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IMB 475

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ANSHUMAN TRIPATHY AND KIRAN K

RESOURCE PLANNING AT AKSHAYA PATRA, VASANTHAPURA


In the Vedic culture, it was a very nice system that nobody should remain hungry. That was the
system. If there is a temple in any neighborhood, in that neighborhood nobody should remain

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hungry.
Temple worship means to distribute prasadam to poor. Temple worship doesn’t mean that you
bring some rice from neighbor, cook and eat yourself and sit, sleep nicely. No. temple worship
means you must distribute prasadam to the poor.
This prasadam distribution item is very important and it is so much pleasing to me that in the
beginning so many children are coming for taking prasadam… please continue this program
rigidly.

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—His Divine Grace A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada–

THE AKSHAYA PATRA FOUNDATION


After witnessing a group of poor children fight with street dogs over scraps of food in Mayapur, a village near
Calcutta, His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada announced that “No one within a ten mile radius
of this centre should go hungry”. This inspired the foundation of The Akshaya Patra Foundation (TAPF), a non-
governmental organization (NGO) with the vision that “No child in India shall be deprived of education because of
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hunger”. The mid-day meal program was first started in five schools of Bangalore in June 2000 catering to 1,500
children. As word spread, there was huge demand for such a scheme. Observing the work undertaken by TAPF, the
Supreme Court of India, on November 28, 2001, passed an order: “We direct the state governments/union territories
to implement the Mid-Day Meal Scheme by providing every child in every government and government-assisted
primary school with a prepared mid-day meal 1." With the help of the Government of India, various state
governments, and other supporters, TAPF was able to provide meals to 1.3 million children every day.
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In 2014, TAPF was functioning at 19 locations across nine Indian states (Exhibit 1). It has been recognized as the
world’s largest NGO-run mid-day meal program. The board of trustees comprises eminent personalities from
different walks of life (Exhibit 2). The mission of TAPF was to reach out to five million children by 2020, thereby
meeting the basic needs of nutrition of the children and also aiding them in the process of education which would
eventually help in achieving the two most critical millennium development goals: elimination of hunger 2 and
universalization of primary education. 3

The kitchens of TAPF formed the backbone of the organization. The kitchens were highly mechanized and scalable,
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which ensured quality and hygienic conditions to provide the best meals for the children. The machinery had the
capacity to cook meals for thousands of children in a matter of few hours. As the kitchens were spread across
different states of India, the meals were customized to suit the palates of the respective regions. TAPF kitchens were
designed based on the type of menu they catered to. Two types of menus were prepared throughout the country:
North Indian and South Indian. The North Indian menu comprised three items: roti (flat Indian bread), sabji
(vegetable gravy) and rice; while the South Indian menu comprised rice, sambar (lentil vegetable stew)/rasam (lentil
soup), and curd. The menus were designed such that the children were provided with the nutritional value needed for
their healthy growth.
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1
http://www.akshayapatra.org/indias-mid-day-meal-scheme
2
http://www.unicef.org/mdg/poverty.html
3
http://www.unicef.org/mdg/education.html

Professor Anshuman Tripathy and FPM student Kiran K, prepared this case for class discussions. This case is not intended to serve as an
endorsement, source of primary data, or to show effective or inefficient handling of decision or business processes.

Copyright © 2014 by the Indian Institute of Management Bangalore. No part of the publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or
by any means – electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise (including internet) – without the permission of Indian Institute of
Management Bangalore.

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TAPF operated through two kitchen models: centralized kitchens (16) and de-centralized kitchens (3) (Exhibit 1).
Centralized kitchens were more suitable for urban and semi-urban locations, wherein all the cooking activities were

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undertaken at a single large facility and then distributed to the schools in its vicinity in stainless steel containers
positioned in custom-built vehicles. Capacities of these kitchens varied between 50,000 and 150,000 meals daily
which aided in achieving economies of scale. The kitchens operated on steam-heated cauldrons which were custom
built to reduce the ‘‘cook-to-consume’’ time and also ensured the highest standards of hygiene by minimizing
human handling of food. In the decentralized kitchens, the entire cooking process was undertaken at the school or in
its vicinity. These kitchens were set up in remote areas where centralized kitchens were infeasible. TAPF

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representatives identified self-help groups who carried out the cooking process. These identified persons were
educated and provided with training to prepare healthy and hygienic meals and were also provided with the raw
materials and infrastructure required by TAPF. Representatives of TAPF monitored the entire process constantly and
ensured that the program functioned smoothly and the children were provided with the best meals. Persons who
cooked in these kitchens were mostly mothers of the children in the schools; who not only gained the joy of cooking
food for the children, but also a certain degree of financial independence.

THE AKSHAYA PATRA FOUNDATION VASANTHAPURA (TAPF VSP)

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TAPF VSP located at Vasanthapura on Kanakapura Road in South Bangalore started its operations in July 2007. It
catered South Indian meals to the schools in the southern Bangalore region comprising 644 schools (86,303
children), covering about 1,800 km. It was built in an area of 23,404 ft2 and had a capacity of preparing 100,000
meals/day. It was headed by General Manager (Operations) (Exhibit 3). It consisted of two buildings; one housed
the boiler machines which generated steam and the other was the kitchen. The kitchen consisted of three floors and
was designed such that the products were transported using gravity. The terrace housed the silos which could hold
rice, dhal, and palm oil. The third floor consisted of the stores and the pre-processing section. The first floor was the
kitchen which was provided with steam-heated cauldrons. The ground floor housed the packaging and shipping
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section.

