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Lesson 02 Outcomes

 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in


race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domains.

Lesson 2 One-liners – Day of Faith/Doctrine of Inclusion/Weightier Matters

1. Do not take others perceptions and assumptions of another person to seriously.


Learn for yourself how the individual is by getting to know them (DOI)
2. When you get to know someone who is different than you talk about what concerns
you (in a respectful way). It is important to have understanding otherwise a
relationship will not last. (DOI)
3. See my mortal methods and short-term goals through the eyes of my ultimate goals.
(example – getting a bachelors and reaching exaltation) (WM)
4. “If we concentrate too intently on our obvious earthly methods or objectives, we can
lose sight of our eternal goals” (WM)
5. It is important that my diverse classroom is unified. (D:C 38:27) (WM)
6. Focus on what unites my class rather than diversity. (WM)
7. “If we are united on our eternal goal and united on the inspired principles that will
get us there, we can be diverse on individual efforts in support of our goals and
consistent with those principles.” (WM)
8. Unity can be achieved when diverse learners seek to know and value one another
for their strengths (DOF)
9. When you disagree with someone, tell them, but in a respectful way. (DOF)
10. When seeking to understand someone from a different standpoint, do your research
first, then come to them with well educated, thoughtful questions. (DOF)

Lesson 2 Reflection

The first concept I would like to focus on is concept #1 “When seeking to understand
someone from a different standpoint, I need to do my research first, then come to them
with well educated, thoughtful questions.” This concept is important and relevant to me
because my current life situation has me associating with new people. I recently have
started working two jobs, and am volunteering at a middle school. I am also in a YSA ward
and I do not know a lot of people in it. All of these experiences allow me to have
opportunities to get to know other people. In the past when I have gotten to know new
people and I learn something about them that I don’t have experience with (hence
diversity) then I will usually ask them a few questions about it and then move on. Very
rarely do I bring it up again. I feel there would be so much depth in the relationship if I
were to think of the conversation on my own time and do a little research and then follow-
up with my friend. I grabbed this concept from the Day of Faith videos. I was very
impressed with the commentator’s knowledge of all the varying religions. It was evident
she had done her homework, and because she had the conversations were rich.
As a teacher I will apply this concept by actively seeking to get to know my students
individually. If I find that a group of students is interested in a particular tv show or sports
team then I will research it and the next time they are talking about it I will ask them a few
questions and do my best to engage in the conversation. I also want to do this with deeper
topics, perhaps having to do with the diversity that exists in the classroom. I think being
genuinely interested builds unity. I will do the same thing as a parent, I feel it will build
unity within our home.
The second concept I would like to focus on is concept #8. It reads “unity can be
achieved when diverse learners seek to know and value one another for their strength.”
This concept is relevant to me right now, being that the current place of my life has me
meeting new people. A lot of the people I work with are very different from me. They are
not active in the church, they have different opinions than I do, and they are older than me.
While it would be all to easy to focus on the differences, I have come to find over the past
few days that when we help each other accomplish a task, our differences are swallowed up
in unity. It is amazing to see! As a future educator I want my class to be unified. I feel that as
students and myself focus on what students have to offer the class with be very tight knit.
When a class is unified learning can take place.

Lesson 03 Outcomes
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability, and religion.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domains.

Lesson 3 One-liners – Elder Oaks Speech at Chapman University, Morals in Children with
Robert Coles
1. The world today finds truth in moral relativism rather than divine doctrine. (Elder
Oaks)
2. Society runs successfully based upon citizens compliance with law. This becomes an
issue when society cannot agree on correct law. (Elder Oaks)
3. “The preservation of religious freedom in our nation depends on the value we attach
to the teachings of right and wrong in our churches, synagogues and mosques. It is
faith in God—however defined—that translates these religious teachings into the
moral behavior that benefits the nation.” (Elder Oaks)
4. One way I can promote religious freedom in my classroom is through allowing the
children to make their own decisions and distinguish between right and wrong.
(Elder Oaks)
5. Children long for a sense of security. Many do not feel this at home. As a teacher I
hope I can be that sense of security to those who need it. (Robert Coles).
6. Ruby Bridges had the gift of charity. I need to view my students the same way.
(Robert Coles)
7. Children come from all different kinds of backgrounds. My classroom needs to be a
safe place where they feel loved, respected, and joyful. (Robert Coles)
8. Children often show their feelings through drawings. I can use this as a strategy with
my students. (Robert Coles)
9. Children’s morals are a big factor of their parent’s morals. (Robert Cole).
10. In the classroom children often pick up on what the teacher values. The best way to
teach students values is to have them see you live them. (online group discussion)

