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ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION AND CAREER INTEREST TEST AMONG COLLEGE

COMMUNITY STUDENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 1
2. PROBLEM BACKGROUND ............................................................................... 2
3. RESEARCH OBJECTIVE .................................................................................. 4
4. LITERATURE REVIEW ..................................................................................... 5
5. METHODOLOGY .............................................................................................. 8
5.1 Instrumentation .......................................................................................... 8
5.1.1 A Quick Measure of Motivation Achievement Malay Version .......... 8
5.1.2 Career Interest Survey .................................................................... 9
5.2 Data Collection .......................................................................................... 9
5.3 Data Analysis .......................................................................................... 10
6. FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION ........................................................................ 12
6.1 Descriptive Statistic ................................................................................. 12
6.1.1 Analysis 1: Respondents’ Demographic ....................................... 12
6.1.2 Analysis 2: Achievement Motivational Test Score ........................ 14
6.1.3 Analysis 3: Career Interest Test Score ......................................... 15
6.2 Inference Statistic .................................................................................... 19
6.2.1 Analysis 1: Gender Effect on Motivational Level and Career
Interest Level .............................................................. ……… 20
6.2.2 Analysis 2: Influence Factors on Motivational Level ..................... 21
6.2.3 Analysis 3: Career Choice Effect on Career Interest Level ........... 22
6.2.4 Analysis 4: Motivational Level Vs Career Interest Level ............... 23
7. CONCLUSION ................................................................................................. 25
8. REFERENCE ................................................................................................... 25
APPENDIX 1: THE QUESTIONNAIRE FORM ......................................................... 27
APPENDIX 2: THE MANUAL OF ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATIONAL TEST AND
CAREER INTEREST LEVEL TEST .................................................. 28
APPENDIX 3: THE RAW SCORE OF ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATIONAL LEVEL ... 29
APPENDIX 4: THE CAREER INSTEREST LEVEL RAW SCORE ........................... 30
APPENDIX 5: SAMPLE OF RESPONDENTS’ ANSWER ........................................ 32
1. INTRODUCTION

A psychological test is a tool intended to measure undetected concepts, which


is also known as dormant variables. Psychological tests are naturally but not
certainly a sequence of problems that respondents have to solve. Psychological
tests are used to assess different mental abilities and qualities such as achievement
and ability, personality, and neurological functioning. Academic achievement, ability
and intelligence tests may be used for students as tools in school placement, in
determining the presence of a learning disability or a developing deferment in
identifying giftedness, or in following intellectual development. Intelligence testing
may also be used to determine vocational ability with students (e.g., career
counselling).
Personality tests are administered for different reasons, from diagnosing
psychopathology (e.g., personality disorder, depressive disorder) to screening job
candidates. They may be used in an educational setting to determine personality
strengths and weaknesses. One of the most prevalent theories of career choice
developed from personality psychology angle conveyed an artificial manner in which
individuals search for those professions that will aid them in practicing their talents
(Dumitru, 2008). John Lewis Holland showed six types of personality which include
social, conventional, artistic, realistic, investigative, enterprising, and six media
appropriate professional event liable to choice of concepts, facts, things or persons.
Career tests are tools that are intended to assist students to comprehend the
influence of various personal attributes such as choices, incentives, standards,
abilities and skills to their prospective achievement and fulfilment with different
choices of career and work surroundings. Whiston and Rahardja, (2005) stated that,
career tests in the last century have been used greatly in career development and
economy. The career tests are used by guidance counsellors, university career
service centres and vocational rehabilitation counsellors to help students make
career decisions that are more knowledgeable. The National Defense Education Act
of 1958, sponsored career guidance in schools in order to help college school
students decide on subjects to offer that will make them get to their chosen career
trail (Kapes, et al. 1994).
Career motivation tests are psychometric valuations that are used to
understand and classify students’ intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli. Motivation tests are