PROCUREMENT
Cooking ingredients could be broadly classified into – rice, dhal and pulses, vegetables and fruits, milk and milk
products, groceries, spices, and oil (Exhibit 4). Procurement activity for each of these categories of goods had
inherent variations. The general procurement process is explained below.
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On the 20th of every month, the monthly plan for the coming month was uploaded onto the ERP (Exhibit 5). The
ERP generated the gross requirements for the next month based on the demand forecast (Exhibit 6) and the bill of
materials of the various products (Exhibits 7-9). The stores in-charge took stock of the current inventory for the
various goods and computed the net requirements for the next month. Based on the net requirements, quotations
were invited from vendors (more than two vendors). A purchase committee meeting was held once the quotations
were received which comprised representatives from stores, purchase, production, and account teams. The
committee looked into price, quality, and delivery aspects of the vendors and carried out negotiations and finalized
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the vendors by the 28th to 30th of the month. This list of vendors was sent to the management for approval after
which purchase orders were released to the vendors (Exhibit 10). Vendors were given the delivery schedule dates
and quantity to be delivered. Upon delivery, the quality control team inspected the load before unloading the goods.
If the quality was found satisfactory, the goods were unloaded and goods receipt note (Exhibit 11) was generated
and goods were moved into stock. The production department then withdrew the goods from the stock based on the
issue slips (Exhibit 12). Owing to space constraints at TAPF VSP, orders with quantity of more than 5 tons were
delivered in a staggered manner.

Rice: The rice used was of two types – market rice (MR) and government rice (GR). The demand for MR and GR
was in the ratio 1:3. The MR was procured directly from the rice mills for the month with a four-day lead time. The
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delivery was staggered with a minimum size of 10 ton/delivery. The GR was procured from the Food Corporation of
India (FCI). Monthly requirements were sent to the government which approved the same and forwarded the
approval to FCI. TAPF VSP had to take the delivery from the FCI warehouses producing the approval certificate.
The costs were as per government norms. Transportation and cleaning costs were to be borne by TAPF VSP. Upon
cleaning approximately, 5% to 10% of GR contained broken rice and wastage.

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Dhal & Pulses: Based on the monthly requirements, the contracts were decided. The price was fixed for the entire
month (including landing) irrespective of the number of deliveries to be made. If the quantity was below 5 tons,

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there was single delivery. If the quantity was more than 5 tons, the delivery was staggered, two or three deliveries
based on 15-10 day requirements, respectively. A safety stock of 7 tons of toor dhal was maintained and lead time
was 1-2 days.

Vegetables & Fruits: For these ingredients, the purchase committee shortlisted 4-5 vendors who satisfied the
requirements of quality and delivery. The orders were placed every day, two days before consumption (Exhibit 13).

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On the day of ordering, the requirements were given by 10.30 AM to all the vendors. These vendors quoted the price
and the vendor quoting minimum price was selected by 1 PM. The selected vendor had to deliver the goods the
following day between 10 AM and 12 PM. The price quoted was inclusive of landing costs. The approved pool of
vendors was revisited every 3 months based on the parameters of quality, delivery, and performance.

Milk & Milk products: Milk products had to be ordered two days in advance. The major product procured was curd.
Curds were procured from Karnataka Milk Federation (KMF). The approximate demand for curds was 40
tons/month/kitchen. The price quoted by KMF included the landing cost and would be delivered on the day of

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consumption.

Groceries: Groceries were delivered in a single monthly shipment except for sugar and chili (B) (two shipments).
The lead time for delivery was 1 day except for chili (B) and salt (2 days). The prices were fixed for the entire
month, including the landing cost.

Spices: Based on the monthly menu, spices were ordered. Here, delivery dates were based on the individual
requirements in order to preserve the fragrance of the ingredients. The lead time was 2 days except for sambar
powders (5-6 days).
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Oil: Palm oil was procured from oil refineries based in Mangalore. The lead time was 1 week and the delivery size
was 8 tons. A certificate of analysis was prepared at the time of delivery checking the quality parameters (Exhibit
14). Procurement was done as and when need arose and not monthly. Ghee, Vanaspati, and sunflower (refined) oil
were procured from oil mills with a lead time of 4-5 days.

PRE-PROCESSING
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Upon delivery of fresh vegetables, pre-processing activities would begin at TAPF VSP at 10 AM. The unloaded
vegetables were checked, weighed, and transported to the pre-processing section on the second floor. The
vegetables, depending on their type, underwent different processes. The leafy vegetable bundles were placed in
crates and sent to designated women employees who cut the roots, searched for any foreign elements such as weeds
and removed them, and then arranged them in a second crate. These crates were then moved to another section of
women employees who undertook fine chopping of the leaves and filled the crates which are then moved into the
cold room (capacity: 10 ton vegetables). Non-leafy vegetables such as pumpkin, carrot, etc., were first immersed in
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chlorine water (50-100 ppm of chlorine) for 10 minutes. Thereafter, they were moved to the vegetable cutting stand
wherein they were rough cut and arranged in crates and moved to another section where peeling and de-seeding
were undertaken. Thereafter, the vegetables were cut into standard sizes (suitable for machine cutting), arranged in
crates, and stored in the cold room. These activities were completed by 5 PM.

The rice delivered from FCI, GR, was put through the de-husking and de-stoning machines wherein the husks,
broken grains, and stones were removed. The cleaned GR was then loaded into the Master Silo (capacity: 250 tons)
through a bucket elevator. From the Master Silo, the GR was moved through bucket elevators to the Rice Silo
(capacity: 10 tons) situated in the third floor. The MR sacks were transported into the stores in the second floor and
retrieved when needed by the pre-processing section. The dhal procured was loaded into the Dhal Silo (capacity 7
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tons) though bucket elevators.

