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Saskatchew an Driver's Handbook / Basic information and rules of the road / Turning

Driver's Handbook
1 - Introduction 3 Basic information and rules of the road
2 - Saskatchewan driver's licence
program
3.15 Turning
3 - Basic information and rules of
the road
3.1 - Speed
3.2 - Distracted driving Right turns
3.3 - Stopping and parking
When approaching an intersection or driveway that requires a right-hand turn,
3.4 - Sharing the road
move as close to the right curb or right edge of the road as possible.
3.5 - The concept of gates
3.6 - Blind spots General procedure:
3.7 - Directional dividing lines
3.8 - Traffic lanes 1. Decide to make your right turn well in advance of the turn. Signal, check your rear gate and
3.9 - Lane position check your blind spot. When safe, move as close to the right as possible.
3.10 - Lane selection 2. Check for traffic, pedestrians and other real or potential hazards in or near the intersection.
3.11 - Signalling A basic left, straight ahead, right, left sweeping pattern will be sufficient.
3.12 - Changing lanes
3. Slow down (and shift to a lower gear if you are in a manual transmission vehicle).
3.13 - Passing
3.14 - Bus lanes and bicycle lanes 4. Check again for real or potential hazards.
3.15 - Turning 5. If there are no potential hazards, complete your right turn into the first available driving lane.
3.16 - Centre turning lanes
3.17 - Right of way See section 4.15 for rules regarding turning right on a red light.
3.18 - Stopping positions
3.19 - Roundabouts
3.20 - Highways
3.21 - Pedestrians
3.22 - Crossing urban streets
3.23 - Wheelchairs and medical
scooters
3.24 - Motorcycles
3.25 - Medians
3.26 - Parking lots
3.27 - Headlights
3.28 - Night driving and low
visibility
3.29 - Choosing the right speed
3.30 - When to dim your
headlights
3.31 - Rules related to vehicles
4 - Traffic signs and signals
5 - Basic driving skills
6 - Advanced driving skills
7 - Drinking, drugs and driving
8 - Complying with the law when
driving
Fuel-efficient driving techniques

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It is the driver's responsibility to move as close to the right curb, or right edge of the road, as
possible.

When a vehicle is parked in the lane closest to the right curb and near the intersection, the driver
must move into that lane at the first opportunity before turning.

Drivers may not make turns from the main driving lane.

Left turns
Left turns are more dangerous than right turns because you have to cross traffic coming from at
least two directions. This means that your searching pattern is very important and you should
continue to search as you cross the intersection. When you intend to turn left across the path of any
vehicle approaching from the opposite direction, you must yield the right of way to the oncoming
vehicle.

When making a left turn, you must approach the intersection and complete the turn in the leftmost
lane available for your direction of travel.

General procedure:

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1. If a lane change is required, decide well in advance to make your left turn. Signal and check
your rear gate and blind spot to see if there is a vehicle close to you. Move safely into the left
side of the left lane.
2. Check for traffic, pedestrians and any other real or potential hazards that may be in or near
the intersection. Use the basic left, straight ahead, right, left sweeping pattern.
3. Slow down (and shift to a lower gear if you are driving a manual transmission vehicle).
4. Check again for real or potential hazards. Watch out for motorcycles when completing a left
turn. Motorists failing to identify oncoming motorcycles when making a left turn is a
significant contributing factor in collisions involving motorcycles.
5. If you have to stop in the intersection to wait for oncoming traffic, be sure to keep your
vehicle parallel to the lane and your front wheels straight. That way if you are hit from behind,
you will not be pushed in the path of oncoming traffic.
6. If there are no potential hazards, complete your left turn into the first available driving lane.

A left turn from a one-way street to a two-way street should be made from a point as close as
possible to the left edge of the roadway. Enter the two-way street into the lane immediately to the
right of the centre line. If there are no parked cars in the curb lane it is appropriate to move into that
lane in advance of the corner. If there is a car in the lane be sure the driver is turning and not pulling
over to park.

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For a left turn from a one-way street to a one-way street, start the turn from the left edge of the
roadway and complete the turn in the extreme left driving lane.

When a vehicle is parked in a lane closest to the left curb and near the intersection, the driver must
move into that lane at the first opportunity before turning.

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For a left turn from a two-way street to a one-way street, turn from the lane next to the centre line
and enter the one-way street into the first available driving lane.

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Disclaimer
Google Translate is a third-party tool, and is not owned or administered by SGI. SGI is not responsible for any errors or
omissions as a result of the translation. In case of a difference in interpretation between the translated version and the
laws and regulations governing Saskatchewan drivers and vehicles, the laws and regulations prevail. See Terms of use.
Rev: 2015

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