Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 640

Critical Reasoning: A User’s Manual

c Chris Swoyer

Version 3.0 (5/30/2002)

Contents

I Basic Concepts of Critical Reasoning

 

1

1 Basic Concepts of Critical Reasoning

 

5

 

1.1 Basic Concepts

 

5

1.2 A Role for Reason

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

13

1.3 Improving Reasoning

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

17

1.4 Chapter Exercises .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

18

II

Reasons and Arguments

 

19

2

Arguments

23

2.1 Arguments

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

24

2.1.1

Inferences and Arguments

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

24

2.2 Uses of Arguments

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

25

2.2.1 Reasoning .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

25

2.2.2 Persuasion

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

25

2.2.3 Evaluation

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

25

2.3 Identifying Arguments in their Natural Habitat

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

26

2.3.1

Indicator Words

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

26

2.4 Putting Arguments into Standard Form .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

27

2.4.1

Arguments vs. Conditionals

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

27

2.5 Deductive Validity

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

30

2.5.1 Definition of Deductive Validity

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

30

2.5.2 Further Features of Deductive Validity

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

33

2.5.3 Soundness

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

33

2.6 Method of Counterexample .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

34

2.7 Inductive Strength .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

39

2.8 Evaluating Arguments

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

41

2.9 Chapter Exercises .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

42

ii

CONTENTS

3

Conditionals and Conditional Arguments

 

43

3.1 Conditionals and their Parts

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

43

 

3.1.1

Alternative Ways to State Conditionals

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

45

3.2 Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

48

3.3 Conditional Arguments

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

53

 

3.3.1 Conditional Arguments that Affirm

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

53

3.3.2 Conditional Arguments that Deny

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

54

3.4 Chapter Exercises .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

55

III

The Acquisition and Retention of Information

 

61

4 Perception: Expectation and Inference

 

65

4.1 Perception and Reasoning

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

66

4.2 Perception is Selective

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

66

4.3 There’s More to Seeing than Meets the Eye

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

67

 

4.3.1

Information Processing

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

68

4.4 Going Beyond the Information Given

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

68

4.5 Perception and Inference

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

70

4.6 What Ambiguous Figures Teach Us

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

71

4.7 Perceptual Set: the Role of Expectations

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

73

 

4.7.1 Classification and Set .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

75

4.7.2 Real-life Examples

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

76

4.8 There’s more to Hearing, Feeling,

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

77

 

Hearing

4.8.1 .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

77

4.8.2 Feelings

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

78

4.9 Seeing What We Want to See .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

79

 

4.9.1 Perception as Inference

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

81

4.9.2 Seeing Shouldn’t be Believing

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

81

4.10 Chapter Exercises .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

83

5 Evaluating Sources of Information

 

85

5.1 Other People as Sources of Information

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

86

 

5.1.1

Information: We need something to Reason About

.

.

.

.

86

5.2 Expertise

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

88

 

5.2.1 What is an Expert?

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

88

5.2.2 Fields of Expertise

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

89

5.3 Evaluating Claims to Expertise

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

89

5.4 Who Do we Listen To?

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

93

 

5.4.1

Faking Expertise: The Aura of Authority

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

94

CONTENTS

iii

5.4.2

Appearing to Go Against Self-interest

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

96

5.5 Evaluating Testimony in General

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

97

5.6 Safeguards

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

99

5.7 Chapter Exercises .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

102

6 The Net: Finding and Evaluating Information on the Web

 

107

6.1 The World Wide Web

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

108

6.1.1 What is the World Wide Web?

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

108

6.1.2 Bookmarks

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

109

6.2 Search Engines

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

110

6.2.1 Specific Search Engines

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

111

6.2.2 Metasearch Engines

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

112

6.2.3 Specialty Search Engines .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

113

6.2.4 Rankings of Results

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

113

6.3 Refining your Search

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

113

6.4 Evaluating Material on the Net

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

115

6.4.1

Stealth Advocacy

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

119

6.5 Evaluation Checklist

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

120

6.6 Citing Information from the Net

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

121

6.7 Chapter Exercises .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

122

7 Memory and Reasoning

 

125

7.1 Memory and Reasoning

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

126

7.2 Stages in Memory .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

126

7.2.1

Where Things can go Wrong

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

128

7.3 Encoding

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

128

7.4 Storage

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

129

7.4.1

Editing and Revising

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

129

7.5 Retrieval .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

131

7.5.1 Context and Retrieval Cues

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

134

7.5.2 Schemas

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

135

7.6 Summary: Inference and Influences on Memory .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

137

7.7 Chapter Exercises .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

137

8 Memory II: Pitfalls and Remedies

 

139

8.1 Misattribution of Source

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

140

8.2 The Power of Suggestion and the Misinformation Effect

.

.

.

.

.

140

8.3 Confidence and Accuracy

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

141

8.3.1

Flashbulb Memories

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

141

8.4 False Memories

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

142

iv

CONTENTS

 

8.4.1 Motivated Misremembering

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

143

8.4.2 Childhood Trauma and False-Memory Syndrome

 

143

8.5 Belief Perseveration

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

144

8.6 Hindsight Bias

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

145

8.7 Inert Knowledge

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.