At 12 AM, the pre-possessing section began its work. Depending on the actual requirements for the food (Exhibits
15 & 16), ingredients were retrieved from the silos, cold room, and the stores. The potato peeler machine (capacity
150 kg/hour) was used to peel the potatoes before sending them into the vegetable cutting machines. The rough-cut
vegetables were loaded onto vegetable cutting machine (three machines with capacity of 150 kg/hour) for final

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cutting (Figure 1). The wet coconuts were first scraped using a scraping machine (capacity: 30 kg/hour, 5 coconuts
= 1 kg), thereafter ground in a grinding machine (three machines with capacity of 30 kg/hour). Tomatoes were

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retrieved, washed, and converted into pastes. These activities were completed by 2.30 AM.

After 3 AM, upon communication from the cooking section, the rice (MR/GR) was retrieved in containers, which
were used as units of measurement (capacity: 25 kg of rice and 18 L of sambar), and transferred into a tub wherein
the rice was soaked and washed with water. Similarly dhal was retrieved from the Dhal Silo, soaked and washed
with water. Thereafter, communication from the cooking section was awaited for transferring the washed rice/dhal

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into the respective cauldrons through the chutes provided (Figure 2). These activities ended at about 8 AM.

COOKING
Activities in the cooking section began at 2 AM. There were totally 13 rice cauldrons (capacity: 500 L, 1 cauldron =
12 containers) and 8 sambar cauldrons (capacity: 1200 L, 1 cauldron = 61 containers). The cauldron working was
based on steam heating, where the steam was produced by boilers (2 ton/hour and 1 ton/hour).

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The rice cauldron was first filled with water for about 3 minutes and allowed to heat for about 5 minutes (Exhibit
17). Thereafter, the pre-processing section was communicated to transfer the washed rice into the cauldron in the
first floor through the chute. The mixture was boiled (at 92°C for 10 minutes) and allowed to cook for about 18
minutes. The quality of rice and temperature was monitored continuously and when the cooking was completed
satisfactorily (Figure 3), the rice was unloaded onto a trolley (Figure 4) and moved to the packaging section
through a chute. The rice cauldrons operated approximately 6 hours daily. It took about 2 minutes each to set up the
consecutive cauldrons for the cooking process and 2 minutes for cleaning and preparing the cauldron for the next
batch.
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The sambar cauldron was filled with water for about 10 minutes and allowed to heat (Exhibit 18). Thereafter, dhal
was added through the chute from the pre-processing section. The mixture was allowed to cook for about 63
minutes. Vegetables, pulses, and salt were added into the mixture through the chute (Figure 5). After about 22
minutes of cooking, tomato paste was added. Masala, tamarind, and seasoning were added after 10 minutes. The
sambar was allowed to boil at 96°C for about 30 minutes. The sambar was then checked for quality, taste, and
unloaded after 8 minutes into the tank (capacity: 6000 L) in the packaging section. The sambar cauldrons operated
approximately 5 hours 30 minutes daily. It took about 2 minutes each to set up the consecutive cauldrons for the
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cooking process and 3 minutes for cleaning and preparing the cauldron for the next batch.

PACKING & DISPATCH


The rice unloaded from the cooking section into the chute was divided between two outlets where two rice
containers, sanitized by steam, were simultaneously filled according to the requirements of the schools (100%, 75%,
50%, and 25%). These containers (1 rice container = 70 meals) were moved over roller conveyors where they were
closed with a lid and stamped with the codes. For example, GR 75% implies that the container was 75% filled with
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government rice; similarly, MR 100% implies that the container was filled completely with market rice.

The unloaded sambar was collected in a tank which was continuously stirred manually. The tank contained an outlet
value (4Ǝ diameter, Figure 6), which was used to fill the sambar containers (1 sambar container = 70 meals),
sanitized by steam, as per the requirements (100%, 75%, 50%, and 25%). These containers moved over slotted
conveyors wherein they were sealed with the lid and the code was stamped.

The packed sambar and rice containers were moved to the loading bay though roller conveyors. The dispatch van
which was specially designed to hold these containers and maintain the temperature of the products arrived at the
loading bay. The sambar containers were loaded first after which the rice containers were loaded. The door of the
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van was secured and the van departed for the schools. All vans reached their destination before 12.30 PM and
unloaded the containers as per the requirements of the school and noted down the requirements for the next day in
the School Inspection Report (Exhibits 19 & 20). The vans collected the containers delivered on the previous day
and brought them back to the facility where they were washed and kept ready for the next day.

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MENU AT TAPF VSP

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In this kitchen, South Indian food was prepared. Broadly, about three kinds of menu items were prepared each day –
rice products, sambar/rasam products, and curds. The rice products consisted of rice (plain), tomato bath, pulav, bisi
bele bath, and a sweet product made of rice – rice kesari bath (Exhibit 9). The different types of sambar were
Madras Sambar, Gokulam Sambar, Kadamba Sambar, Krishnamrita Sambar, and Bhimapaka Sambar; (Exhibit 7)
and the types of Rasam were Aiyangar Rasam, Lakshmi Rasam, and Mysore Rasam (Exhibit 8). Of these items,
daily menu was prepared such that the children were provided with adequate nutritional food and also ensure that

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the same food was not served too often (Exhibit 5).

FOOD SAFETY AND HYGIENE


TAPF VSP followed a process to ensure that nothing but healthy, wholesome, and hygienic food was sent from their
kitchen. The kitchen followed a prescribed food safety plan for handling, preparing, and storing food, to ensure that
no child became sick from foodborne illnesses. TAPF VSP was ISO 22000:2005 compliant and also a recipient of
the Det Norske Veritas Food Safety System Certificate. The kitchen followed the 5S (sort, simplify, scrub,

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standardize, and sustain) principle to ensure a clean and hygienic cooking environment. All the kitchen
infrastructure and equipment were made of stainless steel 304 grade cooking equipment. Employees followed high
standards of personal hygiene, from wearing hair caps, face masks, clean uniforms, gloves, and gumboots to
following stringent hand disinfection; and were taught accordingly during their training.