The one-liner I have chosen to focus on is the importance of values in the classroom.
This was something that was discussed in the adobe connect group discussion I
participated in. The lead student asked what values we thought should be prompted in the
classroom. After thinking about it for a few minutes I came to the conclusion that my
students will value whatever I value. The concept of understanding that my students will
value what I value is important to me because I will need to know that what they see me
doing is what they will see as important. In thinking of how this relates to past experience,
one of my professors comes to mind. Brother Rich was my math professor my freshman
year. He was so disciplined in everything that he did. It was important to him to be a
disciple of Christ. Because it was important to him, it was important to me. His passion
inspired me to be better. Whatever he valued I seemed to value it in my own life as well.
Math became so much easier to me as I gained his trust and we had a level of
understanding.
In my future classroom I want my students to value choice. I feel it is so important
that individuals learn how to master the ability to choose right from wrong. I will promote
this by giving my students lots of opportunities for choice. I am still thinking on ways I can
show my students through actions how I value choice. One way I think would be beneficial
is for me to speak very clearly and with a definite tone. This is something that I currently
struggle with. I tend not to speak with confidence when I speak with other people, I become
really nervous and loose self-confidence. I think working on this is one way I can promote
choice in my classroom.
Another concept I would like to focus on from this lesson is the importance of
parents teaching morals to their children. I was amazed at all the children in Robert Coles
video. Each came from entirely different backgrounds. Some parents seemed very
intentional with their parenting, others seemed more passive. As a teacher, this is a concept
that is important for me to understand. When I am trying to figure out how to help my
students in my classroom I need to get to know their parents as well. Getting to know there
parents will help me see why the children behave the way that they do. I know that not all
parents will want to be as involved as I would like them to be, and I know I wont have the
time or means to connect with every parent. I hope I will have enough contact with the
parents who I feel need it most. In my past experience I have noticed that I definitely value
the same morals my parents do. I really believe morals are taught through example. I also
think intentionally teaching morals to children is a great thing. I listened to Lynn Scoresby a
few months ago and he gave a great talk on this!

Lesson 04 Outcomes
 Understand the relationship between poverty and education, and how best to
support students from socioeconomically challenged backgrounds.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domains.
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.

Lesson 4 One-liners – A broader and bolder approach uses education to break the cycle of
poverty, How Poverty Affects Classroom Engagement, The Widening Income, Powerpoint
Presentation

1. There is a debate that poverty has such a profound affect on a child’s education that
even the best teachers and schools may not be enough to help a child succeed. What
is my opinion on this? (B&B)
2. Students in poverty have little or no parental support in their education. (B&B)
3. Poverty stricken communities struggle to receive funding for local schools, making it
hard for the school to meet the needs of students. (B&B)
4. When schools offer social services (such as social workers, psychologists, nurses, or
dental services) “academic and developmental outcomes for children can improve.”
(B&B)
5. Education achievement in poverty stricken communities increases when school
hours are lengthened and students attend on Saturdays. (B&B)
6. If a school can improve in a poverty stricken community, chances are quality of life
for all residents will eventually increase. (B&B)
7. “Just as the phrase middle class tells us little about a person, the word poverty
typically tells us little about the students we serve.” (PACM)
8. 7 factors can typically set a low-income student apart from a middle-income
student: health and nutrition, vocabulary, effort, hope and the growth mindset,
cognition, relationships, distress. (PACM)
9. The powerpoint presentation presented the following question, “How can you build
self-reliance in children who come from proverished conditions?” I want to ask this
question when I am a teacher. I feel acting on the promptings recieved will greatly
impact the future of my students. (PPP)
10. How can middle class students help students who come from poverty stricken
homes? (my own thoughts)
One-Liner: There is a debate that poverty has such a profound affect on a child’s education
that even the best teachers and schools may not be enough to help a child succeed. What is
my opinion on this?

"Why is this target concept important?"

This concept is important because my teaching philosophy of this concept will


greatly affect my teaching style. I feel that children who grow up in poverty have
tremendous obstacles to overcome. I think the determining factor to whether a student can
overcome poverty is the student’s ability to act for himself. As a teacher I feel this is one of
the greatest teachings I can impart to my students.

How do the concept relate to things personally experienced recently or in the past?
I currently help in a local junior high classroom. My experience has shown me that it
is impossible for a teacher to cater to all the needs of the students. I help in a home
economics classroom. Some of the classes have 20+ students. I have noticed that the
teacher cannot help each student one on one. There is simply too much to do and not
enough time. I have noticed that the teacher is very good at clearly explaining the project to
the class and then having the students work on their projects themselves. By consistently
doing this the teacher is allowing the students freedom to work independently. I feel if
every teacher would do this students would build confidence in their abilities. When
students learn this, especially children who come from poverty stricken backgrounds, they
are laying the foundation to be independent for the rest of their lives.

Articulate how the concepts can/will be applied in the future as a teacher, parent, or
citizen?

When I am a teacher I want to set up classroom objectives that foster choice and
independence within my students. This is a concept that the students can take home with
them. I belivee this will help all students. Students how come from poverty stricken
backgrounds will learn that they are in control of their own lives. I hope this will help them
rise above poverty. In essence, I want to teach my students how to become self-reliant, thus
to think, and act for themselves. There is so much power in this! To be frankly honest I have
no idea how I am going to translate this into action. It all sounds good in theory, but in
application I have no idea. I need to think on this more. All the readings this week kind of
overwhelmed me. I have a strong desire to help my future students, I want the best for
them. It is hard when so many come from difficult circumstances. I just want to take each
one, hug them, and say, “I believe in you, you can do it!” I hope I will be able to show my
love for them through my actions. I am going to talk to the teacher I volunteer with at the
junior high and ask her what her opinion is on this subject. I trust her and her ideas.

