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EXPERIENCE

North Central

Visitor’s Guide | 2018 | 2019
Idaho
2 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
4 Nez Perce County
8 Chicks n Chaps
18 Idaho County
25 Baby Face Rock
30 Clearwater County
36
40 Lewis County
Star Gazing

44 Wild and Scenic Rivers
48 Traveling Onward:
Chamber Directory

PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLAGE

COVER PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLAGE

Advertising Inquiries Submit Stories
SARAH KLEMENT, PUBLISHER DAVID RAUZI, EDITOR
SKLEMENT@IDAHOCOUNTYFREEPRESS.COM DRAUZI@IDAHOCOUNTYFREEPRESS.COM
DEB JONES, PUBLISHER (MONEYSAVER) SARAH KLEMENT, PUBLISHER
Publications of Eagle Media Northwest
900 W. Main, PO Box 690, Grangeville ID 83530

DJONES@LCMONEYSAVER.COM SKLEMENT@IDAHOCOUNTYFREEPRESS.COM
208-746-0483, Lewiston; 208-983-1200, Grangeville

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 3
County
PHOTO BY GREG SCHMIDT MAJESTIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

4 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
PHOTO BY BRAD STINSON

I
PHOTO BY BRAD STINSON

PHOTO BY BRAD STINSON

nitially organized by the Territorial Legislature of
Washington in 1861, Nez Perce County was established
February 4, 1864 by the Idaho Territorial Legislature
with its county seat at Lewiston.

Nez Perce County has a total area of 856 square miles,
of which 8.2 square miles are water; and its population
(2010 Census) is 39,265. The county was named after
the Nez Perce Tribe, and Lewiston served for 22 months
as the territorial capital before it was moved to Boise.
The Clearwater and Snake rivers meet in Lewiston.

Incorporated cities within Nez Perce County include
Lewiston, Culdesac, Lapwai, and Peck. Among the
region’s communities are Sweetwater, Gifford, Lenore,
Myrtle, Southwick, Spalding and Waha.

PHOTO BY GREG SCHMIDT MAJESTIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 5
Events
Lewiston
Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival:
Fourth week in February;
uidaho.edu/jazzfest
Dogwood Festival
Late March through April;
www.lcsc.edu/ce/dogwood

Art Under the Elms
Late April; visitlcvalley.com/events/art-
under-the-elms-2/

Capital Street Dock Concert
Early July;
beautifuldowntownlewiston.com/capital-
street-dock-concert/

Hot August Nights
Aug. 24-25, 2018;
visitlcvalley.com/events/hot-august-nights/

Lewiston Round Up
Sept. 5-8, 2018;
www.lewistonroundup.com

Nez Perce County Fair
Sept. 20-23, 2018; www.npcfair.org/

Downtown Artwalk
early October; beautifuldowntownlewis-
ton.com/artwalk/

Pumpkin Palooza
Last weekend of October; beautifuldown-
townlewiston.com/pumpkin-palooza/
http://www.lcvalleychamber.org/ ; (509)
758-7712 or 800-933-2128

Culdesac
Culdesac Sausage Feed PHOTO BY BRAD STINSON
Usually first Sunday in March

Culdesac Shebang Days

Lapwai
Second Saturday in June

Culdesac
Lapwai
Lapwai Earth Day Celebration
Late April; contact: Lapwai City Hall, Located within the boundaries of Nez Perce Culdesac was named for its location at the end
(208) 843-2212, cityoflapwai.com
County and the Nez Perce Indian Reservation, of the railroad line. Located here is St. Joseph’s
Chief Joseph Warrior Memorial Lapwai is also the seat of government for the Mission (1874), listed on the National Register
Pow Wow tribe. Here, Henry H. Spalding established a of Historic Places for being the first Roman
June 15-17, 2018; contact: Lapwai City Protestant mission in 1836. The name, Lapwai,
Catholic mission among the Nez Perce

Peck
Hall, (208) 843-2212, cityoflapwai.com means “place of the butterflies.” In nearby
Indians.
Lapwai Days Spalding is the Nez Perce National Historic

Lewiston
July 14-15, 2018; contact: Lapwai City Park Museum and Visitors Center, highlighting
Hall, (208) 843-2212, cityoflapwai.com the region’s artifacts and cultural history.
Young Nations Youth Pow Wow
Nov. 17-19, 2018; contact: Lapwai City Located at the mouth of Big Canyon near the
Hall, (208) 843-2212, cityoflapwai.com Clearwater River, Peck is situated east of
Lewiston was founded the same year (1861) as Lewiston between Lenore and Ahsahka. The
Nez Perce National Historic the county, spurred by a neighboring gold rush American Women’s League Chapter House was
Park Bead Bazaar northeast in Pierce. It serves as a hub for
Dec. 2; contact: Lapwai City Hall, built here in 1900, and is listed on the National
(208) 843-2212, cityoflapwai.com recreation into the Hells Canyon National Register of Historic Places; it currently is in use
Recreation Area; and its industries include as the Peck Community Library.
Lapwai Community Christmas agriculture, timber/paper products, as well as
Tree Lighting light manufacturing. The Port of Lewiston is
Dec. 2, 2018; contact: Lapwai City Hall,
(208) 843-2212, cityoflapwai.com the farthest inland port east of the West Coast
of the U.S. It is home to Lewis-Clark State
New Year’s Eve Pow-Wow College.
Dec. 31, 2018

6 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 7
Story and Photos
By Lorie Palmer
Idaho County Free Press

hat’s pink and sassy and fun all over?

