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Princeton Public Schools

Facilities Referendum

A VISION FOR OUR


SCHOOLS:
EXPANDING SPACE
ENHANCING LEARNING
WELLNESS
Enhancing Balance
• Homework
• AP Options
• Time management
• Mental health
• Nutrition/drugs, etc.
Our Mission
CONNECTEDNESS EVERY CHILD INNOVATION Preparing all students to lead lives
Communication & Caring
• Vision & expectations
KNOWN Exploring New Ideas
• Problem-based learning
of joy and purpose
• Relationships
• Internal/external • Technology
• Athletics
• Differentiated
Learning • Assessment as knowledgeable, creative, and
• Alumni & new families • Mindset
• Community, crisis, board
• Community
• Ideas to disrupt compassionate citizens of a
global society.
ACHIEVEMENT
Closing the Gap
• Cultural
responsiveness
• Outreach
• Equity and access
• Early literacy

2
Princeton Public Schools Facilities Referendum
Our Need
Our Vision
Our Investment
Our Need
Capacity
Safety/Security
HVAC
Athletics
Other
Critical Need
Capacity Challenge: Current and Future

2017: 3,769
2022: 4091 - 4,298
2027: 4,284 - 4820

10% growth every 5


years

700 - 800 additional


students by 2027
Capacity Challenge: Current and Future
Grades PreK-5

Currently
at
capacity.
120 - 200
more
students
in next 5
years
Capacity Challenge: Current and Future
Grades 6-8

Currently 100
over capacity

853 in 2020.

916 - 967 in
2022.
26% - 33%
increase in 5 yrs.
190 - 240 stdnts

1,000+ by 2027.
Capacity Challenge: Current and Future
Grades 9-12

Currently
almost 200
over
capacity at
1612.

Between
1800 – 2000
students by
2025
Capacity Challenge: PHS Current Issues

• Teachers in Trailers • Poor air, light, circulation


• Larger rooms divided into smaller • Difficulty accessing cafeteria
spaces • Students eat on hallway floors
• Limited electives
• Current classroom usage at 93% of
capacity
• Industry standard for scheduling is
75%
• Almost every room now scheduled
nearly every period of an 8-period
day
• Teachers have no home base –
relocating during “prep” periods
• Teachers are preparing to teach as
students arrive
• Students cannot find teachers for extra
help
Critical Need:
Possible Implications of Not Building Additional Space
• Elementary • High school
• Class sizes of 25-30 particularly at • Class sizes of 28-30
CP and RS • Limiting of elective offerings so all
• Temporary Trailers students receive only required
• $400,000 to install courses
• $50,000 to rent each year • Possible difficulty of students
• Possible redistricting of meeting graduation requirements
elementary students from CP and in arts and practical arts
RS to JP and LB • Split sessions?
• Middle school • Staggered sessions?
• Class sizes of 30-35
• Cutting of exploratory programs –
(e.g., coding, robotics, business,
shop) to repurpose space for
required classes
• Temporary Trailers
Other Critical Needs

• Safety and Security


• Entryways at all schools require additional security
• Replace doors and hardware to improve lockdown capabilities
• Fire suppression at PHS limited to newer areas
• HVAC
• Limited AC in classrooms, elementary cafeterias, PHS gym
• Learning happening at times in spaces over 90 degrees with CO2 build up
• Response to power outages
• Athletic
• Limited fields for practice and play
• M ultiple teams playing on same space, e.g. JW FH and Freshmen FH sharing half a field
• Weather-related cancellations of games are rescheduled during practices; practices postponed
when fields too soggy
• No defined space for wrestling, fencing
• No access to water or bathrooms in infield area near track
• Other
• Partial roof replacement at PHS, asbestos abatement, etc.
Our Vision
Expand Capacity at PHS
New 5/6 School on VR Site
Relocate VR Administration, Transportation, Maintenance
Security and HVAC upgrades at all Schools
Athletic Enhancements
Other
Our Vision: PHS Expansion
• Space to accommodate 400 additional students
• Capacity of 2000 assuming scheduling at standard level of 75%
• Internal Solution: construction to capture unused space
• Courtyards
• Hallways
• Cafeteria
• Library
• Fitness Center
• Other

• 22 additional large classrooms


• 25 small group areas throughout the building
• 54,000 square feet of new space
• 200,000 square feet of renovations (out of current total of 320,000 sq. ft.)
EXISTING CIRCULATION • LAYOUT
Built in 1927