Lesson 05 Outcomes
 Understand multicultural education and be able to implement culturally responsive
teaching practices in the classroom.
 Understand the relationship between poverty and education, and how best to
support students from socioeconomically challenged backgrounds.
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domains.

Lesson 5 One-liners
- The Culturally Responsive Teacher/Constructivism/Powerpoint/Framework for
Teachers Teaching in a Diverse Classroom/Group Meeting
1. The purpose of culturally responsive teaching is to implement cultural connections
to curriculum and teacher – student interactions to increase “academic and social
knowledge and attitudes.” (CRT)
2. I found this concept very interesting: most schools have white middle class values
and expectations as the norms while other cultures are overlooked. I am definitely
guilty of this notion. (CRT)
3. Research shows that teaching to a student’s culture identity improves academic
performance. (CRT)
4. Culturally responsive teaching is rooted in John Dewey’s philosophy that a student
will succeed when a student learns based on personal, real-life experiences. (CRT)
5. A continuum of responsiveness has been developed for teachers to measure their
degree of culture awareness. I believe that most teachers teach from a socialization
awareness. To me cultural relativism is an attainable goal for a teacher. (PP)
6. While all students come from diverse backgrounds, we are all the same in that we
are all on earth for the same purpose. Eternally, we have so much in common. (GM)
7. Throughout the course of my life I need to intentionally strive to learn about others
culture. (CRT)
8. As a teacher it is important to understand how my student learns, especially
through their culture eyes. (TDC)
9. I need to develop sociocultural consciousness, if not I will fall into the trap of most
teachers who “rely on their own personal experiences to make sense of students’
lives.” (TDC)
10. I want to see the good in all cultures, rather than the negative. (TDC)

One-liner: The purpose of culturally responsive teaching is to implement cultural connections


to curriculum and teacher – student interactions to increase “academic and social knowledge
and attitudes.” (CRT)

Why is this target concept important?

The readings we have completed in the past few weeks have clearly stated that a high
percentage of school drop outs are from minority groups. Many minority groups also make up
a high percentage of families living in poverty, and who are unemployed. A correct
understanding of this concept will allow a teacher to teach students from minority
backgrounds through the eyes of their culture. This is important because by so doing the
students will increase in academic performance, allowing them a higher chance of
overcoming the circumstances they so often find themselves in such as unemployment and
living in poverty. The reading mentioned that teachers who do this empower their students.
This is so powerful to me! Shouldn’t this be a goal for every teacher; to empower their
students! I have always felt that knowledge really opens doors for individuals. If a teacher can
impart knowledge to a student, especially in a way that helps them develop a love for ones’
own culture, then I believe that teacher is successful.

How does the concept relate to things personally experienced recently or in the past?
I am currently off track so I am living at home and working. When I am not at work I
volunteer at my local junior high. This is to help meet the requirements for the culture
learning volunteer assignment. I usually go 1-2 times a week. My hometown borders an Indian
reservation. Many students in the schools live on the reservation and come from a Native
American background. Their culture is very different from the rest of the students in the
school. The class I help out in is the home economics class, as that is my major. The students
are currently sewing aprons. One Native American student was very late bringing his fabric to
class, almost a week and a half to be exact. The teacher emailed his mom several times and
also made a phone call. This student’s mom finally responded and stated that the teacher
should not be upset with the student because he didn’t have his fabric in class. The parent
made no comment about him being able to get the material. The teacher offered to supply the
student with the necessary fabric, but the parent turned the offer down. This student then had
to sit for a week and watch his peers work on their projects while he could do nothing. One
day he finally brought his material. After bringing it he immediately went to work, and within
a few short days he was caught up.

I believe that the teacher was doing her best to be culturally responsive. She understood that
Native Americans who live on the reservation tend to lack accountability. She offered the help
she could, but respected when it was turned down. She also showed love and empathy toward
the student, recognizing that it was not his fault.

Articulate how these concepts can/will be applied in the future as a teacher, parent, or
citizen.

As I plan to teach in my hometown school division I will encounter many students who come
from the reservation. In hopes of being a culturally responsive teacher I have strived to take
opportunities that allow me to learn about their culture. I have taken a course at my local
community college, as well as associating with as many Native Americans as I can.

Lesson 6 Outcomes
 Understand multicultural education and be able to implement culturally responsive
teaching practices in their classroom.
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.