W It’s the annual Chicks and Chaps
event at the Lewiston Roundup.
Each year for the past five years, women have gathered at the Lewiston
Roundup grounds in an effort to support cancer awareness, specifically
breast cancer, in the Quad Cities (Lewiston, Clarkston, Moscow and
Pullman).
“It’s an amazing event and I am so grateful to get to be a part of it,”
said 2017 organizer Kristin Kemak, Lewiston Chamber of Commerce
director.
Part of the afternoon’s events include special speakers, catered
lunch/dinner, silent and live auctions, raffles, taste tests, goodie bags
and – one of the most popular events – the arena clinics.
In the arena, women of all ages have the chance to “cowgirl up” as they
learn to rope, ride a barrel bull and participate in a stick horse race. All for
“real” scores on their cards.
“What? An eight? I definitely think that was a 10,” one participant
laughed after she roped the bull decoy’s horn atop a barrel bull set up on a
haystack.
“I think I should get points simply for trying,” another lady laughed as
her rope didn’t quite make a circle motion.
“Let’s do this!” another young woman yelled, raising her right hand in
bull-rider fashion as she balanced atop the barrel bull. “Shareece’s
wild!” she yelled, throwing out the Lewiston Roundup theme as others
watched and cheered her on.
“It’s such fun to get together, and to raise awareness and money
for those in our communities who truly need the help,” Kemak
said.
For her, the event hit close to home in 2016. By 2017, she was
one-year cancer free.
“I am on the Lewiston Roundup board,” she said, “but for
me, 2016 was too close to my diagnosis. Now, I am able to
focus on all the truly amazing networking and benefits.”
Kemal dug her heels in for the 2017 event and con-
tacted sponsors, vendors and one of the most im-
portant aspects of the event – volunteers.
“We had about 168 people attend and 50 vol-
unteers helping. This would not be successful
without all of them,” she emphasized.
Chicks and Chaps was started in Montana in
2010 and came to Lewiston in 2012. Since its in-
ception, it has raised $72,000. For the 2017 event,
money raised went to the Gina Queensberry Founda-
tion in Lewiston and Light A Candle in Moscow.
The Gina Quensenberry Foundation provides financial assis-
tance through donations and fund-raising activities to area breast

8 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
cancer patients in need. Light A Candle program raises
funds for services, helping cancer patients improve their
quality of life and easing some of the pressure that
comes with facing cancer. Some of the services made
available through the Light a Candle program include
housekeeping, gas cards, grocery assistance and mas-
sages.
“I am one of those people who was helped by Light A
Candle,” survivor Heidi Heath told the group of ladies.
Heath was “44 and healthy,” she said, when she got
her cancer diagnosis.
“Six rounds of chemotherapy, a double mastectomy, a
total hysterectomy and 33 rounds of radiation later –
and here I am,” she said tearfully. “I was so thankful for
that gas card from Light A Candle, but the foot massage I
received was unbelievable.”
When on the roller-coaster ride that is the cancer
journey, she said, it’s the little things that come to mat-
ter.
“They stand out as bright spots in a crazy, stressful
time,” she added. “Take care of yourselves. Sometimes
all you can do is take one step at a time – but always, al-
ways move forward.”
Physician Sally Jones spoke briefly on her career path.
“I could stand here and tell you that one in eight are
diagnosed with cancer, that you need to get your mam-
mograms at 40 – but you know that,” Dr. Jones said.
Instead, she chose to speak on “gratitude,” she said.
“I am honored and privileged in my practice to be
able to take this journey with women. Through it, my
perspective has changed – and I see that in the women I
treat,” she said.
Jones said she sees a transformation in her patients,
who come to see the world in a different way.
“No one has ever come to me and said, ‘I am so glad
for those extra hours I logged in at work,’” she stated.
“They are glad for the photos they took, the fly fishing
they did, the hobby they embraced, the mentor they be-
came –the memories they created and those they spent
their time with.”
Dr. Jones reminded the group to live in a way that
matters, “to show that the struggle of those who have
cancer is not in vain,” she said. “Rock gratitude!”
The seriousness of what Chicks and Chaps is intend-
ed for is not lost; however, the event exudes a carefree
happiness of sisterhood.
Friends, sisters, moms and daughters all come in to-
gether.
“I wouldn’t want to miss it,” said Tammy Iverson, who
bucked, roped, visited and laughed her way through the
afternoon.
As a hot day led into a perfect night, women sat to-
gether in the Roundup bleachers for the evening’s per-
formances, new friends made and new experiences in
the books, already visiting about the coming year.
“Being here is a great way to give back to those in
need and to a community who responds to those in
need,” Kemak said. “It’s my turn to give back by helping
with this event and I love it.”
For more on Chicks and Chaps in Lewiston, log onto
their Facebook page or contact Lewiston Chamber of
Commerce Director Kristin Kemak at LCPRESIDENT@LCVAL-
LEYCHAMBER.ORG.

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 9
in our
Kamiah to
Visit the Powell
Upper •
Clearwater Elk City to
River Lapwai
Corridor! in North
Central Idaho
Kamiah Chamber of Commerce
www.kamiahchamber.com

(208) 935-2290
www.facebook.com/kamiahchamber

10 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 11
12 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
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Spalding Museum Nez Perce National Historical Park tells the story
of Nez Perce Country, from ancient times to today.
A park about a People, for all people.

Located on US Highway 95 at Spalding, Idaho...
the park headquarters and museum offer films, exhibits, and ranger talks on Nez Perce tribal heritage,
history and culture. Admission free.
OPEN 8:30-4 DAILY WITH EXTENDED SUMMER HOURS.
Information: 208-843-7001 • www.nps.gov/nepe
https://www.facebook.com/#!/DiscoverNezPerceNationalHistoricalPark • https://twitter.com/NezPerceNP
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 13
14 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
Can I bring my dog?Sure! Day trips to weeklong
vacations include all the family
members – that includes Fido!
Traveling through North Central
Idaho, visitors will find more and
more public facilities are open to
or have designated areas for
recreating with your dog.
When visiting an area, check
for signs on whether dogs are
allowed. If so, some park facilities
may have designated areas, such
as Lions Park in Grangeville, and
Kiwanis Park in Lewiston, where
dogs are allowed, and they may
also offer dog cleanup stations
with bags available.