All the cooking equipment - cauldrons, trolleys, rice chutes, sambar or dhal tanks, cutting boards, and knives - were
sanitized with steam just before use. Containers which are used for packaging the food were also sterilized with
steam before being filled with food. Vehicles used for transporting the food were designed to maintain the ambient
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temperature of the food. Vehicles were water washed with a pressure jet on the previous day and the cleanliness of
the vehicle was inspected before loading the food. These vehicles were provided with stainless steel racks of
different sizes (small, medium, and large) to secure the containers and prevent spillage of food.
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No
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Figure 1

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Vegetables being cut by the cutting machine

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Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)

Figure 2
Washed raw rice being transferred into the rice cauldrons through the chute
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Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)

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Figure 3

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Inspection of the rice being conducted by the supervisor

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Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)

Figure 4
Unloading of the cooked rice into the trolley
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Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)

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Figure 5

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Ingredients awaiting loading into the sambar cauldrons

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Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)

Figure 6
Sambar being filled into the containers from the Sambar tank in the packaging section
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No
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Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)

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Exhibit 1

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TAPF kitchens across India

Kitchens across India


State/Location Number of Children Number of Schools Type of Kitchen
Andhra Pradesh 60,098 461

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Vishakhapatnam 5,249 7 Centralized
Hyderabad 54,849 454 Centralized
Assam 53,649 592
Guwahati 53,649 592 Centralized
Chhattisgarh 23,674 160

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Bhilai 23,674 160 Centralized
Gujarat 400,158 1,653
Gandhinagar 121,508 666 Centralized
Vadodara 113,593 616 Centralized
Surat 165,057 371 Centralized
Karnataka 460,046 2,627
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Bangalore 184,530 1,055 Centralized
Bellary 115,945 575 Centralized
Hubli 126,693 789 Centralized
Mangalore 19,043 145 Centralized
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Mysore 13,835 63 Centralized


Orissa 80,415 1,000
Puri 55,835 648 Centralized
Nayagarh 24,580 352 Decentralized
Rajasthan 129,493 1,682
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Jaipur 92,763 1,081 Centralized


Nathdwara 25,274 435 Centralized
Baran 11,456 166 Decentralized
Uttar Pradesh 139,262 1,874
Vrindavan 139,262 1,874 Centralized
Tamil Nadu 718 1
Chennai 718 1 Centralized
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TOTAL 1,347,513 10,050

Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)

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Exhibit 2

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Board of trustees and advisors

Board of Trustees
Madhu Pandit Dasa Chairman, The Akshaya Patra Foundation

Chanchalapathi Dasa Vice Chairman, The Akshaya Patra Foundation

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Chitranga Chaitanya Programme Director, The Akshaya Patra Foundation
Dasa

T.V. Mohandas Pai Chairman, Manipal Universal Learning

Abhay Jain Board Member, Head Group Corporate Affairs, Manipal Education & Medical Group

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Ramdas Kamath Senior Vice President, Administration, Commercial Facilities, Infrastructure and Security,
Infosys Limited

V. Balakrishnan Member of the Board, Head, Infosys BPO, Finacle and India Business Unit

Raj Kondur Director, ASCENT CAPITAL

Board of Advisors
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Rajendra Babu S Chairman-Advisory Board, Former Chief Justice of India and Former Chair Person, NHRC,
Chair Professor NLSIU

Ravindra Chamaria Vice Chairman-Advisory Board, Chairman & Managing Director, Infinity Infotech Parks
Ltd.
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Sangita Jindal Chairperson, JSW Foundation

Rajendra J Hinduja Managing Director, Gokaldas Exports Ltd.

Dr. Devi Shetty Cardiologist, Narayana Hrudayalaya

Suhel Seth Managing Director, Counselage

Ramesh Ramanathan Campaign Co-ordinator, Janaagraha Communications


No

Source: TAPF (As on December 3, 2013)


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Exhibit 3

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TAPF VSP Organization Structure

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No
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Source: TAPF VSP (As on December 3, 2013)

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Exhibit 4

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Ingredients

Ingredients
Rice Government Market
Rice Rice

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Dhal & Bengal Black Gram Dhal Horse Dhal Toor Dhal Urad Dhal
Pulses Gram Urad Dhal

Vegetables Beans Bottle Brinjal Cabbage Capsicum Carrot Chow Chow


& Fruits Gourd
Coriander Cucumber Curry Drum Stick Green Green Ginger
Leaves Leaves Chilly Peas

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Long Brinjal Mangalore Pineapple Potato Pudina Sweet Tamarind
Cucumber Leaves Pumpkin

Tomato Turnip Wet White Lobo White


Coconut Pumpkin

Milk Curds
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Products
Groceries Asafoetida Bay Cardamom Cashew nut Cinnamom Chili (B) Cloves
Leaves

Dhaniya Dry Dry Grapes Fried Gram Fried Ground Jaggery


Coconut Gram(P) Nut
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Powder
Jeera Kabul Menthya Mustard Orange Pepper Rawa
Channa Red Colur

Salt Crystal Soump Sugar Tamarind Tamarind White Till


Concentrate Paste
No

Spices Aiyangar Chili(G) Garam Lakshmi Lakshmi Lakshmi Mysore


Rasam Powder masala BBB Powder Rasam Sambar Rasam
Powder Powder Powder Powder

Orkay Sambar Sambar Turmeric Vangi Bath


Puliogare Powder Powder Powder Powder
Powder Bheemapaka

Oil Ghee Palm Oil Refined Oil Vanaspathi


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Source: TAPF VSP

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Exhibit 5

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Production Schedule

Typical Production Schedule for a month


Date Item 1 Item 2 Item 3 Date Item 1 Item 2 Item 3
1 Rice# Madras Sambar Curds 17 TB* Krishnamrita sambar Curds

