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Mexican Culture & Immigration

Emmy Francell, Willa Roberts, EmmaRose Cardwell, Isabel Provisor,


Alex Martinez, Elsa Pecore
Why Are We Here?
- Immigration
- Stereotype
- Religious and Political
Conflict
- Coyote

What Do You Know?


Background Information
* Immigration:
Background Information
* Immigration: The process of relocating permanently to a foreign country
Background Information
* Immigration: The process of relocating permanently to a foreign country

*Stereotype:
Background Information
* Immigration: The process of relocating permanently to a foreign country

*Stereotype: Widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular
type of person or thing.
Background Information
* Immigration: The process of relocating permanently to a foreign country.

*Stereotype: Widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular
type of person or thing.

* Religious and Political Conflict:


Background Information
* Immigration: The process of relocating permanently to a foreign country

*Stereotype: Widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular
type of person or thing.

* Religious and Political Conflict: Discrimination or war put upon someone with a
different political, ethnic or religious background.
Background Information
* Immigration: The process of relocating permanently to a foreign country

*Stereotype: Widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular
type of person or thing.

* Religious and Political Conflict: Discrimination or war put upon someone with a
different political, ethnic or religious background.

*Coyote:
Background Information
* Immigration: The process of relocating permanently to a foreign country

*Stereotype: Widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular
type of person or thing.

* Religious and Political Conflict: Discrimination or war put upon someone with a
different political, ethnic or religious background.

*Coyote: A person who smuggles Latin Americans across the US border, typically
for a high fee.
Stations!
The color of your card determines your group
Station 1 - EmmaRose and Emmy
Timeline - Guess the Order!
Timeline In Order
1. 1519 Colonization
2. 1819 Adams Onis Treaty
3. 1821 Mexican Independence
4. 1846 to 1848 Mexican American War
5. 1877 to 1911 Mexican Dictatorship
6. 1848 Gold rush
7. 1873 Depression
8. 1891 Immigration Act
9. 1910 Mexican Revolution- A hope of democracy
10. 1934 Rebuilding nation after leader is killed
11. 1985 Mexico is in financial crisis
12. 1992 NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement)
13. 2001 Yuma 14
History of the Mexican Government
-1821- Free from Spain

-1877-1911 Mexico is under a dictatorship

-1910 Mexican Revolution- A hope of democracy

-1934- Rebuilding nation after leader is killed

- 1985 Mexico is in financial crisis

-1992 NAFTA (North American Free Trade


Agreement)

(Mexican Timeline)
History of Immigration Through Mexico
● 1519- Colonization
● 1819- Adams Onis Treaty
● 1846 to 1848- Mexican
American War
● 1848- Gold rush
● 1873- Depression
● 1891- Immigration Act
● 2001- Yuma 14
(Mexican Immigration timeline)
Station 2 - Alex and Elsa
The Food
Pan de Dulce- Pan de Dulce is a very popular sweet treat
in Mexico, it means candy bread in Spanish.

Bunuelos- Bunuelos are a popular snack that was first


introduced to mexico when the spanish explorers came.
Facts and Statistics
● In 2014 11.7 million immigrants resided in the USA

● Other countries include; Canada, Spain and Germany

● California, Texas and Illinois are the most popular places of resettlements

● California (37%), Texas (21%) and Illinois (6%)

● 6% of Mexican immigrants (25+) had a bachelors degree

● 28% of Mexican immigrants live in poverty

(Pew Research Center)


Immigration Today (2018)
● Immigration is very relevant in this current election

● Last year the illegal crossings were they have been in

the last 46 years

● In 2017 only 310,531 people crossed or attempted to

cross the border

● In 2002 1,676,438 people crossed or attempted to

cross the border


Station 3 - Isabel and Willa
Push Factors
- Lack of jobs
- Family ties
- High crime rates
- Lack of financial security

(Andrew Schlewitz)
Pull Factors
- Economic opportunity/Employment
- Political security
- Education
- Better resources
- Family

(Emigration)
Illegally
● Hiring a coyote to smuggle them
across
● Hiding in a vehicle, while the
driver passes through
immigration
● First getting visa, and not
returning home after expiration

(VIVIAN YEE)
Legally
● Obtain Green Card
● Are you eligible?
● File USCIS form N-400 ($725)
● Attend citizenship interview

(UCIS) (Immihelp) (Rakoczy)


The Reaction- Media and the US
- 55 to 60% of Americans oppose building a wall on the
border
- 27% said they were a burden to the US, 63% said they
strengthen the country
- 65% said illegal immigrants mostly take jobs Americans
don’t want.
- 59% of registered voters said they should be allowed to
stay in the United States and to eventually apply for
citizenship
- Among Trump voters more said that illegal immigrants
should be offered a chance to apply for legal status (Karlyn Bowman)
Clip from Under the Same Moon
https://www.imdb.com/videoplayer/vi268042521
Culture Across Borders - Paper Flowers
- Mexican immigrants create a new life
for themselves in the US
- Many people maintain aspects of their
culture after leaving Mexico
- These paper flowers can be found all
over the United States