Private
PHOTO BY BRAD STINSON

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 15
R
Appaloosa
The

ecognized internationally for its
distinctive look, the Appaloosa horse
originated out of North Central Idaho,
The Appaloosa is a light horse breed,
generally weighing less than 1,500 pounds.
They are typically used as riding horses for
developed by the Nez Perce Tribe, and is one leisure and trail riding. Being agile and swift,
of the most popular breeds in the United many are also used on the racetrack, in the
States. show ring, and for work on the ranch.
Adopted as the state horse in 1975, the One of the signature events involving the
Appaloosa is known for its spotted Appaloosa is the annual Chief Joseph Trail
patterning, which can be broken into five Ride, organized by the ApHC. The event
categories of blanket, snowflake, leopard, started in 1965, and it is a progressive trail
marble, and frost. Settlers originally referred ride that retraces the route taken by the Nez
to them as the "Palouse horse,” after the Perce Indians and their Appaloosas as they
regional river of the same name. Eventually fled from the U.S. military during the Nez
the name turned to Appaloosa. Perce War of 1877. The 1,300-mile total ride
According to the Appaloosa Horse Club runs from Joseph, Ore., to Canada and is
(ApHC) in Moscow (WWW.APPALOOSA.COM), in done in approximate 100-mile segments
addition to their unique coat patterns, each year, so it takes 13 years to complete
Appaloosa horses also often have mottled or the entire route.
parti-colored skin, white sclera around their
eyes, and striped hooves. Though, some
Appaloosas do not display characteristics
typical of the breed, including the unique and
colorful coat patterns
The Nez Perce lost most of their horses
after the Nez Perce War in 1877, and the
breed fell into decline for several decades. A
small number of dedicated breeders
preserved the Appaloosa as a distinct breed
until the ApHC was formed as the breed
registry in 1938.

16 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 17
County

18 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
I
PHOTO BY DAVID RAUZI
daho County spans the Idaho panhandle and borders
three states, but imposing geography sets this area
apart from the rest of the United States. The famous
Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1805 found a struggle
in the Bitterroot Mountains, near the present-day
Montana state line. To the west, the Snake River
carved the continent’s deepest river gorge – Hells
Canyon – which today separates Idaho County from
Washington and Oregon. Within this vast region, the
Snake, Salmon and Clearwater rivers and tributaries
fostered the Nimi'ipuu, the Nez Perce people, in
ancient times.

During the centuries since Lewis and Clark charted
their route to Oregon, gold rushes and timber booms
have brought modern industries and conveniences to
the area. Established in 1864, Idaho County has
shepherded a frontier spirit into the 21st Century.
Within its boundaries are parts of a dozen national
parks, forests and wilderness areas that together total
more than 4.5 million acres of federal public land.
Together, Idaho County’s eight towns and 18 smaller
communities are home to 16,000 people.

PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLAGE

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 19
20 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
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CLOSED MONDAYS
Private parties welcome
Located 6 miles west
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SERVING: 962-3090
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Good friends.
Breakfast, Lunch and

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EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 21
IDAHO COUNTY
Events
Grangeville
Border Days July 4-6, Idaho’s oldest
rodeo; GRANGEVILLEBORDERDAYS.ORG

Summer Concert Series, July-August
WWW.GRANGEVILLEIDAHO.COM 208-983-0460

Farmers Market July 1 - Sept./Oct.

Octoberfest, Sept. 28-29

Clearwater
Ground Hog Feed Feb. 4

Elk City Wagon Road Days,
July 21-22

Cottonwood
Raspberry Festival Aug. 5
at the Monastery of St. Gertrude
WWW.MYRASPBERRYFESTIVAL.ORG

Idaho County Fair August 15-18
WWW.IDAHOCOUNTYFAIR.ORG

Elk City
Elk City Days Aug. 10-11

Kooskia
Taste of the Clearwater June 23

Kooskia Days Aug. 3-4

Riggins
Salmon River Jet Boat Races April
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SALMONRIVERJETBOATRACES

Riggins Rodeo May 5-6
WWW.RIGGINSRODEO.COM

Big Water Blowout River Festival
June 2; WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/BWBRF

Hot Summer Nights July 28
WWW.RIGGINSHOTSUMMERNIGHTS.COM

Salmon Run a half-marathon, Sept. 8
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/RIGGINSSALMONRUN

Farmers’ Market July through
October.

Stites
Stites Days July 14-15

White Bird
White Bird Rodeo June 15-16
WWW.WHITEBIRDRODEO.COM.

22 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
Lowell and
Syringa
Syringa, located on the Clearwater River,
is named after the state flower. The
community of Lowell is located at the
confluence of the Lochsa and Selway
rivers, where they form the Middle Fork
of the Clearwater River. Services include

Stites
fuel, seasonal restaurants and lodging.

Stites is located along the South Fork of
the Clearwater River, south of Kooskia,
on State Highway 13. Services include

Riggins
gas, groceries, dining and hardware.

Among the Salmon River breaks in the
shadow of the Seven Devils mountains,
about an hour’s drive south of
Grangeville, Riggins (pop. 400) burgeons
during the summer months as river
users flood to the famous “River of No
Return.” Year-round services include
fuel, restaurants, groceries, sporting
goods, and an office of the Hells Canyon
National Recreation Area.
WWW.RIGGINSIDAHO.COM

White Bird
208-628-3320

White Bird is a creek-bottom community
east of the Salmon River, located in a
culdesac below the towering grade
where U.S. Highway 95 climbs up and
over the hills that define the Camas
Prairie’s southern boundary. The
community is home to a historical site –
a battlefield of the Nez Perce War – as
well as services such as dining, lodging,
RV parking, fuel, antiques and gifts.
WWW.VISITWHITEBIRD.COM;
208-839-2777

PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLAGE

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 23
Grangeville at the foot of Cottonwood Butte.
The town began as a stage stop for
journeys into the mining
The Camas Prairie is one of the
communities of Florence, Warren
breadbaskets of North Central
and Elk City. It is now an
Idaho, and Grangeville, with
agricultural hub with a population
roughly 3,200 people, is its most
of 900. Services include a hospital,
populous place. Grangeville’s
restaurants, groceries, banking, a
heritage as a tightly-knit
micro-brewery, skiing, an off-road
agricultural community was written
vehicle dealership, and retail
right into its name at the time of its
shopping.
founding.
WWW.COTTONWOODIDAHO.ORG
During the 1870s, locals established

Elk City
208-962-3851
the old Grange Hall to foster area
grain-growers’ ability to supply
then-booming gold mining
districts. Today, Grangeville is the
seat of Idaho County government as Elk City is located about 60 miles
well as a center of agricultural and east of Grangeville in the heart of
timber industry located astride the the Nez Perce-Clearwater National
junction of highways. State Forest. The town has fuel, food,
Highway 13 and U.S. Highway 95 lodging and a small airstrip. Elk City
PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLAGE connect Idaho County residents to offers a wide range of outdoors
each other and the 8,500-square opportunities, such as hunting,
mile county to civilization. Beyond fishing, horseback riding, gold