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2 Rice# Gokulam Sambar 18 Rice# Madras Sambar
#
3 TB* Kadamba Sambar Curds 19 Rice Mysore Rasam Curds
4 Rice# Krishnamrita Sambar 20 BBB** Rice Kesari Bath
5 Rice# Aiyangar Rasam 22 Rice# Krishnamrita Sambar Curds
6 BBB** Rice Kesari Bath 23 Rice# Madras Sambar

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#
8 Rice Lakshmi Rasam Curds 24 Pulav Gokulam Sambar Curds
9 Rice# Kadamba Sambar 25 Rice# Lakshmi Rasam
10 Pulav Madras Sambar Curds 26 Rice# Bhimapaka Sambar Curds
#
11 Rice Mysore Rasam Curds 27 Pulav Rice Kesari Bath
# #
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12 Rice Krishnamrita Sambar 29 Rice Gokulam Sambar Curds
13 Pulav Rice Kesari Bath 30 Rice# Mysore Rasam
15 Rice# Gokulam Sambar Curds 31 TB* Madras Sambar Curds
#
16 Rice Lakshmi Rasam
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Source: TAPF VSP


*TB: Tomato Bath
**BBB: Bisi Bele Bath
#
Rice (Plain)

Exhibit 6
Daily demand
No

Average demands for the items


Day Rice Sambar / Rasam Curds Sweet
# Containers # Cauldron # Containers # Cauldron (Liters) # Containers # Cauldron
Monday 753 63 825 14 4127
Tuesday 772 65 847 14 4400
Wednesday 783 66 869 15 2965
Thursday 797 67 877 15 2264
Friday 797 67 877 15 1691
Saturday 758 64 408 7 4628 237 20
Do

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 14 of 27

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Exhibit 7

os
Bill of materials for sambar

Bill of Materials of Sambar (Ingredients, kg/Cauldron)

Madras Gokulam Kadamba Krishnamrita Bhimapaka


Toor Dhal 60 Toor Dhal 90 Toor Dhal 60 Toor Dhal 60 Toor Dhal 100

rP
Asafoetida 0.1 Chili(B) 0.5 Asafoetida 0.2 Asafoetida 0.1 Brinjal 100
Bottle Gourd 100 Chow Chow 100 Bengal Gram 30 Bottle Gourd 80 Chili(B) 0.5
Curry Coriander
Brinjal 30 0.65 Chili(B) 2 Carrot 75 3
Leaves Leaves
Chili(G)
Chili (B) 3.1 Jaggery 6 1 Chili(B) 4.5 Curry Leaves 0.65
Powder
Chili(G)

yo
Curry Leaves 0.65 Mustard 1 Chow Chow 80 1 Drum Stick 100
Powder
Dhaniya 5.2 Refined Oil 6 Curry Leaves 1.3 Chow Chow 75 Jaggery 5
Gram Dhal 2.6 Salt Crystal 19 Dhaniya 3 Cinnamon 0.5 Mustard 1
Sambar
Jaggery 3 15 Gram dhal 2 Curry Leaves 1.5 Potato 100
Powder
Menthya 1.04 Tamarind 2 Jaggery 5 Dhaniya 3.5 Refined Oil 8
Mangalore
op
Mustard 1 Tomato 60 80 Fried Gram 2 Salt Crystal 19
Cucumber
Wet Sambar
Palm Oil 0.35 40* Menthya 0.25 Gram Dhal 4.25 18
Coconut Powder
White
Pepper 0.78 100 Mustard 1 Horse Dhal 30 Tamarind 2
Pumpkin
Potato 90 Potato 60 Jaggery 5 Tomato 60
tC

Turmeric
Refined Oil 6 Refined Oil 6 Jeera 0.5 0.05
Powder
Salt Crystal 19.65 Salt Crystal 19 Menthya 0.5 Wet Coconut 40*
Sweet
80 Tamarind 2 Mustard 1
Pumpkin
Tamarind 2 Tomato 50 Potato 70
Turmeric
No

Tomato 50 0.15 Refined Oil 6


Powder
Turmeric
0.67 Urad Dhal 0.75 Salt Crystal 19
Powder
Wet Coconut 20* Wet Coconut 20* Tamarind 2
White Lobo 30 White Pumpkin 80 Tomato 50
Turmeric
White Till 1.3 0.3
Powder
Urad Dhal 2
Do

Wet Coconut 20*

Source: TAPF VSP


* in number

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
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Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 15 of 27

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Exhibit 8

os
Bill of materials of rasam

Bill of Materials of Rasam (Ingredients, kg/Cauldron)

Aiyangar Lakshmi Mysore


Toor Dhal 100 Toor Dhal 100 Toor Dhal 100

rP
Aiyangar Rasam Powder 12 Chili (B) 0.5 Chili (B) 0.5
Chili (B) 0.5 Coriander Leaves 5 Coriander Leaves 5
Coriander Leaves 5 Curry Leaves 1 Curry Leaves 1
Curry Leaves 1 Jaggery 7 Green Chili 0.25

yo
Jaggery 7 Lakshmi Rasam Powder 12 Jaggery 7
Mustard 0.5 Mustard 0.5 Mustard 0.5
Refined Oil 6 Palm Oil 5 Mysore Rasam Powder 13
Salt Crystals 17 Salt Crystals 17 Refined Oil 6
Tamarind 6 Tamarind 6 Salt Crystals 17
op
Tomato 70 Tomato 70 Tamarind 6
Turmeric Powder 0.1 Turmeric Powder 0.1 Tomato 70
Vanaspathi 2 Turmeric Powder 0.1

Wet Coconut 20*


tC

Source: TAPF VSP


* in number
No
Do

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 16 of 27

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Exhibit 9

os
Bill of materials for rice products and sweet

Bill of Materials of Rice (Ingredients, kg/Cauldron)