(Garcia) (Library of Congress)


Paper Flowers
- SIX sheets of tissue paper ONE pipe cleaner
Paper Flowers
- SIX sheets of tissue paper ONE pipe cleaner
- Stack papers neatly
Paper Flowers
- SIX sheets of tissue paper ONE pipe cleaner
- Stack papers neatly
- Fold like an accordion
Paper Flowers
- SIX sheets of tissue paper ONE pipe cleaner
- Stack papers neatly
- Fold like an accordion
- Tie pipe cleaner around middle
Paper Flowers
- SIX sheets of tissue paper ONE pipe cleaner
- Stack papers neatly
- Fold like an accordion
- Tie pipe cleaner around middle
- Cut edges
Paper Flowers
- SIX sheets of tissue paper ONE pipe cleaner
- Stack papers neatly
- Fold like an accordion
- Tie pipe cleaner around middle
- Cut edges
- Unfold edges
Paper Flowers
- SIX sheets of tissue paper ONE pipe cleaner
- Stack papers neatly
- Fold like an accordion
- Tie pipe cleaner around middle
- Cut edges
- Unfold edges
- Peel petals upwards
Meaning Behind Paper Flowers
- In Mexican culture, paper flowers are used in place of real
flowers to decorate parties, weddings, and religious
festivities.
- During seasons in which real flowers are not readily
available, paper flowers can be used to decorate churches.
- Different flowers hold different cultural significances.
- Known for vibrant colors and craftsmanship
(The Story Behind Mexican Paper Flowers)
Kahoot! What did you learn?
What are 3 things you learned?
Share with your group!
Questions? About us, our project,
or Austin High?
Work Cited
History.com Staff. “Mexico Timeline.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 2010,
www.history.com/topics/mexico/mexico-timeline.

Alchin, Linda. “Chinese Migration.” For Kids ***, Siteseen Limited, 1 Jan. 2018, www.emigration.link/.

“The Meaning of Different Flowers in Mexico.” Visual.ly,


visual.ly/community/infographic/animals/meaning-different-flowers-mexico.

“Mexican Immigration to America Timeline.” History of Medicine Timeline,


www.datesandevents.org/us-immigration-timelines/mexican-immigration-america-timeline.htm.

www.datesandevents.org/us-immigration-timelines/mexican-immigration-america-timeline.htm.+https://
www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/why-don%E2%80%99t-they-just-get-line.
“Mexican - Introduction - Immigration...- Classroom Presentation | Teacher Resources - Library of
Congress.” Apple Computers: This Month in Business History (Business Reference Services, Library of
Congress), Victor,
www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/immigration/mexic
an.html.

Yee, Vivian, et al. “Here's the Reality About Illegal Immigrants in the United States.” The New York Times,
The New York Times, 6 Mar. 2017,
www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/03/06/us/politics/undocumented-illegal-immigrants.html.

Forbes, Forbes Magazine,


www.forbes.com/forbes/welcome/?toURL=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.forbes.com%2Fsites%2Fbowmanmars
ico%2F2017%2F02%2F14%2Freading-the-polls-welcome-to-america-what-americans-say-about-immigrati
on%2F&refURL=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F&referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F
.

Zong, Jie, et al. “Frequently Requested Statistics on Immigrants and Immigration in the United States.”
Migrationpolicy.org, 27 Feb. 2018,
www.migrationpolicy.org/article/frequently-requested-statistics-immigrants-and-immigration-united-state
s.
“The Story Behind Mexican Paper Flowers, Ixtapa.” Ixtapa Mexican Grill & Cantina, 6 Nov. 2014,
ixtapacantina.com/story-behind-mexican-paper-flowers/.

“Mexican - Becoming Part of the United States - Immigration...- Classroom Presentation | Teacher Resources - Library of
Congress.” Apple Computers: This Month in Business History (Business Reference Services, Library of Congress), Victor,
www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/immigration/alt/mexican2.html.

“Benefits of Green Card or Permanent Resident Card.” Immihelp.com,


www.immihelp.com/greencard/benefits-of-permanent-resident-card.html.

Mic. “How to Work Legally in the US If You Aren't a Citizen.” Mic, Mic Network Inc., 11 Sept. 2017,
mic.com/articles/184327/how-to-work-legally-in-the-united-states-if-you-arent-a-citizen#.IR5vqSh75.

“Mexican Immigration to America Timeline ***.” Michael Jordan Timeline,


m.datesandevents.org/us-immigration-timelines/mexican-immigration-america-timeline.htm.

“Myths and Facts About Immigrants and Immigration.” Anti-Defamation League,


www.adl.org/resources/fact-sheets/myths-and-facts-about-immigrants-and-immigration.

Krogstad, Jens Manuel, et al. “5 Facts about Illegal Immigration in the U.S.” Pew Research Center, Pew Research Center, 27
Apr. 2017, www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/04/27/5-facts-about-illegal-immigration-in-the-u-s/.