Dixie
the pavement lie wild public forests prospecting and snowmobiling.
that harbor a wealth of recreation
opportunity: trails suitable for
motorcycles and snowmobiles,
mountain bikes, horses and hikers,
and beyond the trails, untamed Located 32 miles south of Elk City,
wildernesses perfect for Dixie is a center of outdoor
backcountry backpackers of recreation with services including
proficient skill. automotive repair and an airfield,
Services available in Grangeville as well as food, lodging, groceries

Ferdinand
include small-town amenities and fuel.
(restaurants and groceries, fuel,
lodging and such) as well as
commercial dealers (automotive,
furniture, hardware, ag equipment) Eight miles north of Cottonwood
and public facilities (county along U.S. Highway 95, Ferdinand
courthouse, light aircraft airport, has a post office, a full-service
hospital, museum, library, veterinarian, guest house and a

Kooskia
swimming pool and ski hill). The brew pub.
historic movie theater is a
destination year-round, and the
drive-in is open during the summer.
WWW.GRANGEVILLEIDAHO.COM

Clearwater
PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLAGE
208-983-0460. Kooskia rests in a river valley where
the Clearwater River’s main forks
flow together. State Highway 13
parallels the South Fork Clearwater
River to its junction with U.S.
Just a step off State Highway 13, this
Highway 12 at the confluence,
community was once the first stop
above which the federal highway
on the wagon road from Stites to
follows the Middle Fork Clearwater
Elk City which supplied miners at
the gold fields around Elk City. River east toward Montana.
Today, Clearwater is home to the Kooskia’s major industry is timber.
Elk City Wagon Road museum. A By virtue of its location, this town of
similar route through the deep 600 is a gateway to some of the
woods is open to forest visitors most isolated country in the
during the summer, from which continental United States and a
there are vistas of places ancient jumping-off point for all kinds of

Cottonwood
people considered sacred. outdoor adventures, including
camping and rafting. Services
available in Kooskia include
banking and hardware, as well as
food, fuel and lodging.
Cottonwood is located on the WWW.KOOSKIA.COM
western edge of the Camas Prairie 208-926-4362
PHOTO BY DAVID RAUZI

24 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
PHOTO — FREE PRESS ARCHIVE

Baby Face Rock
T
he baby-face carving beside State Highway 14 on had, a claw hammer and a cold chisel. Then he carved
the way to Elk City has inspired many stories the date and place.
regarding its origin. Located less than 100 feet up The shady draw is well-known to scores of locals
a narrow draw beside a small creek, the carving is at while others have grown up in the area and never
eye level and hard to miss. The rock also bears the date, heard of Baby Face.
"1929" and the name, "Granite Creek." To find the face carving, travel east on U.S. Highway
What's the real story? Who carved Baby Face? A 2008 14 toward Elk City. Look for mile marker 21 and then
interview in the Idaho County Free Press puts the facts start watching for a brushy draw with a trail leading
to this intriguing story. straight up the bank. There is a hint of a pullout across
"I've heard about the face carving all my life," said from the draw. Otherwise, park up or down the road
Gayle Jacks of Craigmont. "We had to stop every time
and walk along the highway to the unmarked Granite
we drove by and Dad would tell the story again."
Creek. Because the road is narrow, this can be a
According to Jacks, his father, Jim, was responsible
for carving the face in the rock. dangerous walk. Watch for cars and keep in mind that
Jim Jacks and a partner lived in a cabin at the mouth drivers are not expecting to see pedestrians along that
of Granite Creek and ran a trap line across the river. stretch of road.
The two young men took turns crossing the river to Climb up the bank on the right side of the creek.
check their trap line, a trip that took about 1-1/2 days. You'll find a short trail that will lead you straight to the
"One day when Dad was alone at the cabin, looking large rock bearing Baby Face. Moss covers much of the
across the creek, he noticed a knob on a rock that was rock and lettering and the nose has broken off, but the
about the size of a softball," said Jacks. "He got to face is easily made out. At certain times of the day, a
thinking it wouldn't take much to make it a face." So, shaft of sunlight slips through the canopy of trees to
he cut a face into the granite using the only tools he shine directly on the face.

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 25
26 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 27
Idaho Adventures Begin Here.
Salmon Rapids Lodge is located on the confluence of the two Salmon Rivers.
Comfortable accommodations, including breakfast, pool and hot tub,
and cookies and milk await your arrival.

www.salmonrapids.com
1-877-95-RAPID (877-957-2743)
208-628-2743 | Fax 208-628-3834

Salmon
River
Welcome to the

Motel
We Honestly Care!
Building with Confidence
Since 1987 Mon-Sat 7am-10pm; Sun 8am-8pm
Commercial • Educational • Medical
Residential • Public Works

Open 7 Days a Week
Everyday Low Prices ✤ Video Rental
Choice Meats ✤ In-Store Bakery
Rug Doctor ✤ Super Specials
Fresh Produce ✤ Service Deli
Money Orders ✤ Case Sales Cost + 10% 1203 S. MAIN
RIGGINS, IDAHO
AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS
Dry Clean Pick-Up ✤ Idaho Lottery
DISH TV • WI-FI
QUEEN BEDS • IN-ROOM COFFEE
415 W. Main
PETS OKAY • SENIOR DISCOUNT
310 Junction / PO Box 447
Cottonwood, Idaho 83522 GRANGEVILLE, ID (208) 628-3025
WWW.SALMONRIVERMOTEL.COM
Ph.208.962.3903 • Fx.208.962.3120
ArnzenConstruction.com 983-0680, 800-434-1022

28 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
SOLBERG
AGENCY, INC.
Real Estate & Insurance
“Serving the Prairie for over 50 years”

222 PARK ST, GRANGEVILLE ID
Enjoy spacious living in this beautiful 3,284 square foot
Park Street home with wonderful views. Plenty of room
for your family in this 4 bedroom, 2¾ bath, two level
home with a walk-out basement onto a large beautifully
maintained yard that includes a sprinkler system and con-
crete curbing.
SEE THE DETAILS ON THIS HOME AND OTHER LISTINGS AT
www.solbergagency.com
(208) 983-0450 * Toll-Free 1-877-520-0450
133 WEST MAIN • GRANGEVILLE, ID 83530

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 29
County

PHOTO BY ROBERT MILLAGE

30 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
PHOTOS BY MIKE HAYS

E stablished in 1911, Clearwater County
encompasses 2,488 square miles and has
its county seat at Orofino.