Rice Kesari Bath Rice (Plain)
Tomato Bath Pulav Bisi Bele Bath (Sweet)

rP
Government/ 100 Government/ 100 Government/ 80 Government/ 150
Market Rice 140
Market Rice Market Rice Market Rice Market Rice
Curry Leaves 0.5 Bay Leaves 0.05 Toor Dhal 70 Cloves 0.25
Dry Coconut
Ginger 1.5 Beans 5 Beans 10 8
Powder
Gram Dhal 4 Cabbage 10 Capsicum 16 Dry Grapes 4

yo
Green Chili 0.65 Carrot 5 Carrot 24 Pineapple 10*
Green Peas 5 Dhaniya 0.5 Chili(B) 0.5 Sugar 240
Turmeric
Jaggery 3 Garam masala 0.3 Curry Leaves 0.5 0.2
Powder
Jeera 0.2 Ginger 0.5 Green peas 20 Vanaspathi 20
op
Lakshmi
Sambar 1.8 Green chilly 2.5 Jaggery 3
Powder
Lakshmi BBB
Mustard 0.4 Green Peas 5 15
Powder
tC

Palm Oil 18 Jeera 0.2 Mustard 0.2


Salt Crystal 5.8 Palm Oil 14 Potato 35
Tomato 70 Potato 15 Refined Oil 10
Turmeric
0.1 Pudina Leaves 1 Salt Crystal 10
Powder
No

Tamarind
Urad Dhal 2 Salt Crystal 5.2 3
Paste
Tomato 20 Tomato 20
Turmeric
Turnip 15 0.1
Powder
Vansapathi 2 Turnip 50
Vanaspathi 4
Do

Source: TAPF VSP


* in Number

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 17 of 27

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Exhibit 10

os
Purchase Order

rP
yo
op
tC
No

Source: TAPF VSP


Do

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 18 of 27

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Exhibit 11

os
Good received note

rP
yo
op
tC
No
Do

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 19 of 27

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Exhibit 12

os
Issue Slip

rP
yo
op
tC
No
Do

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 20 of 27

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Exhibit 13

os
Vegetable requirement

rP
yo
op
tC

Source: TAPF VSP


No
Do

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 21 of 27

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Exhibit 14

os
Quality Analysis Report for Palm Oil

rP
yo
op
tC
No
Do

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 22 of 27

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Exhibit 15

os
Food Packaging Sheet for Rice
Format No DST 02
THE AKSHAYA PATRA FOUNDATION
Issue Status 01
VASANTHAPURA Revision Status 00
Date 19.07.2013
FOOD PACKING SHEET
Page 1 of 1

rP
Sl MR Rice (Private) MR Rice (BBMP) Govt Rice
Vehicle No Route Names
No 100% 75% 50% 25% 100% 75% 50% 25% 100% 75% 50% 25%

1 2363 Jothi Pura 11 5 4


2 8539 Cauvery Nagara 14 9 4
3 3485 Kadugodi 24 10 4
4 3020 T C Palya 22 6
5 2017 Bhattarahalli 16 8 3
6 4361 Varthur 3 16 6 7
7 4200 Whitefield 4 1 23 6 2
8 7729 Marthahalli 2 17 7 1

yo
9 3021 HAL 1 1 17 7
10 1365 Panathur 2 15 11 2
11 9493 Singsandra 34 10
12 4252 K R Puram 27 3
13 5071 Jigani 23 6 3
14 3484 J B Nagar 1 16 9 2
15 5285 R R Nagar 1 36 5 1
16 4541 Magadi Road 1 8 7 15 5
17 3715 Akkipet 4 2 1
op
18 5309 Jaya Nagara 2 1 30 5 4
19 9488 K.Upanagar 28 10
20 3019 Ulsoor 2 1 2 6 7 2
21 2371 Austion Town 1 7 1 16 1 2
22 5070 Mudalapalya 3 2 11 11 4 1
23 5308 Harohalli 3 1 1 23 5 8
24 2364 SS Garden 1 1 18 10 2
25 4360 Puttenahalli 5 1 33 6 2
tC

26 4846 Koramangala 4 1 1 1 1 12 6 4
27 4196 Audugodi 1 1 14 3 1
28 2342 Madivala 39 8
29 7660 Kaggalipura 22 9 6
30 2240 Somanahalli 1 20 3 5
31 3014 Bendre Nagara 1 1 21 9 1
32 4883 BBB
33 Staff 3
34
No

35
Total 28 3 11 2 32 2 15 4 623 0 199 71
Conversion Factor 1 0.75 0.5 0.25 1 0.75 0.5 0.25 1 0.75 0.5 0.25
Total Quantity to be Cooked 28 2 6 1 32 2 8 1 623 0 100 18

Total MR Rice(Private) to be Cooked in Vessels : 36 Vessels


Total MR Rice(Private) to be Cooked in Cauldrons ( No. of Vessels / 11) : 3.30 Cauldrons
Total MR Rice(BBMP) to be Cooked in Vessels 42 Vessels
Total MR Rice(BBMP) to be Cooked in Cauldrons ( No. of Vessels / 11) 3.82 Cauldrons
Total Govt.Rice to be Cooked in Vessels 740 Vessels
Do

