam- help to inoculate people against But my favourite – which bor-
I’ve been involved in science tive tendency allows us to build ple, really believe there is a vital scientific misinformation. Of rowed from Rick and Morty, a pop-
policy for 25 years. I’ve witnessed our own realities. life-force energy that runs course, so many other factors are ular, science-themed cartoon –
the disruptive power of social While sitting on a plane 10,000 through our body that can be important – building trust, emphasized one of the reasons
media, the rise of fake news, the metres in the sky, an individual controlled by our hands? appealing to the audience’s val- that, in these incredibly divisive
growth of science-free, celebrity- can connect to the Internet and Changing minds isn’t easy. But a ues and using creative and engag- times, science is more valuable
endorsed health trends and the send social-media missives about good place to start is with an un- ing communication strategies. than ever. Science is meant to be
official legitimization of pseudo- how all knowledge is relative and derscoring of what science is and Yes, context matters. But all value-neutral and agenda-free.
science by governments and uni- that science is just one way of un- is not. knowledge is not relative. Please, The poster read: “Rise Above,
versities. derstanding the universe. (One As Carl Sagan said, “Science is a haters, there is no need for more Focus on Science.”
Yes, there has always been sci- assumes that this same individual way of thinking much more than finger-wagging references to post- Amen.
A12 • NEWS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

CHINA

Extreme workout
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

People practise tai chi on a


suspension bridge during an event
at a Beijing tourist spot on Sunday.
REUTERS

Couple arrested in Edmonton in case of dead toddler


Police say charges are pending against a man and woman after boy’s body found outside church by a passerby
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Edmonton police have arrested who was estimated to be about can Church on Tuesday morn- “My heart just really aches
a man and a woman in the case 20 months old. ing, three days before it was to think of this thing happen-
of a toddler whose body was Police did not publicly identify found by a passerby on Friday. ing,” said Marryman Porter,
found outside a church on the My heart just really aches the suspects, however, they indi- Police did not say in their who attended a bake sale and
north side of the city. to think of this thing cated they would have more to statement whether they had lunch held Saturday at the
A police statement issued Sat- say about the investigation. identified the child. Good Shepherd Anglican
urday night said the two were happening. Earlier Saturday, police An autopsy has been sched- Church.
arrested without incident in released grainy surveillance-vid- uled for Monday morning to People also stopped by to
northwest Edmonton earlier in Marryman Porter eo pictures of a man and wom- determine how the toddler died. leave flowers and a teddy bear
the evening, that they were in Edmonton resident an they were looking for in In the statement issued Satur- at the place where the child’s
police custody, and that charges connection with the case. The day night the Edmonton Police body was discovered.
were pending against both indi- pictures showed the two push- Service thanked the many peo- One woman, after laying flow-
viduals. ing a stroller as they entered a ple it said contacted them with ers, hugged another woman
The statement said investiga- store. tips, adding that no more would she’d arrived with, her eyes
tors were working to determine Investigators have said they be necessary. welling with tears.
................................................................
the exact relationship between believe the boy’s body was left The case has triggered an out-
the suspects and the little boy, near the Good Shepherd Angli- pouring of emotion in the city. The Canadian Press

WEATHER
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

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T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O NEWS • A13

FROM PAGE 1

RCMP: Commissioner doesn’t support protests, but offers words of encouragement


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 The two-month trial threat-


ens to highlight a series of
chronic issues that ordinary
announced it had filed a formal
bid, having signed up 10,000
RCMP officers. This represents a
Mounties suggest have long majority of the force.
been swept under the carpet. While the unionization process
“When it comes to equipment, could take years to play out, the
when it comes to pay, the RCMP continuing fiscal prudence of
is the dollar store of policing,” Ottawa officials has had the un-
Sgt. Backus, of the RCMP’s Sun- intended consequence of galva-
shine Coast detachment, said in nizing groups.
an interview, adding that thou- On April 5, Public Safety Min-
sands of Mounties have joined ister Ralph Goodale announced
the pant-stripe protest. Rhyming a much-anticipated retroactive
off complaints about staff shor- RCMP raise. Yet the annual pay
tages, broken squad cars and bumps of 1 per cent and 2 per
dangerous duties, the 19-year cent were so underwhelming
veteran said he is past the point that many of the fence-sitters on
of caring about the career con- the force immediately cast their
sequences of urging colleagues lots with the NPF.
to tape over a yellow stripe that “A lot of members were wait-
harks back to 19th-century ing to see whether they would
cavalry traditions. take care of us. And they
“If I get disciplined, or if I get didn’t,” says RCMP Sergeant
fired for this, it will be the Brian Sauvé, a co-chair of the
proudest moment of my RCMP NPF.
career,” he said. The NPF basically doubled in
................................................................
size in the span of that week in
Decisions in Moncton early April, Sgt. Sauvé said, to
The image of Constable Douglas lock down its majority of RCMP
Larche in his traditional RCMP members. Separately, thousands
uniform is now cast in bronze. of Mounties also joined the
In Moncton, a statue memorial- grassroots pant-stripe protest.
izes him and two other officers “They haven’t had the gap
shot dead within 20 minutes of closed in a decade and now it’s
each other. A woman places flowers at a memorial to three RCMP officers – Constables Douglas Larche, David Ross and Fabrice getting wider,” said Senator Ver-
Constable Larche’s widow says Gevaudan – who were gunned down in Moncton in June, 2014. ANDREW VAUGHAN/THE CANADIAN PRESS non White, a former RCMP assis-
she supports the pant-stripe pro- tant commissioner. “Police
test and the labour-code trial in across Canada. labour unions are polarizing. services are making $96,000 to –
the hope that they prompt dis- Labour Code charges are more They aggressively promote offi- in Calgary – $102,000 a year.”
cussion and action. typically laid against federally cer safety and salaries, but often He added that with the new
“I feel that this trial is sadly If I get disciplined, or if I get regulated corporations complicit at significant public cost. The pay raises, a first-class RCMP
needed to make it safer for po- fired for this, it will be the in accidents – for instance, farm- RCMP leadership has also lately constable would make between
lice officers,” Nadine Larche, a ing employees crushed by grain expressed fears about “militar- $86,000 and $87,000.
mother of three daughters, told proudest moment of my shipments or transport workers ization” – or the notion that po- Confronted with all this, RCMP
The Globe. RCMP career. maimed by malfunctions. lice develop a siege mentality Commissioner Bob Paulson has
On June 4, 2014, 24-year-old There is no question that the and lose vital problem-solving appealed for labour calm.
Justin Bourque donned military Sergeant Chris Backus RCMP were badly outgunned in skills if powerful weaponry and In an internal statement circu-
fatigues, grabbed his semi-auto- Royal Canadian Mounted Police Moncton. Pistols and short-range armour are always within reach. lated mid-month, Commissioner
matic rifle and marched through shotguns proved no match for The Mounties have never had Paulson told his officers he
town intent on killing police. He Mr. Bourque’s military-style rifle. to contend with a union. For didn’t support the pant-stripe
wounded two RCMP officers and Compounding the tragedy was decades, commanders in Ottawa protest, but wouldn’t discipline
killed three – Constables Larche, the fact that bigger guns had have quashed and co-opted bids subordinates for participating in
David Ross and Fabrice Gevau- been promised for years, but by the rank-and-file to organize. it.
dan – before being arrested. were not yet available to detach- With the potential to represent The retiring commissioner
Mr. Bourque is now serving ment members. “The time it nearly 18,000 cops, such an enti- urged patience, adding that
what is considered the toughest took to roll out the carbine pro- ty would be strong enough to RCMP members could probably
life-sentence – no chance of pa- ject, including the training and challenge almost all entrenched count on their “revolutionary”
role for 75 years – ever meted delivery of the weapons to police policies in Canada. But in organizing efforts to win them
out in Canada. members of the RCMP, has tak- 2015, the Supreme Court ruled it some significant salary gains in
What’s at issue during the en far too long,” reads a 2014 was unconstitutional for the the years to come.
current trial are operational postmortem report on the Mounties to be blocked from “What needs to be recognized
decisions made by senior RCMP Moncton massacre. unionizing. and remembered by us all, in
................................................................
commanders who had the job On April 18, a Mounties-only my opinion, is the impending
of rolling out training, weapons Underwhelming pay hikes group known as the National reality of a unionized RCMP
and equipment to detachments For the wider public, police Police Federation (NPF) work force,” he said.

Letter to the Prime Minister of Canada


THE CANADIAN MODEL MUST NOT BE A BARGAINING CHIP
Dear Prime Minister:

Founded in 1922, La Coop fédérée is a major player in the country’s agricultural and agri-food industry, with more than 90,000 members grouped into 70 cooperatives, nearly
18,000 employees and combined revenue of $9.2 billion. La Coop fédérée operates in 8 of Canada’s 10 provinces either directly or through subsidiaries and partnerships.

Canada might enter into NAFTA renegotiations with the United States and Mexico. It is because of this model that our farmers can make a decent living from their pro-
This is a major source of concern for agricultural producers and the Canadian fession, despite climate conditions that are considerably increasing their produc-
agri-food industry. tion costs and the proximity of agro-economic predators hoping to turn an even
bigger profit by coming into our farms and supermarkets without considering the
These concerns are well founded if you compare the players involved: Canadians damage this would cause to our regional economies.
and their counterparts south of our border. The size of US farms, the billions paid
in subsidies to US farmers and the production methods used in the US are unbe- Canada came to be because of the determination and energy of pioneers who
lievable. This comparison in itself would be enough to justify the concerns felt by wanted to build a better world while respecting the most admirable of human val-
us and all across the country. While what we have to say today takes this informa- ues: honesty, support, solidarity and fairness—values that are firmly held by the
tion into account, it is not the only lens through which we see this issue that affects members of La Coop fédérée. And the history of these pioneers so far has been a
us so deeply. resounding success, with no need to succumb to the siren’s song of economically
liberal despots.
Agriculture is a significant economic activity in Canada.
In 1994, several countries agreed to give the arts and culture special treatment in
It is first and foremost a deeply human activity, a history of men and women who some major international treaties. This was called “cultural exception,” meant to
have passed down their work, from one generation to the next, and set high stan- be a counterweight to the offensives of certain powers.
dards for themselves, providing their fellow Canadians with access to high-quality
products. Our farmers were practising an economy of proximity well before it was As you know, several countries, including India and Brazil, have rejected the
a buzzword. unique model for the exceptional activity that is food production and processing
for human consumption.
Canadian agriculture is also a particular way of understanding our country and
the quality of life of its inhabitants due to the reliability and safety of the products We must ensure Canadians that the food they buy and consume is consistent with
provided, the jobs created, the economic activity generated. This also includes cut- our values and the quality and ethical standards they are entitled to.
ting-edge research and the development of digital services.
In the upcoming negotiations, the political and economic choices that Canada
Supply management is a societal choice, a value choice. In this sense, our agricul- makes will have implications on several future generations of Canadians. We ap-
tural and agri-food philosophy is a part of our collective identity, our expression preciate you not thinking of our agricultural economy as a bargaining chip, as just
of respect for people, family, animals, land and the environment. This philosophy another industry, as you asserted in a Bloomberg Debrief.
has enabled the development of an agricultural economy that is a crucial part of
the Canadian experience. Mr. Trudeau, we are available should you wish to meet with us and engage in what
we believe, under the present circumstances, is an essential dialogue.
Prime Minister, every day our farmers are modernizing their practices, using more
efficient and environmentally friendly technology, diversifying their offering and Ghislain Gervais
helping expand our country’s global reach, while demonstrating the soundness of President of La Coop fédérée
a model—supply management—that benefits producers, processors and consum- President of the Board of Directors of Olymel L.P.
ers, while ensuring food safety for all. President of the Board of Directors of Groupe BMR
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Parkinson 6 The case for a soft landing in Toronto’s real estate market PAGE 4

M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 SECTION B
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Report on Business
Investors look
U.S. eyes punitive lumber duties for restraint as
Ottawa denies American industry’s allegations of ‘critical circumstances’ in Canadian softwood exports good times roll
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... for gold miners
BRENT JANG QUESNEL, B.C. New Brunswick. U.S. industry is in swaying the de- Commerce selected four man-
................................................................ The department will announce partment. U.S. producers allege datory respondents in Canada in
................................................................
The U.S. Department of Com- its preliminary determination on there has been a surge of soft- the cross-border lumber dispute:
merce is on the verge of imposing Tuesday on countervailing duties wood exports from Canada into Three B.C.-based producers (West JOSH O’KANE
duties on Canada’s softwood- for Canada’s alleged lumber sub- the United States – “massive” Fraser Timber Co. Ltd., Canfor ................................................................

lumber exports, a move that


will send shock waves across
forestry-dependent communities
sidies.
Precisely how much pain is felt
by Canadian producers will
shipments that would constitute
“critical circumstances” to war-
rant not only duties in the future,
Corp. and Tolko Industries Ltd.)
and Montreal-based Resolute For-
est Products Inc.
W ith Canada’s biggest gold
miners back in the mode of
making deals and striking part-
from British Columbia to depend on how successful the but retroactively up to 90 days. Softwood, Page 2 nerships, analysts will be watch-
ing the companies’ self-discipline
as first-quarter financials start
rolling in.
The housing experts nobody wants to hire Last year was a period of recov-
ery for gold producers: balance
sheets got better, gold prices were
healthy and rising and share
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
prices climbed. The S&P/TSX
KIRAN RANA global gold index went up 50 per
................................................................ cent in 2016, and it’s up another

H ome inspectors are taking a


substantial hit to their busi-
nesses amid the frenzied bidding
12 per cent so far this year.
In the past, strong gold markets
have led to a round of mergers,
for houses taking place in Toron- acquisitions and mine-building,
to and the surrounding regions. followed by a painful reckoning.
In desperation to come up on Investors haven’t forgotten, so
top in bidding wars, many home free cash flow, cost savings and
buyers are forgoing conditions debt reduction remain in their
that may make their offer less sights as precious-metal miners
appealing to a seller. One of the mull new projects in their march
first conditions to go is the need out of the commodity slump.
for a home inspection. The industry’s poster child for
“Nobody has a clause for home irrational exuberance was Bar-
inspection in this hot housing rick Gold Corp., which burned
market,” says Murray Parish, billions of dollars with the $7.3-
president of the Ontario Associa- billion cash purchase of Equinox
tion of Home Inspectors, who Minerals Ltd. in 2011. Barrick’s
says his 550 members have expe- Toronto-listed shares, once worth
rienced a 30 to 50 per cent drop about $55, fell below $8 a couple
in home inspections over the of years ago as the magnitude of
past few months. its errors became apparent to the
Toronto has seen consecutive market. (They’ve since rallied to
years of double-digit price gains. near $26.)
The average sale price for In this cycle, the deal making
detached homes in the central has been more sober and cau-
416 area code in March was $1.56- tious. Typical was last month’s
million, up 33 per cent from a announced deal between Barrick
year earlier. In the 905 region and Goldcorp Inc., the country’s
that surrounds the city, detached Home inspector John Hansen checks the furnace in a house in Hamilton Friday. The number of houses Mr. Hansen two biggest gold miners, which
homes went for an average of inspects has dropped as sellers reject buyers with bids conditional on an inspection. GLENN LOWSON/THE GLOBE AND MAIL said that they would join together
$1.12-million, up 34 per cent. to consolidate gold-mine devel-
Prices for semi-detached such as Kitchener-Waterloo, But while there has been a coming to the table, he says. opment in Chile’s Maricunga Belt.
homes, townhouses and condos Oshawa and Hamilton. decrease in home inspections on However, this isn’t enough to It’s a complex, multistage trans-
are all up sharply. In February, the number of the buyer’s side, Mr. Carson says completely offset the decline in action that also involves Kinross
Alan Carson, president of home home inspections his company he’s also seeing an uptick in buyer home inspections. Gold Corp. and a junior mining
inspection agency Carson Dun- did was down 30 per cent overall. home inspections being conduct- “We’re frustrated,” Mr. Carson company, but the result is that
lop, says that while the city of “Buyers aren’t forgoing the ed by the seller. When sellers says. “We know people want to Barrick and Goldcorp will be part-
Toronto may be the epicentre of inspection because they want to; conduct a home inspection and protect themselves and are just ners in northern Chile, a move
the issue, his business has felt it’s because they feel like they offer the results in a report, they finding it so hard to do.” the companies said would help
the shock waves even in regions have to,” says Mr. Carson. are finding that more buyers are Inspectors, Page 12 them split capital and operating
costs while sharing infrastructure.
It’s a busy week for Canada’s big
Globe Investor ANALYSIS resource companies, with Barrick,
Goldcorp and other gold miners

Why BMO’s Brian Belski believes How dairy farmers are trying to reporting first-quarter results,
joined by other mining outfits, in-

we’re in a long-term bull market milk consumers with EU trade deal cluding Teck Resources Ltd. and
Potash Corporation of Saskatche-
wan Inc.
.....................................................................................................................................
The gold industry “is definitely
.....................................................................................................................................
that keeps retail prices artificially in a better position than it was in
BRENDA BOUW What’s your take on the high. 2015,” said Siddarth Subramani,
................................................................ markets? Europe will eventually be mining analyst with Veritas

B rian Belski has been covering


his ears a lot lately. The chief
investment strategist at BMO Nes-
U.S. stocks are mired in a 20-to-25-
year bull market. Canada
allowed to ship almost 18,000
tonnes of additional duty-free
cheese to Canada – the equiva-
Investment Research Corp, in an
interview. “What I’ll be looking
for is operating discipline,” he
bitt Burns says there’s too much is going to come along for the BARRIE McKENNA lent of roughly 2 per cent of Can- continued, keeping an eye on
noise in the market – blame U.S. ride. I think investors are bmckenna@globeandmail.com ada’s domestic market. The first cost- and debt-reduction pro-
President Donald Trump – that is focusing way too much on rheto- batches are set to hit the Cana- grams – like Barrick’s plan to
................................................................
distracting investors from what ric. dian market this summer with reduce its debt by $2.9-billion
he sees as the early stages of long- Our call for 2017 for North OTTAWA the coming into force of the Can- (U.S.), to $5-billion, by the end of
................................................................
term bull market. America is overweight analysis ada-European Union compre- next year.
How long term? Decades, per-
haps.
The pessimists might be tempt-
and underweight rhetoric. The
U.S. is going to continue to
outperform Canada, I think, for
D onald Trump grumbles about
what Canada’s dairy industry
is doing to Americans. But it isn’t
hensive economic and trade
agreement (CETA) on July 1.
Imported cheese currently makes
Barrick will report its financials
after markets close on Monday
and is holding its annual general
ed to tune out Mr. Belski if it the next three-to-five years, espe- half as bad as what we’re doing up just 5 per cent of the Cana- meeting on Tuesday.
weren’t for his recent track cially given the fact that the U.S. to ourselves. dian market, and virtually all of it In a research note, BMO Nesbitt
record. In late 2015, he forecast has a clear path towards fiscal Take cheese, for example. comes in tariff-free. Burns Inc. analyst Andrew Kaip
the S&P/TSX composite index policy changes – meaning tax Among the key concessions Otta- So you might be thinking: and his team said mergers and
would outperform the S&P 500 in cuts, health care changes, re- wa made in its recent free-trade Finally, some relief on the steep acquisitions are expected to play
2016 and set a target for the S&P/ patriation and infrastructure. agreement with Europe was to price of that tiny wedge of Cam- a big role in earnings conference
TSX composite index of 15,300. It The positives we’ve seen so far allow more duty-free cheese into embert. calls for the sector. “Asset sales
did outperform and closed at from the Trump administration this country. Not so fast, cheese lovers. Trade and partnerships continue to
15,288. The Globe recently spoke on Canada are the Keystone XL That’s a big deal because Cana- deals aren’t always about more remain topical for Barrick,” BMO’s
to him about his view of the mar- pipeline. da imposes a 245.5-per-cent tariff competition and lowering costs. analysts wrote.
kets and his calls for 2017. Belski, Page 6 on cheese imports – a barrier McKenna, Page 2 Lookahead, Page 2

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Connect with us: @globebusiness facebook.com/theglobeandmail linkedin.com/company/the-globe-and-mail EDITOR: DEREK DeCLOET


B2 • REPORT ON BUSINESS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

FROM PAGE 1

Softwood: Forestry workers across Canada nervously await details on duties


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 New Brunswick-based con-


glomerate J.D. Irving Ltd., a
major lumber producer regional-
cement in late June for an anti-
dumping rate that is expected to
be 10 per cent or higher. Analysts
posed comparisons appear to be
solely aimed at finagling a way
to show an increase in imports
enormous for forestry commun-
ities such as Quesnel in the B.C.
Interior.
year, followed by Quebec (19 per
cent), Ontario (7.9 per cent),
Alberta (7.8 per cent) and New
ly, is a voluntary respondent. also forecast a ruling of critical greater than 15 per cent, but that West Fraser, founded in Ques- Brunswick (7 per cent).
“Based on the most recent in- circumstances, meaning punitive increase bears no relationship nel in 1955 by the Ketcham fami- The Atlantic provinces have
formation received from the tariffs would be backdated 90 whatsoever to the purpose of the ly, has grown over the decades to escaped U.S. tariffs and quotas
company respondents, the de- days from the effective date of critical circumstances provision,” become one of the largest lum- over the decades in the long-run-
partment should make an affir- duties on new exports. the Canadian government said in ber producers in the world. ning softwood dispute dating
mative critical circumstances The Canadian government de- a letter Thursday to the U.S. Brian Balkwill, West Fraser’s back to 1982, but New Brunswick
finding as part of its preliminary nies the U.S. industry’s allega- Commerce Department. vice-president of Canadian lum- is being targeted this time
determination in the counter- tions of a surge of lumber The 2006 Canada-U.S. soft- ber, proudly pointed out the 400 around by the influential U.S.
vailing duty investigation,” a shipments south of the border. wood-lumber agreement expired jobs at the sawmill – one of the industry group named COALI-
group led by the U.S. Lumber Co- Ottawa counters that the U.S. in October, 2015. The U.S. lumber largest in British Columbia. TION, which stands for Commit-
alition said in a letter last week producers have cherry-picked sector petitioned the Commerce Forestry management and tee Overseeing Action for
to the U.S. Commerce Depart- statistics to suit their pro-tariff Department to begin its probe employees across Canada are Lumber International Trade
ment. agenda by creating new mea- this past November, after the nervously awaiting the details of Investigations Or Negotiations.
Industry analysts predict the surements that go well beyond expiration of a one-year litiga- punitive duties. COALITION said it isn’t asking
United States will slap a prelimi- traditional methods of gauging tion moratorium. British Columbia is Canada’s the U.S. Commerce Department
nary countervailing-duty rate of exports after an investigation is With tariffs anticipated to total largest lumber exporter into the to take action against Nova Sco-
least 20 per cent on Canadian launched. at least 30 per cent on Canadian United States, with a 55.2-per- tia, Prince Edward Island and
exports, followed by an announ- The U.S. industry group’s “pro- lumber exports, the stakes are cent share of sales volume last Newfoundland.