In 1805, Lewis and Clark followed an old
Indian trail between the north and middle
forks of the Clearwater River and met the
Nez Perce Tribe near the present site of
Weippe. Gold was first discovered by E. D.
Pierce in 1860 and shortly after formed
Pierce City that is the oldest mining town
in Idaho. The county is named for the
Clearwater River whose name was translated from the Nez Perce
term Koos-Koos-Kai-Kai, describing clear water.
Incorporated cities within Clearwater County include Elk River,
Orofino, Pierce and Weippe.
Multiple unincorporated communities exist within the richly
forested hills and plains including Ahsahka, Cardiff, Cavendish,
Dent, Grangemont, Greer, Headquarters, Hollywood, Judge Town,
Konkolville, Moose City and Teakean.

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 31
Events
Elk River
Elk River Annual Spring
Fishing Derby May
SLORA Jet Boat Races
on Elk Creek Reservoir, May 25-27
ATV/UTV & Cycle Fun Run May 12
ATV/UTV & Cycle Fun Run June 16

CLEARWATER COUNTY
“Thunder in the Mountains”
Fireworks Show July 7
Elk River ATV Drag Races July 21
PHOTO- FREE PRESS ARCHIVE
Elk River Days Aug. 10-11
Elk River Rec District Fun in the
Mud, Mud Bog Competition Sept. 1
hiking, ATV trails, downhill and
Orofino cross-country skiing,
Rotary Crab Feed January snowmobiling and camping.
The Maniac “The Best Dam Race Bald Mountain Ski Area is 11

Elk River
in Idaho” June 9 miles northwest of Pierce.

Weippe
Year-long golfing events Orofino WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM
Golf Course & Country Club; the third highest in the U.S.,
WWW.OROFINOGOLF.COM completed in the early 1970s.
Elk River is a gateway to the
Clearwater County Fair and region’s outdoor recreation The community sits alongside Weippe is located on State
Orofino Lumberjack Days U.S. Highway 12, along the
Mid-September activities including Highway 11, on the Gold Rush
www.OROFINOLUMBERJACKDAYS.ORG snowmobiling and snowshoeing, Clearwater River, that connects Historic Byway, and is part of the
Annual Christmas Festival, Light ATV riding, hunting and fishing. to Lewiston and Missoula, National Lewis and Clark
Parade and Tree Lighting The community is accessed off Mont., part of the National Historic Trail. The region is
December; www.orofino.com

Orofino
State Highway 8 from Bovill. Scenic Byway system named the known for its connection to this
Pierce “Northwest Passage Scenic
Byway.”
historic expedition where – on
the Weippe Prairie -- the
Pierce Winter Festival February

Pierce
Orofino (in Spanish: fine gold) WWW.OROFINO.COM explorers had their first contact
Annual Deer Creek Fishing Derby
Deer Creek Reservoir, June is the county seat, named from a with the Nez Perce Tribe.
Annual 1860 Days Aug. 3-5 gold mining camp established in Among the notable areas in
1861 two miles south of Pierce. The discovery of gold – the the region are the Weippe Prairie,
Annual Holiday Bazaar November
Orofino is situated five miles first in the state -- drove settlers known for its annual rich bloom
Annual Festival of Trees December from “Canoe Camp” where the to Pierce that began the rush that of camas flowers, as well as the
WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM
Lewis and Clark Expedition built soon moved across the region. Lewis and Clark Interpretive
Weippe five dugout canoes to travel
downstream to the Pacific Ocean
Pierce is located on State
Highway 11 northeast of Weippe.
Center at the Weippe Discovery
Center, containing historic
Annual Camas Festival May 25-27
in 1805. The community is four In recreation, the region offers murals and displays.
Wild Weippe Rodeo Aug. 17-19 miles north of Dworshak Dam, WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM
access to hunting, fishing,
WWW.PIERCE-WEIPPECHAMBER.COM

32 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
HIGHLAND Harpster RV
REALTY
www.highlandrealty.net
• RECREATIONAL
PROPERTIES
• ACREAGES
• BUSINESSES
• HOMES
201 West Main
We can help you
find the perfect Corner of Main & State St.
residential, Grangeville, ID Located right on the beautiful South Fork of the Clearwater.
Summer hours 7 a.m.-8 p.m.
commercial or
vacation
Full menu Bar & Grill • Yurt rentals, tent camping
208-983-2935
property.
and RV spots • Laundry and shower facilities.
Toll Free: 800-983-2935
Roger Nuxoll.....208-983-8701
208-983-2312 • harpsterrvpark.com
GIVE US
A C ALL Tara Connolley 208-507-1806

WHITE B IRD r
YouScenic & Recreation Destination!
Best of the Snake & Salmon Rivers!

Enjoy miles of the Salmon River & Gateway to Hells Canyon • Nez Perce National Historical Park-White Bird • Awesome ATV Rides
World-famous fishing & hunting • Excellent camping & lodging • Amazing Jet Boat Tours