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used to measure the motivational purpose, independence, recognition, status, and
achievement of college students. Also, different people and organizations used the
career motivation tests to help individuals in making right career choices. Leitch,
(2017) indicated that, motivational test facilitate personal development. Individuals
have different beliefs and aspiration as to work and necessities in their job to feel
fulfilled and contented. Such aspiration may include power, money, social
interaction, fame, charity, achievement or freedom.
Motivation types are intrinsic and extrinsic, and each of the types has its own
advantages. Nonetheless intrinsic motivation is found to be more advantageous. It
has the tendency to be durable, self-sustaining, and students with intrinsic motivation
are found to be in personal control. According to a published study in a Journal of
Sport Psychology (1984), intrinsic motivation increases with a positive feedback but
reduces with a negative feedback. Extrinsic motivation is found when students or
individuals are motivated based on reward or punishment; by guilt of responsibilities;
by admitting to important activities even with lack of interest. Career tests benefit
students in realizing their talents and abilities. The test serves as a guide to the
students on getting focus in an appropriate career as they are being helped by
career counsellors. Students can be told their level of motivation towards a particular
career where they can function well. The tests saves time and are easily observed,
thereby getting a prompt results that are consistent. It is cost efficient.

2. PROBLEM BACKGROUND

A sure major and career choice is a good motivation for students to have in
completing college education. Nevertheless, studies have shown that majority of
college students are not sure about their career major. While those who choose a
major tend to change severally. Unspecified career goals by students is a factor that
put them in the danger of been college dropout or delay leaving college. Other
factors that might influence college students’ career choice include environmental
factor; where they live, people they see to have captivated them, parents influence.
Students’ Personality plays a significant role in making a right career choice that will
suit the profession potentials (Splaver, 1977). Many college students from a less
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privileged background may be less opportune to determine the type of career to
choose during a specific time in their lives. These call for special training motivation
program to help such students overcome enlightenment and social helplessness
(Thout, 1969).
College community students choose a career course for their future job based
on some aspects they know in that particular field but may not know all about the
chosen career. College students may not understand what is entailed in their interest
of profession, the subjects to be offered and the extent of work required. To help
students in their decision for definite career choice, they should be encouraged to
participate in career carnivals, internships, or job observation in order to expose
further other parts in a career field that college students know nothing about. The
Princeton Review, (2013) stated that business administration and management,
psychology, nursing, biology and education are top five college majors in career
decision making offers to students. (Beggs et al., 2008) asserted that some college
students decide on their major based on their academic skill. Though some college
students lack the necessary skills needed to succeed in some majors. There are
students who have the zeal for larger amount of work but have no intellect to do the
tasks that are required for their chosen field.
Students’ motivation is examined to be an important component that is
required for quality education (Palmer, 2007). Motivation enhances learning and
career decision making. According to Cherry (2010) motivation is ‘’the process that
initiates, guides and maintains goal oriented behaviors”. Brennen, (2006) considers
motivation to be “the level of effort an individual is willing to expend toward the
achievement of a certain goal”. In general, academic motivation is affected by
several individual and social factors. There are many motivational theories, but the
social cognitive theory (SCT) Bandura, (1986) describes the behavior of human
beings based on mutual interactions amidst an individual’s social environmental
factors, cognitive factors, and behavioral factors. The theory proposes that human
beings have cognitive factors such as self-efficacy and self-regulatory ability, active
adaptable and preparatory tactic in achieving certain drive. Motivation to learn is
described by the evidence that students’ thoughts, beliefs, and emotions allow their
behavior to be thrilled, focused, and continuous (Schunk, et al., 2008). Motivation is
group into extrinsic motivation which is the motivation of external factors that
stimulate the behavior of students and intrinsic motivation which is the motivation

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that occurs naturally in students mind. Intrinsic motivation is the main factor that
energies a student’s self-efficacy and self-regulation (Ryan & Deci, 2000; Ahmed et
al., 2013). Students different levels of motivation in agreement to their goals and
their tendency to approach are shown (Elliot, 2001). Intrinsic motivation is seen to be
more appropriate and effect improved outcomes of learning than extrinsic motivation.
Students’ styles of making decision, their personality proportions and motivational
procedures can aid school counsellors in individual and group career counselling.
College students’ awareness to determine career interest is an important
requirement for interest, commitment, and self-efficacy to improve. Dorsen et al.
(2006) found that students usually have a restricted understanding of obtainable
careers and desires for accomplishment. Career awareness can be increased
through career study activities and raise a sense of capability and possession that
becomes inherently motivating (Blustein & Flum, 1999). Increase in career self-
efficacy is normally revealed in students’ self-confidence in been able to complete
career-related tasks, and the expectation of optimistic outcome tends to influence
further career study and decision (Betz & Voyten, 1997). Students make a choice
from different career opportunities using various skills in the process of selection due
to difficulty in making decision.
A main goal among other goals of college education is to assist students in
realizing their real interests based on college interest’s development and cultivation.
Therefore, interest can be seen as been important with reverence to change and
contentment in life. Studies in positive and health psychology have shown that,
contentment and fulfilment in life are essential tools for happiness (Lucas, 2007;
Sheldon & Lyubomirsky, 2007). Interesting subjects and activities are essential in
determining one’s fulfillment (Sheldon & Elliot, 1999).