FROM PAGE 1

Lookahead: Among its class, Goldcorp’s growth potential is strongest, analyst says
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 On top of its joint venture


with Goldcorp, Barrick this
SIGNS OF STABILIZATION
.....................................................................................................................................
debt; in the 15 months ending
Dec. 31, 2016, the value of out-
prices – receiving $157 a tonne
in the fourth-quarter of 2016,
month announced a nearly Earnings this week standing notes shrunk to $6.1- compared with $238 a year earli-
$1-billion (Canadian) deal with Teck Resources Barrick Gold Goldcorp billion (U.S.) from $7.2-billion. er.
Shandong Gold Group Co. Ltd. $40 Daily Analysts are now curious But the potash company has
that will give the Chinese com- about a potential dividend in- suggested its forthcoming merg-
pany 50-per-cent of Barrick’s crease, which in December chief er with Calgary’s Agrium Inc.,
Veladero mine in Argentina, executive Don Lindsay suggested slated to close this summer,
among other benefits. 30 to Bloomberg could happen this could generate up to $500-mil-
That announcement came month. Teck, like Barrick, had to lion in synergies annually. And
shortly after the third cyanide- make a severe cut in its divi- in a research note last week,
solution incident in two years at 20 dend to get through a debt Andrew D. Wong of RBC Domin-
the site prompted Argentine squeeze; the former’s semi- ion Securities Inc. said that stea-
officials to request the mine sus- annual payout was cut from 45 dy global demand and improved
pend operations. Analysts will cents per share (Canadian) to market fundamentals for the
be keenly watching for an 10 just 5 cents. fertilizer producer should help
update. With a stronger balance sheet give the company a boost.
Goldcorp on Wednesday will and lowered spending at the “We expect to see improving
reveal its first-quarter results. 0
Fort Hills oil sands project as free cash flow as the potash
The company announced its Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. construction nears completion, market gradually recovers and
aggressive “20/20/20” five-year 2016 2017 Teck “is positioned to shift its capex investments are essential-
growth program in January, aim- THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: BLOOMBERG focus toward revisiting its divi- ly completed,” he said.
ing for 20-per-cent increases in dend policy and growth oppor- Related companies reporting
both production and gold re- diminished slightly, because of with Barrick, and a similar one tunities, namely the QB2 copper on the Toronto Stock Exchange
serves and a 20-per-cent cut to recent deals. with Vancouver-based, diversi- project,” wrote TD Securities Inc. next week include Agnico Eagle
all-in sustaining costs. Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. fied miner Teck in Chile in 2015. analyst Greg Barnes in a March Mines Ltd., AuRico Metals Inc.,
Mr. Subramani said that com- analysts, who have a “hold” rat- Following a better-than-expect- research note. (QB2, or Quebra- Cameco Corp., Capstone Mining
pared with major-producer ing on Goldcorp, are more skep- ed profit in the fourth quarter of da Blanca Phase 2, is a project Corp., Detour Gold Corp., Eldora-
peers Barrick and Newmont tical: “We await operational 2016, Teck will release first-quar- aiming to expand production at do Gold Corp., Excelsior Mining
Mining Corp., Goldcorp’s growth delivery and predictability fol- ter financials on Tuesday. Recov- the Chile-based copper mine.) Corp., First Quantum Minerals
pipeline is strongest, with the lowing a challenging 2016,” they ering from the commodity price Potash Corp. will also report Ltd., Hudbay Minerals Inc., IC
most options to increase pro- wrote in March. slump, Teck’s share price has in- first-quarter financials Thursday Potash Corp., Lundin Mining
duction over the next five years The company is aiming for creased nearly six-fold since the morning. With an oversupplied Corp., Nevsun Resources Ltd.,
– though its ability to fund such growth in part through partner- start of 2016, and the company global market, the company has New Gold Inc. and Teranga Gold
projects with cash on hand has ships such as its joint venture has been rapidly retiring its been grappling with low potash Corp.

FROM PAGE 1

McKenna: Making dairy farmers the gatekeepers on imports won’t help consumers
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 Nothing is ever quite as it


seems in Canada’s sometimes
upside-down world of supply
piece of the action.
Among the aspiring importers
are Canadian dairy farmers and
the European trade deal.
Canadian cheese makers
wouldn’t want to import cheese
of Canada vice-president Karl Lit-
tler told a parliamentary commit-
tee last fall that only retailers can
executive director of the Dairy
Farmers of Canada, the national
lobby organization for the coun-
management – the convoluted processors, who say all the new that competes directly with their “ensure that the right product is try’s roughly 12,000 dairy farms.
system that regulates everything import quota should go to do- own offerings. Why would Agro- provided to consumers, at the The final call on this will come
to do with milk, chicken and eggs, mestic cheese makers because pur, for example, undermine its right price.” He suggested other from federal Trade Minister Fran-
from farm to fridge. they are the ones most affected own Oka sales? industry players might impose cois-Philippe Champagne – or
The Europeans won’t get to by the trade concessions to One can imagine other ways Ca- unfair mark-ups. even further up the food chain,
choose which cheeses we’re going Europe. nadian processors might use per- The only thing Ottawa has said given the high stakes.
to get or at what price. Nor will If Ottawa agrees, these new mits to further their own interests – publicly, at least – is that it The government should tread
consumers. That will be up to the import permits will act as a back- at the expense of consumers or wants 30 per cent of the new Eur- carefully. Dairy farmers and pro-
Canadian importers that Ottawa door subsidy to Canadian proces- retailers; for instance, import per- opean quota to go to “new cessors already have a pretty firm
arbitrarily picks to bring in the sors and, indirectly, to the farmers mit holders could, at least tempo- entrants” – players who aren’t grip on their industry. Making
cheese. who sell them milk. That’s rarily, choose not to bring in any currently importing duty-free them import gatekeepers as well
The government is poised to because some large processors, cheese, effectively denying cheese. would be like putting the fox in
start doling out these lucrative including Agropur and Gay Lea, Europe the trade gains it made in That has created some unusual charge of the hen house.
permits in the coming weeks. are farmer-owned co-operatives. CETA. business arrangements. A group It won’t help consumers, and it
With potential mark-ups of as These subsidies would be on Not surprisingly, retailers say all called the Canadian Alliance of risks enraging Europeans.
much as 100 per cent available top of the $350-million in support the new quota should go to them Cheese Makers Inc. is seeking a And that’s before Mr. Trump
on the goods, importers have that Ottawa has already pledged because only they know what share of the new quota. Among takes on Canada’s merchants of
been lobbying furiously to get a to help the dairy sector adjust to consumers want. Retail Council the directors is Caroline Emond, dairy.

Weekly Appointment Review


The following appointments have been announced by companies and organizations during the past week www.peo.on.ca
All Globe and Mail appointment notices are archived and available online at
www.globeandmail.com/appointments Bob Dony
PhD, P.Eng., FIEE, FEC

Bob Dony, PhD, P.Eng., FIEE, FEC, assumed office


as the 98th president of Professional Engineers
Ontario (PEO) at the association’s Annual General
Meeting on April 22. He was elected by
PEO members in 2016 to lead its 85,000 licence
and certificate holders.
Dr. Dony has a long history of volunteer
leadership within PEO and the engineering
community. He has served as PEO vice president
and councillor-at-large, and is a past chair of
Andrew Peck Kathy Bardswick Anne M. Stewart, Jeff Clark Tamara Finch both PEO’s Academic Requirements and Legislation committees. He also
to President to Chair of the Board Q.C. to Managing to Managing represents PEO on Engineers Canada’s Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board.
The Canadian Real CANATICS to Consultant Director, Business Director, Portfolio
Estate Association Fengate Real Asset Analysis and Quality Management As an associate professor in the School of Engineering at the University of
Investments Assurance OTPP Guelph, Dr. Dony is passionate about building a stronger profession for the
OTPP next generation of engineers. During his term, he plans on partnering with
engineering educators to examine the future evolution of the accreditation
system, as well as increasing the diversity of voices at all levels of discussion
within PEO.
To make arrangements for a Report on Business Appointment Notice, please e-mail
advertising@globeandmail.com or call: (416) 585-5111 • 1-800-387-9012 Dr. Dony holds BASc and MASc degrees in systems design engineering from
the University of Waterloo and a PhD in electrical and computer engineering
from McMaster University. He has authored numerous research papers in the
field of image and signal processing in biomedical engineering.

Under the authority of the Professional Engineers Act, PEO governs


over 85,000 licence and certificate holders and regulates professional
engineering in Ontario. PEO’s mission is to regulate and advance the
practice of engineering to protect the public interest. Its vision is to be
the trusted leader in professional self-regulation. Professional engineering
TO SUBSCRIBE CALL 1-800-387-5400 safeguards life, health, property, economic interests, the public welfare and
the environment. Professional engineers can be identified by the P.Eng.
after their names. Holders of limited licences can be identified by LEL or
LET after their names.
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O REPORT ON BUSINESS • B3

Investors cheer French election results


French stocks expected to rally on relief the country was not left with a choice between two radical, anti-EU presidential candidates
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

JEMIMA KELLY LONDON perceived decline in the break-up


................................................................ risk in the euro area,” he added,
The euro surged in early trading though he said the single curren-
in Asia on Sunday, while French cy’s moves would be limited by
bond yields were expected to fall the fact that this outcome had
and French stocks to rally on been expected.
Monday morning, on relief that French and European equities
France had not been left with a were expected to rally when they
choice between two radical, anti- begin trading on Monday morn-
EU presidential candidates. ing, while peripheral bond yields
Multiple projections showed were expected to fall as investors
centrist Emmanuel Macron and regained their risk appetite.
far-right leader Marine Le Pen set The projected result will mean a
to face each other in a May 7 run- face-off between politicians with
off for the French presidency, radically contrasting visions. Mr.
after coming first and second in Macron favors deregulation mea-
Sunday’s first round of voting. sures that will be welcomed by
Investors’ greatest worry had financial markets, while Ms. Le
been that the far-left, Euroskeptic Pen wants to ditch the euro cur-
Jean-Luc Mélenchon, who had rency and possibly pull out of the
surged in the polls in recent EU – markets’ biggest fear.
weeks, could jump ahead of Mr. Even if Ms. Le Pen springs a sur-
Macron and make it into the final prise on May 7, her “Frexit” ambi-
run-off against Ms. Le Pen, giving tions will require constitutional
voters the choice between two change that experts say will be
radical candidates who would difficult, especially as her Nation-
threaten the future of the EU. al Front party only has a handful
That this worst-case scenario of federal lawmakers and is seen
looked likely to have been avert- as highly unlikely to win anything
ed, therefore, was seen as positive like a majority in June’s parlia-
for risk sentiment. While Sun- Voters line up at a polling station in Marseille in southern France on Sunday during the first round of the French mentary elections.
day’s results looked broadly in presidential election. ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES June’s legislative elections also
line with polls, failures to predict pose a challenge for Mr. Macron,
the outcome of the Brexit referen- “We are likely to see a notable per cent to $1.09 (U.S.), its highest who wants to win a parliamenta-
dum and U.S. elections had shak- tightening of European sovereign level since Nov. 10, the day after ry majority with his brand-new
en investors’ trust in them. spreads and this would also be the results of the U.S. presidential party “En Marche!” (“Forward!”)
And while the anti-EU Ms. Le We can now conclude that positive for the euro and stocks,” election, as some markets opened “We can now conclude that
Pen looked likely to have made it [Frexit] is off the table, he said, although he added that in Asia. [Frexit] is off the table, assuming
through to the second round, the exit polls must be viewed Against the yen, which investors that most people will now regard
polls have consistently shown Mr. assuming that most people with a degree of caution. tend to flock to when they per- Mr. Macron as the likely winner of
Macron will beat her in the run- will now regard Mr. Macron The spread between French 10- ceive high levels of risk, the euro round two,” said Marie Owens
off. as the likely winner of round year government bond yields and jumped as much as 3 per cent to Thomsen, head of economic
“The assumption now is that their German equivalents has trade at a five-week high of research at Indosuez Wealth Man-
centrist voters will rally around two. been a key gauge of investor sen- ¥120.905. agement in London.
Macron, denying Le Pen the presi- timent around the French elec- “I think people will be fairly “But, the open question is still
dency and hence this will effec- Marie Owens Thomsen tion in recent months. confident that Macron will win in the June parliamentary election,
tively be a pro-establishment, Head of economic research at That gap was widely expected to the second round, and the market what the future president’s
pro-European result which will be Indosuez Wealth Management narrow on Monday as investors will be relieved by that,” said government will look like and
positive for risk appetite on Mon- buy back into French debt, and as Insight fund manager and head of whether or not he will have a
day morning,” said Rabobank’s safe-haven German bunds are currency investment in London, majority.”
................................................................
head of rates strategy in London, sold off on higher risk appetite. Paul Lambert.
Richard McGuire. The euro jumped as much as 2 “The euro will benefit from the Reuters

LEGALS MEETING NOTICES

Court File No.: CV-17-01758-00CL NOTICE OF MEETING


ONTARIO Notice is hereby given that the following meeting of Shareholders has been declared.
SUPERIOR COURT OF JUSTICE RECORD MEETING MEETING
(COMMERCIAL LIST) ISSUER TYPE DATE DATE & TIME LOCATION
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES’ CREDITORS ARRANGEMENT ACT, MCAN Mortgage Annual March 24, 2017 May 9, 2017 Toronto, ON
Corporation & Special 4:30 pm
R.S.C. 1985, c. C-36, AS AMENDED
AND IN THE MATTER OF PAYLESS HOLDINGS LLC, PAYLESS SHOESOURCE CANADA INC.,
PAYLESS SHOESOURCE CANADA GP INC., PAYLESS SHOESOURCE CANADA LP AND THOSE THE WAWANESA MUTUAL BUSINESS TO BUSINESS
OTHER ENTITIES LISTED BELOW (collectively, the “CHAPTER 11 DEBTORS”) INSURANCE COMPANY
APPLICATION OF PAYLESS HOLDINGS LLC UNDER SECTION 46 OF THE COMPANIES’ THE WAWANESA LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY CAPITAL WANTED/AVAILABLE
CREDITORS ARRANGEMENT ACT, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-36, AS AMENDED
NOTICE OF EARN 15% PER YEAR -
NOTICE OF RECOGNITION ORDER ANNUAL MEETING Interest Paid Monthly
PLEASE BE ADVISED that this Notice is being published pursuant to an order of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice Mortgage Secured - 2 Year Term
The annual meetings of The Make Your Money Work Harder
(Commercial List) (the “Canadian Court”) issued on April 7, 2017 (the “Recognition Order”). Wawanesa Life Insurance wineva.com
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on April 4, 2017, the Chapter 11 Debtors commenced voluntary reorganization Company and The Wawanesa
proceedings (the “Chapter 11 Proceedings”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Missouri Mutual Insurance Company will be
(the “US Court”) by filing voluntary petitions for relief under Chapter 11 of Title 11 of the United States Code, 11 held at 11:15 a.m. and 11:45 a.m. INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
U.S.C. 101-1532 (the “US Code”). Pursuant to an order of the US Court, Payless Holdings LLC was appointed as foreign (local time), respectively, on
representative of the Chapter 11 Debtors (the “Foreign Representative”). The Chapter 11 Debtors carry on business May 25, 2017, at 107 – 4th Street,
GTA BROKER
in Canada through Payless ShoeSource Canada LP. in Wawanesa, Manitoba, for the (Lic. 12642 & 12643) has mortgage
following purposes: (a) to receive investments avail.; fully secured;
PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that the Recognition Order and a Supplemental Order approved on April 12, 2017 the financial statements for the interest paid monthly; RRSP
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Creditors Arrangement Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-36 (the “CCAA Recognition Proceedings”) which, among other things: together with the reports of the
(i) recognized the Chapter 11 Proceedings as a foreign main proceeding; (ii) recognized Payless Holdings LLC as the
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GTA. Min $150K (647)273-0119.
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Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP
1 First Canadian Place, These items of business are
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Attention: Patrick Riesterer
Phone:
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sweet.
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Attention: Matt Brouwer by the Corporate Secretary at the
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B4 • REPORT ON BUSINESS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

OPINION
In Toronto real estate, short-term strain
could help prevent long-term pain
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

while real estate booms of the downturn will only take us back that can gut a housing industry. region’s home-price spike.
scale of Toronto’s current one are to where we were a year ago – But that bust was preceded by a It strongly suggests that already
almost invariably followed by which is to say, to valuations that boom that had lasted four years – high debt burdens in the Toronto
downturns, the biggest price were considered quite healthy. which, TD’s analysis suggests, is area have become acute over the
surges didn’t necessarily result in Nevertheless, that kind of a fall the kind of time frame from past year, and thus at increased
the hardest falls. would likely rattle consumer which long, hard falls are all but risk in a downturn. The vulner-
DAVID PARKINSON More important than the scale confidence in a decidedly inevitable. ability of households to a price
dparkinson@globeandmail.com of the climb was its duration. unpleasant way. But it’s worth considering that slump has both spread and
Longer stretches of real estate But a more modest pullback of this current 15-month spike rep- grown – the kind of thing that
................................................................
excess tended to be followed by less than half that amount could resents only the extreme of a has the potential to both magnify

O kay, Torontonians (and Grea-


ter-Golden-Horseshoeians),
we need to pinch ourselves. This
both deeper and longer slumps.
“The longer they last, the more
time there is for financial pres-
unlock demand from prospective
buyers who have been scared off
by the price spike, and convince
much longer period of strong
price gains in the Toronto mar-
ket. Even before this surge, prices
and accelerate price declines.
These are the sorts of amplified
financial pressures that Ms.
dizzying dream of a housing sures to build,” Ms. Petramala some prospective sellers to put had risen close to 30 per cent Petramala alludes to in longer-
boom – or nightmare, if you’re said in an interview. their properties on the market over the previous three years. In running housing booms.
priced out of the market – is des- For Toronto’s current price rather than sit on them in hopes other words, the market came On the other hand, some of the
tined to end. History, and gravity, spike, that’s good news, at least of still higher payoffs to come. into this 2016-2017 price spike at worst slumps in TD’s historical
and a healthy cross-section of so far. The scale of the price in- That would quickly restore some already elevated levels. analysis came in the U.S. housing
economic experts say so. creases has been relatively large. normalcy to the market. At the same time, Canadian meltdown and financial crisis
The key question, then, is how But prices have not been surging This is the coveted “soft land- household debt loads – as mea- nearly a decade ago. There were a
far prices will come down once substantially above the market’s ing” that we hear about. But sured by debt as a percentage of lot of extenuating circumstances
the hot air goes out of the bal- normal range of growth for very anyone who has been around disposable income – have been at play at that time, including
loon. The answer may lie in just long – just 15 months, Ms. Petra- long enough to witness an asset persistently north of 160 per cent, crucial weaknesses in the system
how much longer Toronto’s mar- mala calculates. While there is a bubble or two knows that a true unprecedented heights, for the for financing home buyers,
ket remains in the stratosphere. pretty wide range of experiences soft landing is much easier said past five years. While Statistics resulting in some epic price
Toronto-Dominion Bank econo- in the historical data, TD’s analy- than done. When you start hear- Canada doesn’t break out data by drops in some regions. Many of
mist Diana Petramala recently sis suggests that booms of about ing a lot wishful thinking about province or city, there’s little these factors are not at play in
examined the price trends in nu- this duration often lead to cor- soft landings, you might want doubt the Greater Toronto Toronto’s current mark-up.
merous local and provincial/state rections of less than 10 per cent. brace for impact. region’s booming housing prices Nevertheless, history suggests
housing booms in Canada and As Gluskin Sheff chief econo- Toronto witnessed its own hard have been a significant contribu- that the longer Toronto’s boom
the United States going back to mist David Rosenberg recently landing when a housing bubble tor to that. The surge in the continues, the more the risks of a
the early 1980s, tracing them noted, when average prices in the of the late 1980s popped. Average national debt-to-income ratio hard fall will build. But if the
through the dramatic climb and Greater Toronto Area are appre- prices not only tumbled close to over the past year or so, to a surge runs its course sooner rath-
the subsequent down slope. ciating at a 30-per-cent annual 30 per cent, but the slump lasted record 167 per cent at the end of er than later, the pain may be
What she concluded was that rate, even a dramatic 30-per-cent nearly five years – a time frame 2016, more or less parallels the both bearable and short-lived.