One-Liners
1. When working with students from different cultures I must adopt the mindset of
“how do they think.”
2. As a teacher I want all of my students to learn the skill of critical thinking.
3. As I teacher I want to have informed empathy this requires me, as the teacher, “to
feel with the students rather than feel for them.” This will “build a sense of
solidarity” between my students and I, it will also allow my students to put in the
work needed to do well. (Practicing Culturally Relevant Pedagogy)
4. As a teacher I don’t want to simply teach a curriculum, I want to teach the purpose
behind the curriculum. I want to ask myself the question “What is the reason for
why I am teaching this material?”
5. Native American culture teachers the importance of being in harmony with the
earth.
6. It is custom in Native American tribes for a child to look down when talking with an
elder; this is to show respect.
7. Native American children learn best when they are moving around.
8. In Korean culture many smile when they are confused or unaware of something.
9. Due to Confucianism’s concept of formalism, many Asian cultures emphasize chatty
people. This is why many Asian students will not participate in a classroom
discussion. The also wont participate unless they are positive they have the right
answer.
10. “Often East Asians, Koreans included, will remain calm and polite during a
conversation or disagreement. As Westerners, we may take that to mean everything
is in accord; we may not see any warning signs for impending trouble. Then
suddenly, they will become very hostile seemingly with out reason. This is a perfect
example of anthropologist Edward Hall’s (1983) description of high-context
culture, which means that individuals do not verbally transmit information. The
rules of the cultural expectations are implicit. As previously mentioned, this
behavior is contrary to that which is found in the United States, Which is a low-
context culture. Procedures, thoughts, ideas and feelings are explicitly verbalized in
U.S. Culture.” (Ariza p. 129)
11. This book is a good resource: Whelan-Ariza, E.N.; (2010) Not For ESOL Teachers:
What Every Classroom Teacher Needs to know about the Linguistically, Culturally
and Ethically Diverse Student Boston: Allyn & Bacon

One-Liner: As a teacher I don’t want to simply teach a curriculum, I want to teach the
purpose behind the curriculum. I want to ask myself the question “What is the reason
for why I am teaching this material?”

"Why is this target concept important?"

This concept is important because it deals with motivation. In education we are often
asked, “How do we motivate students?” While many use enticement through point/prize
systems and temporal satisfaction, such as candy, I believe there is a better way. I think the
better way is holding students accountable for their own learning. I feel students should
do their best, because it brings growth. I want my students to be motivated to do their
assignments because of the why behind them.

Explain how this concept relates to things personally experienced recently or in the
past

When I was a student in junior high and high school I would often find myself asking the
question “what am I supposed to learn from this? How will it benefit me in my life?” Often
times I could not find the answers to these questions. Looking back I can now see some of
the reasons as to why my teachers taught the curriculum that they did. When I got to
university I noticed that professors regularly have objectives for the concepts being
taught. You will find objectives on syllabuses, assignments, and tests. This has been a great
help to me because I can see the why behind the what. Looking back now I can identify
that my junior high and high school teachers did publish the objectives for the curriculum
we covered, but being in the mindset of a teenager, I failed to see it.

Articulate how these concepts can/will be applied in the future as a teacher, parent, or
citizen.

As a future teacher I do not want my future students to have the same experience that I
had. I want them to have a clear understanding as to why I am asking them to do a
particular assignment. I want it to be so clear to them that they become excited because
they desire the objective. A practical way to implement this could mean, before giving an
assignment I will introduce it and explain what the objective is. I could then as my
students why they feel this objective is important. It could turn into a great class
discussion. I could ask them who they know who has achieved the objective and what
impact it has made on the person’s life as well as the life of the students. I hope this helps
my students’ learning to become real, I want it to motivate them to work hard and desire
success in their education.

In my long list of past teachers the ones who have been most influential to me are the ones
who taught to my potential and encouraged me to learn because doing so would allow me
grow and develop. I will always be grateful for them for this.

Lesson 07 Outcomes
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domain.

Not True! Gender Doesn't Limit you!


P. Moss in Teaching Tolerance Number 32: Fall 2007

Gender Differences in Learning Style Preferences Among Undergraduate Physiology


Students (45 min)
E.A. Wehrwein, H.L. Lujan, and S.E. DiCarlo in Advances in Physiology Education (31: 152-157,
2007)

Ruby Bridges the Movie

1. Children respond to gender stereotypes when they have been taught phrases to say.
This is more affective than showing/telling stories to children of how others
responded to stereotypes. (NT!)
2. Children often succumb to gender stereotypes without realizing it, they no know
different. (NT!)
3. As teachers, we need to be conscious of the gender stereotypes we use and how they
affect children. (NT!)
4. Men and Women have different learning styles. Women prefer one learning style
while men prefer multiple styles. (GD)
5. Women prefer kinesthetic, read/write, and visual learning styles. (GD)
6. As a teacher, it is important to teach with a wide variety of learning styles to cater to
both men and women. (GD)
7. Children will respond reasonably well to stress when they have moral
guidance/values (such as religion). (Ruby Bridges)
8. As a teacher it is important to put the students first, rather than political
correctness. (Ruby Bridges)
9. When trying to understand a child, have them draw a picture of the situation they
are going through. This is a good way to know what they are thinking and how they
are feeling. (Ruby Bridges)
10. Children teach us how to treat other people. (Ruby Bridges)
11. Children don’t pay attention to political correctness, or differences in culture, race,
ethnicity, gender, class, religion etc. They pay attention to what is right and wrong,
and they learn what is right and wrong from adults (namely teachers and parents).
(Ruby Bridges)

One-Liner: Children don’t pay attention to political correctness, or differences in culture,


race, ethnicity, gender, class, religion etc. They pay attention to what is right and wrong,
and they learn what is right and wrong from adults (namely teachers and parents). (Ruby
Bridges)

Why is this important to me? / Explain how concepts relate to previous experiences.

