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Configuring DCN

MINI-LINK TN ETSI

OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

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Copyright

© Ericsson AB 2012–2015. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be


reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright owner.

Disclaimer

The contents of this document are subject to revision without notice due to
continued progress in methodology, design and manufacturing. Ericsson shall
have no liability for any error or damage of any kind resulting from the use
of this document.

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Contents

Contents

1 Introduction 1
1.1 Description 2
1.2 Planning Advice 3
1.3 Limitations 5

2 Prerequisites 7
2.1 Safety Information 7
2.2 Required Hardware 7
2.3 Required Licenses and Software 7
2.4 Required Documentation 8
Configuring DCN Using CLI
3 Configuration and Operations Tasks 9
3.1 Configuring a DCN Channel 9
3.2 Configuring Static Routes 23
3.3 Configuring OSPF Areas 25
3.4 Configuring Syslog 30
3.5 Configure Sending of NE Configuration Changed Events 32

Configuring DCN Using MINI-LINK Craft


4 Configuration and Operations Tasks 33
4.1 Configuring a DCN Channel 33
4.2 Configuring Static Routing for IPv4 56
4.3 Configure Static Routing IPv6 57
4.4 Configuring OSPF Areas 59
4.5 Configuring Syslog 65
4.6 Configuring an SNMP Manager 67

Reference List 71

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Configuring DCN

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Introduction

1 Introduction

This instruction describes how to configure Data Communication Network


(DCN) over PPP and DCN over VLAN in MINI-LINK TN, using either CLI
commands or MINI-LINK Craft. High speed routing between multiple DCN
VLANs is also supported. For more information, refer to Configuring Routed
DCN VLANs, Reference [5] and Migrating to Routed DCN VLANs, Reference
[10].

Figure 1 shows the configuration workflow for configuring DCN.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 1 Workflow for Configuring DCN

1.1 Description
The MINI-LINK network consists of two networks: the traffic network and the
Data Communication Network (DCN). The traffic network handles the data
transmission between, for example, radio base stations in the mobile access
network. The external DCN provides IP-based transport of operation and
maintenance data between management systems and MINI-LINK equipment.

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Introduction

MINI-LINK TN supports the following standard external IP network services:


• All clocks, used, for example, for time stamping alarms and events, can be
synchronized with a Network Time Protocol (NTP) server.
• File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is used as a file transfer mechanism for
software upgrade, and for backup and restore of system configuration.
• Domain Name System (DNS) enables the use of host names.
• Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is used to allocate IP
addresses in the DCN. The NE has a DHCP relay agent for serving other
equipment on the site LAN. DHCP is only used for the site LAN.
• Syslog is used to forward log messages in the network and log alarms and
events to a central syslog server.

MINI-LINK TN provides an IP-based DCN for transport of its operation and


maintenance data. Each NE has an IP router for handling of the DCN traffic.
MINI-LINK TN supports a number of different alternatives to connect and
transport DCN traffic.

MINI-LINK TN supports both numbered and unnumbered IP addresses.


Numbered IP addresses are used for the Ethernet interface and IP interfaces
configured as Area Border Router. All other IP interfaces are set up with
unnumbered IP addresses. The IP interfaces with unnumbered IP address
inherit the characteristics of the Ethernet interface.

In Provider Mode, when configuring multiple Layer 2 connections using VLAN, it


is possible to specify a default mapping rule for CE-UNI ports. When the default
mapping rule is specified, all ingress C-tagged frames are allowed and tagged
with an S-tag according to the rules defined in the C-VLAN ID registration table.
The default mapping rule is enabled when a C-VLAN ID–S-VLAN ID pair is
added with C-VLAN ID set to 0. If needed, it is possible to define exceptions
from the all-to-one mapping by adding non-default entries to the C-VLAN ID
registration table.

For more information, see Planning and Dimensioning DCN, Reference [14]
and Technical Description, Reference [18].

1.2 Planning Advice


To ensure proper node and network function, all configuration activities must be
planned in advance by skilled personnel.

Before configuring DCN, consider the planning advice both in this section and
in the document Planning and Dimensioning DCN, Reference [14].

Each NE holds an internal IP router using numbered and unnumbered


interfaces. PPP interfaces configured for an Area Border Router (ABR) use
numbered interfaces. All other interfaces are unnumbered, that is inheriting
the IP address of the router.