Over capacity
(1423 capacity vs 1612
enrollment)
Complex

Congested
Limited Daylight
Corridors used for
Dining • Social

Long travel times

15 |
Design Approach
Expand Inward

COURTYARDS
+ GLASS SKYLIGHT
= CAPTURED USABLE LE
SPACE

16 |
Three-Step Design: Heart, Hub, Flexible Learning Zones

Provide more Flexibility and


Fluidity to teachers and
students

Create a wider Variety of


learning spaces to better FLEXIBLE FLEXIBLE
LEARNING LEARNING
support current activities ZONE ZONE FLEXIBLE
LEARNING
Break down the Scale of the ZONE
COLLABORATIVE HUB
school
FLEXIBLE FLEXIBLE
Build Community among LEARNING LEARNING
teachers and students ZONE ZONE

Distribute Educators and HEART


provide teacher collaboration
SECURE AND
spaces WELCOMING
ENTRY (TOWER)

17 |
STEP 1 | Create a Heart Space

FLEX
LEAR IBLE
ZONE NING

PRES
GATHENTATIO
ERIN N AN
G D
IN F O
RM
LEA AL A
RN I ND
NG SO C
TO IA L
NUR GRO SEMI
N
SE’S
SUIT
FLOOUND
R M EDI AR /
E RESO A
URCE
TO S S
FLOOECOND
R

H EA
RT
SECU
ADM POIN RITY
INIST FOYE T
RATI R
ON SECU
POIN RITY
T
TOW
ENTR ER
RECE Y
PTIO
N

18 | First Floor Plan [Proposed]


FIRST FLOOR
Ground Level | Proposed Heart Space VIEW
TERRACE

SEMINAR
ROOMS NURSE’S
ABOVE SUITE

TO CORRIDOR
SMALL GROUP ROOM
BEYOND

PRESENTATION AND
GATHERING

19 |
Gathering Stairs

At Ecole Kenwood French


Immersion School, a pre-K to
sixth grade public magnet school
in Columbus, Ohio, designed by
Fanning Howey, the stairway has
been extended to accommodate
carpeted student seating and
features an overhead projector, a
large projection screen, a sound
reinforcement system, and
wireless access. The location is a
popular spot for lectures and
student presentations as part of
project-based learning (PBL).
STEP 1 | Create a Heart Space

FLEX
LEAR IBLE
ZONE NING

TER
RAC
E

H EA
TO F RT TER
RAC
E
SEM FLOOIRST
ROO INAR SEM
R
M
ROO INAR
M

COM
MON
S
FLEX
LEAR IBLE FLEX
ZONE NING LEAR IBLE
ZONE NING

21 | Second Floor Plan [Proposed]


GROUND FLOOR
STEP 2 | Collaborative Hub/Media Center VIEW

COLLABORATIVE
TERRACES

SEMINAR / SMALL MEDIA


GROUP ROOMS COMMONS

DESIGN LAB

CONNECTION TO DINING,
INFORMAL LEARNING, AND
FOOD TECH.
CONNECTION TO
NORTH
COURTYARD

22 |
Design Labs
Robotics, 3D Printers, Maker Spaces
Collaborative Hub
Milan HS
Milan, Michigan
Milan High School, a public
school in Milan, Michigan, the
PBL learning addition called the
Milan Center for Innovative
Studies has a designated
collaboration space, the
Innovation Zone, where students
conduct individual research,
collaborate on group projects,
and give presentations. But the
Innovation Zone also serves as
the school’s social hub and hosts
the campus coffee shop and
student-run bookstore,
mimicking the integration of
work and relaxation space that is
so common in today’s start-ups
and cutting-edge technology
companies.
Three-Step Design: Heart, Hub, Flexible Learning Zones

Provide more Flexibility and


Fluidity to teachers and
students

Create a wider Variety of


learning spaces to better FLEXIBLE FLEXIBLE
LEARNING LEARNING
support current activities ZONE ZONE FLEXIBLE
LEARNING
Break down the Scale of the ZONE
COLLABORATIVE HUB
school
FLEXIBLE FLEXIBLE
Build Community among LEARNING LEARNING
teachers and students ZONE ZONE

Distribute Educators and HEART


provide teacher collaboration
SECURE AND
spaces WELCOMING
ENTRY (TOWER)
Distribute Dining for students
and staff beyond the cafeteria

25 |
Current PHS Hallway – Collaboration, Socialization
STEP 3 | Flexible Learning Zones
Allows space to adapt to learning goals

Variety of Flexible Learning Zones

27 |
Aligning Our Space to Our Goals for Learning

What are the skills our


students need to
thrive in the world?

Students should not


just receive
knowledge; they
should apply and
create it.