The many failings of Canada’s Missing from Wynne’s remedies:


supply-management system are
government’s fault, not farmers’ A plan to increase housing supply
..................................................................................................................................... ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

SYLVAIN CHARLEBOIS and restaurant owners to become SEAN SPEER costs for the national economy. since Toronto’s single-family
Dean of the Faculty of Management more competitive. The entire Munk senior fellow at the Home-ownership is associated detached-home construction has
and professor in food distribution food chain has been held back Macdonald-Laurier Institute with a raft of economic and been consistently low. Surely for-
and policy at Dalhousie University for years. social benefits including better eign buyers and greedy landlords
................................................................
Also, supply management in educational and health out- can’t be held responsible for low
................................................................

F or the first time, U.S. Presi-


dent Donald Trump acknowl-
the dairy industry has led to a
sense of institutionalized entitle-
ment. The words “consumer”
O ntario Premier Kathleen
Wynne’s 16-point plan to
address the growing housing
comes, stronger families, safer
communities, higher levels of
civic participation and greater
housing starts.
At minimum, provincial and
city governments should under-
edged last week that he knows of and “customer” have no mean- affordability challenges in the wealth accumulation. There are take a detailed review of existing
the existence of supply manage- ing. Over the years, dairy farmers province is the policy equivalent few policy areas more likely to policies related to zoning and de-
ment, also known by the global have become great cost manag- of searching for one’s keys under enable upward mobility and eco- velopment to better understand
community as Canada’s milk car- ers, as it is the only way for them a street lamp. New taxes on for- nomic opportunity than housing the implicit tradeoffs involving
tel. For years, dairy farmers in to earn more by doing the same eign buyers and expanded rent and home-ownership, and so housing construction and, in
this country have been resistant thing. By virtue of maintaining controls are a classic case of the affordability matters. turn, prices.
to any change to Canada’s milk supply management, dairy farm- “streetlight effect” whereby poli- But unaffordable housing Environmental and quality-of-
and cheese policies. But with ers are, for all intents and pur- ticians like the rest of us search prices can also have larger eco- life objectives may ultimately be
NAFTA 2.0 on the way, Canadian poses, bureaucrats, not entre- for simple answers rather than nomic implications. Toronto and paramount, but at least we ought
dairy farmers are about to find preneurs. They work for the state, real ones. Vancouver are disproportionately to understand the costs in the
out that decades of defending the not for the economy. Dairy Farm- The result is frustratingly pre- responsible for net new job cre- form of fewer homes and higher
status quo was the wrong stra- ers of Canada has spent hun- dictable. The so-called “Fair ation in Canada. The labour mar- housing prices.
tegy. dreds of millions of dollars over Housing Plan” will at best do ket in these cities is shouting at Other supply-related options
It would have been fascinating the years promoting milk to Ca- nothing to address the underly- the top of its lungs for workers. include: greater flexibility for
to be in the room when Mr. nadians, while the consumption ing supply issues affecting affor- Yet unaffordable prices are pre- “accessory dwelling units” and
Trump got his first briefing on of fluid milk per capita has dability and at worst further cluding people from relocating other residential renovations;
the Canadian dairy industry. dropped for almost three dec- distort the housing market. and are thus causing those cries expedited approvals for develop-
Anyone who has tried to explain ades. No strategy whatsoever. A real solution would be for to go answered. ment and construction; adopting
supply management to Ameri- Value chains and/or design provincial and municipal politi- Politicians at all levels are un- inclusionary zoning; further
cans would appreciate the reac- thinking are irrelevant concepts cians to look at the extent to derstandably in search of solu- investment in public transit; and
tion. Mainly, it is one of disbelief. to dairy farmers. However, a which their own policies – partic- tions. But it’s much less under- ultimately more market-based
Supply management is about growing number are indeed ularly around zoning and devel- standable that the Wynne urbanism as witnessed in Hous-
producing what we need for entrepreneurs and want to think opment – are contributing to government’s response is to ton.
dairy, poultry and eggs. Quotas differently but are dragged down Toronto’s housing affordability focus only on demand-related Progress in these areas would
are given to farmers so they can by the mediocre class. challenges. factors and neglect the role that invariably go further in address-
produce the commodities As Canada was standing still, The extent of those challenges provincial and municipal policy ing the underlying problems
needed, while extremely high the world changed. For years, is well-documented. Year-over- plays with regard to housing sup- than a foreign buyers’ tax, which
tariffs are placed on imported many have called for changes to year prices are up by one-third. ply. has only had short-term effects in
products that could compromise supply management – in vain. The average detached home is That restrictive land-use regu- Vancouver, and rent controls,
our delicate supply-and-demand But a sudden scrapping of supply now nearly $1.6-million. The con- lations or building codes that which have consistently failed
equilibrium. Given that dairy management would be a mis- tagion is spreading from the city limit supply can lead to higher where they’ve been tried.
accounts for 80 per cent of agri- take, because quotas are worth and is now reflected in rising housing prices is demonstrated The Ontario government’s plan
cultural cash receipts within sup- more than $30-billion. Unlike prices in surrounding commun- in a growing body of research. is thus inadequate and bound to
ply management, it has always Europe’s former system, ours has ities such as Guelph, Kitchener The role of zoning policies, urban be ineffectual because it over-
attracted the most attention. a lot of fiscal baggage. Most and Hamilton. containment strategies and other looks the question of supply. A
Such a program could be important, we are just north of The Ontario government is policies that affect supply is real, effective plan to address the
expected in an emerging market the United States, where dairy right to be concerned about generating considerable atten- province’s housing affordability
or even in a highly centralized farms are much more competi- these trends. Unaffordable hous- tion across the intellectual and challenges – particularly in the
economy. But no one would tive. Getting rid of supply man- ing prices not only hurt those political spectrum. Greater Toronto Area – will
expect such a program to exist in agement overnight would lead to priced out of the market, they Excluding supply-related require that policy makers see
a developed economy such as a complete collapse of our dairy can come to carry economic reforms in the Fair Housing Plan their own role in creating the
Canada’s. Since Europe eliminat- industry. For a strong agricultural costs in the form of opportunity is a major blind spot – especially problem and now fixing it.
ed quotas several months ago, economy, Canada needs to main-
Canada’s is now the only devel- tain some domestic production
oped economy in the world with capacity to support our proces- DILBERT
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................
such a scheme. sors, where the value adding and
Given our obsession with mar- innovation really occur.
keting boards, we are accus- What is unfortunate is the cur-
tomed to it. We see our boards as rent economic climate around
a natural, very effective model to the world, which is being driven
protect our farmers by counter- by the Trump administration and
vailing power down the food Brexit. We are about to see an
chain. Farmers who are inherent- entire industry filled with dedi-
ly price-takers can only get the cated workers on alert. Instead of
price oligopolistic powers are developing a vision for our dairy
willing to pay. Farmers are often sector and taking ownership of
highly vulnerable. Often, dairy our own destiny, we are about to
farmers around the world are see changes based on someone
exposed to wild milk-price fluc- else’s terms.
tuations and must adapt quickly. Jobs in rural Canada and young
But supply management allows farmers are at stake. Dairy farm-
our dairy farmers to rely on pre- ers have lobbied Ottawa hard for ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

dictable revenues year in and decades to maintain the current Report on Business
year out. A simple approach, real- system, and Ottawa listened and
ly, but maintaining such a system bowed. DEREK DeCLOET, EDITOR CLAIRE NEARY, SENIOR EDITOR MICHAEL BABAD, ASSISTANT EDITOR
for more than five decades has However, let’s be clear, dairy MARK HEINZL, DEPUTY EDITOR ARON YEOMANSON, SENIOR EDITOR GILLIAN LIVINGSTON, ASSISTANT EDITOR
come at a tremendous cost. farmers are not to blame – they DARCY KEITH, INVESTMENT EDITOR RITA TRICHUR, FINANCIAL SERVICES EDITOR SARAH EFRON, SMALL BUSINESS EDITOR
First, our dairy industry is high- were just protecting assets and ROULA MEDITSKOS, SENIOR EDITOR
ly inefficient. Several studies over defending the next generation. ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................

the years have pointed to how Who wouldn’t? But the leader- Globe Content Studio
costly milk production is in Can- ship should have come from
ada compared with other indus- Ottawa. Several federal govern- JON BANACK, MANAGING DIRECTOR ELIZABETH HOLLAND, EDITOR KAREN AHN, MARKETING DATA ANALYST
trialized economies. Switzerland ments have consistently shown SEAN STANLEIGH, MANAGING EDITOR MICHAEL RAJZMAN, DIGITAL STRATEGIST STEPHANIE CHAN, DIGITAL PRODUCER
is the only place where milk pro- weak leadership on this file. Lit- STEVE TUSTIN, EDITOR
duction is more expensive. High tle strategic attention was given
farm-gate milk prices are not to our supply management Globe Content Studio manages earned, owned and paid content opportunities
allowing our dairy processors regime. Shame on them. across all Globe and Mail platforms and formats. Send queries to GCS@globeandmail.com
T H E G L O B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 LI 1

SP O N SO R CO N TE N T

LEGAL INNOVATION
INTERVIEW

Client-centred approach translates technology into solutions


Process and people key to unlocking problem-solving potential
Self-driving cars, IBM’s Watson One example involved a client service providers and clients share the continue to do so. Predictive analytics
with a massive volume of low- to same incentive to be efficient. on document review for litigation,
and ‘robo’ financial advisers are mid-complexity contracts. It was too and in transactional work, continues
sparking conversations about expensive for them to outsource, but What are the foundations of an to change how we deliver services.
the potential of innovation to they didn’t have the in-house capac- innovative culture?
ity. We developed a solution that JM: In the 1980s, law firms weren’t JM: An early indication of the future
change everything. In the legal included a legal process outsourcer. allowed to operate outside of a single is McCarthy Tétrault’s acquisition of
sector, the rapid evolution of We start with the client’s We used a lot of process mapping province, and McCarthy Tétrault went Wortzmans’ law firm earlier this year.
artificial intelligence and digital problem and then think and applied contract management all the way to the Supreme Court of Now, under one roof, we offer very
software with robust data analytics Canada to become the first national sophisticated e-discovery processes,
connectivity has opened up vast about people: teamwork to track the life cycle of the contract. firm. Our tradition of innovation has technology and information gover-
new potential.
and collaboration within The result for the client was a high- continued from there. nance. This enables us to work with
the firm, with service quality, consistent solution at a very Another innovation for us was in our clients to manage their tens of
What does this mean for attractive price point. the area of legal project management, millions of documents and records,
providers and with our which we introduced about eight years to better run document retention
Canadian companies today? Two client. Then we look at MP: When companies do merger and ago. As we started to think about the programs that pare down the number
national legal innovation leaders, how we can improve acquisition deals, for example, the way that we deliver services as a pro- of duplicate documents and make
McCarthy Tétrault’s Judith McKay, processes – and only due diligence process has historically cess, everything else evolved naturally it possible to find documents more
Chief Client and Innovation Officer, been humans reviewing things. We out of that. Processes derive solutions, readily. It’s fantastic technology that
then bring in technology. asked, “What if we apply process, they enable you to make them leaner helps us solve a client’s problem,
and Matthew Peters, partner and technology and people to deliver a and more efficient, and allow you to from end to end.
Judith McKay
National Innovation Leader, share is Chief Client and Innovation better solution?” think about different resources. Our clients are feeling cost and
Officer at McCarthy Tétrault Clients also have issues with low- budget pressures; having to do more
their perspectives. value contracts such as confidentiality What happens next? How are you with less. They’re looking to us for
agreements or employee offer letters, preparing for the future? solutions, and we’re helping them
How do you see recent innova- which are usually created manually. MP: We don’t have a crystal ball, but understand that there are simple gov-
tion changing the delivery of legal We developed an end-to-end process we can predict some things with a ernance processes and inexpensive
services? using a document automation tool, high degree of confidence. One is technologies they can leverage to be
JM: In our view, true innovation comes an electronic signature tool and a da- that the composition of individuals more organized, efficient and effec-
from understanding our clients, their tabase. Everything lives in the digital providing services in a law firm will tive. We’re also leading that process,
businesses and the industries in which sphere; you answer the questions, continue to diversify. Traditionally, lawyer by lawyer, within our firm: how
they operate. In the business world, and it generates the agreement to be it was lawyers and paralegals; it has can we have better databases, find
there is no distinction between legal Lawyers won’t all be signed and stored. Clients have been already evolved to include other roles things more easily, repeat tasks using
challenges and business challenges. replaced with computers paying law firms $1,000 to $1,400 for such as project managers and process templates and checklists, et cetera.
They’re all business challenges. these simple agreements, and now improvement experts. It’s exciting for us to have an impact
We start with the client’s problem – project out 10 years they can do them for as little as $100. The role of technology will continue on transforming the legal industry
and then think about people: team- and lawyers will still be For us, the centre point of innova- to grow. Lawyers won’t all be replaced and how it provides value – what
work and collaboration within the central to the problem- tion is staying focused on solutions. with computers – project out 10 years motivates us is helping our clients
firm, with service providers and with and lawyers will still be central to the achieve even greater success.
our client. Then we look at how we can solving role. Has this approach changed your bill- problem-solving role. But AI will play
improve processes – and only then Matthew Peters ing relationship with your clients? a role in making many of the services This content was produced by Randall
bring in technology. Technology needs is partner and National Innovation MP: Instead of billing by the hour, that we deliver more efficient. Anthony Communications, in partnership
to be considered in thoughtful con- Leader at McCarthy Tétrault which incents inefficiency, we are Data is playing a bigger and bigger with The Globe and Mail’s advertising
department. The Globe’s editorial
nection with people and processes, looking to things like fixed price. It’s role in the services we and some department was not involved in its creation.
or it often fails. a win-win for everybody when both other law firms provide, and will

Visit globeandmail.com/adv/legalinnovation

way

We innovate in a different

because our clients


Looking at things

will always come first.


In the ever-changing legal market, one thing that will never change is our passion for
exceeding our clients’ expectations. For delivering better results. For assuming greater
accountability. For taking the lead and challenging the status quo. It’s why we are always
looking for new ways to serve our clients. Join us in turning the legal profession around.
McCarthy Tétrault LLP | mccarthy.ca
B6 • REPORT ON BUSINESS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

Globe Investor
ME AND MY MONEY
Key events for investors to watch this week BY LARRY MacDONALD
................................................................

David Desjardins
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Occupation
Monday Wednesday Thursday Friday Equity analyst
................................................................

6 Earnings include: Ballard Power Canada retail sales for February Consumer confidence readings Japan CPI, retail sales, household The portfolio
Systems Inc.; Barrick Gold Corp.; are released. The estimate is released across Europe. spending, industrial production Shares in “small, obscure, ugly
Brookfield Canada Office Proper- unchanged from January. Exclud- U.S. durable goods orders for and jobless rate are announced and scary” companies
................................................................
ties; Canadian National Railway ing automobiles, the projection is March. Consensus is a 1.3-per- France GDP, CPI and consumer
Co.; Capstone Mining Corp.; a 0.1-per-cent decline. cent increase. spending. The investor
Choice Properties REIT; DH 6 Earnings include: Alaska Air U.S. pending home sales for Canada real GDP at basic prices Hands up. Who has read Security
Corp.; First National Financial Group Inc.; AltaGas Ltd.; Amgen March. Consensus is a decline of for February are announced. The Analysis, the weighty, 725-page
Corp.; Halliburton Co.; Hasbro Inc.; Anthem Inc.; BCE Inc.; Boe- 0.8 per cent from previous estimate is an increase of 0.1 per magnum opus of Professors
Inc.; Kimberly-Clark Corp.; New- ing Co.; CRH Medical Corp.; Calf- month. cent from January. Benjamin Graham and David
mont Mining Corp.; PrairieSky rac Well Services Ltd.; Canfor Also: Nova Scotia and Ontario Canada industrial product price Dodd (now in its sixth edition)?
Royalty Ltd.; Precision Drilling Corp.; Canfor Pulp Products Inc.; budgets are revealed. index and raw materials price in- Not many, we’ll wager. But
Corp.; West Fraser Timber Co Ltd. Cenovus Energy Inc.; Credit 6 Earnings include: AbbVie Inc.; dex for March are announced. David Desjardins has. Twice.
................................................................
Suisse; Dr Pepper Snapple Group Agnico Eagle Mines Ltd.; Alpha- U.S. first-quarter GDP is To say Mr. Desjardins has a
Tuesday Inc.; GMP Capital Inc.; Glaxo- bet Inc.; Amazon.com Inc.; released. The Street expects passion for stocks and investing
SmithKline PLC; Goldcorp Inc.; American Airlines Group Inc.; annualized growth of 1.2 per cent. is no overstatement. He is
U.S. S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Hershey Co.; Lundin Mining CME Group Inc.; Constellation University of Michigan Con- completing his finance degree in
Index (20 city) for February is Corp.; Methanex Corp.; First- Software Inc.; Crescent Point sumer Sentiment for April. April, and will be working as an
released. U.S. new home sales for service Corp.; New Gold Inc.; Energy Corp.; Dow Chemical Co.; 6 Earnings include: Cameco equity analyst on Bay Street this
March are announced. Norfolk Southern Corp.; PPL Eldorado Gold Corp.; Expedia Corp.; Exxon Mobil Corp.; Gener- summer. In the fall, he’ll begin
6 Earnings include: 3M Co.; AT&T Corp.; PepsiCo Inc.; Potash Cor- Inc.; First Quantum Minerals al Motors Co.; Imperial Oil Ltd.; studying for his chartered finan-
Inc.; Baker Hughes Inc.; Biogen poration of Saskatchewan Inc.; Ltd.; Ford Motor Co.; Invesco LyondellBasell Industries NV; cial analyst (level 2) designation.
................................................................
Inc.; Capital One Financial Corp.; Procter & Gamble Co.; Restaurant Ltd.; Kirkland Lake Gold Ltd.; Thomson Reuters Corp.; UBS
Caterpillar Inc.; Coca-Cola Co.; Brands International Inc.; Suncor Jean Coutu Group Inc.; Maple Group AG; Vermilion Energy Inc.; How he invests
Edwards Lifesciences Corp.; Eli Energy Inc.; Superior Plus Corp.; Leaf Foods Inc.; Microsoft Inc.; Weyerhaeuser Co. In his portfolio, Mr. Desjardins
................................................................
Lilly and Co.; Exco Technologies T-Mobile US Inc.; Toromont Nevsun Resources Ltd.; Praxair follows the approach laid out in
Ltd.; Freeport-McMoran Inc.; Illu- Industries Ltd.; TransAlta Renew- Inc.; Southwest Airlines Co.; Stor- For more economic releases, check Security Analysis of buying
mina Inc.; Leucrotta Exploration ables Inc.; Western Energy Serv- age Vault Canada Inc.; TransCan- out our online economic calendar shares in companies whose
Inc.; McDonald’s Corp.; Metro ices Corp. ada Corp.; Under Armour Inc. at tgam.ca/EconomicCalendar stocks are trading below net
Inc.; Teck Resources Ltd.; Texas current asset value (NCAV). The
Instruments Inc.; Wi-LAN Inc.; latter is defined as cash and
Xerox Corp. other current assets minus total
liabilities.
When a stock can be pur-
FROM PAGE 1 chased for less than NCAV,
investors can still earn a return
Belski: ‘Canada is on pretty firm footing’ even if the company is liqui-
dated – because cash should be
left over after paying off all lia-
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
bilities. Such deep undervalua-