MINI-LINK TN supports both IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces that allows using two
independent DCN networks (one IPv4 and one IPv6) using different addressing

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Configuring DCN

and different routing. However in some cases, for example when a node via
IPv4 requests a DNS server for an IP address, the DNS server can respond
with an IPv6 address. For more information on combined IPv4 and IPv6
operation, see Technical Description, Reference [18].

The preferred IP routing strategy for MINI-LINK TN is the Open Shortest Path
First (OSPF) protocol (OSPFv2 for IPv4 and OSPFv3 for IPv6), which makes
use of automatically updated routing tables to determine the most efficient
transmission of data. The OSPF areas can be created during the initial setup or
at a later occasion, see Section 4.4.1 on page 59. The Command Line Interface
(CLI) is used for advanced OSPF configuration and troubleshooting, see CLI
Descriptions, Reference [2].

MINI-LINK TN supports static routing from MINI-LINK Craft. Static routing can
be configured during the initial setup or at a later occasion.

The available DCN channels are briefly described below.

E0 The SAU3 provides two auxiliary interfaces for serial


communication, G.703 E0 (64 kbps).

E1 Up to two E1 interfaces per NPU1 C, NPU3 B, NPU3


C, and NPU3 D in the NE can be used for transport of
DCN traffic. The interfaces can be selected during the
initial setup. Robbed timeslots can also be used.

PDH radio overhead channel


An unprotected (1+0) protected or protected (1+1)
Radio Terminal provides two PPP interfaces by default.

• CQPSK: Two channels at 64 kbps.

• QAM:

Traffic Capacity Traffic Capacity DCN Capac


[number of E1] [Mbps] ity [kbps]
1-13 2-27 ≥ 128 kbps
14-27 28-55 ≥ 256 kbps
28-41 56-84 ≥ 384 kbps
42-55 85-113 ≥ 512 kbps
56-69 114-142 ≥ 640 kbps
≥ 70 ≥ 143 ≥ 768 kbps

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Introduction

STM-1 The STM-1 interface (stand-alone or MSP) on the


LTU 155 provides PPP interfaces in the RSOH
and MSOH bytes of the frame. The MSOH can be
configured as one single channel of 576 kbps or as
three separate channels of 192 kbps. Three separate
channels are set as default. The default bandwidth is
192 kbps for both DCCr and DCCm.

The STM-1 interface on the MMU2 E/F and MMU3 B


(traffic type configured as SDH) provides PPP interfaces
in the RSOH bytes of the SDH frame. The default
bandwidth is 192 kbps for DCNL and can be used in
protected configuration.

LAN The LAN interface on the NPU can be used to connect


to an external DCN. For NPU1 C, NPU1 D, NPU3 B,
NPU3 C, and NPU3 D it is possible to configure the
interface to 10, 100, or 1000 Mbps.

VLAN On NPU1 C, NPU1 D, NPU3 B, NPU3 C, and NPU3 D


the management traffic can be transported in a logically
separated VLAN together with the Ethernet traffic.
An internal switch port in MINI-LINK TN forwards the
management traffic to the IP DCN router.

1.3 Limitations
This section describes the routing and IP address limitations to consider when
configuring DCN.

1.3.1 Routing Limitations


Consider the following routing limitations when configuring DCN:

• The number of static routes is limited to 100.

• The number of dynamic routes is limited to 500.

1.3.2 IP Address Limitations


When configuring DCN, do not use the following due to IPv4 address
restrictions:

• The link-local subnet (169.254.0.0/16).

• The loopback subnet (127.0.0.0/8).

• The multicast subnet (224.0.0.0/4).

• The reserved subnet (240.0.0.0/4)

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Configuring DCN

• The network address, that is, the lowest address in the subnet.

• The broadcast address, that is, the highest address in the subnet.

• The default host address (192.168.0.1/24).

• The default usb0 address (10.0.0.0/30).

• "This host on this network" address (0.0.0.0/8).

• NAT64/DNS64 Discovery address (192.0.0.170/31).

• 6to4 Relay Anycast address (192.88.99.0/24).

• TEST-NET-1 address (192.0.2.0/24).

• TEST-NET-2 address (198.51.100.0/24).

• TEST-NET-3 address (203.0.113.0/24).

• The address of the ping target host.

When configuring DCN, do not use the following as ping target host:

• The link-local address (169.254.0.0/16).