Our space should


align with our
goals for learning.
PHS: Transforming Learning in
Three Key Areas

Time

Instruction Space
Our Vision: New 5/6 School

Practical Student-Centered
• Cost-effectively frees up space • Extends nurturance of elementary
at JW and all 4 elementary school while offering middle school
exploration
schools • Increases collaboration; reduces
• Maintains neighborhood conflict
• 5th and 6th graders are in sync –
elementary schools socially, emotionally, intellectually
• Allows for exciting cross-grade level
• Creates staffing efficiencies by projects, performances, and
placing all fifth grade professional development
classrooms in one building • Allows all children to experience
new school and connect before JW
& PHS
• Promotes clear and caring focus on
transitions
5/6 School: Success Stories

Other Districts
• Montgomery The Lower Middle School succeeds
because it combines the content
• Lower Middle School specialization supported by most
• Hillsborough middle school academic
• Auten Road Intermediate structures with the nurturing
sensibilities of the elementary
• Bridgewater-Raritan years.
• Eisenhower Intermediate
It is truly just that simple!
• Hillside Intermediate
Mike Richards, Principal
• South Brunswick
• Upper Elementary School
5/6 School: Success Stories – South Brunswick
Joanne Kerekes, Asst. Superintendent

• The cafeterias, hallways, and


For those of us fortunate enough to playgrounds were unbelievably
have been a part of the UES peaceful.
experience, you will hear in SBSD to • Regrouping across grade levels was
this day that there were no better managed with ease.
years than those. • The arts, and performance and
research tasks flourished.
What happened during those five • ECA’s focused on collaborative clubs
years was nothing short of magical. – Odyssey of the Mind, Invention
Convention
We saw childhood extended and • Alignment of curriculum made PD
gained a glimpse into who our with staff as rich as I have ever
children would become as adults. experienced it. We were ahead of
the curve.
NEW 5/6 B

SCHOOL

Existing Valley
Road Site
Honor site
history and
maintain
stone arch
Upgrade
fields

34 |
VALLEY RD.
ENTRY EXIT

PROPOSED
COM M UNITY
GARDENS

PARENT / VISITOR
[5 1 C A R S ]
PARKING

SITE COM M UNITY PORCH


MAINENTRY
D R O P -O F F / P IC K U P L A N E

HARRIS RD.
PLAN NEW 5/6 ELEMENTARY
[2 STORY / APPROX. 85,000 SF]

87,000 sq. ft. OUTDOOR CAFE

660+ max OUTDOOR


LEARNING

capacity
OUTDOOR PLAY

EXIT
BUS LANE ATHLETIC FIELDS
Drop-off and
[1 0 + 2 ] [TURF?]

EXISTING FIRE

bus drives +
STATION
STAFF/ ADMIN PARKING
[6 5 C A R S ]

parking
W ITHERSPOON ST.

Turf athletic
fields

35 |
ENTRY
COMMUNITY GARDEN

PROPOSED PLAN DROP-OFF/ PICK UP LANE


COMMUNITY PORCH MAIN ENTRY

FOYER
GYM
ENTRY

FLZ
ADMIN
HEART

CAFE
LOCKER ROOM
ACCESS
M AKERSPACE
FLZ [R & D G A R A G E ] FOOD TECH
GYM
OUTDOOR DINING KITCHEN

SECONDARY
ENTRY GREENHOUSE
PROJECT PORCH
S L ID E

FLZ
KITCHEN
ACCESS
OUTDOOR
LEARNING
N ATU R AL PLAY

OUTDOOR PLAY
ATHLETIC
FIELDS

BUS LANE
[1 0 + 2 ]
Create a School Heart

Informal Learning Emerald Elementary School

38 |
Gathering Stairs

Direct Connections Meadowlark School

39 |
Sustainability

The building
itself
becomes a
laboratory for
learning – and
a cost-
effective one.

LEED Standards, WELL standards, Solar, Gardens, Rain Collection, Green Touchscreen
Supporting Learning Through Community
Partnership

An
opportunity
to create a
true
community
school
focused on
helping
children and
families
thrive -
intellectually,
physically,
emotionally.

The 5/6 School will bookend the community together with the Public Library.
Our Vision:
What Else Will the Referendum Include?
• Safety and Security
• Main entrances at all six schools to be reconfigured to be both welcoming and secure
• Control doors to restrict access at LB and RS
• Additional Fire Suppression at PHS
• Connector built at JW between C and E wings
• HVAC upgrades at all six schools
• AC in classrooms and cafeterias
• AC in PHS Gym
• Hook up for generators at elementary schools in case of power outages
• Electrical Upgrades
• Athletic fields turfed plus flexible indoor space
• VR Field and Upper Field at PHS
• Loft over PHS fitness center with additional spaces for sports and PE
• Concession stand and bathrooms by lower field and track
• Alternate space at Thanet Circle for administration, facilities and transportation currently at VR
• Other (Examples)
• Sloped roof replacement at PHS
• Old Library renovated at JW to more useable, modern space
• Acoustical upgrades to JW cafeteria and commons
Thanet Circle: Aerial View
Thanet Property for Administration,
Transportation, Facilities – and Future Possibilities
Thanet Circle Benefits

• 15 acres minutes from schools


• Two existing 3-story office buildings
• Two floors of one building can house admin, transportation, facilities staff
• Corporate tenant on third floor adds $200K of rental income
• No need to build addition and parking lot on front of JW
• Elimination of temporary rental expense
• VR staff can move in immediately
• Projected savings of $300,000
• Future athletic fields
• Space for self-funding pre-school
• Potential future school site if needed decades from now
Our Investment
Students
Schools
Home Values
Costs and Assumptions
Tax Impact
Operational Costs
Next Steps
What Are We Investing In?