9 While Trump has been in-


creasing the rhetoric on Can-
ada, it’s our belief that [a trade
tion is rare but it can be found
among stocks that lack analyst
coverage or are too thinly trad-
war] isn’t going to happen. Our ed for professional investors to
call all along has been that take positions.
Trump needs a friend in the These “small, obscure, ugly
region, and that friend is going and scary” companies give indi-
to be Canada. [What we’ve heard vidual investors a chance to
in recent days about trade earn better returns than the
regarding dairy, energy and lum- market, Mr. Desjardins believes.
ber] is just noise. Trump needs In support of this view, he cites
Canada for the oil, the paper, the on his website (www.netcashval-
wood and the railroad, and those ue.com) a study by Victor
types of things. Wendl, author of The Net Current
................................................................
Asset Value Approach to Stock
You’re calling for a 20-plus-year Investing. It found that a portfo-
bull run. What year are we in lio of stocks selling 75 per cent
now? below NCAV turned $1 into
$44,500 from 1951 to 2009. The
We originally came out with that S&P 500 Index returned less
call in 2009. I can build a scena- than a tenth of that amount.
rio that the bull market hasn’t Mr. Desjardins’ holdings in-
even started yet. The move to clude Spackman Equities Group
date has been driven by momen- Inc., Zimtu Capital Corp., Inspira
tum and multiple expansion. We Financial Inc. and Western
haven’t seen real growth. We’ve Brian Belski, chief investment strategist at BMO Nesbitt Burns, considers Canadian banks to be the world’s ‘most Resources Corp. More details are
had eight years of zero growth. excellent stewards of capital.’ CHRISTOPHER GOODNEY/BLOOMBERG available on his website (a use-
You can’t recess from zero ful resource for investors inter-
growth. We don’t think there’s What will drive the next market We like banks and insurance since March, 2009, nobody has ested in the NCAV approach).
................................................................
going to be a recession any time correction? companies, and insurance com- believed it. Fear and loathing
soon, given the fact that reces- panies in particular in Canada gets you nowhere. Best move
................................................................
sions happen from higher levels This has been the most hated, over the U.S. because of the asset It was buying Ivanhoe Mines
of GDP and are triggered by an discontented, discorded stock management side of things. We What sectors are you Ltd. stock in early 2016 at 60
inversion of the yield curve. market rally in the history of love the banks that have U.S. underweight? cents (now trading just under
................................................................
bull markets and it has every- exposure. Industrials, this is all $5).
................................................................
What are your forecasts for thing to do with the fear and about a North American recov- Anything to do with yield. REITs
2017? loathing of corporate America ery – the waste management, and utilities in Canada. We are Worst move
and financial services. Investors railroad and aerospace compan- also underweight health care in In 2014, he was put through the
Our base case is 2,350 for the should never base their decisions ies. Canada because there are better wringer with coal stocks (until
................................................................
S&P 500. Our best-case scenario on fear or hatred. They should alternatives in the U.S. We like reversing course and buying put
is 2,500. [The U.S. benchmark base them on fundamentals. Our Don’t you see a threat to Cana- telecom in Canada more than we options on them). The experi-
ended last week just shy of call is that the big correction da’s banks from the overheated like telecom in the U.S. ence brought home the realiza-
................................................................
2,350.] We don’t change targets everyone is waiting for isn’t national housing market? tion that an unpopular
because the markets go up, only going to be Trump-related. Cor- Any parting advice for company can be a value trap if
if we see something change in rections are driven by funda- All of the bank CEOs are being investors? its balance sheet is dodgy or its
the base, and that would be mentals or some defensive – of course. Canadian cash burn is unsustainable.
................................................................
earnings. If we get this mythical geopolitical-type of surprise, banks are the most excellent You have to turn down the vol-
pullback, what I call the “chicken which you can’t manage money stewards of capital in the world. ume on the noise. Noise doesn’t Advice
little correction,” we’ll change for. You just buy high-quality They’re all too conservative. drive stocks, fundamentals drive “I think it is very hard to com-
our forecast, potentially. For Can- companies and when the market They’re all very smart in terms of stocks. Investors need to deploy pete against somebody passion-
ada, it’s 16,000. I think we’ll see gives you an opportunity to buy managing their money. The discipline and stick with it. ate in a discipline … ,” Mr.
single-digit returns in Canada. them cheaper, you buy more of “chicken little” housing correc- Stocks are rarely linear for long. Desjardins says. “In financial
[The TSX is at 15,614, so a rise to them. tion [sentiment] in Canada is Never try to time the market. If markets, it translates into find-
................................................................
16,000 would imply a return of similar to the “chicken little, sky we do see some sort of pullback, ing your niche and capitalizing
about 2.5 per cent.] What sectors do you like today? is falling any day now” in the that’s an opportunity to buy on it.”
................................................................
Canada is on pretty firm foot- stock market in America. Every- your favourite names.
................................................................
ing. Oil prices have solidified. We Our favourite sectors in America one can’t wait for housing to go Special to The Globe and Mail
................................................................
think oil is mired within a $40- are financials by far, health care, down in Canada. They’ve been This interview has been edited
$60 [(U.S.) per barrel] trading materials and industrials. In Can- willing it lower for five years. and condensed. Want to be in Me and My Money?
................................................................
range for the next several years. ada, we are overweight finan- Think about the bull market in Contact Larry MacDonald at
That can be good for Canada. cials, materials and industrials. America in terms of stock prices; Special to The Globe and Mail mccolumn@yahoo.com

MEETING DATES
DATA SUPPLIED BY ISSUING COMPANIES THROUGH THE SERVICE OF CDS CLEARING AND DEPOSITORY SERVICES INC.
* = CHANGE IN PREVIOUSLY REPORTED INFORMATION % = CANCELLED MEETING; @ = ADJOURNED MEETING; A = ANNUAL; S = SPECIAL; G = GENERAL; X = EXTRA; E = EXTRAORDINARY
RECORD MEETING TYPE RECORD MEETING TYPE RECORD MEETING TYPE RECORD MEETING TYPE RECORD MEETING TYPE
DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE
eCobalt Solutions Inc. May 18 Jun 28 AGS CGX Energy Inc May 01 Jun 01 AGS GT Gold Corp. May 08 Jun 12 AG NGEx Resources Inc. May 05 Jun 15 AGS Slate Retail REIT May 10 Jun 20 AGS
iLOOKABOUT Corp May 08 Jun 12 AS Dalradian Resources Inc. May 10 Jun 23 AG GVIC Communications Corp. May 16 Jun 20 AG Odyssey Resources Limited May 12 Jun 20 A Sparton Resources Inc May 08 Jun 20 A
kneat.com, inc. May 18 Jun 22 AGS Dealnet Capital Corp. May 12 Jun 28 AGS Hinterland Metals Inc May 09 Jun 13 AGS OneREIT May 12 Jun 28 A Sphere 3D Corp. May 11 Jun 27 AS
Acasta Enterprises Inc. May 08 Jun 19 AS Divestco Inc. May 08 Jun 22 AS Int’l Bethlehem Mining Corp May 11 Jun 15 AG Palamina Corp. May 12 Jun 21 AS Starrex International Ltd. May 15 Jun 20 AGS
Aldridge Minerals Inc. May 12 Jun 27 AS Dominion Diamond Corporation May 11 Jun 13 AS Inter-City Gas Limited May 08 Jun 13 AG Pan Global Resources Inc. May 16 Jun 20 AGS Strongbow Exploration Inc. May 11 Jun 20 AGS
Allied Hotel Properties Inc May 11 Jun 29 AG Dundee Sustainable Tech Inc. May 11 Jun 15 AG IC Potash Corp. May 24 Jun 28 AG Park Lawn Company Limited May 11 Jun 28 AS ST.Augustine Gold & Copper Ltd May 15 Jun 30 AGS
Arizona Mining Inc. May 12 Jun 23 AGS Duran Ventures Inc May 19 Jun 28 AS IDM Mining Ltd. May 08 Jun 14 AG Pender Growth Fund Inc May 11 Jun 19 A Talon Metals Corp. May 15 Jun 21 AGS
Asbestos Corporation Limited *Apr 13 Jun 06 A Dynacor Gold Mines Inc. May 05 Jun 20 A K-Bro Linen Inc. May 10 Jun 14 A Photon Control Inc. May 09 Jun 15 AG Tamarack Valley Energy Ltd May 18 Jun 22 AS
Athabasca Minerals Inc. May 12 Jun 23 AG Dynasty Gold Corp May 08 Jun 13 AGS Keg Royalties Income Fund(Cdn) May 09 Jun 22 A Poet Technologies Inc. May 26 Jul 13 AG Tellza Communications Inc. May 05 Jun 22 AS
Aurania Resources Ltd. *Mar 31 May 22 AGS Dynex Power Inc. May 08 Jun 20 AG Kraken Sonar Inc. May 10 Jun 21 AG Polaris Infrastructure Inc. May 08 Jun 20 AS Terago Inc. May 15 Jun 15 AGS
Aurinia Pharmaceuticals Inc. May 12 Jun 21 AG DV Resources Ltd. May 01 Jun 05 AS Lithium Americas Corp May 12 Jun 26 AG PolyMet Mining Corp May 24 Jul 19 AS Tetra Bio-Pharma Inc. May 11 Jun 15 AGS
Aurora Spine Corporation May 09 Jun 20 AS EcoSynthetix Inc. May 08 Jun 20 AS Marching Moose Capital Corp. May 23 Jun 27 AGS Poydras Gaming Finance Corp. May 17 Jun 28 AGS The North West Company Inc. May 12 Jun 14 AS
Automotive Properties REIT May 15 Jun 20 AG Erdene Resource Development Co May 10 Jun 14 AG Martinrea International Inc. May 10 Jun 14 AGS Precipitate Gold Corp May 08 Jun 14 AG Tidewater Midstream And Infras *Apr 07 May 25 AGS
AGT Food And Ingredients Inc May 04 Jun 14 AG Feronia Inc. May 08 Jun 20 A Maya Gold & Silver Inc May 05 Jun 14 AG Premier Gold Mines Limited May 11 Jun 22 AS Titan Medical Inc. May 09 Jun 15 AGS
Bearclaw Capital Corp. May 05 Jun 09 AG Filo Mining Corp. May 05 Jun 14 AGS Mazarin Inc *Apr 13 Jun 06 A Primewest Mortgage Investment May 08 Jun 08 AGS Touchstone Exploration Inc. May 11 Jun 19 AGS
Bellhaven Copper & Gold Inc Apr 18 May 23 S Foremost Income Fund May 11 Jun 21 AG Medicure Inc. May 12 Jun 27 AS Pure Multi-Family REIT LP *Apr 07 May 25 AS Transeastern Power Trust May 09 Jun 28 A
BTB REIT May 11 Jun 15 AGS Fortune Bay Corp. May 10 Jun 14 AGS Minco Gold Corporation May 11 Jun 27 AG PYROGENESIS CANADA INC. May 11 Jun 21 AS Unigold Inc. May 15 Jun 14 AGS
Canarc Resource Corp. Apr 26 Jun 02 AS Getty Copper Inc *Apr 28 Jun 05 AGS Minco Silver Corporation May 11 Jun 27 AG P2P Info Inc May 17 Jun 23 AG Uranium Participation Corp May 12 Jun 29 AS
Candente Copper Corp. May 01 Jun 22 AG Glacier Media Inc. May 16 Jun 20 AG Moneta Porcupine Mines Inc. May 12 Jun 30 AG Questerre Energy Corporation May 08 Jun 20 AGS Urbanfund Corp May 12 Jun 14 AGS
Canlan Ice Sports Corp May 11 Jun 15 AG Glance Technologies Inc. Apr 19 May 25 AG Mongolia Growth Group Ltd May 08 Jun 14 AS Renoworks Software Inc. May 10 Jun 20 AG Victory Nickel Inc. May 12 Jun 22 AG
China Gold International Corp. *May 08 Jun 14 AS Gold Standard Ventures Corp. May 17 Jun 29 AG Morien Resources Corp May 10 Jun 14 AGS Return Energy Inc. May 09 Jun 14 AGS VBI Vaccines Inc. May 04 Jun 21 AGS
Colibri Resource Corporation May 01 May 31 AGS Golden Hope Mines Limited May 05 Jun 21 A Nevado Resources Corporation May 11 Jun 15 AS Sable Resources Ltd May 24 Jun 28 AS Wescan Energy Corp May 08 Jun 07 AS
Conifex Timber Inc. May 16 Jun 20 AGS Golden Share Mining Corporatio May 08 Jun 22 AGS NewCastle Gold Ltd May 08 Jun 15 AGS Sama Graphite Inc. May 10 Jun 14 AG Wesdome Gold Mines Ltd May 09 Jun 21 AGS
Constantine Metal Res. Ltd. May 10 Jun 22 AG Gran Colombia Gold, Corp. May 09 Jun 22 AGS Noram Ventures Inc. May 02 Jun 06 AG Scozinc Mining Ltd. May 08 Jun 14 AGS Wolfden Resources Corporation May 10 Jun 23 AS
Cornerstone Capital Res. Inc. May 12 Jun 16 AGS Granite REIT May 09 Jun 15 AG Northern Uranium Corp. May 12 Jun 22 A SecureCom Mobile Inc May 12 Jun 12 AS Xebec Adsorption Inc. May 11 Jun 15 A
Coro Mining Corp. May 08 Jun 15 AG Granite REIT Inc. May 09 Jun 15 AG Northfield Capital Corporation May 23 Jun 27 AS Sierra Metals Inc. May 15 Jun 14 A
Crystal Peak Minerals Inc May 08 Jun 20 AGS Grenville Strategic Royalty May 09 Jun 13 AS Novelion Therapeutics Inc. May 10 Jun 28 AG Sirius XM Canada Holdings Inc. May 09 Jun 29 A
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O REPORT ON BUSINESS • B7

T.G.I.M.
MONDAY MORNING MANAGER

Learn to tame
your e-mail
so it doesn’t
eat your time
.....................................................................................................................................

sen to handle this crisis have


been flawed. Multitasking gets
us nowhere, and leads to an
unfocused day that feels even
more overwhelming and further
confuses priorities. Our second
HARVEY SCHACHTER tactic is triaging – sifting
harvey@harveyschachter.com through all the e-mails to figure
out how best to deal with them,
................................................................
and so, handling them too

T he Good, The Bad and the


Ugly is the title of a classic
mid-1960s movie. It also
many times. That’s fine when
you have five minutes between
meetings to check the inbox,
describes the daily battle with but not as a routine practice.
your e-mail. Clint Eastwood, Yet, for many people, triage is a
who portrayed the leading char- prime policy and Ms. Gomez
acter in the film, was a fighter calculates it costs them 120
with gumption and a clever hours a year in wasted effort –
strategy to triumph. Likewise, three weeks’ worth of work. The
you need to be a warrior to third approach is hoarding, DARRYL DYCK/THE GLOBE AND MAIL
emerge victorious from the keeping things in the e-mail box
three faces of e-mail. to serve as to-do list and filing
Ann Gomez, a Toronto pro-
ductivity consultant, has worked
cabinet.
She teaches e-mail warriors THE LADDER
‘The values of the company are the sum
with thousands of people to three strategies that are the
reform their instinctive, ineffec- obverse of those approaches:
................................................................
tive e-mail practices to free
them from the overwhelming
deluge. “It was so liberating and
empowering for people that it
6 Dedicate: Instead of responding
to e-mail as it comes in, attack
it in batches at convenient
of the values of the people at the company’
inspired me to turn it into a times, chosen to fit your sched-
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................
book,” she says in an interview ule, preferences and the needs
about her effort, The Email War- of those you connect with. Greg Malpass, 40, is the founder always been reluctant to accept We hire based on three main
rior. Usually that doesn’t mean and chief executive officer of [the] status quo. I always want to criteria: No. 1 is cultural fit. We
The good: E-mail allows speed, checking more than once an Traction on Demand, a Burnaby, understand why. used to say it’s someone you’d
................................................................
collaboration and transparency. hour – certainly not every five B.C.-based cloud consulting and like to have a beer with, but
It’s asynchronous, so the parties minutes – and in many jobs, it software-development firm. It In my first semester at Simon [now] we have a better term,
to a conversation don’t have to can be every few hours or once works with Salesforce to provide Fraser University, I ended up which is someone you’d like to
arrange to connect at the same or twice a day. That liberates a customer-relationship manage- with a 1.54-grade point average. I get to know better. If you don’t
time – they can reply according you to focus on your actual pri- ment platform that helps orga- had this notion that I wanted to pass that one, it’s a no-go. The
to their individual schedules. orities and to be less frenetic nizations consolidate info- be a doctor like my dad, but a next one is intelligence. It’s the
The bad: E-mail consumes and more intent when you do rmation for easier access and sports-medicine doctor. My ability to absorb and retain
much of our day. It has taken tackle e-mail. co-ordination. grades suggested that interest knowledge. The last one is skills.
................................................................
on a life of its own, the volume Trust that people who urgent- wasn’t going to pan out. What we found is that if skills
................................................................
ever-increasing and each missive ly need you will phone if you It’s kind of a funny story. The were put first, it would be a fail-
seeming to demand an urgent don’t respond immediately. She physician that was supposed to Hitchhiking up the hill to school ure. You are getting someone for
response. We are constantly stresses there is no one-size-fits- deliver me was a no-show. My one day, I got picked up by the what they are, versus what they
checking e-mail, without realiz- all principle; our jobs are quite dad was a resident at the hospital head of kinesiology. We started could become.
................................................................
ing the grip it has on us – different and will require dif- [in New Westminster, B.C.] and talking and I explained my situa-
research shows we check e-mail ferent response times. There he ended up delivering me. tion. He said, ‘Do you want to The values of the company are
................................................................
10 times more often than we might be a day, for example, work in the clinic or run the clin- the sum of the values of the
admit. Asynchronicity is forgot- with a lot of back-and-forth I grew up in Nelson, B.C., as the ic?’ When he put it that way, I re- people at the company. We
ten as we seek instantaneous re- over a contract being signed second-oldest of four kids. It was alized I’d wanted to run it. survey every one of our team
................................................................
sponse. that requires more checking a great town to grow up in. I did members each year on their val-
The ugly: E-mail is addictive, than normal. everything from rowing for the I immediately went to the busi- ues. That takes tremendous pres-
eroding our attention span and 6 Do: Apply the one-touch prin- school, I swam competitively, ness faculty to declare my inter- sure off of me as a leader because
with it our ultimate productiv- ciple – which is the opposite of spent a ton of time skiing. My est in pursuing a career in it’s not my values. My values are
ity. triage – handling each e-mail parents gave us free reign. From business. I didn’t realize you equally considered, along with
Ms. Gomez says that “e-mail once. Respond immediately if the age of 13, we were able to do needed about a 3.5-grade point everyone else at the company.
................................................................
functions like a slot machine in you have the time and since overnight hikes in the backcoun- average to get in. I made a deal
a Las Vegas casino.” We are con- you will now be assigning big- try. I had lots of freedom. with the dean – if I was nominat- I’m very motivated to find sys-
................................................................
stantly refreshing the send- ger blocks of time to e-mail, ed on the executive of three tems and processes that can
receive button to see if some- longer responses are possible. All of us kids are entrepreneurs different business clubs, he share the burden of decision
thing exciting will arrive to lift 6 Defer: If the item needs further in some way. The credit goes to would allow me to go to each making. This allows us to operate
our day. It feeds our curiosity, at study or time, put it on your our parents. No matter what we professor, and they could choose with agility and without hierar-
a seemingly low cost (we don’t to-do list as its own priority. thought we were capable of if they would allow me to take chy. I don’t believe I’m smarter
count our productivity). We And then transfer it to another doing, they would always re- their class. I negotiated to get than the average person at Trac-
seek instant rewards, which in- folder, so you aren’t hoarding spond saying, ‘That sounds great. into every business class in uni- tion. I see my job as the protec-
clude the noble cause of re- and can easily see new stuff I can’t wait to see when you versity. tor. My title is actually enabler.
................................................................ ................................................................
sponding quickly to urgent arriving. accomplish that.’
................................................................ ................................................................
e-mails from colleagues and cli- I founded Traction on Demand The whole journey has been su-
ents. These principles aren’t murky. In Grade 10, three teachers col- in 2007. It was after having set up per humbling. When I set out to
But most e-mails aren’t actual- In three hours at her work- luded and decided they would a software system that would start Traction, I didn’t want to be
ly urgent. It’s a self-imposed shops, Ms. Gomez shows people allow me to go through an track online sales leads. For part of a company anymore.
expectation, not the time frame how to implement them and in- unstructured learning process. four years, I hammered away Now, here I am.
................................................................
most senders expect. “If you get cludes such guidance in her While most of my classmates on Salesforce. In January, 2010, I
100 e-mails a day, not all are book. “There is an easier way to were going to class, I was allowed took on a huge contract from Special to The Globe and Mail
................................................................
urgent. If everything is a priori- process e-mail and it’s well to do self-directed studies. I think CanPages. That’s when I brought
ty, nothing is a priority,” she within your grasp,” she insists. they saw me not engaging in on my first temporary contractor. As told to Brenda Bouw. This
................................................................
says. class and thought I was capable We have more than 300 people interview has been edited and
The approaches we have cho- Special to The Globe and Mail of doing better than I was. I have working at Traction today. condensed.