3. RESEARCH OBJECTIVE

The main purpose of this research is to examine the student achievement


motivational level and career interest level. Others objective include:
 Evaluate the difference between demographical factor (gender,
influence factor and career choice) and achievement motivational level
and career interest level.

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 Identify the correlation between achievement motivational level score
with and career interest level score

These research questions (RQ) have been develop in order to achieve the
stated research objective:
RQ 1: What is the level of college community students’ achievement
motivational?
RQ2: What is the level of college community students’ career interest?
RQ3a: Are males having higher motivational level & career interest level
than women?
RQ3b: Is there a difference in achievement motivational score
among five group of influence factor?
RQ3c: Is there any difference between career choice and career
interest level?
RQ4: Does achievement motivational level score correlate with and
career interest level score?
(Pallant, 2007)

4. LITERATURE REVIEW

Students choose a particular career interest due to motivations of cognitive


personal factors such as self-realization, need of independence, social status,
personal development and financial achievement, and environmental factors such as
social pressure, family professions or business, the labour market (Haase, 2011).
The factors that motivate students to choose a proficient career can influence the
curricula preparation and planning of the universities by increasing the number of
development programs and develop career counseling approaches to improve the
self-efficacy of students in several parts of their career decision making (Marinas C.
et al 2014). Mielu Zlate (2004) defines career as "succession of professions,
occupations, positions, experiences and roles of individual practiced throughout his
professional life along with their subjective interpretation resulting in different career
paths".

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According to Krapp (2003), the real interest of an individual “provides an
orientation when the individual has to make decisions about the directions of future
learning goals and the directions of the next step of the intentional learning and
development”. Vanessa F. et al (2017) examined the Impact of career course on
College Students’ Career Decision and Affective States and revealed that career
course had a significant positive effect on career decision and affective states. That
is to say, students’ ability to pilot the career decision-making process, particularly
increasing their career choice confidence can be influenced positively with a career
course. Also, the participants stated a high level of satisfaction with the choice they
make at the end of the career course. Similarly, there was a positively impact of the
course on students’ career affective state which makes them to become more
focused and motivated in their career plans.
Barbara Tuchel, a University Wisconsin-Stout’s Assistant Director of
Admissions was interviewed by the researcher, Michael Borchert, (2002) on the
opportunities taken by high school students for career choice. It was stated that
students at times go with their parents’ suggestion into a particular career field due to
confrontation and pressure on them, especially when the students have no present
plans of their own. Also, environment and marriage can play a large role in students’
career choice (B.J. Tuchel, personal communication with Micheal Borchert, June 18,
2002).
Different dimensions of parents’ behaviors influence children’s individual
beliefs while children’s beliefs have been revealed to influence their course choices
and career interests (Gniewosz and Noack 2012a, b; Simpkins et al. 2012). Baycan
& Nijkamp (2011) investigated the diverse attitudes, career motivations and
perceived leadership skills of university students in the Netherlands and analyzed,
compared and evaluated their interest in entrepreneurship based on gender and
ethnic. The results show that there are gender and ethnic-based differences in the
entrepreneurial interest of university students. There is high entrepreneurship career
interest as among immigrant males than among native males, while the most
motivated by ‘external factors’ such as family, friends, prestige, and financial gain are
females and males migrant. Kyong-Jee, et al (2016) examined medical students’
career choice motivation and its relationship with their academic interest and
performance for intrinsic and extrinsic group. The findings indicated that the intrinsic
group performed more than the extrinsic group in their GPAs, even though there was