Ever since I was in high school one of the ways my dad and I spend quality time together is
watching the news and discussing current events. I have always felt it was important to aware
of what is going on in the world. My dad is the same way. I find many news reports confusing,
and misleading. My dad is very helpful in teaching me what the news report is saying and he
always gives me his opinion on the matter. Over the past year there has been an increasing
amount of violence in America. Much of the violence is a result of differing views of culture
and diversity. Many find themselves superior to other cultures, races, and religions. With the
increase of violence, political correctness has risen to a new height. Offense is common, and
feelings are often hurt. With all of this going on I find myself repeatedly thinking, “How can I
be politically correct in my classroom when I do not agree with what is happening?” The story
of Ruby Bridges helped me see that children have no idea what is politically correct. Children
learn from their parents what is right and what is wrong. These values are emphasized in the
classroom as the teacher plays a role in helping a child determine what is right and what is
wrong. The story of Ruby Bridges helped me see that children learn from what we teach them,
therefore it is vital that we teach them moral values.
I was touched by the way Ruby’s parents taught her. They were very intentional, especially
Ruby’s mom. Oftentimes her mother’s faith was enough to propel Ruby in the right direction. I
think that holds a great lesson for us all. Having faith by living your religion is some of the
best missionary work you can do.

How will you apply this concept to your teaching?

In my classroom I will do just as the teacher in the Movie Ruby Bridges I will not pay attention
to what is politically correct, but rather I will by attention to moral standards. I was so
impressed with how the teacher just loved Ruby like a child of God, she had correct eyesight if
you will. She did not look through glasses of political correctness. I think this is a good lesson
in life. We often see things through multiple lenses, the more we peel away, the clearer it is to
truly see what is important. I want to view my students through the lens of eternity. I want to
teach them that everyone is equal, important, and has something to contribute. I know this
will be hard with so much pressure on teachers to teach certain ways, but I think if I handle it
right I will be able to successfully do it.

Week 8 One-Liners

Presenting an Inclusive Tool: Understanding Diversity, Learning Styles and Typologies of


Cultural Differences: A Theoretical and Empirical Comparison, Video

1. Just because someone has a disability doesn’t mean they are limited in other areas.
Teachers forget this. Just because a student cannot walk doesn’t mean he can’t think.
2. There is no evidence to show that teaching to a student’s learning style actually
increases there chances of success.
3. Culture of a country plays a big role in the learning style of the people.
4. Learning involves the totality of human activities: feeling, reflecting, thinking, and
doing.
5. Japanese, Chinese, French, and Arabic countries have a high context culture.
6. United States, Switzerland, Germany all have low-context cultures.
7. As hard as it is, do not judge others for decisions they make. We really do not know
what people have to go through. The saying is true, we never fully walk in someone
else’s shoes.
8. Parents make decisions for their children based upon their life experience. We can
do are best to persuade and help them make good decisions, but it ultimately falls
on the parents to make the decision.
9. Children have a hard time understanding things outside of their own culture.
Parents need to model this behavior for them.
10. Motivate students from a moral standard, an inner self.

One-Liner: Just because someone has a disability doesn’t mean they are limited in other
areas. Teachers forget this. Just because a student cannot walk doesn’t mean he can’t think.

"Why is this target concept important?"


This concept is important because every class has students who have disabilities. If I as a
teacher saw every student with a disability as not being able to contribute to the class, both
the student and the class would suffer greatly. It would also be very hard on the student. It
is so important to have a clear understanding of what a student can accomplish and focus
on that so that the student can be successful. As a teacher I will do my best to do my
research by doing my own research, talking to the parents, and trained professionals so
that I know exactly what a student is capable of. This will be a lot of work, but it is crucial
the student’s success so it is worth it.

Explained how the concept relates to things personally experienced recently or in the past.

I have been helping out at a local junior high. There are a few students who have
disabilities in the classroom that I have been helping in. I have been a little hesitant to help
these students because I am not sure what they are capable of. After reading this one-liner I
have now know I need to talk with the teacher I volunteer for and inquire to know the
abilities of the student. After reading this one-liner I feel so bad that I have judged these
students and been to worried about myself and my worries to be helpful to them.

Articulated how these concepts can/will be applied in the future as a teacher, parent, or
citizen.

As a parent if I have a child with a disability I want to have a “you can do it mentality.” We
will not focus on the “cannots” but rather the “cans.” If they can’t walk, then we will focus
on the fact that they can use their arms, and fingers, and that they have a brain to think. I
know there will be hard days, but I really believe having a positive attitude will benefit
everyone. I have a friend with a son who has a disability. She focuses on the cans that her
son can do. I have noticed the impact it has on the entire family. They are all very positive. I
think this is so inspirational. I want to be a parent like this. I also want my classroom to be
like this. It will be a great way to build community. After reading this one-liner I am going
to be better at paying closer attention to others who have disabilities and try to have
conversations with them that focus on what they can do. I think this will be a great way to
be more comfortable around others who have a disability. It will take practice, but I will get
there soon.