My daughter’s dismissal bars some future work. Is this legal?


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

THE QUESTION ance package or employment come may not happen. important this restriction is to
................................................................ ................................................................
offer that contains clauses limit- her to begin with. Most of my cli-
My 22-year old daughter had been ing future employment options THE SECOND ANSWER ents fired under similar circum-
................................................................
a barista for the first five years, (short or long term), it is highly stances have zero interest in
then promoted to supervisor advisable to seek legal advice. Daniel Lublin returning to work for the com-
before being terminated for “poor Employers, however, cannot Partner at Whitten & Lublin pany that fired them. Therefore,
performance.” She attempted prevent you from working. And Employment & Labour Lawyers, when I see a clause prohibiting
repeatedly to resolve issues with unfortunately, what happened to Toronto reapplying for future employ-
................................................................
upper management and HR, but you is equally not unusual, where ment, I often advise my clients to
was unsuccessful. The separation employees are dismissed for per- When employers claim that their ignore it and focus on the more
package, which offered three- sonal reasons. It may not be doc- contractual clauses are “stan- important issue – the amount of
months pay and benefits, con- umented as the reason, but dard,” they are applying a nego- severance the company is offer-
tains a clause barring her from making it a without cause termi- tiating tactic designed to have ing as a result of the termination.
applying to any of the chain’s nation entitles your daughter to a you believe that they have little Like all contracts, severance
other locations or affiliated com- severance, and still qualifies her to no ability to change the lan- packages and all of the clauses
Are you facing a burning issue at panies in future. She asked that for employment insurance guage. This is often just a ploy, within them are generally nego-
work? Need help navigating that the clause be removed and was (pending she has been paying masking the fact that they just tiable. If your daughter is com-
mine field? Let our Nine to Five refused. Is this legal? Is there any into it and has the correct num- don’t want to change the clause pletely hung up on having the
experts help solve your dilemma. way to have that clause removed? ber of insurable hours). or take it out, not that they can’t right to work for this company in
................................................................
E-mail your questions to She seemed to do the right do it. the future, despite how they
ninetofive@globeandmail.com. THE FIRST ANSWER thing by discussing it with human Legally, the employer has every treated her, then she should not
................................................................
resources, so it is important to right to include terms that will sign the documentation and take
Eileen Dooley keep everything documented benefit it, as part of paying out a her chances that she would
Vice-president, VF Career for proof and ease of understand- severance package. A term stating achieve a better deal in court, or
Management, Calgary ing. Please keep in mind that that your daughter will never she should try to negotiate with
................................................................
sometimes, even with the most apply for a job with the company the company further and seek
Although your question requires complete investigation from is a little unusual, but not un- other improvements to her deal
a legal opinion, from a human- human resources, a decision heard of and definitely not illegal. (i.e. more money and benefits) if
resources perspective, these may be overruled by someone Your daughter has to decide the employer is truly not pre-
clauses are not unusual. Whenev- higher up in a company and whether she wants to work at this pared to amend this one conten-
er an employee receives a sever- unfortunately, your desired out- company in the future and how tious term.
M1 T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

SP O N SO R CO N TE N T

CANADIAN MORTGAGES

For a more secure future,


stress test your mortgage today
T
he good news? Mortgage inter- stress tested as a condition of qualify- first step, she notes. “You want to sit plan in place to ensure you can live
est rates are still at historical ing. Even if their actual mortgage rate down with an adviser who can offer well now and are prepared for the
lows. But as policy-makers and will be much lower, borrowers must solutions and options.” future. If that feels daunting, find the
the media regularly remind us, this prove they’re capable of making the While it’s easy to forget in the support you need.”
means there is only one direction for higher monthly payment required at excitement of a home search, these As with any major commitment,
them to move – and that is up. And the bank rate, which is currently 4.64 are decisions that affect every as- it’s best to think through all possible
this could potentially mean trouble per cent. In the case of a $300,000 pect of your life. “Take a hard look outcomes, says Brandon Scott of
for Canadians who have stretched mortgage at 2.69 per cent, Meridian’s at your financial picture and cash Benchmark Mortgages Inc. in Edmon-
their budget to own a home. “You want to make sure that current five-year rate, that difference flow,” advises Sheila Walkington, ton. “Getting married and getting
Rather than worrying about what is $300 per month, Ms. D’Cruz points chief financial officer and co-founder a mortgage have more in common
might happen and when, stress test if a life event means you out. of Money Coaches Canada. “Know than you may think – it’s important
your mortgage, urges Dilys D’Cruz, have additional expenses But there are good reasons to do your numbers. What is your lifestyle to realize the honeymoon phase may
vice-president of community banking or your income drops, you this exercise beyond the legislative costing you now? What are you will- wear off.”
at Meridian Credit Union in Ontario. requirement, even in the absence of ing to adjust to be sure you can afford The federal government has made
To make it easy, Meridian offers have a safety net.” rate increase expectations, because the additional costs that come with six major policy changes in the last
a suite of easy-to-use online calcu- stress testing your mortgage is really home ownership?” eight years that impact mortgage
lators, she notes. “You key in the Dilys D’Cruz about stress testing your life, says Buying a home without reducing options for Canadians, so it’s critical
amount of your mortgage [or the is vice-president of community bank- Ms. D’Cruz. “You want to make sure other spending can mean running up to seek expert advice, he adds. “For
mortgage you need], at the current ing at Meridian Credit Union that if a life event means you have credit cards or a line of credit quickly, instance, someone who owns their
interest rate, and get an estimate of additional expenses or your income she says. To avoid that outcome, she own business may have a tougher
your payment. Then, to stress test it, drops, you have a safety net. You’re recommends setting up an automatic time today than a few years ago.”
you re-enter the same amount with not stretched to the max.” savings plan for all the things you’ll While self-employed Canadians
a rate at least two per cent higher.” For those shopping for a home or want and need going forward, includ- naturally want to claim all deductible
For Canadians in the market for coming up to a mortgage renewal, ing other important priorities such business expenses to reduce their
a home today, recent legislation re- doing the calculations online should your children’s education, a comfort- taxable income, this may not be the
quires that any insured mortgage be be viewed just as an illuminating able retirement and vacations. “Put a best strategy when seeking a home
loan or refinancing.
“Connecting your mortgage pro-
Visit globeandmail.com/adv/mortgages fessional and your tax adviser early
will ensure you are declaring enough
income to meet current guidelines.”
OPINION Stress testing a mortgage should
also include considering some ‘what-

Guidance for achieving ‘mortgage peace of mind’ if’ scenarios, Mr. Scott notes. “Make
an exit plan for situations such as a
job transfer or selling the home for
less than it cost. When you consider
payment. There is terminology to for many Canadians. This is due in part gage broker who will answer your terms, conditions, privileges and
master, products to review and deci- to recent changes made to mortgage questions and explain the implications penalties, a mortgage that appears
sions to make. rules by the federal government, of the changes, in plain language, to have a lower rate may, in fact, cost
Purchasing a home is likely the larg- which may affect your ability to pur- relative to your specific circumstances. more in the long run.”
est and most significant financial deci- chase a home, especially if you are a A mortgage broker is your personal
sion most Canadians will make in their first-time buyer. What does this mean adviser throughout the entire home- This content was produced by Randall
lifetime. Although buying a home is a for you? For starters, your home- buying and mortgage-financing pro- Anthony Communications, in partnership
By Paul Taylor, President and sound investment idea, it is critical to buying purchasing power could be cesses, taking into account both your with The Globe and Mail’s advertising
fully comprehend what home owner- reduced, and you may be subject to short- and long-term goals. department. The Globe’s editorial
CEO, Mortgage Professionals ship entails. Understanding each step a stress test that will require you to Expertise, Page M 3
department was not involved in its creation.
Canada of the home-buying process is key to qualify for your mortgage at a higher
ensuring you will make a wise deci- rate than you would have before.

I
f you are in the market to buy a sion that suits your emotional needs Navigating the mortgage process
home, you likely have questions and financial situation – now and into can be intimidating at the best of INSIDE
about how much you can afford, the future. times, but combined with these new
what size mortgage you can obtain Access to affordable home owner- changes, it is more important than
Help along the way: the entire home-buying journey. M 3
or how much you need for a down ship is becoming increasing difficult ever to work with a professional mort-

2.69% 5-YEAR FIXED


APR*

(with the best mortgage on the market,1 there’s no need to shout)

Visit a branch or call us at 1-866-592-2226


and a Mortgage Specialist will come to you.

*2.69% APR assumes the typical example of a new mortgage with no costs of borrowing other than interest. 1Best mortgage on the market is based on a direct comparison of Meridian’s featured closed 5-Year Fixed Rate against the big
banks’ posted special rates online on their respective websites including their respective pre-payment privileges as of March 31, 2017. Limited time offer. Big banks are defined as: Toronto-Dominion Bank, Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Nova
Scotia, Bank of Montreal and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. Some conditions apply. Rates are subject to change without notice. TMTrademarks of Meridian Credit Union Limited. 04/2017
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 SPONSOR CONTENT • M 2

Visit globeandmail.com/adv/mortgages

LONG-TERM GOALS

Looking for your next home?


Leverage your home-buying experience and seek expert advice

P
eople who are looking to buy
their second – or next – home
typically have a few advantages
over first-time homebuyers. Hav-
ing gone through the home-buying
process before, they know what to
expect and can come prepared, says
Janet Boyle, Scotiabank’s vice-presi-
dent of real estate secured lending. In “We encourage people
addition, they can generally leverage
the equity in their current home for who’ve bought a home
their next purchase. before to reflect on the
“Buying a home is the largest pur- choices they’ve made in
chase many Canadians make during
their lifetime, and whether they are the past and what they can
buying their first home or are look- learn from them.”
ing for another, it’s important that
this decision is aligned with their Janet Boyle
needs,” she says. “When people are is Scotiabank’s vice-president of real
thinking of moving, they need to estate secured lending
make sure their next home purchase
fits with their overall financial goals.
Understanding their options, know-
ing what financial tools are available
and getting expert mortgage advice
are all critical to finding the home that
is right for them.”
While there are many reasons for
buying a next home, a few consider-
ations at the outset can help to make
the process as stress-free as possible,
says Ms. Boyle. “We encourage peo-
ple who’ve bought a home before to
reflect on the choices they’ve made
in the past and what they can learn People familiar with the home-buying process can not only learn from previous experiences, they often have a
from them. For example, did they better sense of how various choices affect their goals and lifestyle. ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
choose a variable rate, and were they
comfortable with that decision? What What are some of the priorities for says Ms. Boyle. “We recommend start, regardless whether you’re plan-
was the frequency of their payments, Canadians looking to buy a home? looking for opportunities to either ning to make this your forever home
and is there anything they can do dif- According to an online survey commis- change the frequency of the pay- or think of expanding or trading up
ferently that might affect the length sioned by Scotiabank in the fall of 2016, ments, increase the payment amount again in the future,” she says. “Engag-
of their amortization?” while 88 per cent of homebuyers rank or try to make an extra payment once ing with a team of experts, which can
People familiar with the home- competitive interest rates as the most or twice a year. Our customers can also include financial planners, mortgage
buying process can not only learn important feature when choosing a look at diversifying their mortgages specialists, appraisers, real estate
from previous experiences, they mortgage, future homebuyers also to include both fixed and variable rate agents and lawyers, can help with
often have a better sense of how factor in additional key considerations. components as part of a strategy for making a good decision.”
various choices affect their goals and Just over one in three Canadians con- becoming mortgage-free faster.” With a solid financial plan and
lifestyle, says Ms. Boyle. “They know sider “the option to renew early” very Ms. Boyle suggests that it can be sound expert advice, homeowners
to pay attention to what they can af- important. And two in three state that easy to underestimate the time, effort can ensure that when they pack up
ford, but also to consider additional flexible payments – and pre-payment and resources needed for buying a and move to their next home, they
factors, like how long to lock in their privileges – are important to them. home even for those who have been can feel confident in their decision
interest rate and how this purchase “Many homeowners are interested through the process before. “Finding and also “stay on track for meeting
fits with their other financial goals, in exploring strategies and options for your dream home in the neighbour- their overall financial goals,” says
so they can buy with confidence.” paying down their mortgage faster,” hood that fits your needs is just the Ms. Boyle.

There’s more to a home than the house.


There’s more to a mortgage than the rate.
Buying a home is likely the biggest financial decision you’ll ever make. Our mortgage advisors
take you beyond just the rate and show you mortgage solutions customized to your needs,
so you can enjoy your home knowing you made the right decision.
Talk to a Scotiabank advisor today, or visit www.scotiabank.com/homeownership

®
Registered trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
All mortgage applications are subject to meeting Scotiabank’s standard credit criteria, residential mortgage standards and permitted loan amounts.
M 3 • SPONSOR CONTENT T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

CANADIAN MORTGAGES Visit globeandmail.com/adv/mortgages

STRATEGY

Buying a home is a journey. Here’s the map.


Y
ou’re dreaming of a spacious lot of headaches later in the process.
master bath and a view of the “We want to ensure all of our
tree tops. Or a great school for clients’ pre-approval requirements
the kids, along with a little garden and have been fulfilled before they make
a sunny window to play beside. What- an offer,” says Charles Kornbluth, an
ever the details, making your dream RBC mortgage specialist in Toronto.
a reality requires careful planning and “Our goal is to give our clients as
preparation. much runway as possible between
Self-education is a smart first step, “Start off with a solid starting the dialogue and making an
says John McNain, RBC’s vice presi- offer. In this market, whether you’re
dent of home equity acquisition. “Start knowledge base. Find a first-time buyer or a seasoned
off with a solid knowledge base. Find out how much you can purchaser, it is so important to have
out how much you can afford. Then, afford. Then, start to set all the due diligence done ahead of
start to set expectations, given your time. That way, you’re comfortable
desires. What are your options?” expectations, given your that your financial institution is be-
Before obsessing over Realtor.ca desires. What are your hind you and your expectations are
listings, connect with a mortgage spe- aligned with an attainable reality.”
cialist who can point out any potential options?” With the right team of experts,
pitfalls and ensure you’re prepared to closing becomes a time of celebra-
move forward when the opportunity John McNain tion rather than stress. “We’re pro-
arises, he suggests. is vice president of home equity viding information throughout the
Once you have a plan for your acquisition at RBC stages of the process, so buyers
mortgage and budget, flexibility is a are not getting information at the
crucial prerequisite to success. “You’ve last minute,” says Mr. Kornbluth.
got a lot of immediate and longer-term “For example, in Toronto, we have
needs; if two people are buying a a double land transfer tax. There’s
home, you may have some different nothing worse than sitting across
needs. Within your budget, you’ve Technology tools like the Neighbourhood Finder, Home Value Estimator and from your lawyer looking at a state-
got location and home size options. True House Affordability Calculator can help to navigate the different steps ment of adjustment and seeing a
There are always trade-offs,” says of buying a home. ISTOCKPHOTO.COM $5,000 land transfer tax that you
Mr. McNain. didn’t account for.”
RBC offers online tools designed equity will translate into your next parks. The True House Affordability To help ensure his clients have
to help throughout the process, such down payment. A Neighbourhood Calculator quickly provides an idea the right advice on all aspects of the
as a Home Value Estimator that esti- Finder helps find areas with the ame- of affordability and connects you to home buying journey, mortgage
mates your home’s current worth to nities that are important to you, such a mortgage specialist in your area – a specialists check in to ask if they’re
help you figure out how your home as schools, commuting distance and quick connection that can prevent a working with a realtor. If they’re not,
they can pass on contact informa-
tion for competent realtors they’ve
FROM M 1 worked with before. “We know they

Expertise: Sound advice that matches unique circumstances


can explain the closing process in a
way clients understand,” says Mr.
Kornbluth.
Even when everything is in order,
The services offered by mortgage A mortgage broker will do the many, the down payment is a real chal- Canada members are committed to pro- competitive markets may mean that
brokers are truly invaluable and homework and legwork needed to get lenge, so these and other programs are viding the highest level of service and you won’t get the first home you
are generally free to homebuyers. you the best rate, terms and payment helpful for entering the market. meeting Canadian homebuyers’ needs. put an offer on – or perhaps even
In addition to staying on top of updates schedule to help you achieve your While the federal government has If you’re thinking of buying a home, the third or fourth. “For most clients,
and changes such as those recently dreams. How much you can afford – a imposed some obstacles to affordable or even if you want to refinance an typical lead time is now anywhere
announced by the government, mort- calculation based on such factors as home ownership, buying a home still existing mortgage, or free up some from four months to a year,” he says.
gage brokers also have their finger on income and history of credit score – provides Canadians the opportunity to funds for renovations, don’t do it alone “It can be frustrating and emotional,
the pulse of real estate market updates should be determined before you begin build equity and offers long-term finan- – work with a professional mortgage because they just want to be in a
or Bank of Canada announcements house hunting. Your mortgage broker cial security – working with a mortgage broker and get “mortgage peace of home. Our job is to act as facilitators
that may affect you as homeowner. also ensures you are aware of govern- broker will help you achieve this. mind.”- to help them do that, but it’s also
Your mortgage broker will offer sound, ment programs available to first-time Trust in the experience and knowl- to prepare them so they can make
professional advice and a mortgage homebuyers, including land transfer edge of a broker who is a member of To find a qualified professional near informed decisions under pressure
solution that matches your unique tax rebates in some provinces as well as Canada’s national mortgage industry you, visit www.mortgageproscan.ca/ – and to be there for the times they
circumstances. options to borrow from your RRSP. For association. Mortgage Professionals findabroker. don’t get the house.”

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B12 • REPORT ON BUSINESS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

Globe Careers
Workplace diversity benefits bottom line, research shows
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

DARAH HANSEN Dr. Konrad’s research paper on visible minorities. flexibility practices and policies about diversity and inclusion
................................................................ the topic, Outcomes of Diversity “When businesses work on that support professional growth “from a win-lose dichotomy to a

S heryl Sandberg’s 2013 best-


seller, Lean In, helped to fuel
new Ivey Business School
and Equality Management Sys-
tems, is published in Human
Resources Management and was
welcoming more women into
leadership, they develop systems
and processes that are also ben-
and promotion within a firm.
The researchers found that the
more thoroughly integrated such
yin/yang connectedness.”
That is, “People sometimes
fear that if we welcome histor-
research that underscores the co-authored by Ivey assistant eficial for other historically mar- practices are, the more diversity ically excluded groups, hard-
value of actively supporting di- professor Cara Maurer and Yang ginalized groups,” she says. will show up in employment working members of historically
versity, equality and inclusion in Yang, an assistant professor of Dr. Konrad’s latest research statistics (and, ultimately, trans- included groups will suffer.”
the workplace. management at Rowan Univer- tested a theory that suggests late to a more positive bottom The research says that’s not so.
“She made it okay to ask ques- sity in Glassboro, N.J. there are synergies among indi- line). The findings show that rich di-
tions about why it is taking so In an e-mail, Dr. Konrad says vidual organizational practices. Dr. Konrad says she was most versity and inclusion programs
long to attain gender diversity in the resulting push by many An aggressive search for a high- surprised to see the theory sup- result in a positive impact on
leadership among our top cor- large businesses to move more quality diverse candidate, for port workers with disabilities, financial performance and that
porations. She also made it not women into leadership positions example, would not be enough who “have been treated as sort benefits everyone. “When the
okay for business to do noth- has had a broader-than-antici- to bring diversity to senior of a separate category of people company is doing well, there are
ing,” says Alison Konrad, a pated effect on office diversity, leadership. The practice must requiring disability-focused more rewards across the board,”
professor of organizational also helping people with dis- also be supported by various accommodations for success.” Dr. Konrad says.
................................................................
behaviour at the London, Ont., abilities, different religious practices – from inclusive inter- Ultimately, Dr. Konrad says,
school. groups, younger workers and viewing techniques to work-life she’s looking to change thinking Special to The Globe and Mail

FROM PAGE 1

Inspectors: ‘What happens when [buyers] find out they have a $20,000 fix?’
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 In a more balanced market,


60 per cent to 70 per cent of
deals include a home inspection
norm, as buyers priced out of oth-
er regions make aggressive moves
to close deals in areas nearby.
Home inspectors warn that for-
going inspections puts buyers at
risk.
house … What happens when
they find out they have a $20,000
fix?”
eign home buyers, will cool the
housing market.
“I hope it has a positive impact
clause, says John Hansen, who The number of home inspec- “You wouldn’t buy a car without The effects are starting to spill on housing availability and affor-
runs a home inspection business tions Mr. Hansen says he conduct- taking it for a test drive,” Mr. Par- over to other businesses as well, dability for the average home
in Hamilton. “This year, I don’t ed in March was fewer than half of ish says. The same rationale, he Mr. Parish says. Electricians and buyer.”
................................................................
think it’s even 5 per cent. The the amount he did a year prior. says, should apply for a purchase plumbers who receive business
market in Hamilton is crazy.” It’s making it harder for home that is much bigger. following results from a home The 2017 Globe and Mail Small
According to March data, Ham- inspectors to bring in money, he Mr. Hansen says he worries that inspection are feeling the impact Business Summit is a one-day con-
ilton home prices shot up 28 per says, and some have gone out of buyers – particularly young, first- from the lack of referrals. ference of insightful sessions, proven
cent from the previous year. In a business. Mr. Hansen says he’s time home buyers – are placing Mr. Carson is hoping the Ontar- business growth strategies and
city where the average price is been relying more heavily on his themselves in a position of finan- io government measures innovative ideas from the country’s
half that of Toronto, bidding wars work on septic, well and fireplace cial vulnerability. “They tap out announced on Thursday, which brightest business leaders. Full
are increasingly becoming the inspections to keep him afloat. all their resources to get their include a 15-per-cent tax on for- details at globesummits.ca.