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no significant difference in their previous academic achievements. The intrinsic
group showed high significant levels of academic interest.
Bullock-Yowell et al. (2011) revealed how the state of career decision, career
thoughts, and the stress of life are related among 232 college students in a
vocational course. The results showed that students have higher levels of negative
career thinking on increase in life stress and career stress. However, the rise in
negative career thoughts was related to lower levels of conviction and satisfaction
with choice.
Nyamwange, J. (2016) carried out a study on the influence of interest among
first year university students on career choice decisions and found the importance of
when students have prior knowledge about a career, it helps in the development and
cultivation of their interest in the career. Having a prior knowledge prepares the
students on the situation of a career before making decision to go into the career.
This prior knowledge can be learnt from research and conferences, training,
industrial attachment, mentorship, commitment, incentive and mixing with those in
the interested career. The interest of students in determining career choice decisions
is significant for an individual’s career.
Motivation affects commitment in academic tasks such as active involvement,
attention, and engagement. Likewise, task commitment improves motivation and
interest (Singh, et al. 2002). In a similar study by Bryan R. et al (2011) on high
school students’ learning science motivation. The study found that the students’
intrinsic motivation, self-efficacy, self-determination, and achievement are related
and consistence with social cognitive theory such that, the most related motivational
factor to achievement was self-efficacy. Career interests, choices, and educational
and occupational success have been influenced by thoughts, beliefs, and personal
and environmental factors (Petersen, 2014). More specifically, career interests were
shaped by self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goal orientation (Brown, 2002).

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5. METHODOLOGY

5.1 Instrumentation

The questionnaire used in this research was develop by A Quick Measure


of Motivation Achievement (Ray, 1979) and Career Interest Survey Malaysian
Version produce by Dr Nor Ba’yah binti Abdul Kadir from Universiti
Kebangsaan Malaysia and have been proved of their validity and reliability in
measuring achievement motivational level and career interest level (Nor
Ba’yah, 2014). It consists of three parts which include respondent background,
achievement motivational level test and career interest test. There are three
items in demographic part asking about students’ gender, influence factor for
continuing in tourism program and career choice in the tourism industry. In Part
II, there are 14 items measuring the achievement motivational level and Part III
consists of 25 items measuring the level of career interest. The full script of the
questionnaire has being attached in Appendix 1.

5.1.1 A Quick Measure of Motivation Achievement Malay Version


A Quick Measure of Motivation Achievement Scale is a tool to
measure motivation for individual’s achievement in the field of work. In
subsequent studies, (Cueva, 2006; deCharms, 1972; Elias & Rahman,
1994; Kolb, 1965; Lopez, 2008; Ryals, 1975; Smith, 1973) researchers
have found that levels of achievement motivation held by students in
educational settings can be increased, and are predictors of students’
success. In addition, this test tool is designed to examine the motivation of
respondents’ achievements globally. The survey had been administered
for respondents at the age of 18 and above and was conducted in written
method. The question is built in broadly means to allow them to formulate
interpretations and forming self-assessment. This test tool uses nominal
answer forms which are Yes, No and Not Sure answer and the
researchers need to explain and ensure that the respondents understand
how to respond to the questions correctly.

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5.1.2 Career Interest Survey
Career Interest Survey is constructed to review degrees of career
interest and career variety among the respondents. This instrument helps
individuals in making decisions and gains a better understanding of their
career interests. According to Crow (1987), the main reasons for an
individual engage in self-employment is because they have a high degree
of interest on job activities and have a personal ability to get satisfaction
from the job. This tool can be useful for individuals who was seek for a
job, people who want to change their career or students that was
considering career-related education This survey is conducted in written
method by using Yes, No and Not Sure answers form and required the
respondents to answer it individually. The explanation towards the
procedure of answering the questions was given and the data obtained
were confidential.

5.2 Data Collection

A questionnaire related to the level of motivation and career interest was


being circulated to the respondents in the study which is 30 students of
Community College. The respondents were briefed on the study conducted to
ensure a clear understanding among them. Respondents were informed about
the aims and the nature of the study and confidentiality was assured.