Call White Bird Chamber of Commerce (208) 839-2777
Visit the White Bird Chamber of Commerce website:
or White Bird City Hall (208) 839-2294
for more information about our beautiful area!
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 33
34 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 35
Star
A
Gazing
fter the sun goes down, the skies above North
Central Idaho come alive.
outdoor lights. Do some shine in your eyes more than
others? Can you find a light that only shines downward?
Learn more about night sky friendly lighting.
Light pollution is still largely unknown to this region IN THE WILDERNESS
where the night sky will reveal thousands of stars – and • Look for the Milky Way stretching across the night
meteor showers – for stargazers. sky. What looks like a faint cloud is actually the light
For North Central Idaho (and the Northern Hemi- from millions and millions of distant stars. The Milky
sphere in general), the best time to see the Milky Way is Way is our home galaxy and is best seen in summer and
March through October when the brightest part of the fall evening skies.
Milky Way’s core is visible. Beginning in March, early ris- • If the full moon is up, the Milky Way will be hard to
ers can view the Milky Way in the predawn hours rising see. Try going for a night hike instead! Let your eyes ad-
in the southeast. By midsummer, it will arc from the just to the moonlight and keep your flashlight turned off
south directly overhead once the sky is completely dark. (but available for safety if needed).
By October, it will be setting toward the southwest in the IN A NATIONAL PARK
early nighttime hours. • Camp under the stars. What better way to experi-
To maximize the number of visible stars, plan your ence the great outdoors than camping in a national park
viewing times when the sky is darkest — about two under a star-filled sky?
hours after sunset until two hours before dawn. • National parks are great places to get to know the
Here are some ideas to make your experience memo- animals that are nocturnal — wildlife that is awake at
rable: night and asleep during the day. Sit quietly and listen for
IN TOWN these creatures.
• From an open field or park, find the Big Dipper. The • Many national parks offer night sky programs, from
last two stars in the cup of the Big Dipper point to the telescope astronomy events to full moon walks with
North Star, which is just a bit dimmer than the individ- rangers. Be sure to check with your park if you are inter-
ual stars in the Big Dipper. ested.
• Next time you are riding in a car, look closely at the
PHOTO BY GREG SCHMIDT MAJESTIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 37
Heritage
Clearwater County
Clearwater County has developed an annual event
celebrating the history of the region. The Camas Festi-
val in Weippe allows visitors an opportunity to visit the
area where Lewis and Clark originally met the Nez
&Culture
Idaho County
Perce. The annual Raspberry Festival is a fund-raiser for the
The day and a half festival takes place in mid-May Historical Museum at St. Gertrude. Held on the scenic
and includes food and entertainment on Friday and a grounds of the Monastery of St. Gertrude in Cottonwood,
mix of events on Saturday. Activities include a Dutch the event attracts more than 3,000 visitors to eat and
oven cookoff, a Dutch oven dinner, a Haw Hee Show, a shop for unique, handmade crafts and gifts. The sisters
Fun Run/Walk, breakfast, music in the park, exhibits also offer regular tours of the ornately designed and
and displays, craft and food vendors, a silent auction handcrafted chapel and the historic museum.
and a horseshoe tournament. The event takes place the first Sunday in August every
Visit www.weippe.com/events/May or call 435-4362 year. The one-day event features a children’s carnival, art
for more information. show, arts and crafts fair, car show, vintage sale and a Fun
Run & Walk. Start your day early with a pancake breakfast

Lewis County
and bring money for the grilled hamburgers, BBQ beef
sandwiches, raspberry shortcake, jam and wine.
The Salmon River Fall Art Show is a juried art show
that takes place the first weekend of October in Riggins.
Every year, bluegrass musicians travel to Kamiah for The event draws entries from Idaho, Washington and
picking and singing as part of the Idaho Sawtooth eastern Oregon.
Bluegrass Association’s Spring Jam. Held at the Lewis- Artwork is submitted in a range of mediums, including
Clark Resort, the event offers visitors an opportunity to photography, painting, pastels, antler carvings and
listen to what is commonly called American roots music. sculpture.
The 2018 event will be June 1-3.

Nez Perce County
Visit www.idahosawtoothbluegrass.org.
Another popular event in Kamiah, the Chief
Lookingglass Powwow takes place the third weekend in
August. Native American dancers, drummers and vendors
travel from numerous states to participate with family
and friends and share their many tribal traditions. The Dogwood Festival is an annual celebration of
Visitors from across the region gather at the grounds of arts, culture and community in the Lewis-Clark Valley.
the Wa-a'Yas Community Center to witness brilliantly A variety of events are scheduled throughout the
colored regalia, memorials and name-giving ceremonies. month of April.
Other activities include a friendship dinner, huckleberry Included are the Stephen Lyman Memorial
pancake breakfast, fry-bread contest, basketball Children’s Art Exhibit, Lewis Clark Recyclers Earth Day
competition and a parade. events, Lewiston All-Breed Dog Show, a grape and
And bring an appetite, as plenty of food vendors will be grain confluence, river run, car show, quilt festival and
on site as well. Look for details on the Chief Looking Glass Art Under the Elms.
PowWow Facebook page as well as on the Kamiah Art Under the Elms features more than 100 art
Chamber of Commerce Facebook page or web site vendors, a food court and live entertainment
(www.kamiahchamber.com). highlighting regional musicians and performance
Aside from the Chief Lookingglass Pow Wow, there are artists. The food court offers dishes from vendors
other events where Native Americans gather to renew throughout the northwest region. Children can create
their culture and preserve their rich heritage. Check the their own art with instruction from local artists or visit
county schedules for listings of events. the Dogwood Fairies tent and build a fairy garden.

38 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
Don’t Miss
The Chief Looking Glass Powwow takes place the third weekend in August.

...
Lewiston Round-Up Grangeville Border Days Raspberry Festival Orofino Lumberjack Days Kamiah Free Barbecue
Sept. 5-8 July 4-6 Aug. 5 Sept. 13-16 Aug. 31, Sept. 1-2
Lewiston Grangeville Cottonwood Orofino Kamiah

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 39
County

PHOTO BY GREG SCHMIDT MAJESTIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTO BY GREG SCHMIDT,
MAJESTIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY BRAD STINSON

PHOTO BY LORIE PALMER

L
Lewis County, established in 1911, was named for explorer
Meriwether Lewis and includes 480 square miles with Nez
Perce as its county seat and Kamiah as its largest city. Its
population is 3,821 (2010 Census).

Most of Lewis County is within the Nez Perce Indian
Reservation though American Indians make up only about
6 percent of the county’s population.

Incorporated cities within Lewis County include
Craigmont, Kamiah, Nezperce, Reubens and Winchester.

PHOTO — FREE PRESS ARCHIVE

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 41
Events
Craigmont
Citywide yard sale day May 5
May Memorial Day services
11 a.m., at the cemetery
Craigmont June Picnic June 22-24
Thursdays in July Jammin’ in the
Park concerts, every Thursday evening;
call 208-924-5432
American Legion November
Breakfast, noon, Nov. 3
Breakfast with Santa at city hall 9 a.m.,
December TBA

Kamiah
Long Camp Saturday
Farmers’ Market 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., April
through September/October
Community yard sale May 5

LEWIS COUNTY
Glenwood-Caribel Volunteer Fire
Department pancake breakfast TBA
ISBA Spring Jam Bluegrass
Festival June 1-2
Youth Fishing Derby May/June
Long Camp Classics on the
Clearwater June 2
CVRA Parade June 18
CVRA Rodeo June 16-17
Clearwater Christmas Affair-
Christmas in July, July 13-14
Clearwater Valley Fly-In July 14
41st annual Chief Lookingglass
Powwow Aug. 17-19
Kamiah Free Barbecue Days
Aug. 31/Sept. 1-2
KCPC Youth Zone September TBA
Riverfront Park pumpkin carving
Oct. 21