• The loopback address (127.0.0.0/8).

• The multicast address (224.0.0.0/4).

• The reserved address (240.0.0.0/4).

• The default host address (192.168.0.1).

• An address within the default usb0 subnet (10.0.0.0/30).

• An address already used by an active interface (eth0 or serial).

• An already configured serial address, even if the interface is inactive or


unnumbered.

For information about limitations specific to IPv6, see Configuring IPv6,


Reference [6].

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Prerequisites

2 Prerequisites

This section includes information about required preparation before configuring


DCN.

2.1 Safety Information


Make sure that the information in the following documents has been understood
by the persons performing the procedures:
• Personal Health and Safety Information, Reference [13]
• System Safety Information, Reference [17]
• Supplementary Safety Information for MINI-LINK, Reference [16]

2.2 Required Hardware


The node must be equipped with NPU1 C/D or NPU3 B/C/D, which contains
the router. Table 1 shows the hardware required depending on DCN channel.

Table 1 Required Hardware for Different DCN Channels


DCN Channel Required Hardware
G.703 E0 (64 kbps) SAU3
E1 NPU1 C or NPU3 B/C/D
PDH radio overhead channel Radio terminal (a RAU and an MMU)
STM-1 LTU 155, MMU2 E/F, or MMU3 B
(traffic type configured as SDH)
LAN NPU1 C/D or NPU3 B/C/D
VLAN NPU1 C/D or NPU3 B/C/D

Note: For IPv6 DCN support, the node must be equipped with NPU1 C, NPU1
D, NPU3 B, NPU3 C, or NPU3 D.

2.3 Required Licenses and Software


DCN over PPP is a basic feature. No license is required.

DCN over VLAN requires a license. For information about how to install a
license, see Installing and Managing Licenses, Reference [8].

To access an NE remotely through MINI-LINK Craft, a MINI-LINK Craft license


is required on that specific NE.

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Configuring DCN

2.4 Required Documentation


Read through this document. Make sure that referenced documentation is
available during the configuration process by having the electronic CPI library
available on your PC. See Library Description, Reference [9] for information
about how to make the CPI library available.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

Configuring DCN Using CLI

3 Configuration and Operations Tasks

To configure DCN parameters using CLI commands, perform the tasks


described in the following sections.

Note: The configuration can be prepared offline and transferred to the


node in the form of a CLI script, either remotely (when modifying the
configuration for an installed node) or on site (when installing a new
node).

The following additional information is applicable when using CLI commands:

• How to start a CLI session and navigate between different command


modes, see CLI User Guide, Reference [4].

• How to prepare a CLI script, see Preparing a CLI Script File Offline,
Reference [15].

• How to transfer a CLI script on site, see Transferring a CLI Script File on
Site, Reference [19].

• For a detailed description of each CLI command, see CLI Descriptions,


Reference [2].

This section covers general information and procedures related to the Data
Communication Network (DCN), providing IP-based transport of operation
and maintenance data between management systems and MINI-LINK TN
equipment.

The DCN parameters are normally set during the initial setup but can also be
changed later, following procedures in this section.

For information about setting the system time, see Configuring Network
Element Basics, Reference [7].

3.1 Configuring a DCN Channel


This section describes how to configure the following types of DCN channels:

• PPP interfaces with IPv4 and IPv6, see Section 3.1.1 on page 10

• DCN over VLAN with IPv4 and IPv6, see Section 3.1.2 on page 12

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• DCN for non-OSPF equipment, see Section 3.1.4 on page 21

For information about configuring routed DCN VLANs, refer to Configuring


Routed DCN VLANs, Reference [5].

3.1.1 Configuring the PPP Interfaces

Note:

• PPP interfaces support both IPv4 and IPv6. IPv4 supports both
numbered and unnumbered IP interfaces. Numbered IP interfaces
are used for the Ethernet interface and IP interfaces configured
as ABR. All other IP interfaces must be set up with unnumbered
IP interfaces.

• IPv6 supports both globally routable IP addresses and link-local


addresses. With some exceptions, these correspond to IPv4
addressing scheme (unnumbered interfaces as link-local address
and numbered interfaces as globally routable addresses).

• It is recommended to set all interfaces destined to the same NE as


either numbered or unnumbered. Mixing both types may cause
DCN instability.