Globe Careers

PRESIDENT & CEO


4.7 million British Columbians are depending on you
The desire to make a difference can hold a powerful system in B.C. E-Comm has an annual operating budget of A rapt listener, an accomplished administrator, a far-
attraction when you’re considering a new job. In approximately $60 Million. seeing strategist and inspiring leader, you have excelled
this leadership role, you can make a difference every As President & CEO you will also serve as CEO of leading a large, complex, multi-stakeholder organization.
day through your oversight of essential emergency PRIMECorp, the organization that manages PRIME-BC, the In addition to your financial and business acumen, you are
communications that support British Columbians. information management system police across B.C. use to a consummate relationship developer who understands
You’ll connect people who need help with police, fire access data and other critical information that helps them the power of partnership. Put that power to work in a not-
and ambulance personnel and help keep those first prevent and solve crime. It is the only multi-jurisdictional for-profit enterprise that makes a difference every hour of
responders safe through the communications technology police records management system in Canada covering every day.
on which they depend. an entire province. It has an annual budget of $12 Million As a condition of employment, the incumbent will need to
The defining mission of E-Comm—Emergency and its own Board of Directors. acquire and maintain an RCMP Reliability Status (Level I)
Communications for British Columbia Incorporated—is to Working with your Boards, multiple stakeholders and Police-Level Security Clearance. The minimum residency in
help save lives, protect property and to build partnerships emergency service partner groups, you and your Canada to conduct this police-level clearance is five (5) years.
that enhance public safety. With a dedicated staff of 500, executive leadership teams will: refine, communicate Therefore, if applying for this position, you will need to have
E-Comm operates the largest 9-1-1 call centre in Canada, and implement a vision of safer communities across B.C., been a resident of Canada for the past five years.
handling approximately 1.36 million 9-1-1 calls per year through expansion and innovation; ensure that E-Comm If you are excited about this unique opportunity and
for Metro Vancouver and 24 other regional districts and and PRIMECorp both continue to provide the latest meet the criteria above, we look forward to hearing from
communities from Vancouver Island to Alberta and from technology and the most secure and responsive service you. To apply in confidence, please submit your resume
the U.S. border to north of Prince George. E-Comm also possible; provide strategic thinking, inspirational direction online at www.odgersberndtson.com/en/careers/13949.
provides emergency call-taking and dispatch service and everyday organizational management excellence For further information, please contact Esther McGregor
for 35 police and fire agencies and mission-critical in a large, complex, regulated environment with 24/7 at esther.mcgregor@odgersberndtson.com or Elaine
technology that supports first responders, including the operations; and, play a crucial role in the safety and Grotefeld at elaine.grotefeld@odgersberndtson.com.
largest multi-jurisdictional, tri-service emergency radio security of the province.

56 Offices in 28 Countries Worldwide

Executive Search • Executive Interim • Leadership Assessment

President and Vice-Chancellor


The University seeks a forward-thinking President evolution, and the ability to inspire its students, UOIT respects people’s different needs and
and Vice-Chancellor who will lead students, faculty, staff and alumni. The ideal candidate therefore will take all reasonable steps to
faculty and staff with focus and inspiration. The is an effective communicator, advocate and ensure accommodation for applicants where
President will provide progressive and dynamic ambassador, who is committed to excellence in appropriate. If you require an accommodation
institutional, academic and administrative research, teaching and learning, and promoting to participate in the recruitment process, please
leadership, while also serving as the University’s student experience and success. notify Knightsbridge Robertson Surrette.
chief advocate and principal ambassador.
With a distinguished record of academic wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww
The University of Ontario Institute of Technology Reporting to the Board of Governors, the
achievement, the ideal candidate possesses
(UOIT) stands as one of Canada’s smart, young President will collaboratively continue to
successful leadership experience in a university
and focused leaders in career-ready education evolve and champion UOIT’s unique identity To explore this exciting leadership opportunity
or similarly complex organization, strategic
and collaborative research. The University has and vision, while it matures as an exceptional and a five-year renewable term, contact
planning experience, and the ability to develop and
ambitious growth plans rooted in a commitment to STEAM-focused, career-oriented, socially Stephanie Sykes (ssykes@kbrs.ca), Anna
maintain strong synergistic partnerships. Industry
social, scientific, and economic innovations, as well conscious and research-intensive university. Stuart (astuart@kbrs.ca) or Shauna Smith
experience, or strong relationships with industry
as equity, diversity and inclusivity. It prides itself on (ssmith@kbrs.ca) or call 1.866.822.6022 or
The role requires an individual who will encourage and the public sector, is considered an asset.
creating an intersection of outstanding teaching apply online: www.kbrs.ca/Careers/11633
interdisciplinary collaboration, foster good and Lastly, the ideal candidate is deeply committed to
and a dynamic learning environment that embraces
collegial governance, and ensure operational diversity, equity, inclusion and to UOIT’s student-
innovative uses of technology for its almost 10,000
effectiveness. They will also lead fundraising and community-centred values.
students pursuing baccalaureates to PhDs. UOIT is
efforts, continue to build and lead high-performing,
located in Oshawa, Ontario, inside Durham Region, UOIT is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes
cohesive and collaborative leadership teams, and
known as one of the fastest-growing areas in applications from qualified women and men, including
embrace innovation and entrepreneurship.
North America. An eastern gateway to the Greater members of visible minorities, Indigenous peoples and
Toronto Area, Oshawa and the surrounding regions Success requires executive leadership skills persons with varying abilities. All qualified candidates
offer prime access to Canada’s largest market and administrative acumen. It also requires are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and
of more than six million people. vision, energy, dedication to the University’s permanent residents will be given priority.

Toronto w Montreal w Calgary w Halifax w Moncton w St. John’s www.kbrs.ca


O
FACTS & ARGUMENTS These days, living a simpler life eating all-natural foods is aspirational, not essential PAGE 6

M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 SECTION L
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Globe Life & Arts


HEALTH & FITNESS
OPINION

Canada’s
assisted-dying
laws must be
open to those
with mental
illness
................................................................

SANDRA MARTIN
smartin@globeandmail.com
................................................................

A dam Maier-Clayton, who


took his own life last week,
had begged many people to
help him end his suffering. One
of them was Dr. Ellen Wiebe.
She is the country’s pre-eminent
practitioner of Medical Assist-
ance in Dying (MAID), the Lib-
eral government’s law in
response to the Supreme Court’s
2015 Carter ruling that decrimi-
nalized physician-assisted sui-
cide. Wiebe and Maier-Clayton
met several times by Skype and
e-mail over the past many
months, she said in an inter-
view on Monday. “It was a dis-
tressing situation,” she recalled.
“He suffered so much, and he
wasn’t able to have a good
death.”
At 27, Maier-Clayton, a bright,
articulate activist, had a multi-
tude of intractable mental ill-
nesses, which were not respon-
ding to drugs, therapies or
experimental treatments. He
was not suicidal, as he kept
insisting on social media and to
broadcast and print journalists.
He just wanted the pain to stop,
pain that was enduring, irreme-
diable and intolerable – all the
qualifying criteria the Supreme
Court had laid out for compet-
ent patients in Carter.
Wiebe was moved by Maier-
Clayton’s plight and distressed
that the choices he outlined for
himself were all “hideous.” So
why didn’t she help him die, as
she had done with other
patients?
The problem, essentially, was
that Maier-Clayton was suffering
from a mental illness, albeit one
with debilitating physical symp-
toms. Just one mentally ill
patient, a woman known only
as E.F., has been granted a phy-
sician-assisted death in Canada.
At 58, E.F. was suffering from

NOTHING TO HIDE
such a severe conversion disor-
der (a mental illness with physi-
cal manifestations) that she
couldn’t walk, had trouble dig-
esting food and had such in-
tense migraines and involuntary
Unapologetically feminine, ZOSIA BIELSKI Jenner writes in the new mem- muscle spasms that her eyelids
................................................................ oir The Secrets of My Life, in had fused shut. She applied for
proudly Republican and trans:
Caitlyn Jenner’s new memoir B ruce Jenner is 10 years old
and home alone. He walks
into his mother’s bedroom clos-
which she refers to herself as
Caitlyn after her transition, in
the spring of 2015, and Bruce
a physician-assisted death under
a constitutional amendment
before the government passed
reveals the Olympic decathlete as et, brushing a hand over the beforehand. its MAID law last June.
cotton dresses. He selects one, Before transitioning publicly, Alas, for Maier-Clayton, he had
an outsider finally comfortable careful to mark its exact posi- Jenner’s is a lonely life of con- to apply under the more restric-
tion with a piece of paper, so cealment. Trying to “exorcise tive MAID rules. MAID goes
in her own skin no one discovers. He accessoriz- what was living inside,” Jenner beyond the Carter criteria of
es with one of Mom’s scarves marries and divorces three “grievous and irremediable” suf-
and with shoes belonging to his women, trying on their clothing, fering that is intolerable to the
sister, Pam, and dabs on some too. The wives are left deeply patient. It requires a patient to
lipstick. After surveying the confused, as are the children. be in an irreversible decline and
ensemble in a mirror, the child After their makeup starts going to have a reasonably foreseeable
......................................................................................................... ventures out of the red brick missing, young Kylie and Ken- natural death.
FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES apartment building in tiny Tar- dall enable a security camera on Martin, Page 4
rytown, N.Y., making it around their computer, only to discover
the block. Dad in drag – they are “too
The adventure is both thrilling young to understand.” INSIDE
and painfully alienating: It’s In the eighties, the Olympic
1959, and Bruce has no idea decathlete crisscrosses America, Neighbourhood watch
what’s going on. delivering corporate motivation-
“Even at the age of ten, my al speeches to stay afloat finan- The best way to handle friction in
life had become a sealed box, cially. On these occasions, the family – especially when they
and over time, the sides would Jenner dons a suit with a bra live on the same block – might
become even higher and ulti- and pantyhose underneath. be to kill them with kindness.
mately impossible to scale,” Jenner, Page 5 Damage control, Page 4
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Connect with us: @Globe_Health facebook.com/theglobeandmail ARTS EDITOR: CRAIG OFFMAN


L2 • GLOBE LIFE & ARTS
ARTS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

When an opera festival’s drama is offstage


With a new position as general director of the Vancouver Opera, Kim Gaynor couldn’t let her leg injury take the spotlight
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

MARSHA LEDERMAN
VANCOUVER
................................................................

N ot that there’s ever a good


time to fall from your horse,
but when it happened to Kim
Gaynor, it was particularly in-
convenient.
Gaynor was exactly three
months away from launching a
brand new opera festival in Van-
couver when she fell from her
beloved horse Gin Fizz de St.
Germain. She had brought him
over from Switzerland when she
left the Verbier Festival to take
on the position of general direc-
tor of Vancouver Opera. It was a
serious accident that resulted in
a tibial plateau fracture, with
cracks down her leg almost to
the bottom. She was in hospital
initially for two weeks; but a
few days after her release, she
had to return because of a
serious infection.
“Six weeks of antibiotics; I just
finished. And painkillers. It was
a very, very painful injury. So
one week I’ve been heavy-drug-
free,” Gaynor says during an in-
terview just before Easter week-
end. She pulls up her left pant
leg, revealing an enormous scar.
But even with 14 inches of Kim Gaynor, the head of the Vancouver Opera festival, is seen at the opera’s facilities on April 13. Gaynor took a hard fall off her horse, which landed her
metal in her, Gaynor still had an in the hospital for a few weeks, three months before the festival’s launch, making the festival planning a challenge. RAFAL GERSZAK/THE GLOBE AND MAIL
opera festival to plan, no easy
task in an arts environment better than my dog,” she says. “I With the hopes of creating a fes-
faced with aging audiences and MORE TO SEE don’t know how long I’ll keep tival feel on the outdoor plaza,
................................................................................................................................
declining sales. With no WiFi in them, because actually my the possibility of rain is not
the hospital, friends wheeled In addition to the three opera student composers and writ- entire house and car and dog thrilling. And the Queen Eliza-
her over to the closest Starbucks productions, here are five ers collaborate with two sing- are covered in little sparkles.” beth Theatre, the venue for Otel-
so she could get some work worthy events at the VO ers and a pianist to create Gaynor will certainly still be lo and Dead Man Walking on
done. Further complicating mat- Festival. new chamber opera works. using those crutches (perhaps alternating dates, was not built
..........................................................
ters, she was robbed twice dur- May 3, 5, 10 and 12, 3 pm, restyled) when the inaugural to accommodate works in reper-
ing her ordeal – her phone and Ethical Justice in Festival Tent Vancouver Opera Festival opens tory. There are no wings or
..........................................................
e-reader stolen from her hospi- the 21st Century on April 28. Taking place prima- backstage areas that can ade-
tal bedside while she was in a You’ve seen the film, now Ute Lemper rily at the Queen Elizabeth The- quately store the sets. So the
drug-induced sleep; and back at meet its inspiration. Sister The legendary German singer atre, the Vancouver Playhouse company commissioned a single
home, while immobile upstairs, Helen Prejean, author of the makes a rare Vancouver ap- next door and on the Queen set that would serve both shows
an intruder entered the house book Dead Man Walking, joins pearance with her show Last Elizabeth Plaza, the festival is (but decorated so that it will be
and walked off with her com- a panel to discuss the death Tango in Berlin, with songs by packed with promising program- unrecognizable from opera to
puter. With replaced electronics, penalty, incarceration and Piaf, Brel and others. May 4, 8 ming. opera).
she did as much work as she their alternatives. April 29, pm. Orpheum Theatre (with a There are three core produc- Then there’s the all-important
could from the hospital and 4:30 pm, Festival Tent free talk May 5, 4:30 pm at the tions: Verdi’s Otello, Mozart’s box office. VO moved to a festi-
..........................................................
home. Festival Tent) The Marriage of Figaro and Jake val model to ensure the future
..........................................................
“I knew that would all be un- The Carmina Burana Heggie’s Dead Man Walking, with viability of the company as it
der control and people kept me Sing-Along Tanya Tagaq libretto by Terrence McNally, deals with universal challenges
up to date,” she says now. Watch from your seat or reg- Never miss an opportunity to based on the book by Sister Hel- facing the opera world. Gaynor
“Obviously, had there been big ister to rehearse and perform see Tagaq, the Polaris Prize- en Prejean. Prejean herself will says tickets are selling, but she
problems, it would have been with the Vancouver Bach winning throat singer who appear at one of the comple- concedes the buzz has been
different because I would have Choir and sing onstage. May puts on a mind-blowing mentary festival events, many slow to build.
been not able as well as normal- 3, 8 pm, QET show. May 12, 8 pm, Vogue taking place in the Festival Tent “It’s only just now that we’re
..........................................................
ly to deal with them, but we Theatre on the Queen Elizabeth Plaza. starting to see press coming out
..........................................................
haven’t really run into any of New Works Project The Plaza will be animated with about the festival, so I’m still
those yet.” In four open workshops, UBC Marsha Lederman an opera-inspired video install- really waiting for the big excite-
Still, it was an awful lot to ation by artist Paul Wong on ment,” she says. “I think festi-
deal with as the inaugural Van- enormous screens, playing until vals, for them to be successful,
couver Opera Festival around on my crutches as best I Mirhady, VO’s head of costumes, the action shuts down each have to have a level of buzz
approached. Not only is it a new can,” she says. came to her rescue. “She took night. And unlike many other that happens. Now, it’s a new
festival, which has replaced the As crutches go, they’re quite my crutches and brought them events that take place in that festival so that’s harder to
traditional season model at VO, lovely. Gaynor had finally been back at the end of the board space, the festival will not be generate … but I’m still hoping
but Gaynor herself is also new back on her feet – well, one of meeting bedazzled,” Gaynor cut off from view with fencing. that that will happen. So that’s
to the company, having taken them, anyway – making a grad- says. Gaynor had intended to “I wanted to have something the anticipation thing right
over from James Wright only ual entry back into the work- use them like that only for the open and inviting,” Gaynor says. now: wondering ‘will the fire
this past July. “There’s never a place when she attended a gala, but the ultimate fashion “I wanted a made-you-look catch?’ ”
................................................................
good time to smash your tibia, board meeting ahead of the accessory has turned out to be a effect.” There are challenges
but it’s kind of the worst time company’s big gala on March 31. fine ice-breaker. “Everywhere I with putting on this festival that The Vancouver Opera Festival runs
with the new job and the festi- She was bemoaning the ugliness go, people smile and talk to me. don’t involve bone fractures – April 28 to May 13 (festival.van-
val coming up. But I will hobble of her crutches when Parvin It’s a conversation starter. It’s some quite Vancouver-specific. couveropera.ca).

THEATRE REVIEW

Though this be madness, yet there is method in’t


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Prince Hamlet of Kurt Cobain about her. The effect of this is twofold. On
Written by William Shakespeare Early on and in her more upset the problematic side, it can
Directed by Ravi Jain scenes, she has a tendency to make the show feel as though it
Starring Christine Horne and speak in a flat tone and too fast is taking place in the past tense,
Dawn Jani Birley for her torrent of words to com- which is compellingly fatalistic
At the Theatre Centre in Toronto municate much beyond numb- in certain moments, but merely
### ness. flaccid in others. (Thomas Ryder
When Hamlet’s mind is fully Payne’s unwavering underscor-
................................................................
awake, however, Horne is in fine ing doesn’t help – imposing an
REVIEWED BY form – emotionally accessible in unfortunate stamp of sameness
J. KELLY NESTRUCK introspection, very funny when to the tone.)
................................................................
she dips into a kind of slacker Thematically, however, this

N ormally, it would be a bad


thing to come out of Hamlet
raving about Horatio – but direc-
sarcasm. This Hamlet seems pet-
rified of sex, keeping to pecks
with Ophelia – and imagining
new structure draws your atten-
tion to how much of Hamlet is
about silences and secrets – and
tor Ravi Jain’s bent, bilingual the romps between his mother, how much is the action really is
production of William Shake- Gertrude (Karen Robinson), and people tattling or telling.
speare’s tragedy now on in uncle as a neon-pink nightmare. It struck me here that Hamlet’s
Toronto is blessedly far from We see this mental image of journey is from making Horatio
“normal.” “incestuous pleasure” at the swear to “never make known
Prince Hamlet, as this Why Not back of the stage – before Horne what you have seen tonight” to
production in association with Dawn Jani Birley, right, plays Horatio in Prince Hamlet during a dress unleashes an unsettling scream him making his best friend
Soulpepper is billed, begins rehearsal in Toronto on April 18. CHRIS YOUNG/THE CANADIAN PRESS that leads her into “to be or not promise to “tell my story.” The
where Shakespeare ended, with to be.” question of whether to trust
Horatio standing amid the production. But for a hearing playing the title role – as far as I Having just seen into Hamlet’s what you see or what you hear is
bloodbath of the fencing match, audience member such as can tell, the first female Hamlet brain, we feel the deep, deep omnipresent even as the dual
beginning to tell those who just myself, Birley – who gives the in a major professional produc- dread in his fear of “what ASL and English tracks of the
showed up what happened. most evocative, emotionally tion in Canada. dreams may come” after we show deconstruct the very di-
“So shall you hear of carnal, engaged performance here – But the casting of Horne shuffle off this mortal coil. chotomy of hearing versus see-
bloody and unnatural acts, of adds a sensational second layer doesn’t really register as radical Horne connects with and com- ing, what it is to be an audience
accidental judgments, casual to the show with her gestural because the gender of the actors municates this well-worn speech (one who hears) versus a spec-
slaughters, of deaths put on by language. in this production rarely match in a way I thought was not lon- tator (one who sees).
cunning and forced cause,” he I’ll never forget her haunting up with the characters. Instead ger possible. There are some wonderful sec-
says. retelling of Ophelia’s drowning, of two women in the show, here As Hamlet says when he sees ondary performances – to single
Or, rather, she signs. leaning backward slightly, her there are only two men in the the ghost of his father, “The time out only two: Maria Vacratsis’s
Horatio is played by the actor hand bouncing above her nine-person cast; one, Rick Rob- is out of joint” in Jain’s adapta- short and short-tempered Polo-
Dawn Jani Birley – a Saskatche- mouth, creating bubbles in the erts, is playing Claudius, while tion – which sticks to Shake- nius is an officious lackey who
wan-born deaf artist who has air – a stream, and then a few in- the other, Jeff Ho, is playing speare’s words, but remixes sits halfway between White
had an extensive career in Fin- dividual ones and then nothing. Ophelia. Gender-blind casting, them. Designed by Lorenzo House press secretary Sean Spic-
land. Once we flash back to the This was much more chilling like colour-blind casting, works Savoini, his production on a er and Melissa McCarthy’s popu-
start of Shakespeare’s play, she than Gertrude’s famous retelling best when it is pervasively play- wooden platform surrounded by lar parody of him; and Hannah
remains on stage for the entire of the same ever is; as is so often ful like this. piles of dirt is told as a flashback, Miller stands out staying in the
show as narrator, sometimes the case, even Shakespeare’s Horne’s Hamlet makes a strong but also contains flashbacks background sharply drawing a
translating Shakespeare’s lines best-known scenes can reach us first impression – arriving late to within flashbacks. So, for exam- variety of smaller roles including
directly into American Sign Lan- in surprising new ways through the stage for the preshow ple, we cut between Ophelia’s in- Guildenstern and the Player
guage (ASL), sometimes speak- translation. announcement. Wearing a shape- teractions with Hamlet, and her Queen.
................................................................
ing to all with a more universal I walked into Prince Hamlet less black shirt with long sleeves telling her father, Claudius and
poetic physicality. expecting the most notable she can tuck her hands into; her Gertrude about them – Andre du Prince Hamlet (theatrewhy-
For deaf spectators, she’ll be aspect of Jain’s production to be blond hair, wavy and at grunge- Toit’s lighting making all of this not.org) continues to April 29
the primary entry point to this the fact that Christine Horne is singer length, there’s something crystal clear. at the Theatre Centre
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O
HEALTH & FITNESS GLOBE LIFE & ARTS • L3

Fuelling on the fly: It’s truly gut-check time


For endurance athletes, training the stomach to adapt to calorie-rich snacks is key to an eat-and-run (or cycle) regimen
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

ALEX HUTCHINSON
JOCKOLOGY
jockology@globeandmail.com
................................................................