Total Govt.Rice to be Cooked in Cauldrons ( No. of Vessels / 12) 61.69 Cauldrons

Prepared By Distribution In charge Operation Manager

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 23 of 27

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Exhibit 16

os
Food packaging sheet for sambar
Document No DST 02
THE AKSHAYA PATRA FOUNDATION
Issue Status 01
VASANTHAPURA
Revision Status 00
Date 19.07.2013
FOOD PACKING SHEET
Page 1 of 1

rP
Sl. Madras Sambar Curd
Vehicle No Route Names
No 100% 75% 50% 25% 13% 100% 75% 50% 6Lis 1Lts
1 2363 Jothi Pura 13 3 4
2 8539 Cauvery Nagara 18 5 5
3 3485 Kadugodi 25 11 4
4 3020 T C Palya 22 6
5 2017 Bhattarahalli 19 7 3
6 4361 Varthur 19 8 6
Whitefield 30 6 2

yo
7 4200
8 7729 Marthahalli 19 8 2
9 3021 HAL 20 8
10 1365 Panathur 15 13 2
11 9493 Singsandra 34 16
12 4252 K R Puram 27 3
13 5071 Jigani 27 7 3
14 3484 J B Nagar 20 7 1
15 5285 R R Nagar 36 9
op
16 4541 Magadi Road 24 13
17 3715 Akkipet 1 4 2
18 5309 Jaya Nagara 33 6 4
19 9488 K.Upanagar 29 9
20 3019 Ulsoor 9 9 2
21 2371 Austion Town 24 2 2
22 5070 Mudalapalya 26 7
tC

23 5308 Harohalli 26 6 9 173


24 2364 SS Garden 21 9 3
25 4360 Puttenahalli 50 2
26 4846 Koramangala 18 7 6
27 4196 Audugodi 17 4 2
28 2342 Madivala 40 9
29 7660 Kaggalipura 22 9 6
30 2240 Somanahalli 20 5 5
No

31 3014 Bendre Nagara 22 12 1 174


32 4883 BBB
33 Staff 3
34

35
Total 729 0 228 76 0 0 0 0 0 347

Conversion Factor 1 0.75 0.5 0.25 0.13 18 12 12 6 1

Total Quantity to be Cooked 729 0 114 19 0 0 0 0 0 347

Total Sambar to be Cooked in Vessels: 862 Vessels


Do

Total Sambar to be Cooked in Cauldrons(No. of Vessels / 61 ) : 14.13 Cauldrons


Total Curd to be packed : 347 Litters

Prepared By Distribution In charge Operation Manager

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Document No. PDN 03
Do
THE AKSHAYA PATRA FOUNDATION Issue Status 01
Issue Date 01.01.2008
Exhibit 17

VASANTHAPURA - BANGALORE
Revision Status 01

Source: TAPF VSP


Revision Date 01.06.2010
Rice Cooking Record Page 1 of 2
Manu GR Rice 60 52 Boiler
Water Rice Boiling Ganji Water Rice Boiling Ganji
Sl Batch Boiler Unloading Sl Batch Boiler Unloading
addition addition Staining addition addition Staining
No
no No. No. Time Temp Time no No. No. Time Temp time
Time time Time Time time Time
1 1 1 3.20 3.27 3.40 92.06 3.55 25 4 1 5.07 5.09 5.18 92.06 5.33
2 1 2 3.22 3.29 3.41 92.03 4.00 26 4 2 5.10 5.14 5.21 92.00 5.38
3 1 3 3.24 3.34 3.44 92.07 4.08 27 4 3 5.14 5.15 5.24 92.04 5.42
4 1 4 3.26 3.37 3.48 92.00 4.10 28 4 4 5.16 5.18 5.27 92.06 5.44
tC
5 1 5 3.28 3.40 3.53 92.08 4.13 29 4 5 5.20 5.22 5.30 92.03 5.47
6 1 6 3.29 3.43 3.55 92.06 4.18 30 4 6 5.23 5.25 5.34 92.08 5.50
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura

7 1 7 3.31 3.45 3.57 92.08 4.21 31 4 7 5.26 5.28 5.37 92.07 5.57
8 1 8 3.33 3.47 4.00 92.05 4.25 32 4 8 5.29 5.32 5.41 92.06 5.59
9 2 1 3.57 4.00 4.10 92.06 4.33 33 4 1 5.36 5.41 5.50 92.07 6.12
10 2 2 4.02 4.05 4.15 92.07 4.35 34 5 2 5.40 5.43 5.51 92.06 6.14
11 2 3 4.41 4.11 4.19 92.00 4.40 35 5 3 5.44 5.47 5.56 92.08 6.16
op
12 2 4 4.12 4.16 4.25 92.00 4.44 36 5 4 5.46 5.50 5.58 92.00 6.20
13 2 5 4.16 4.20 4.28 92.05 4.47 37 5 5 4.50 5.58 6.06 92.03 6.22
Rice cooking record

14 2 6 4.20 4.22 4.30 92.03 4.50 38 5 6 5.52 6.00 6.08 92.08 6.25
15 2 7 4.23 4.26 4.35 92.06 4.55 39 5 7 5.59 6.02 6.10 6.10 6.27

Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
16 2 8 4.27 4.30 4.39 92.08 4.59 40 5 8 6.01 6.04 6.13 6.13 6.30
17 3 1 4.35 4.39 4.47 92.00 5.05 41 6 1 6.44 6.45 6.54 6.54 7.08
yo
18 3 2 4.38 4.41 4.49 92.03 5.08 42 6 2 6.46 6.48 6.57 6.57 7.10
19 3 3 4.42 4.45 4.54 92.06 5.12 43 6 3 6.50 6.51 6.59 6.59 7.15
20 3 4 4.46 4.49 4.58 92.04 5.14 44 6 4 6.52 6.54 7.03 7.03 7.30
21 3 5 4.49 4.53 5.01 92.06 5.17 45 6 5 6.56 6.08 7.16 7.16 7.33
22 3 6 4.52 4.55 5.03 92.02 5.21 46 6 6 6.58 7.01 7.10 7.10 7.36
23 3 7 4.57 5.01 5.09 92.00 5.24 47 6 7 7.00 7.03 7.11 7.11 7.39
rP
24 3 8 5.03 5.05 5.14 92.04 5.26 48 6 1 7.10 7.12 7.21 7.21 7.42