Diagram 1: Data Collection Process

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5.3 Data Analysis

Raw data was keyed into Microsoft Excel 10. The scoring manual was
referred to tabulate the raw score of the test (Appendix 2). Table and charts
were used to represent the data. The raw score will be converted into
standardized scores. The obtained scores were analysed using the software
SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Science). Descriptive statistic is used
to describe the demographical data and the raw score of both test (answering
RQ1 and RQ2) which will be presented in frequency and percentage.

In the Achievement Motivational Level Test, individuals who responded


NO is as much as 35% (5 items), the individual is considered to have no
direction in life. The scoring for answers YES = 2, NO = 1, NOT SURE = 0. For
item negativity (Item 1, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14), YES = 1, NO = 2, NOT SURE = 0. In
Career Interest Level test, individuals who respond NO is as much as 36% (8
items), the individual is considered to have no direction in life. The scoring is
YES = 2, NO = 1, NOT SURE = 0. For item negativity (Item 5, 6, 7, 10, 17, 18,
19, 20, 21, 24): YES = 1, NO = 2, NOT SURE = 0. The interpretation of scores
for both test are shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Interpretation of Score

Achievement Motivational Level Career Interest Level


14 - 18 = Moderate 25 - 29 = Low
19 - 23 = Good 30 - 34 = Medium
24 - 28 = High 35 - 39 =Medium High
40 - 50 = High

Before choosing any test to be used, the normality of tabulation of data


has to be proven first. Then inferential statistics will be used to explain the
difference among gender in motivational level and difference among career
choice chosen and interest career level. Correlation between influence factor
and career choice with the score of achievement motivational test and career
interest test also will be analysed. For purpose of this, four hypotheses were
derived as follow:

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RQ3a = H01: There is no difference in scores of both tests between male
and female groups

RQ3b = H02: There is no tendency for the rank in any influence factors to
be systematically higher or lower than the ranks in any
other influence factors. (There are no differences among
the influence factors)

RQ3c = H03: There is no tendency for the rank in any career choice to be
systematically higher or lower than the ranks in any other
career choice. (There are no differences among the career
choice)

RQ4 = H04: There is no correlation between student’s motivational level


and career interest level. There are no differences among
the Students’ motivational level and career interest level.

The summary of the statistics used in this research is shown in Table 2


below:

Table 2: Summary of Statistical Analysis Used in the research

Research Question Scale Statistic


RQ1: What is the level of college Ratio Descriptive
community students’
achievement motivational?

RQ2: What is the level of college Ratio Descriptive


community students’ career
interest?

RQ3a: Are males having higher Nominal Vs Ratio Mann Whitney


motivational level & career interest (2 group) Test
level than women?

RQ3b: Is there a difference in Nominal Vs Ratio Kruskal Wallis


achievement motivational score (more than 3 group) Test
among five group of influence
factor?

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Research Question Scale Statistic
RQ3c: Is there any difference Nominal Vs Ratio Kruskal Wallis
between career choice and career (more than 3 group) Test
interest level?

RQ4: Does achievement Nominal Vs Ratio Correlation


motivational level score correlate spearman test
with and career interest level
score?

(Pallant, 2007)

6. FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION

6.1 Descriptive Statistic

6.1.1 Analysis 1: Respondents’ Demographic


Table 3 show the findings of analysis conducted for the items in Part 1:
Respondent Backgrounds. Based on Table 4, there were 30 numbers of
students who were involved in this research. The ratio of Female: Male is 3: 2.
Table 5 shows the influence factor to the respondents in continue study for
college community. 20% of the respondents seem to have strong interest in
continuing studies in college community. Table 5 show the choice of career
chosen by respondents which clearly result in coach assistant as the most
popular (40%) career chosen by the respondents.