A mong the lesser-known skills


that ex-track star Mike
Woods has picked up in his five
years as a professional cyclist is
the ability to scarf down an arbo-
rio rice cake loaded with sugar,
coconut oil and cream cheese in
the middle of the peloton, ideally
before a sudden breakaway
makes it too hard to eat and
breathe at the same time.
“Going from running to cycling,
there was a big learning curve in
all aspects of the sport, and diet
was certainly one of them,” says
Woods, a 30-year-old Ottawa
native who turned to cycling in
2011 after a series of stress frac-
tures derailed his running career. Your digestive system can adapt and respond to repeated challenges, so you can eat and run with fewer problems. ISTOCK
On the track, Woods was a mid-
dle-distance specialist: His 3:57 driving alongside him during muscles. There are two key types ning motion. For Woods, eating
mile from 2005 still stands as a RACE CAKES training runs in the mountains of of transporter that move carbo- plain yogurt every morning and
..........................................................
Canadian junior record. But as a Ethiopia and handing him bot- hydrate across the intestinal wall; taking a sport supplement from
cyclist with top pro team Can- The “soigneurs” on the Can- tles of concentrated carbohydrate by training while consuming car- Sound Probiotics has helped with
nondale-Drapac, he’s often com- nondale-Drapac cycling team solution, in an attempt to im- bohydrate, you’ll increase the digestion. And for the last two
peting for several hours at a prepare special rice cakes for prove his ability to absorb carbo- number of these transporters in days before a race, he follows a
time; his road race at last sum- Mike Woods’s mid-race feed- hydrate on the run. the intestine, as well as their effi- low-residue “five-year-old’s diet”
mer’s Rio Olympics took more bags. When Gebrselassie set his first ciency. with no vegetables, red meat or
than six hours. That means Here is the recipe: marathon world record, in 2007, In practice, one of the best other high-fibre foods, in order to
refuelling on the go is crucial to 6 500 g of short grain rice he was able to stomach far more ways to train your gut is to sim- reduce bloating.
his success – even though, as 6 1 litre of water fluid and carbohydrate than dur- ulate your race plan in training. During races, in addition to rice
many would-be marathoners and 6 1 tbsp of sugar ing his earlier attempts at the dis- Start by figuring out how much cakes, he’ll receive a mid-race
cyclists discover, eating and hard 6 a pinch of cinnamon or vanil- tance. Over the course of just fuel you’re aiming for; for races feedbag with a banana, an OTE
exercise don’t always mix well. la extract more than two hours, he downed longer than two hours, a goal of sports bar and perhaps a waffle
By some estimates, 30 per cent 6 1 tbsp of coconut oil two litres of sports drink and about 60 grams of carbohydrate filled with Nutella or speculoos.
to 50 per cent of endurance ath- 6 300 g of low-fat cream cheese water, as well as six gels. an hour is ideal but challenging And he carries gels with him,
letes regularly experience gas- Cook the rice, water, sugar, Training the gut focuses on two for most people. which are easier to swallow when
trointestinal problems, such as and cinnamon/vanilla. Mix key goals, Jeukendrup explains. Then figure out how much you the pace is hard.
bloating, nausea and diarrhea. the cooked rice with coconut First, to reduce bloating and full- can tolerate in training – and All that has taken a while to
One solution, according to a oil and cream cheese. Wrap ness, you want to ensure that gradually, over the course of master. But then again, a CT scan
review published last month in the resulting slab in cling film, food and fluid exits your stom- weeks, push the limits of what after the Olympics revealed that
the journal Sports Medicine, is cool it overnight in the fridge, ach quickly. Training immediate- you find comfortable and tolera- Woods had raced on an undiag-
“training the gut.” then cut into chunks. ly after a meal, or while ingesting ble. nosed fracture in his left femur,
..........................................................
Just like your muscles and deliberately high volumes of flu- Ultimately, Jeukendrup notes, the consequence of a mass wipe-
heart, your digestive system can Alex Hutchinson id, will help speed stomach emp- digestive challenges vary greatly out in the Tour of Poland earlier
adapt and respond to repeated tying. between individuals. You may that summer.
challenges, so that you can eat It will also likely reduce your struggle to reach 60 grams an So compared with the intrica-
and run with fewer problems. example, competitive eaters can perception of how full you feel, hour, but if gut training increases cies of peloton etiquette and bike
The idea that the gut is adap- eat 70 hot dogs in 10 minutes: by even if there’s still fluid in your your limits from 20 to 40, that’s handling, maybe learning to eat
table has long been recognized progressively stretching their stomach. still a significant gain. You can Nutella waffles on a bike isn’t
anecdotally, says Asker Jeuken- stomachs through techniques Second, once the food and fluid also experiment with different such a tough job after all.
................................................................
drup, the author of the review, such as drinking large volumes of have passed from the stomach to forms of fuel: While cyclists tend
who is currently a visiting profes- fluid. the small intestine, you want to to favour a mix of solid and liq- Alex Hutchinson’s latest book is
sor at Loughborough University Jeukendrup has worked with speed its absorption into your uid food, most runners have Which Comes First, Cardio or
in Britain and the head of mys- athletes, including retired mara- bloodstream, where it can be trouble with solids due to the Weights? Follow him on Twitter
portscience.com. That’s how, for thon great Haile Gebrselassie, quickly delivered to fuel-starved up-and-down jostling of the run- @sweatscience

Are you calling in sick because of your mental health?


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

This is part of a series examining are a resource and not the ene-
the mental-health experience in my. They don’t have authority to
Canada’s workplaces. This series change policies or benefits.
supports The Globe and Mail and
Morneau Shepell’s Employee Rec- 6 2. When off work, understand
ommended Workplace Award, what your employer believes is
which honours companies that put the most important job for you.
the health and well-being of their Your sole job when you are off
employees first. Winners for 2017 work is to do what you can to get
will be announced at a conference well. This can include counsell-
in late spring. Sign up to receive an ing, exercise, diet, rest and fol-
e-mail about registration for 2018 lowing a treatment plan that
at employeerecommended.com. may include skill development
................................................................
such as taking coping courses.
BILL HOWATT Using your time off productive-
ALLISON COWAN ly is likely the single best predic-
................................................................
tor for which employees will

H ave you ever felt you’re hav-


ing a difficult time going to
work owing to your mental
successfully return to work and
be able to get well and off disa-
bility.
health? Your employer invests in disa-
It’s estimated that 500,000 bility management programs to
employees call in sick every day help employees get back to work,
in Canada because of mental ill- not to create a system that sup-
ness. Depression and anxiety cost ports them to be off for an indef-
the Canadian economy at least inite period. Most programs
$32.3-billion a year, and $17.3-bill- come to an end and if a person
ion a year is lost in foregone GDP uses all the time allotted they
because of lost productivity, will transition from short-term to
according to a recent Conference long-term disability.
Board of Canada report. When a
person with a mental-health 6 3. Get ready to return
issue needs to take time off from If you are taking sick days because you can’t handle work, it may be time to get some help. ISTOCK to work.
work, their organization’s attend- If you are off work with a mental
ance-management policy will aged internally or externally, Accountability should be planning to return to illness, find out what you need to
define their leave options, but have a common goal – to help work and have a sense of that successfully get back to work. It’s
employees also have an impor- employees get better and back to Every employee owns their men- timing. This will help you define helpful to work with your case
tant responsibility in this pro- work as quickly as possible. tal health, but it’s not advisable what’s needed for success. It’s worker to frame and design a
cess. These systems are driven by poli- to self-diagnose and develop important to be clear on your return-to-work plan that engages
................................................................
cies that are designed to hold your own treatment plan. It is skills and abilities, and what your direct manager as well as
Awareness employees accountable to pro- always best to work with your accommodations and support human resources.
vide evidence that they are in- medical doctor, in consultation will help you in your role. It’s beneficial to stay in touch
If you’re struggling to be at work, deed sick and have a treatment with a mental-health profession- with trusted peers at work and
this may be an important sign plan to get well. al, to determine the best treat- 6 1. Understand your employer’s your manager.
that something is not going right, Attendance- and disability- ment and how time off work will attendance and disability man- This helps to keep you plugged
and you could benefit from sup- management programs provide a help you, and what you will do agement program. in to your community and feel
port. Taking some time off work type of insurance for employees with your time off to help you Regardless of your employer’s connected. You don’t need to
may be what you need, but a to get help in times of need, but get better. Taking two months off program, it’s valuable to learn share your personal health issue
week off work may not achieve they shouldn’t be seen as an en- and doing nothing other than sit- how it works. The objective is to with people; just providing gen-
the outcome you need to get titlement. They provide a helpful ting at home likely will not help support employees to successful- eral updates and asking what’s
healthy. benefit that can provide time to you cope when you return to ly and safely return to work as new is one way to keep yourself
Many employees who call in get well when the leave is used work. Your employer may in fact quickly as possible. Case workers plugged in.
................................................................
sick a day here and there because correctly. It is well recognized have supports in place to help. facilitate an organization’s at-
they’re not mentally up to it are, that getting help sooner leads to These supports could include tendance and disability manage- Bill Howatt is the chief research
in essence, self-diagnosing. If this better outcomes for employees extended health-benefit plans, ment program and will work and development officer of work
is your strategy and you start to with an illness. structured stay-at-work pro- directly with you with a set of force productivity with Morneau
call in sick on a regular basis, this These programs are not grams, workplace accommoda- defined rules. Shepell in Toronto. Allison Cowan is
coping mechanism will likely designed to get employees out of tions and assistance in getting Their primary goal is to be sup- the director of Workplace Health
draw attention. You may also be work because they don’t like medical treatment. portive and to hold you account- and Total Rewards Research at The
................................................................
missing out on the supports that what they’re doing. Employees able to ensure you are doing Conference Board of Canada.
................................................................
your employer has in place. Or- who don’t comply with the rules Action what you can to get back to
ganizations that have a defined outlined by the program are risk work. Add your voice and take part in our
attendance- or disability-man- of losing the benefit or being dis- When you leave work because of Typically, you will be assigned a short mental-health survey:
agement system, whether man- ciplined by their employer. a mental-health issue, you case worker to support you. They (tgam.ca/mentalhealthsurvey)
L4 • GLOBE LIFE & ARTS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

FROM PAGE 1

When irksome in-laws Martin: Not all pain is physical

live in the neighbourhood


.....................................................................................................................................

9 That was a crucial difference


in the medical assistance E.F.
and Maier-Clayton received.
film, we watch her apply for med-
ical assistance in dying, under
Belgium’s 2002 euthanasia law,
Take the high road – confronting them will only make things worse Maier-Clayton, who was diag- including interviews with her
nosed with obsessive compulsive psychiatrist Dr. Lieve Thienpont.
disorder, generalized anxiety and Finally, despite Thienpont’s reluc-
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................
a conversion disorder, similar to tance, de Schutter secures the
get so many questions about fam- did to you until about the age of E.F.’s, “did not qualify under our right to end her life with a doc-
ily and neighbours is because of 28, at which point you have to let law,” Wiebe said. That meant she tor’s help.
one thing they have in common: the issues go, and try to become “couldn’t even assess him,” for Here’s the thing. Now that she
You can’t choose them. the best possible version of your- MAID, using the clinical guide- had death as an option if her des-
And you do tend to have to deal self. lines to determine “mental suf- pair worsened, de Schutter felt
with them. I suppose you can And it doesn’t sound as if your fering” that she had developed calmer, as she explained to the
DAVID EDDIE avoid/turn your back on family. husband is being his best possible over 40 years as a practising phy- audience at a Canadian screening
DAMAGE CONTROL Harder to avoid neighbours, version of himself. sician. of the documentary last fall. She
damage@globeandmail.com though, as you suggest. Maybe your in-laws aren’t ei- Wiebe says helping a patient believes that there will eventually
We had neighbours once who ther, throwing around terms such die should never be an easy call, a come a time when she will have
................................................................
had an issue with us. They felt we as “mentally ill.” But that’s on decision that is “absolutely” more an assisted death, but for now,
THE QUESTION had scooped them on a piece of them. onerous when the suffering is she is hopeful enough to carry
................................................................
real estate (our current domicile) And who knows? Maybe your caused by a mental illness rather on. Road to Mercy producer
My husband has recently decided they had their eye on and a right husband is in the right. (As usual, than, say, terminal cancer. But Nadine Pequeneza told me that
to go to battle against his parents to and would accept no peace of- I wish I had more information: difficult should not mean impos- de Schutter has written a book
regarding a whole slew of child- ferings or even an offer of the God, or the devil, depending who sible. E.F.’s suffering was more about her experience and is
hood issues. While I support him, house itself. you talk to, is in the details.) enduring and overtly demonstra- working with caregivers to in-
I know very well his parents will What made it extra horrible was But dollars to doughnuts, con- ble than Maier-Clayton’s, who crease their understanding of
never change. What’s worse is I I would see the not-speaking-to- fronting them will only make was 30 years younger, but that mental illness in people such as
have now heard that they think me wife of the couple every- things worse – and could lead to a doesn’t mean his pain wasn’t real. herself.
that I am a bad influence and that where. For some reason, whenev- permanent rift. “I believe that Adam’s suffering Wiebe has seen the same phe-
I must be “mentally ill,” because er our eyes met, my hand would Of course, he could find a way was terrible and it was probably nomenon with her own patients.
they think I am the one pushing pop up like a marionette and my to approach them in a delicate, irremediable,” she said. She re- “They are so grateful to be given
him into these confrontations. face would stretch in a reflexive circumspect, kinder-gentler fash- mains “very conflicted” about the permission [to die], and then
Worse still, we all live in the same rictus. She would just glare and ion and get it all off his chest. Maier-Clayton’s relatively young they don’t need it, or they need it
neighbourhood. I feel sick to my turn away. To say: “Mom, Dad, these are age, but to turn away from a much later,” she said. “It just
stomach about leaving my house Of course, our kids became my issues, they’ve been simmer- patient in distress, as the law gives them the ability to put up
for fear I will run into them and friends. Played in the sandbox ing and festering all these years, demands with mental illness, dis- with so much more.” A similar
what I might say. I pretty much together while she glowered at now it is time for me to unburden tressed her mightily. (The govern- option might have offered Maier-
never want to see them again me. Of course, my kid bopped her myself.” ment has initiated a review of the Clayton the sustaining beacon he
after this. Do I confront the issue? kid with a toy truck and we had to But what, in the end, is the ban on mental illness, which is needed.
Do I try to make amends or do I sort it out. … My point being: Bat- point? As you said yourself: “His due in 2018, but so far, it is not Maier-Clayton’s suicide
simply do as Oscar Wilde says and tling with neighbours sucks. parents will never change.” required to hold consultations behooves the rest of us – at least
“always forgive your enemies; Whenever you battle with anyone Why not just get it all off his with patients or their families or those of us who believe in patient
nothing annoys them so much.” you wind up carrying around a chest to you, or a therapist, or required to produce any recom- autonomy and think that medi-
What should I do? terrible psychic load, and who friends or other family members mendations.) cine should be practised in the
................................................................
needs that? or some combination? “I am my own saviour,” Maier- best interest of patients – to re-
THE ANSWER In your case, it will go double, Bottom line: In your boots, I’d Clayton wrote in his final Face- spect the suffering of the mental-
................................................................
because you’ll be battling with persuade your husband to forget book post, before reportedly con- ly ill. We can’t leave it to
First, stop mowing my lawn with both family and neighbours all about going to battle with his par- suming an overdose of Nembutal, vote-wary politicians and risk-
the Oscar Wilde quotes! I’m the rolled into one. ents – and basically forgive what- a drug he almost certainly averse medical associations to
one who’s supposed to be throw- No. Better, far better, to figure ever it is and let it go. acquired illicitly on the Internet. campaign for an equitable MAID
ing those around like confetti at a out a way to get along. Thenceforward: Lead by exam- That’s what happens when we law. After all, it took more than
parade. Basically, I think you have to ple. Even if they’re rude to you, rob suffering patients of hope. 20 years after Sue Rodriguez lost
I’m kidding: That’s a good one. talk your husband down from the kill them with kindness. They kill themselves alone and in her Supreme Court challenge to
Actually, even though I’ve been a (metaphorical) ledge of his war- Have them over for a nice din- secret, often by violent means. decriminalize assisted suicide. We
lifelong Oscar Wilde fan, I hadn’t like stance with his parents/ ner and just … be nice to them. Some of them botch it and end can’t wait for another constitu-
heard it before, so thank you. neighbours. Why not? After all, as Oscar up in worse condition than tional challenge to recognize that
Thank you also for the challeng- You don’t say how old he is, or Wilde said: “After a good dinner before they tried to end their not all suffering is physical. That
ing, two-tiered question. Here at what his “issues” are, and of one can forgive anyone, even lives. struggle is Maier-Clayton’s legacy
Damage Control HQ, we get a lot course I recognize there are some one’s own relatives.” Maier-Clayton’s deplorable sit- – and fighting for it might make a
................................................................
of questions about family, and a things parents do to their off- uation reminded me of Amy de difference to you or somebody
lot of questions about neighbours spring that are so harmful they’re Are you in a sticky situation? Send Schutter, a Belgian woman who you love.
................................................................
– but yours is, as far as I can impossible ever to get over. your dilemmas to damage@glo- appeared in the 2016 CBC docu-
remember, the first about people But my rule of thumb vis-à-vis beandmail.com. Please keep your mentary Road to Mercy. De Schut- Sandra Martin’s book A Good
who are both, thus doubling the run-of-the-mill “issues” is: You submissions to 150 words and in- ter, 29, has refractory depression Death, which is shortlisted for the
difficulty and fanning the friction. can complain and whine and clude a daytime contact number so and a history of self-harm and Donner Prize, has just been released
One of the reasons I think we moan about what your parents we can follow up with any queries. multiple suicide attempts. In the in paperback.

In CJF J-TALKS:
Partnership JOURNALISM MATTERS.
with #CJFjtalk

THE MEDIA AS OPPOSITION: COVERING TRUMP IN A POST-TRUTH ERA


ONE EVENING
They are among the world’s most unrelenting truth seekers. In TWO TALKS
their first live joint appearance, these renowned, award-winning
journalists and authors will discuss the pressing need to apply TORONTO
constant, critical pressure on an American president who threatens MAY 24, 6:30PM
the very fabric of democracy, journalism, civil society and the truth.
ROY THOMSON HALL
60 SIMCOE
STREET

HANNAH SUNG
GLENN GREENWALD NAOMI KLEIN AMY GOODMAN JEREMY SCAHILL MODERATOR

In this two-part Toronto event, our first discussion features Amy Goodman, host and executive producer of Democracy
Now! ; Naomi Klein, journalist and syndicated columnist; Glenn Greenwald, Pulitzer-prize winner and co-founder of The
Intercept ; and Jeremy Scahill, war correspondent and co-founder of The Intercept . Their conversation will be moderated
by Hannah Sung, video and podcast producer for The Globe and Mail .