Supervisor Quality Assurance Executive Asst Manager - Operations


Page 24 of 27

os
t

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
6
Document No. PDN 06
Do
THE AKSHAYA PATRA FOUNDATION Issue Status 01
Exhibit 18

VASANTHAPURA - BANGALORE Issue Date 04.07.2013

Source: TAPF VSP


Revision Status 01
Revision Date 01.06.2010
Sabji/Sambar Cooking Record Page 1 of 1
Date: Menu: sambar 8.15 Boiler
No
tamarindadditin
Boiler Water Dal addition Vegetables Pulses & Salt Tomato Masala Boiling Unloading
sl Batch No. time
No. Filling Time time addition time addition time addition time addition time time
Time Time Temp.
1 1 1 3.15 3.25 4.28 4.28 4.50 5.00 5.00 5.30 96.03 5.35
2 1 2 3.17 3.27 4.30 4.30 4.53 5.03 5.03 5.32 95.07 5.37
tC
3 1 3 3.19 3.30 4.33 4.33 4.55 5.05 5.05 5.33 96.04 5.43
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura

4 1 4 3.22 3.32 4.35 4.35 4.57 5.09 5.09 5.35 96.02 5.47
5 1 5 3.25 3.35 4.37 4.37 5.00 5.10 5.10 5.37 96.03 6.00
6 1 6 3.27 3.37 4.40 4.40 5.03 5.12 5.12 5.39 95.09 6.05
op
7 1 7 3.29 3.39 4.50 4.50 5.20 5.27 5.27 6.03 96.03 6.35
8 1 8 3.30 3.40 4.53 4.53 5.23 5.30 5.30 6.05 96.00 6.37
Sambar cooking record

9 2 1 5.37 3.40 5.50 5.50 6.15 6.23 6.23 6.40 96.06 6.57

Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
10 2 2 5.39 5.42 5.53 5.53 6.17 6.25 6.25 6.42 95.09 6.59
11 2 3 6.00 6.02 7.00 7.00 7.20 7.30 7.30 7.55 96.02 8.05
yo
12 2 4 6.03 6.05 7.03 7.03 7.23 7.32 7.32 7.57 96.06 8.07
13 2 5 6.05 6.07 7.05 7.05 7.25 7.35 7.35 7.59 95.04 8.10
14 2 6 6.07 6.10 7.07 7.07 7.27 7.37 7.37 8.03 95.04 8.12
rP
Supervisor Quality Assurance Executive Asst. Manager - Operations
Page 25 of 27

os
t

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 26 of 27

t
Exhibit 19

os
School inspection report
Document No DST 08
THE AKSHAYA PATRA FOUNDATION
Issue Status 01
VASANTHAPURA Revision Status 00
Revision Date
SCHOOL INSPECTION REPORT Page 1 of 1

rP
Date : Zonal Supervisor : Time of Visit :

School Details
School Code Enrolled Today's
Area Route
Strength Attendance

HM Name Contact No
Teacher Name : Contact No

yo
Teacher Name : `
School Timings Lunch Timings
Week Days
Saturdays

Item Qty Delivered Qty Required Food received Time


Rice Received By
Sambar Vessels Practice
op
Curds/Pachadi Vessels kept at
Special Vessel washing
BBB Vessels returned at
Sweet Pongal Km from Temple
No. of Vessels: Big : Medium: Small :
Inconvenience/ Changes / Remarks , if any Explain :
tC

Feed Back of Food and Distribution


Note : Mention the grades based on the satisfaction
A : Very Good, B : Good, C : Average, D : Satisfactory, E : Poor, F : Very Poor
Rice Sambar Curds Vegetables Special Distribution
No

For any suggestions or clarifications or complaints ask teacher to contact : Distribution Cell :- 9379942130
Do

Supervisors Remarks and Signature School Seal and In charge/HM Signature

Important Note : Inform the teacher that no one should take home food, since it is meant to be consumed in the
school premises with in the school timings. No Outsiders should be allowed to take food from the school.

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860
Resource Planning at Akshaya Patra, Vasanthapura Page 27 of 27

t
Exhibit 20

os
School inspection report details

THE AKSHAYAPATRA FOUNDATION


VASANTHAPURA
SCHOOL INSPECTION DETAILS

rP
SL.N
O
QUESTIONS SOURCES Yes / No
1 Are the food is good and tasty? HM/teacher
2 Have the food reaches on time? HM/teacher
3 Are the childrens are taking sufficiently ? HM/teacher
4 Are the TAPF employees behaves properly? HM/teacher

yo
5 What basis are you placing order - food quantity HM/teacher
6 Are you getting food as per your requirement? HM/teacher
7 Are you tasting the food? How you are feeling the taste? HM/teacher
8 How and When are you communicating your school Holiday to TAPF? HM/teacher
9 Are the food is good and tasty? Children
10 Are you getting food sufficiently ? Children
11 Are the teacher giving you the required quantity? Children
op
SCHOOL SEAL AND INCHARGE / H.M SIGNATURE
tC

OFFICE USE ONLY


SL.N
QUESTIONS ANSWERS
O
1 No. of vessels delivered
2 Vessels stored place - Is it Hygenic
No

3 Is it stored in place every one can access or safely kept


4 Is it stored in the sun light (open place)
5 Check the condition of the food/vessel
6 Quantity of food delivered is as per the school requirement
7 Food observation - are the food is taken before lunch time
Do

ZONAL SUPERVISOR DISTRIBUTION INCHARGE MANAGER OPERATION

Source: TAPF VSP

This document is authorized for educator review use only by Harish V, PSG Institute of Management (PSGIM) until December 2018. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.
Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860