Lesson 09 Outcomes
 Understand multicultural education and be able to implement culturally responsive
teaching practices in the classroom.
 Develop an awareness and appreciation of the ways in which culture and language
influence learning.
 Increase their repertoire of strategies for supporting English language learners in
the classroom.
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domains.

1. There are four stages of adjustment for immigrants: honeymoon stage, hostility stage,
humor stage, and feeling at home stage.
2. The honeymoon stage involves happiness and excitement.
3. The hostility stage is when reality sets in and culture shock occurs.
4. The humor stage is when the new immigrant accepts their new country as their new
home and starts to building meaningful relationships with others.
5. The home stage takes place several years later, when the immigrant has a feeling of
belonging and a sense of home in their new country.
6. It is important to watch the homework load given to ELL students. It is exhausting to
function in a classroom all day where your first language is not spoken.
7. Acquiring second language acquisition occurs in 5 stages: pre-production, early
production, communicating in simple phrases, complex sentence structures, near-native.
8. Stage one of acquiring a second language is when a student knows very little, but can
understand a lot of what is being said.
9. Stage two of acquiring a second language comes when a student speaks one or two word
phrases.
10. Stage three of acquiring a second language comes when a student can communicate in
simple phrases and sentences.

One-liner: It is important to watch the homework load given to ELL students. It is


exhausting to function in a classroom all day where your first language is not spoken.

Why is this target concept important?"

This concept is important to me because it will help me help my future ELL students. I am
not an ELL, I have spoken English my entire life and have not learned any other languages.
Because of this, I will have a hard time relating to my ELL students. The content in this
lesson is extremely valuable to me because it will help me have an understanding as to
what my ELL students will experience. This will help me in creating lesson plans as well as
how I manage my classroom. My hope is that the knowledge I have learned and will apply
to my future students will help ELLs be as comfortable as they can be in the classroom.

Explained how the concept relates to things personally experienced recently or in the past.

I grew up in a small town, where the predominate language was English. Being close to an
Indian reservation has allowed me to be exposed to some blackfoot language, but I only
know a few words. Growing up a lot of my peers in school did not speak blackfoot fluently,
but their parents and grandparents did. After reading the research from British Columbia I
am more aware of the extreme effort and work it takes for students to be exposed to two
languages and the demand to be fluent in both. I have a lot of compassion for ELL, they
have a hard task ahead of them.
Articulated how these concepts can/will be applied in the future as a teacher, parent, or
citizen.

In my future work as a schoolteacher I will apply this content by being extremely careful as
to the homework load I will give ELL students. I will only give these students homework if
I feel it is crucial that they need to complete it. I will also inquire as to whether there is a
parent or sibling at home who is fluent in English and able to help. If there isn’t such a
person in the household then I do not it is necessary to send homework home with a ELL
student. I feel that this would add to the frustration and exhaustion ELL students feel. I also
want to create a meaningful relationship with ELL students so they know that I believe in
them. This may be hard to convey if they do not understand English, but perhaps my body
language will be enough to show that I care. In my community I will do my best to educate
others on the research known about ELL. This will help others to effectively help ELL
students they know. As a parent I will do my best to teach my children to be sensitive to
ELL peers and to reach out to them.

Lesson 10 Outcomes
 Understand multicultural education and be able to implement culturally responsive
teaching practices in the classroom.
 Develop an awareness and appreciation of the ways in which culture and language
influence learning.
 Increase their repertoire of strategies for supporting English language learners in
the classroom.
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domains.

1. English language learners now make up the fastest growing group of children ages
K-12 in the United States.
2. It is extremely hard for ELL students to learn when the academic language used by
teachers and textbooks is advanced English.
3. It is crucial that teachers identify challenging words and define them to students.
Some of these words could be: describe, identify, explain, formulate, etc.
4. It is extremely important to make content relevant to the student to ensure the
highest degree of understanding. A student from Guatemala may know much about
how to grow bananas, but little about the newest technology.
5. A way to teach to the needs of ELL is through sheltered instruction. SI helps
language development and concept comprehension. It is student-focused.
6. The Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol Model (SIOP) is a model designed to
help teachers create lesson plans to teach ELL students in an SI way.
7. The model has 8 components: preparation, building background, comprehensible
input, strategies, interaction, practice/application, lesson delivery, and
review/assessment.
8. If students do not know the academic language they cannot learn the content.
9. There are several pdf documents saved in Fall 2017 folder that have ideas for SI
strategies.
10. Using SI means you need to know your students one-on-one. This is crucial.

One-Liner: It is extremely important to make content relevant to the student to ensure the
highest degree of understanding. A student from Guatemala may know much about how to
grow bananas, but little about the newest technology.

"Why is this target concept important?"