Craigmont Nezperce
Christmas Light Parade Nov. 30

Nezperce
Citywide yard sale day May 12 Originally two communities named Ilo and Nezperce is the Lewis County seat. Named for the
Nez Perce Prairie Days July 13-14 Vollmer, the area was bypassed by the Camas Nez Perce Tribe, the name is derived from the
Lewis County Fair Sept. 27-30 Prairie Railroad in 1904. French (pronounced neigh-percey), literally mean-
Combine Derby September After a 10-year-feud and the consolidation of ing “pierced nose.” WWW.CO.NEZPERCE.ID.US;

Reubens
school districts, the communities merged in 1920 WWW.CITYOFNEZPERCE.COM
Reubens to become Craigmont.
Reubens Community Church Annual Craigmont is an agricultural town with crops being
Reubens Sausage Feed, Spring Reubens had a population of just 71 people in the
winter and spring wheat, winter and spring barley,

Winchester peas, lentils, canola and flaxes. There are also sev-
eral hay and cattle operations in the area.
2010 Census, although it once boasted more than
1,500 residents. The railroad on stilts movies

Kamiah
Citywide yard sale May 5
“Breakheart Pass” and “Wild Wild West” were

Winchester
WWW.CRAIGMONTAREACHAMBER.COM
Memorial-Labor days, visitor center is filmed near Reubens.
open Friday and Saturday, noon-4 p.m. Museum
of Winchester History opens Fridays and
Saturdays, 12:30-3 p.m. Summer programs Kamiah is the largest city in Lewis County and
start at Winchester Lake and the Wolf Education
Resource Center extends a short distance into Idaho County. Winchester was named in 1900 after the rifle. Much of the
The Nezperce Appaloosa was first bred in this area. town was destroyed by a fire in 1964 which began at the
Winchester Days and Rodeo July 7-8
Explorers Lewis and Clark camped in the Kamiah local mill operated by Boise Cascade. Winchester State
Christmas in the Pines at Winchester area in 1806. Park is located one-half mile outside of town and is a pop-
Community Center Nov. 3
1-800-847-4843 ular recreation area in the summer fishing, boating and
Christmas Tree Lighting Dec. 8, 6 p.m. WWW.KAMIAHCHAMBER.COM camping months. Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, ice fishing
and ice skating are just a few of the winter activities.

42 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
Lewis County

Attractions Heart of the Monster
At the heart of every culture are the stories and places that sustain
them as a people.
For an up close look at local history and Nez Perce legend, be sure to
stop by the Heart of the Monster site on U.S. Highway 12.
This site includes a large parking area, interpretive center and rest
rooms. The paved walking trail leads to the large, fenced mound that is
where the “Heart of the Monster” landed.
“The creation legend tells the story of Coyote defeating the monster, and,
as he dripped the blood and tossed the heart said, ‘Where this blood lands
and with this heart will grow a people. They’ll be strong. They’ll be brave.
They’ll have good hearts. They will live good lives. And these will be the Nez
Perce.’ And that’s where the Nez Perce came from.’” (Taken from Coyote and
the Swallowing Monster told by Mari Watters, Nimipuu, 1991).

Winchester State Park
Winchester State Park offers year-round recreation for fishing, as well
as seasonal offerings for outdoor activities and wildlife viewing.
Winter activities at the park include cross-country skiing, ice skating
and ice fishing. Summer offers swimming, boating and fishing
opportunities.
The lake’s big fishing draw is for rainbow trout, regularly stocked by the
Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Other species include perch, tiger
muskie, bass and blue gill.
Winchester Lake offers 46 serviced, 22 standard, and three ADA
campsites, as well as four yurts (one ADA), along with rest rooms, showers
and a dump station. Reservations can be made for Memorial Day through
Labor Day for campsites and year-round for yurts.
Seasonal bike and canoe rentals are available.
The park is located 38 miles south of Lewiston off U.S. Highway 95. For
information: 1786 Forest Road, Winchester, ID 83555; (208) 924-7563;
www.parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/winchester or find them on
Facebook.

Lawyers Canyon
Although it may sound as if a band of attorneys traveled through the
treacherous terrain, this canyon along Lawyers Creek in the middle of the
Camas Prairie was actually named for a Nez Perce Indian.
Hallalhotsoot was nicknamed “Lawyer” by area mountain men
because of his shrewd mind and combative nature.
The historic canyon, creek and railroad trestles can be viewed from the
historic lookout in North Central Idaho, between Ferdinand and
Craigmont off U.S. Hwy. 95.

Combine Derby
Their harvesting days are over, but these agricultural machines have a
new life – if, however, briefly – during the annual Combine Demolition
Derby, held in conjunction with the Lewis County Fair in Nezperce in late
September.
The event is hosted by the Nezperce Lions Club that donates proceeds
back into the community for youth organizations and athletics, and civic
programs such as the Nezperce Library and Lewis County K-9 fund.
Mostly, local residents participate in the annual event; however, it has
also drawn competitors from across the region and even internationally.
Old combines are picked up for between $500 to $1,000 to use in the
derby – out-of-date hunks of iron that have been gathering rust while
sitting in fields across the prairie.

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 43
Wild
& Scenic
S
pending time
along a river
refreshes and
renews. Rivers feed our
desire to explore -- to
daydream about what lies

Salmon River
downstream and around
the next bend. America’s
rivers have long served as
workhorses supporting the
exploration, transportation
systems, and industrial and
agricultural development
of our nation.
DESIGNATED JULY 23, 1980
In 1968 Congress passed WILD: 79.0 MILES
the Wild and Scenic Rivers RECREATIONAL: 46.0 MILES
Act to ensure that some of TOTAL: 125.0 MILES
our most cherished river
segments are conserved in
their natural, untamed
The segment of the main stem from the mouth

state for us and for future
of the North Fork of the Salmon River

generations, and 2018
downstream to Long Tom Bar.

marks the 50th anniversary
Known as "The River of No Return," the

of this landmark act. From
Salmon River originates in the Sawtooth and

placid canoe streams to
Lemhi valleys of central and eastern Idaho;

rushing whitewater kayak
snows from the Sawtooth and Salmon River

runs, from icy trout-filled
mountains in the south and the Clearwater and

brooks to lazy cypress lined
Bitterroot mountains in the north feed this river.