Table 3: Respondents’ Background

Demographic Item Frequencies Percentage (%)


Gender Male 12 40
Female 18 60
Influence Factor Parents 9 31
Myself 21 9
Career Choice Inbound Officer 1 3
Coach
12 40
Assistant
Front liner 11 37
Tourist Guide 6 20

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Male
Female 12 (40%)
18 (60%)

Diagram 2: Respondents’ Gender

Parents
9 (31%)

Myself
21 (69%)

Diagram 3: Respondents’ Influence Factor

13
14
40%
12 37%
10

8
20%
6

2 (3%)
0
INBOUND COACH FRONTLINER TOURIST GUIDE
OFFICER ASSISSTANT

Diagram 4: Respondents’ Career Choice

6.1.2 Analysis 2: Achievement Motivational Test Score


This analysis is conducted to answer RQ1: What is the level of college
community students’ achievement motivational? The tabulation of raw score is
shown in Appendix 3. In conducting this analysis, the raw score have to be
compared with interpretation index in Table 1. The summary of the findings can
be represented in Diagram 5.

Frequencies Statistic
Min 15
Max 27 20%
Low (0-13)
Mean 21.63 37%
Moderate (14-18)
Outliers 4
Good (19-23)
43%

Diagram 5: Achievement Motivational Score

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Based on Diagram 5, 43% (13) of the respondents have moderate score.
The answer is a reflection on the motivational level of respondents'
achievement. The higher the score, the stronger motivation compared to the
relatively low score. The outliers are those who score NOT SURE item more
than five items. These respondents are considered to have no direction in their
life. The four outliers should be referred to a counsellor or motivational expert
for further intervention.

6.1.3 Analysis 3: Career Interest Test Score


This analysis is conducted to answer RQ2: What is the level of college
community students’ career interest? The tabulation of raw score is shown in
Appendix 4. Based on Diagram 6, 40% (12) of the respondents have
moderate score. The answer is a reflection of the respondents' interest in the
careers or clients. The higher the score, the higher the career interest
compared to the relatively low score. The 3 outliers are considered to have no
direction in their life and should be referred to a counsellor or motivational
expert for further intervention.

Frequencies Statistic 12
Min 18 11

Max 47
Mean 3.57
Outliers 3
6

Low (25-29)
Moderate (30-
34) Good (35-39)
High (40-50)

Diagram 6: Career Interest Test Score

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Table 4: Motivational level test and career interest level test standardized score

ID GENDER INFLUENCE CAREER MOTIVATIONAL CAREER


FACTOR CHOICE LEVEL INTEREST
LEVEL
1 1 1 2 34 42
2 1 1 3 44 39
3 2 1 2 61 61
4 1 2 3 34 27
5 2 2 3 44 39
6 1 2 3 53 55
7 1 2 2 51 49
8 2 1 2 53 61
9 2 1 2 61 49
10 2 2 2 34 52
11 2 2 2 34 52
12 2 1 2 63 51
13 1 1 1 63 51
14 2 1 2 53 52
15 2 4 58 58
16 2 1 4 58 58
17 1 1 2 61 65
18 2 2 3 39 40
19 2 1 3 44 42
20 1 1 3 61 61
21 1 1 4 63 48
22 2 1 3 48 59
23 1 1 2 44 51
24 2 1 4 53 62
25 2 1 2 51 62
26 2 1 3 44 23
27 1 1 3 58 51
28 2 2 4 56 49
29 2 2 3 36 43
30 1 1 4 46 48

*Notes:

Gender Influence factor Career Choice


1 Male 1 Myself 1 Inbound and Outbound Office
2 Female 2 Parent 2 Recreational Coach Assistant
3 Teacher 3 Front liner (Hotel, Resort or Tourism Agent)
4 Friend 4 Tourist Guide

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Table 4 shows the standardized scores of 30 respondents that have been
computed from the raw data. Frequencies statistics is used to find the mean,
median, mode and standard deviation of the data. Tabulation of scores are
presented in histogram. The analysis result from SPSS software is shown
below:

Table 5: Frequencies statistic

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6.2 Inferential Statistics

Generally, interval and ratio scale are tested using parametric test, but if the
data are not normally distributed, we have to use non parametric test. To be
sure of the distribution, the normality test must be conducted. The results are
showed as below:

Table 6: Normality Test Result

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The total number of data, N = 30, which is < 2500 therefore we will analyse the
Shapiro-Wilk reading. From Table 2, Sig value, p < 0.05, so data is not
normally distributed.