The second discussion features Matt Taibbi, author


of the recently published Insane Clown President:
Dispatches from the 2016 Circus and contributing
editor to Rolling Stone, in conversation with David
Walmsley, editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, on
journalism’s response to this ongoing circus and
chaotic presidency.
Taibbi’s book, along with the latest books from our other DAVID WALMSLEY
speakers, will be available for purchase at the event. MATT TAIBBI MODERATOR

Visit the Roy Thomson Hall box office,


FOR TICKETS: roythomsonhall.com or call 416-872-HALL

WITH www.cjf-fjc.ca
THANKS The Lavin Agency
TO: info@cjf-fjc.ca
T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 O GLOBE LIFE & ARTS • L5

FROM PAGE 1

Jenner: ‘My road to womanhood has certainly been different’


.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9 There are strolls in little


black dresses through anony-
mous hotel lobbies, excursions
that leave Jenner self-conscious,
“a thinner version of Big Bird
standing out for the world to see
and snicker at after I pass.”
Excruciating electrolysis ses-
sions and hormone-therapy
treatments are conducted in
secret throughout the mid-80s.
Later, Jenner gets more daring,
changing into dresses and wigs in
a car near the family home – and
lurking paparazzi – in Los
Angeles. With a low, masculine
voice, Jenner makes sure never to
speak out loud, except for one
Starbucks run to order a vanilla
latte.
Applying and removing make-
up and false eyelashes, squeezing
into undergarments – the daily
rituals many women find oppres-
sive, Jenner finds liberating and
life-affirming. But Caitlyn’s gla-
mazon femininity has earned her
few friends in either the trans-
gender or feminist camps. When
she gushed about nail polish in
her first revelatory interview with
Diane Sawyer, her critics were
aghast, noting that the struggles
of womankind extend beyond
chipped nails. Others took issue
with Jenner’s wealth and her poli-
tics: She’s a Republican who vot-
ed for Donald Trump.
Jenner’s memoir presents a per-
son who is deeply conscious of Online bullying is worse than get-
her critics, desperate to avoid ting bullied in person in high
confrontation and constantly school or grade school. The real
apologizing – now to her trans- critical kids are the ones that suf-
gender critics, but before that to fer from depression combined
her three wives and six children with trans issues. It is devastating
for being “consumed and self- for these children, and a lot of
absorbed” by a lifelong gender them take their own lives. We
dysphoria. have to do a better job of accept-
“I am trying to learn as quickly ing the community.
................................................................
as I can,” writes Jenner, who visits
with the families of bullied trans- You expressed disappointment
gender children lost to suicide. “I after Donald Trump revoked
am very new to the community Barack Obama’s federal guide-
and I understand some still per- lines for public schools to let
ceive me as an outsider. My own transgender students use bath-
story, I believe, is worth telling rooms of their choice. You asked
because the pain and fear I expe- Trump to call you about it. Did
rienced was real.” he?
The Globe and Mail spoke with
Caitlyn Jenner from Los Angeles. Okay, this is where I’m at. I had
................................................................
Top: Caitlyn Jenner is seen at talked to Trump during the cam-
What does hiding the way you Glamour’s Women of the Year paign. We spoke on the phone
did for five decades do to a Awards ceremony in Los Angeles about a lot of these issues. He
person? in 2016. Jenner’s new memoir, The seemed to be on our side. I was
Secrets of my Life, is an inside look relatively optimistic at first.
Everybody has stuff they have to into her past challenges, present When he rescinded the federal
deal with in life. My identity was struggles and future optimism as guidelines with Jeff Sessions and
my stuff for my entire life. In the a trans woman in the spotlight. Betsy Devos, I couldn’t figure out
fifties and sixties, there wasn’t TOP: ELIZABETH LIPPMAN/THE NEW YORK TIMES; why he would do that. It was the
even a word for it. I didn’t know LEFT: RUVEN AFANADOR absolute wrong thing to do. Why
why I felt this way. There was no even go there? We’ve got so many
information. more important issues to deal
This continued all the way with in this country. Go deal with
through the eighties, when I was those and just leave us alone.
really struggling. I couldn’t even When I was at the inauguration,
find a therapist. It was a life of he said he wanted me to come
hiding and sneaking around and down and play golf with him – I
being embarrassed that my iden- just don’t know if he wants to get
tity was such an issue in my life. hung up on pronouns. stunned by it but still not into it. upsetting to transgender people? beaten by a 67-year-old trans
It’s not like you take two Aspirin What was it like for these wives woman. I would love to get four
and get plenty of sleep and wake Pronouns are extremely impor- – who clearly wanted their Gender-confirmation surgery is hours out on the golf course with
up the next morning and you’re tant, and I get that. I try to do my husband Bruce Jenner back? an extraordinarily personal thing. him to be able to talk business.
fine. It was extremely lonely. best to get all the pronouns right It’s not for public consumption That’s how a lot of things get
................................................................
but even I’ve messed up. I was six I did open up conversations with and it’s not something trans peo- done. But if I went down now and
After a lifetime of hiding, you months into my transition, and them, but it was the last thing ple really want to talk about. The played golf with him, the trans-
are abruptly thrust into the spot- somebody working in production they wanted to hear. I can’t general public thinks it’s all gender community would just
light as a mainstream transgen- called and I said, “Hi, it’s Bruce.” blame them for that. I under- about what’s between your legs. destroy me. If I do anything now,
der spokesperson. My daughters Kendall and Kylie stand that it’s difficult when you It has nothing to do with that. It’s it’s got to be behind closed doors.
................................................................
How was that for you? have asked me, “What do we call transition. I respected if they about what’s between your ears.
you?” I said, “ ‘Dad’ is going to were not into it. I get it. We’re The day after she has that sur- A trans friend of yours talks
The public and the press put me work for me. I’m your dad. I’ll better friends now with both gery, a trans woman is no more a about the first day she wakes up
in a position where, all of a sud- always be your father till the day Chrystie and Linda. In a lot of woman than she was the day and goes to bed without think-
den, I represented this entire you or I die.” Sometimes “Dad” ways, we’re fine. With Kris, it before surgery. She is just more ing once about gender. Have you
community, which is not the and “she,” they kind of get was a little closer and tougher for comfortable with herself. had that day?
................................................................
case. I’m a representative for my messed up a little bit. But my her. Plus, we spent 23 years
story. daughters do a very good job. I together. People are pruriently obsessed I am very pleased at where I’m at
................................................................ ................................................................
spoke to Kendall on the phone with your surgeries but also in my life. This woman has lived
Disenfranchised transgender today and she goes, “Yes, ma’am.” You say that your stepdaughter with your sexuality. They want inside of me since I can remem-
women take issue with you as a She’s getting it. Kim Kardashian was the most to know if you’re gay or straight ber. Maybe it’s time to let her live
spokesperson because of your But I don’t get hung up on it. I sympathetic. As you’re chucking – post-transition. Where do you and give her an opportunity.
privilege. You seem acutely know people are going to make Bruce’s clothes, Kim carts her stand on those questions? Bruce pretty much did everything
aware of your critics, writing out mistakes. favourite pieces away. In a clip – there was nothing left for him
................................................................
the words “I am white. I am enti- from Keeping Up With the Kar- I have no idea. I’m not looking to to do. Let’s take little Bruce and
tled. I have wealth” in a bold You explain that you consider dashians, Kris Jenner smells the date – men, women, anything. I put him inside and let her live. It
font in the book. You face a trans yourself a trans woman, not a suits and cries, mourning that have no problem being by myself was very liberating to let her go.
protest at one of your appear- woman. What is the distinction Bruce is gone. Do you empathize in my home. I’m set in my ways. I always want to wake up in the
ances and you distinctly remem- to you? with that? If I can find a really good friend morning excited about the day. In
ber the protest signs. “You are down the way, I would have a the old days, when I was training,
an insult to trans people,” one My road to womanhood has cer- [Chuckles] She can be pretty dra- friend. I would wake up in the morning
................................................................
reads. How does it feel to be an tainly been different. I will never matic at times – on the show. I excited for the day to start. I had
outsider all over again? have a period. I will never bear a understand that. It’s tough. But How are the challenges for trans weights to lift, I had workouts to
child. So I’m very comfortable we didn’t go our separate direc- teens different today than what do, I had competitions coming
It hurts. If a trans woman writes with the words “trans woman.” tions because I was going to go you were facing, completely up. I lost that in my life for many
something [critical of me], I have It’s the way my life has been. and transition. It had been 23 alone, in the 1960s? years. I couldn’t care about the
................................................................
this terrible problem where I just years and things had changed. next day. In going through this
call ’em up. I’ve done this on nu- There is clearly division among We both mutually decided that it My journey is a lot longer than transition, that excitement for
merous occasions. I tell them, trans women, but there is also was best for both of us to go in many journeys of people today. life has returned. I got the old
“You don’t know me. You don’t division between feminists separate directions for many rea- Today it’s a different world. The mojo back.
................................................................
know my intentions.” They don’t about trans women. Some femi- sons. big change for our community
................................................................
know where my heart is. Yes, I’m nists argue that trans women was the Internet. It opened the This interview has been edited
white – can’t do anything about can’t just take on the label of The book was leaked and tab- entire community up. Trans- and condensed.
................................................................
that. Privileged? My experience “woman” after enjoying the loids have been obsessing over gender people can now get a lot
being trans is much different perks of masculinity all their its final revelation – your gender more information at a very young Follow me on Twitter:
than theirs, I will admit to that. lives. What’s your feeling about reassignment surgery. age, and that’s good. It also hurts. @ZosiaBielski
But I’ll never apologize for work- that?
ing hard all my life and making a I had “it” done and that already
good living. That’s what this People criticize trans women snuck out and it’s been all over TODAY’S SUDOKU SOLUTION TODAY’S KENKEN SOLUTION
................................................................ ................................................................
country’s all about. because you go from what society the Internet. The tabloids love
We’re all trying to do the same treats as the powerful, masculine that, and so does the general
thing: to make it better for our role to what society thinks is a public. The book is about hones-
marginalized community and for weaker, feminine role. From this ty, about getting all this weight
the next generation. There’s no standpoint, I think women un- off my shoulders and getting rid
sense in criticizing anybody. I call derestimate themselves and the of it. That had to be part of it, but
my critics and say, “I’d like to get amount of power they have. I’ve I didn’t want to make it the main
to know you. Tell me your story.” always been with very strong part. My reasons for doing some-
It changes people’s minds. women. thing like that are in the book,
................................................................ ................................................................
and then I’m not talking about it
At the same time, you write Your first wife, Chrystie Scott, any more. I want to protect
about taking some of the “sanc- and your second wife, Linda myself and I want to protect the
timony out of the sails of the Thompson, did not take the community.
................................................................
trans community.” You make a news of your cross-dressing
point of noting that you’re not well. Kris Jenner was less Why is the fixation on surgeries
L6 • GLOBE LIFE & ARTS O T H E G LO B E A N D M A I L • M O N D AY , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 7

FACTS & ARGUMENTS


When all-natural was all there was
Eating homemade, free-range and local was the diet of the thrifty when I was a kid, Mary Jane McPhee writes
.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

M y parents were the original


hipsters. Picture this: Dad,
in his plaid flannel shirt, work
hunting. And yes, there was
venison and moose meat, too.
So au courant now in high-end
my folks could never eat this
way today.
My parents’ idea of parenting
boots and hair pomade keeping dining establishments. was pretty cool, too. Their con-
his pouf in place. Mom, in her My dad and uncles were avid cept was something like, “Out
cigarette capris, floral kerchief fishermen. We were often treat- you go. Come back when the
tied into her hair, Ray Ban avia- ed to fresh rainbow trout, lake street lights come on.” No orga-
tor sunglasses and wedge san- trout, whitefish, bass, pickerel nized play dates or structured
dals. Thing is, it was 1959. and a giant feed of smelts when lessons. Just get out there and
Everything old is new again. they were running. play with real, live friends. So
They were the couple you see Dipped in egg and flour and we roamed free and wide, cre-
today in Whole Foods or at the fried in butter. Fresh churned ating our fun from what was
pop-up farmer’s market in the butter. No dye. We ate smoked available in the natural world,
park, picking out local produce salmon, cured by my uncle, his scrounged or invented. We ska-
for their 100-mile diet. The recipe a secret. ted on our rink in winter. We
slow-food movement folks. Can you imagine the cost of skied on the local hill after
Organic. Free from. Foodies. this diet today? Homemade pies walking there by crossing the
Our food was all slow. All or- and cakes and cookies? Local Trans Canada Highway, climbing
ganic. And all from a 50-mile fruit, hand picked? Pails of the hill, strapping on our skis,
radius. We grew what we ate: creamed honey? We were a fam- skiing down trying to avoid the
beans, beets, peas, lettuce, rad- ily of six. We ate a lot. The rocks and repeating till we
ishes, potatoes, squash, corn, irony being, we ate this way in couldn’t do it any more. And
zillions of zucchini, cucumbers, order to save money. It wasn’t then walking home. No adult
tomatoes. even a choice. supervision. It was an everyday
Vegetables were blanched and We rarely went up and down thing. Summers were unstruc-
then frozen in our giant chest the aisles in the grocery store, tured and endless. The word
freezer to eat all winter long. picking prepackaged foods. bored was never allowed in our
Others were eaten fresh or Breakfast was oatmeal. Mom house.
made into chili sauces and pick- mixed our milk with powdered I see my parents in the young
les. Any day of the week, mom SANDI FALCONER/THE GLOBE AND MAIL milk to make it go further. This families at markets and in the
had a batch of something going, was the diet of the thrifty. We parks. Everyone wants what’s
depending on the season of made mayonnaise. All-natural labelled. Locally raised. Happy would have killed for a Pop best for their kids. It seems as if
course. ingredients, of course. No addi- cows. In-house charcuterie? It’s Tart. the draw to a simpler life is one
Crab-apple jelly to go with the tives or colouring. all the rage now. Dad made his So I chuckle to myself a little more goal for them to aspire to
roast pork. Strawberry jam As for hormone-free meat, ev- own blood sausage and head when I see the advertisements – and it’s one more expense.
made from the berries we erything we ate was raised on a cheese using the laundry sink in for fresh, local, organic food, One more thing to worry about,
picked at our granny’s berry local farm. It wasn’t uncommon the basement as his work space. like it’s a new idea or some- one more stress. Kind of ironic
farm. Raspberry and blueberry for us to come home at lunch Our Italian neighbours brought thing. Restaurants that feature the way things go. Full circle. I
jam made from the berries we on a school day and see half a over Italian sausage made in house-made charcuterie, artisa- wish them well.
................................................................
picked in prickly patches or on pig hanging in our basement. their basement. nal whole-grain baking, home-
hot rocks. Chokecherries were Our dad and uncle would cut it Free-range eggs were picked made jams and jellies, hor- Mary Jane McPhee lives in
made into jelly. Relish was into roasts and ribs and chops, up at the farm on the corner. mone-free meats, free-range Stratford, Ont.
made with corn and zucchini. wrap it in brown paper and We didn’t eat much chicken, but eggs. Don’t get me wrong, I ................................................................

And pickles! All kinds of pick- label it with a black grease pen- when duck-hunting season was think it’s great. It’s just that it’s Submissions:
les. Bread and butter being my cil. Into the freezer it would go. on, we could be sure there taken on an uber-cool vibe, facts@globeandmail.com
................................................................
favourite. Dills and pickled beets Bacon was smoked in a neigh- would be ducks in the freezer. available to those who can
and pickled green beans. Oh, bour’s smokehouse. Our side of Or geese. Sometimes on a Sun- afford it – such as the hipsters We want your personal stories.
and watermelon rinds. We had beef, raised on grass, was deliv- day after church, we would go in Whole Foods. The people try- See the guidelines on our website
homemade ketchup and home- ered butchered, wrapped and partridge hunting. Or woodcock ing to stretch a dollar such as tgam.ca/essayguide

BRIDGE BY STEVE BECKER Monday, April 24, 2017 Daily horoscopes at http://tgam.ca/horoscopes

This deal occurred in a match It seemed to depend only on the a second diamond ruff. Bergen opening trump lead, and it was
between the Netherlands and the location of the king of hearts. The then returned a low heart and, then a simple matter for Berkow-
United States in 1993. It dramati- Dutch could not have anticipated when declarer elected to finesse, itz to win the first spade lead and
cally demonstrates how accurate the price they would end up pay- gained a third diamond ruff to return a second trump to secure
defensive play can be as exciting ing for reaching a 50-50 slam. register an 1,100-point set! a two-trick set for plus 500.
and profitable as any offensive The slam was doubled by East, At the second table, with David Together with the 1,100 points
effort. Marty Bergen. By convention, the Berkowitz and Larry Cohen of scored at the other table, this
When the Dutch pair of Enri double requested an “unusual” the U.S. North-South, the bidding gave the U.S. a gain of 1,600
Leufkens and Beri Westra held lead. West, Eric Rodwell, had no went: points (17 IMPs) – virtually all of
the North-South cards, the trouble selecting a diamond, but it attributable to inspired defen-
bidding went as shown. East’s he was careful to lead the deuce, sive play.
opening two-heart bid indicated a suit-preference signal suggest- It might seem that declarer
a pre-empt in clubs, after which ing a club return. should lose only two hearts and
the bidding was natural. Bergen ruffed and, showing a spade at five clubs, ruffing two
The final contract of six spades complete faith in his partner, un- of his losing spades in dummy.
was certainly a reasonable one. derled his ace of clubs to obtain But Cohen unerringly found an

CHALLENGE CROSSWORD SUDOKU

1 2 3 4 5 6 QUICK
Across
7 8 1 Rumpus (11)
9 Stupid (7)
10 Subsequently (5)
9 10
11 Throw (4)
12 Intermittently (2,3,3)
14 A people (6)
16 Courage (6)
11 12 18 Malicious (8)
19 Final (4)
13 22 Joint of foot
and leg (5)
14 15 16 23 Make better (7)
24 Waging war (11)
17
Down
2 Bury (5)
18 19 20
3 Seized (4)
4 Rebellion (6)
21 5 Agreed (8)
6 Make up (7)
22 23 7 Republic of
central Asia (11)
8 Egotistic (4-7)
13 Predict (8)
24 15 Glitter (7)
17 Judicial
decision (6)
CRYPTIC 20 Beautify (5)
Across Down 21 Stimulus (4)
1 Financial experts 2 Fur on one animal (5)
making reports about 3 Said to be some
a model worker (11) form of test (4) INSTRUCTIONS
9 Unusual data about a 4 Not one on view (6) Friday’s Cryptic Fill in the grid so that each row of nine squares, each column of nine
chap is unshakable (7) 5 One means of and each section of nine (three squares by three) contains the
10 No head on the beer, making a garden Across: 1 Moral, 4 Foresee, 8 Sag, numbers 1 through 9 in any order. There is only one solution to each
that is strange (5) attractive (8) 9 Unbending, 10 Artiste, 11 Order, puzzle.
11 Something missing 6 Ends interim 13 Towels, 15 Treaty, 18 Day of
from the Irish flag (4) arrangements (7) reckoning, 19 Mascara, 23 Ian,
12 Settlements of lice 7 Whichever way you 24 Sceptre, 25 Trend. KENKEN
soon dug out (8) look at it, it adds up to Down: 1 Miscast, 2 Right away,
14 A feast on the bed? (6) the same thing (5,6) 3 Lauds, 4 Fibres, 5 Rancour, INSTRUCTIONS
16 No rise can be 8 It takes liquid 6 Ski, 7 Elgar, 12 Dramatize, 1. Each row and each column
arranged for the refreshment and 14 Left out, 16 Yearned, 17 Um- must contain the numbers 1
one at the top (6) leaves (3,8) pire, 18 Darts, 20 Sight, 22 Cue. through 6 without repeating.
2. The numbers within the
18 A top duet, perhaps, 13 A worker has fallen, heavily outlined boxes, called
right in fashion ... (2,2,4) but pass on (4,4) Friday’s Quick
cages, must combine using the
19 ... and female wear 15 A muscle that turns Across: 1 Allow, 4 Debacle, 8 Elm, given operation (in any order) to
that wasn’t long up or down (7) 9 Dirigible, 10 Blurred, 11 Allot, produce the target numbers in
in fashion (4) 17 Sew in pain (6) 13 Clinch, 15 Beaver, 18 Wheat, the top-left corners.
22 This gives one a sense 20 Having no flaws, 19 Abstain, 21 Bulldozer, 23 How, 3. Freebies: Fill in single-box
of proportion (5) though I have a lot (5) 24 Repulse, 25 Pansy. cages with the numbers in the
23 The work of these artists 21 He wrote music Down: 1 Acerbic, 2 Limousine, top-left corner.
is above our heads (7) for half the band 3 Wader, 4 Deride, 5 Baggage,
24 A tailor may make his and part of the 6 Cub, 7 Elect, 12 Leviathan,
mark with it (6,5) orchestra (4) 14 Citadel, 16 Runaway, 17 Dazzle, ©2017 KENKEN Puzzle LLC. KENKEN is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC.
18 Weber, 20 Scrap, 22 Lap. Dist. by UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com
O
NBA PLAYOFFS

The Bucks
stop here
The Raptors’ chance
of closing out the series
with Milwaukee hinges
on the team breaking
itself of the habit of
coasting after a win
PAGE 5