This concept is important because if I cannot teach to the level of understanding for
my students I am not fulfilling my purpose as a teacher. As a future teacher I have always
had the mindset that my students come first. I feel that my success as a teacher will and
should be based upon the successful experience my students will have while in my
classroom. If several students in my classroom, specifically ELL given the subject of this
weeks activities, cannot comprehend content and application due to my inability to create
an environment to learn I will have failed as a teacher. The readings we did last week,
specifically the one research from the province of British Columbia, reported that
immigrants have extremely high stress levels, and feelings of discomfort in the first few
years of living in their new country. If students in my classroom do not understand content
because they can’t understand what is being spoken by me as the teacher or by the
textbook, then their stress will increase. This concept is important to me because when
applied successfully it will turn my classroom from teacher-oriented, to student focused.

Explained how the concept relates to things personally experienced recently or in


the past.

I had an experience just this week that relates to this concept. I have a friend who
just started a teaching practicum in a grade 3 class. Her mentor teacher asked her to teach a
40 minute art lesson on her third day. She mentioned to me that she was nervous to teach
because she had not had the opportunity to get to know the students yet and felt invalid in
teaching them because she didn’t know their needs and how to best instruct her lesson
plan. When I asked her what art project she would do she explained that she didn’t know
for sure, but that her mentor teacher gave her a few suggestions and she felt she would do
one of them. We left the conversation at that. The result of the experience is written in the
paragraph below.

Articulated how these concepts can/will be applied in the future as a teacher, parent,
or citizen.

After my friend taught her lesson plan I asked her how it went. She responded that it
went well, but she had a hard time keeping everyone engaged. She explained that this is to
expected as she is new and still building a relationship with her students. As I was talking
with my friend I couldn’t help but think on what I would have done in her situation. If I was
in her situation, I would plan an art lesson centered around introducing myself to the class
and allowing them to get to know me, as well as the students introducing themselves to me.
I would have done this by drawing pictures. We have learned much this semester about
how students share their feelings through art. I would have begun the lesson by showing
students pictures about my life, and then I would have drawn several pictures that
illustrate my life. I would then let them ask me any questions they want. After that I would
turn the time over to them and have them draw me a few pictures about their life. As they
would be finishing I would have them come and tell me about their picture. This would be a
great start to starting to get to know my students, particularly the backgrounds they come
from. This would help me to assess their knowledge in the content area we will be studying
in the future as well as the language barriers we face in the classroom.

Lesson 11 Outcomes
 Understand multicultural education and be able to implement culturally responsive
teaching practices in their classroom.
 Develop an awareness and appreciation of the ways in which culture and language
influence learning.
 Increase their repertoire of strategies for supporting English language learners in
the classroom.
 Assess individual and circumstantial responsiveness to the differences that exist in
race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, ability and religion.
 Collaborate with families by identifying the similarities and differences in
educational expectations of families across cultures and other domains.

1. When a student is not fitting in with the class set some time aside for the students to
interact without academics involved. Simply let them play with one another. (group
1)
2. When putting ELL students in groups with English speaking student, model good
behavior of interacting with the ELL student. This will help other students include
them better in the group. (group 1)
3. When dealing with a difficult student it can be helpful to ask the parents if they have
any suggestions to help solve the problem. After all, they know the student better
than the teacher. (group 2)
4. It is important for teachers to be aware of the conditions of the student’s home life.
They should know something about the student’s family makeup, immigration
history, hobbies, concerns, and strengths. (group 2).
5. When having a hard time knowing how to teach and interact with a student, it is
valuable to see how the child interacts with their parents. Sometimes seeing how
the child interacts with their parents will give you further insight. (group 3)
6. When lesson planning, plan an activity that you can give to students who finish
early. It may be good to have the early finishers teach the other students. (group 3)
7. When you have a refugee student in your class do your best to build a good
relationship with the student’s parents. (group 4)
8. Analyzing peers work is a great way to learn.
9. Group work allows you to create a diverse work based upon the backgrounds of all
group members.
10. Encourage group work in the classroom. Teach your students how to get over the
roadblock of “responsibility and accountability.”

One-liner: When dealing with a difficult student it can be helpful to ask the parents if they
have any suggestions to help solve the problem. After all, they know the student better than
the teacher. (group 2)

"Why is this target concept important?"


This concept is important to me because I firmly believe that mothers and fathers
are responsible for the welfare of their children, and that responsibility includes their
education. Because mothers and fathers have the main stewardship over their children I
feel it is important that I get to know the parents and strive to understand what their view
is on their child’s education. I also believe that parents are a crucial asset to understanding
behavior problems that may arise in the classroom.

Explain how the concept relates to things personally experienced recently or in the
past.

A few semesters ago I took ED200 Philosophy and History of Education. I loved the
class because we were able to dive deep into the issues teachers face as well as learn about
the philosophies of past world renowned educators. I remember the last day of the class
very vividly. All of us students formed a circle with are chairs and had a discussion. We
could ask any question we wanted. We were free to express are opinion as well as
encouraged to support are statements with references from the semester readings. I don’t
remember what the student before me said, but I remember that my response to their
question was that I felt that we needed to understand the family background of the child
and see if it relates to the problem that the child is currently having at school. I remember
my professor very quickly responding something along the lines of, “all teachers think it’s
the parents fault, and all parents think it’s the teachers fault.” I have never forgetting that
statement. It has really bothered me. I do not think my professor was right in implying that
teachers should not seek to understand a child’s family background. I do understand that
some parents wont bother to take interest in their child’s academic life, but I feel for the
most part a child’s parents and family members seek to help to the degree that they can.