6.2.1 Analysis 1: Gender Effect on Motivational Level and Career


Interest Level

This analysis is conducted to answer RQ3a: What is the relationship


between gender and motivational level & career interest level? The assumption
from the score given in Table 4 is, there is a significant difference in
motivational level of male and female respondents:

 H01 : There is no difference in scores of the male and female groups


 H1 : There is a significantly difference between the scores of the
two groups

Since the data were not normally distributed (p<0.05), therefore the
data have to be analyzed using non-parametric test which is Mann Whitney
Test because it include two independent samples/groups. The output/result is
shown below:

Table 7: Mann Whitney Test Output

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The Mann-Whitney test in Table 7 showed that male and female do not
appear to differ in their levels of motivational level, z = -.511, and career level,
z =-.828, with p > .05, two-tailed, therefore we fail to reject H01.

6.2.2 Analysis 2: Influence Factors on Motivational Level

This analysis is conducted for RQ3b: What is the relationship between


influence factor and achievement motivational level? Since there were five
independent groups, Kruskal Wallis Test was used to test the hypothesis. The
assumption from the scores given in Table 4, there is a significant difference in
the five influence factors to continuing education at community college:

 H02: There is no tendency for the rank in any influence factors to be


systematically higher or lower than the ranks in any other
influence factors. (There are no differences among the five
influence factors)

 H1: The rank in at least one influence factors are systematically higher
(or lower) than the ranks in another influence factors. (There are
differences among the treatment)

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Table 8: Kruskal Wallis Test Result for RQ3b

The Kruskal Wallis test result as shown in Table 8 indicated that the data
are sufficient to show significant differences among the five factors, p<0.05,
two-tailed. Therefore, H02 can be rejected.

6.2.3 Analysis 3: Career Choice Effect on Career Interest Level

This analysis is conducted for RQ3c: What is the relationship between


career choice and career interest level? Since there were more than three
independent groups, Kruskal Wallis Test was used to test the hypothesis. The
assumption from the score given, there is a significant difference in the career
choices chosen by the students.

 H03: There is no tendency for the rank in any career choice to be


systematically higher or lower than the ranks in any other career
choice. (There are no differences among the career choice)

 H1: The rank in at least one influence factors are systematically higher
(or lower) than the ranks in another influence factors. (There are
differences among the choices)

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Table 9: Kruskal Wallis Test Result for RQ3c

The Kruskal Wallis test result as shown in Table 9 indicated that the data
are not sufficient to show significant differences among the career choices,
p>0.05, two-tailed. Therefore, H03 failed to be rejected.

6.2.4 Analysis 4: Motivational Level Vs Career Interest Level

The scale given is ratio scales because the score reflect the amount of the
variable and it is the actual amount. It’s a continuous amount. The assumption
from the score given in Table 4, there a correlation between student
motivational level and career interest level:

 H04: There is no correlation between student’s motivational level and


career interest level. There are no differences among the
students’ motivational level and career interest level.

 H1: The student’s motivational level correlate with their career interest
level. There are differences among the students’ motivational level
and career interest level.

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Since there are two dependent groups in the data, so we have to use non
parametric spearman test to conduct the hypothesis testing. The result from the
correlation test is shown in Table 10 below:

Table 10: Spearman Correlation Output

In conclusion, the correlation test showed that there is a no correlation in


students motivational and career interest level, spearman’s correlation < 1.
Therefore H04 failed to be rejected.

24
7. CONCLUSION

The data from literature review have shown how high motivation and strong
career interest can contribute in college student having a clear direction of their
career life. Even though the findings does not correlate motivational with career
interest level, but both test show a good separation in determining the achievement
motivational level and career interest level. College Community Students’
Achievement Motivation Level and Career Interest Level are proven to be in
moderate score. The rank in at least one influence factors of student decisions in
continuing college community studies are systematically higher (or lower) than the
ranks in another influence factors. Further analysis (annova n post hoc tukey) can be
done to examine which factor influence more (higher).

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APPENDIX 1: THE QUESTIONNAIRE FORM

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APPENDIX 2: THE MANUAL OF ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATIONAL TEST AND
CAREER INTEREST LEVEL TEST

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APPENDIX 3: THE RAW SCORE OF ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATIONAL LEVEL

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APPENDIX 4: THE CAREER INSTEREST LEVEL RAW SCORE

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APPENDIX 5: SAMPLE OF RESPONDENTS’ ANSWERS

31