bayous, the system con-
The upper section passes through the Frank

tains America’s best free-
Church River of No Return Wilderness, while the

flowing waterways. There
lower section forms the southern boundary of

are 208 river segments in
the Gospel-Hump Wilderness. In recognition of

40 states that are part of
the river's many outstanding values, including

the system.
scenery, recreation, geology, fish, wildlife, water

Whether you want to
quality, botany, prehistory, history and cultural

hike, fish, canoe, camp or
traditional use, Congress designated 46 miles of

just relax along the bank,
the river, from North Fork to Corn Creek, as a

here are those rivers with-
recreational river and 79 miles, from Corn Creek

in North Central Idaho that
to Long Tom Bar, as a wild river.

highlight opportunities to
The Salmon flows through a vast wilderness in

explore the diversity and
one of the deepest gorges on the continent. Its

beauty of America’s Wild
granite-walled canyon is one-fifth of a mile

and Scenic Rivers.
deeper than the Grand Canyon, and, for
approximately 180 miles, the Salmon Canyon is
PHOTO- FREE PRESS ARCHIVE more than one-mile deep.

44 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
PHOTO BY GREG SCHMIDT MAJESTIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

Middle Fork Clearwater
DESIGNATED: OCTOBER 2, 1968
WILD: 54.0 MILES
RECREATIONAL: 131.0 MILES
TOTAL: 185.0 MILES
The Middle Fork from the town of Kooskia upstream to the town of Lowell. The Lochsa River from
its confluence with the Selway River at Lowell (forming the Middle Fork) upstream to the Powell
Ranger Station. The Selway River from Lowell upstream to its origin.
The Middle Fork Clearwater includes the Lochsa and Selway Rivers, premier whitewater rivers.
Part of the exploration route of Lewis and Clark follows the Lochsa River. Most of the Selway lies in
Idaho's Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. These rivers offer clear, clean water, beautiful scenery with

Snake River
great plant diversity and abundant wildlife.

DESIGNATED: DECEMBER 1, 1975
WILD: 35.2 MILES
SCENIC: 34.4 MILES
TOTAL: 66.9 MILES
The Snake River is as big as the landscape. Below Hells Canyon
Dam, the Snake usually carries more water than the Colorado River
through the Grand Canyon. Below the confluence with the Salmon
River, flows average 35,000 cfs and often peak at more than 100,000
when the Salmon is high. Further downstream, the Clearwater and
other rivers dump their flows into the Snake River, creating the Co-
lumbia River's largest tributary. (The total drainage area is approxi-
mately the size of Oregon.)
The adjacent ridges average 5,500' above the river. He Devil Moun-
tain, tallest of the Seven Devils (9,393') towers almost 8,000' above the
river, creating the deepest gorge in the United States.
River recreational use is limited for all user groups (private float
and power boat; commercial float and power boats) for each segment
of river and within primary and secondary use seasons. Permits are
required yearlong for use on the river by float or power boats.

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 45
Craft Beer and Craft Food ■ Family Friendly
Riggins, Idaho 208-628-9200 ■ Moscow, Idaho 208-596-4061
100 South Main St. 308 N. Jackson St.

800 585-4121

46 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
18 Hole Golf Course
Public Resort
LOCATED 4 MILES NORTH OF
NEW MEADOWS, IDAHO.
Mountain scenery, lush fairways with gorgeous greens entice
golfers to play their best. Four sets of tees allow players to choose
their challenge at Meadow Creek. After your round, stop at our
Osprey Snack Bar-Grill hosting a delightful menu with full service
beer, wine & spirits. Relax by the pool and enjoy the Meadow Creek
Resort scenery!

For tee times CALL the
Pro Shop (208) 347-2555
or BOOK ONLINE at www.meadowcreekgolfresort.com.
Mention this ad and receive a
2 for 1 Green Fee Special!!

EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 47
Regional Chamber Contacts
Lewiston, Clarkston
Visit the Lewis Clark Valley Chamber
of Commerce
825 6th Street, Clarkston, WA 99403
(509) 758-7712 or 800-933-2128
WWW.LCVALLeyChAmber.org

Asotin, Wash.
Asotin, Wash. Chamber of Commerce
Po box 574, Asotin, WA 99402
(509) 243-4242

Pullman, Wash.
Pullman Chamber of Commerce
415 N grand Ave
Pullman, WA 99163
1-800-365-6948 | (509) 334-3565
PuLLmANChAmber.Com

Moscow
moscow Chamber of Commerce
411 S. main Street
moscow, ID 83843
(208) 882-1800
WWW.moSCoWChAmber.Com

McCall
mcCall Chamber of Commerce
P.o. box 350, 301 e. Lake Street
mcCall, ID 83638
(208) 634-7631 or toll-free 1-800-260-
5130
mCCALLChAmber.org

New Meadows
meadows Valley Chamber of
Commerce
New meadows, Idaho 83654
(208) 347-2647

Council
Council Chamber of Commerce
P.o. box 527
Council, ID 83612
CouNCILChAmberofCommerCe.Com

Cascade
Cascade Chamber of Commerce
500 N main Street
Cascade, ID 83611
(208) 382-3833
CASCADeChAmber.Com

PHOTO BY GREG SCHMIDT MAJESTIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 49
124 W. Main • Grangeville 208-983-4203
Breakfast•Lunch•Dinner
7 Days a Week
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Great Sandwiches g
Steaks & Pasta
Cocktails, Beer & Wine
TACKETT’S SAW SERVICE
Our Burgers Are Ground
845 E. Main 983-0491 Grangeville
Fresh Daily

Daily Orders
Specials To Go!

3 Locations
To Serve You!

BAR & GRILL
12 Rotating Cra Beers
Award Winning Bite Size Steak
Kids Welcome
GRANG EVILLE
Right off Highway 95 • Grangeville, Idaho Downtown Ferdinand, Idaho CLOSED MONDAYS
208/983-1335 (208) 962-7233
KA MI AH LIBERT Y LAKE Like Us on
Hours: Tue-Sat 11-10? Facebook
Hwy. 12 • Kamiah, Idaho Liberty Lake, Washington
208/935-7700
Sun 11-7
509/928-3112

50 EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO
EXPERIENCE NORTH CENTRAL IDAHO 51

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