Articulate how these concepts can/will be applied in the future as a teacher, parent,
or citizen.

As a future teacher I will seek to understand the family background of my students


by asking students about their families and doing several activities that will help me know
their family makeup. I will also introduce myself to the parents of all of my students and
encourage them to share any feedback with me about their child that will help me be a
better teacher. I believe doing all of this will create a teaching environment apt for success!
It all sounds so fun and exciting! I cannot wait until I can actually be a teacher and have my
very own classroom!
Week 12 One-Liners

1. When having students work with other students whether it be book work, group
work, or grading other student’s papers, always prepare them for it and teach them
how to do it. (like the book The Six Thinking Hats) (Group 5)
2. Teach respect in the classroom. The minute bullying occurs, address it. (Group 5)
3. When you have a student with special needs in your classroom it is important that
you as a teacher teach your students about the students disability and how they can
help. (Group 6)
4. Let all students introduce themselves to the class. Give them time to talk to the
entire class. I think this is a great way to build community. I think it would also be
fun to include these presentations as part of the classroom decorations and bulletin
boards. (group 6)
5. Encourage students to eat healthy and to have breakfast. It is hard for students to
concentrate when they skip breakfast. (group 7)
6. Try to incorporate nutrition into curriculum content. (group 7).

With this final reflection, you should go back to the course


readings/videos/PowerPoints and the outside sources your group considered and
discuss how you feel about the practices/strategies that exist (or talk about what
does not exist) that surround your target ill-defined problem.

For the group 7 project we chose to focus on Joey, a 6th grade student who lacks

understanding and knowledge of the importance of nutrition. Because of this lack Joey is

overweight and is teased by his peers. Miss Henry, his teacher, identifies the problem and

comes up with a lesson plan to target the problem. Miss Henry also talks with Joey’s

parents about the situation and together they come up with solutions to help Joey and his

family. One of the alternate strategies we found while working on part 3 of the project was

to have a classroom garden. I think this is a great idea! I think this is a great idea because a

classroom garden can transfer into several subject areas such as math, science, and social

studies. Not only will students be learning how to eat healthier by growing their own food,

but they can learn numeracy skills by figuring out how many seeds to plant and how far to
space them apart. They can learn the science behind how plants grow and nutrients they

need to be sustainable. They can also learn about what food grows best where they live

based upon the climate. With the added content that can be added to other subjects I think

it would be very beneficial to have a classroom garden.

Include how you felt about what you did and how working in a group impacted your
perspective and your product that was finally posted.
I felt like I did my best work with this project. For part 1 my part of the project was

to come up with the scenario. I initially did not want to do the topic of nutrition, but the

rest of my group members did so I knew that I had to go along with it. When I choose to

write the scenario I was a little nervous because I was not thrilled about the topic so I

thought it would be hard to be creative enough to come up with a realistic scenario. As I

started writing the scenario it came fairly easy and it started to be fun. In part 2 my part

was to write the script, I worked with another group member to do this. While writing the

script I had to break it up into several days. I had to do this because I would have a hard

time knowing how to express the characters as real people with real emotion. After I would

leave it for a day and come back to it I found that I could dive into the heads’ of the

characters again and realistically portray their actions and emotions. For part 3 of the

project my part was to create the slideshow and narration. I was very nervous to do this,

but felt that I needed to step outside of my comfort zone and try something new. It took me

along time to put the slideshow and narration together – about 3.5hrs. After I completed

the work I was very proud of it. It was hard, and time-consuming, but I felt the end product

was very high quality.

Consider your group and how you worked with them and what you wished you had
or knew if you were to do this project again.
I will be completely honest when I say that I am not a fan of group work. In the past I

have always been the one to do the majority of the work when it comes to working as a

group. I also have a hard time trusting other students with my grade. Doing this group

project has changed my view of group work. My team was so fantastic to work with. We

formed a group text right from the beginning and we all kept in contact throughout the

semester. We also had a bit of humor as well (I accidently sent them a text describing how I

felt about dating at BYU-Idaho that was supposed to go my sister but I accidently sent it to

the group text) we all got a good laugh out of it!

One thing that I really appreciated about my group was that not only were we all

accountable for what we said we would do, but everyone was very supportive of each

other. A few times throughout the semester I received text messages from a few girls in the

group asking if I needed help with my part of the assignment. Knowing that they cared

about me and how I was doing meant a lot to me. Overall I would say this group project was

fantastic. I highly recommend doing it again for your next online classes. It is so beneficial

to understanding and applying the content to the course. I especially loved the question in

part 3 when we are asked to address how are culture and diversity as a group impacted are

overall presentation. When I read everyone’s responses to that in my group my eyes were

opened and I really was able to see how diversity affects us all.