• Our children
• Our school buildings
• Our home values
• 2010 Wharton study showed
passage of a school referendum
led to a 6% increase in home
values
• 6% = $50,000 on average
assessed home of $837,074
• Increase occurred gradually over
2-3 years and was sustained for at
least a decade
Overall by school
BUDGETS

$ 15,322,530
High School by type
$ 30,180,530
BUDGETS
Overall by type
$ 5,142,780
BUDGETS
$ 11,827,800
What is an ESIP?
POTENTIAL ESIP

Why consider an ESIP?

What has been considered?

Estimated project $ 19.5M


Understanding Costs: Key Information
All Projects: $129,614,950
BUDGETS
:
Budgets are not present-day dollars but reflect anticipated inflation
through mid-2020 (approx. 3% or $4 million)

All budgets include material and labor (legally required prevailing wage,
which can be 30% more than private construction)
Soft costs (approx. 23-26%), contingency (10-13% approx. $16 million),
fees, approval, bidding, legal, finance, furniture, abatement, and other
project related costs.

Furniture allowance of 3.25% ($4 million) for HS and New 5/6

Present value of 2001 Referendum of $80 million is $115 million (Ratables


$3.5 billion compared with $7.2 billion today)
Overall Budget
$129,614,950
TAX IMPACT

Est. Tax Impact – annual, not cumulative


$ 295
$ 294
$ 692
$ 220
……
$ 53.49

Basis Information
Average assessed home $837,074
30 year pay down schedule
Multiple bond issues as needed for construction over several years
Estimated state share 16.13% or approximately $20 million
$14 ,00 0,0 00
Princeton School District
PRELIMINARY Net Projected Debt Service
(Based on $129.830 M project total with three bond tranches, with debt service aid and
$12 ,00 0,0 00 other offsets)

Highest Annual
Aggregate NDS:
$10 ,00 0,0 00 $11.778M

$8, 000 ,00 0

$6, 000 ,00 0

Current Annual
NDS: $5.755M Average
NDS: Annual New
$5.698 M
$4, 000 ,00 0

$2, 000 ,00 0

$0
201 9 202 1 202 3 202 5 202 7 202 9 203 1 203 3 203 5 203 7 203 9 204 1 204 3 204 5 204 7 204 9 205 1

Exi s t ing De bt Se rv i ce
Other Financial Considerations: Operational
Impact
• Costs for operation of new 5/6 school
• Approximately $1.5 million increase for 22 new staff such as administrators,
counselors, CST, special area teachers, secretaries, custodians
• 5 th and 6 th grade teachers are already on staff; any increases will be the result
of enrollment growth; efficiency in staffing by having the grade level in 1
building
• Energy costs to be determined by engineers – LEED school should operate
more efficiently
• State provides for a limited tax levy adjustment beyond the 2% cap for the
opening of a new school
Operational Impact

Costs for Expanded Space at PHS Costs for Thanet Property


• Approximately $135K for 3 • Current energy costs for
custodians based on 54,000 110,000 sq. ft. at Thanet is
additional sq. feet $146,000
• Estimated energy costs of • Current energy costs for
$112,000 based on current operation of 30,000 sq. ft. at
usage Valley Road building is $89,000
• Cost of any additional teachers • Difference of $57,000
will be tied to enrollment • Current offset of rental income
growth or program expansion from tenants at Thanet Circle,
but would likely remain within approx. $200,000
the 2% cap on the tax levy
Financial Next Steps

• Continue to work with financial advisers to factor in actual amount of


state grants as well as to consider future increases in ratables
• Continue to work with independent citizens’ group to look for
efficiencies and to promote full transparency regarding responsible
use of public funds
• Continue to negotiate contributions to our operating fund from our
non-public partners whose children attend our schools.
Referendum Timeline

• Plans reviewed by DOE: April-July, 2018 • Projected Opening of New School:


September, 2020
• Design Adjustment Phase with ongoing
stakeholder input: Now– Sept. 2018 • Rolling Completion of PHS:
Fall 2019 – Fall 2023
• Information sessions re: design, cost,
benefit to students and the community:
Now – September, 2018
• Referendum Vote: October 2, 2018
• Construction Begins: Spring, 2019
Schools are not buildings; they are the people in them.

referendum@princetonk12.org