• Using a large number of PPP interfaces may cause DCN instability.


This can happen in nodes with a lot of high-capacity modems, as
these have a high DCN bandwidth. Only activate the required
number of PPP interfaces, and do not allocate all available
bandwidth.

• Numbered PPP links use 32-bits subnet masks and the subnet
masks are set automatically. To more easily manage PPP links, it
is recommended to use addresses for PPP interfaces from subnets
with a 31 bit subnet mask. Therefore, the IP address needs to
be one of the two IP addresses in a 31-bit subnet. For example,
use 192.168.1.0 or 192.168.1.1 from the network 192.168.1.0/31.
Use the same 31-bit subnet mask if OSPF is to be configured on
the numbered PPP links.

The following example script configures a PPP interface:

! In Global Configuration mode, switch to the (interface-serial) submode


! to configure serial interfaces for PPP:
! (config)#interface serial <RSP>
! This example switches to the configuration mode for
! the PPP interface 1/3/1 SC1 (a Service Channel on an MMU),
! which is located in slot 1/3:
interface serial "1/3/1 SC1"

! Enable or disable PPP interfaces:


! (interface-serial)#[no] shutdown

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! This example enables the selected PPP interface:


no shutdown

! Configure PPP interfaces as numbered or unnumbered for IPv4:


! (interface-serial)#[no] ip numbered
! This example configures the selected PPP interface as numbered:
ip numbered

! Enable or disable alarms and events:


! (interface-serial)#[no] trapenable
! This example enables alarms and events:
trapenable

! Set an IPv4 address for the interface:


! (interface-serial)#[no] ip address <IPADDRESS>
! This example sets the IPv4 address for the selected interface to 192.168.1.1:
ip address 192.168.1.1

! Reset the IPv4 address for the serial interface:


! (interface-serial)#ip address 0.0.0.0
! This example resets the IPv4 address of the serial interface
! and makes it unnumbered automatically:
ip address 0.0.0.0

! Set an IPv6 address for the interface:


! (interface-serial)#[no] ipv6 address <IPV6ADDRESS>
! This example sets the IPv6 address for the selected interface to 2001::47
ipv6 address 2001::47

! Reset the IPv6 address for the serial interface by using one of the following
! two commands:
! (interface-serial)#no ipv6 address
! or
! (interface-serial)#ipv6 address 0::0
! These examples reset the IPv6 address of the serial interface:
no ipv6 address
ipv6 address 0::0

! Set the MRU size of the DCN-LAN interface:


! (interface-serial)#mru <MRUSIZE>
! This example sets the MRU size for the selected interface to 1200 bytes:
mru 1200

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Display configuration information for serial interfaces:


show running-config 11

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! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.1.2 Configuring DCN over VLAN

This section contains instructions for the following procedures:

• Creating DCN over VLAN configuration

• Configuring double tagging in Provider mode

• Removing DCN over VLAN configuration

3.1.2.1 Creating DCN over VLAN Configuration

Before configuring DCN over VLAN, consider the following:

• The DCN VLAN traffic cannot have priority 7, due to a conflict with the
control plan traffic.

• A USB connection to the nodes or DCN over PPP must be configured.

• The LAN-DCN can be configured with the subnet. prefix of the DCN over
VLAN.

• The numbered PPP interfaces must be on different subnets for the routing
to work.

• The VLAN used for DCN is configured.

! In Global configuration mode, switch to (interface-ethernet) submode:


interface ethernet
! Add an IPv6 address to enable traffic on the LAN-DCN port:
! (interface-ethernet)#[no] ipv6 address <IPV6ADDRESS>
! This example adds an IPv6 node host address:
ipv6 address 2001::47

! Alternatively, an IPv4 address can be specified for the Ethernet interface:


! (interface-ethernet)#[no] ip address <ADDR> [<SUBNETMASK>]
! This example adds an IPv4 node host address:
ip address 172.31.29.48 255.255.255.0

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Change to (interface-loopback) submode:


! (config)#interface loopback
interface loopback

! Specify the IP address of the loopback interface:

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! (interface-loopback)#ip address <IPADDRESS>


! This example specifies the IP address of the loopback interface:
ip address 172.31.12.12

! Exit the (interface-loopback) submode:


exit

! In Global Configuration mode, set the DCN mode to disabled:


! (config)#dcn-mode {vlan | frontConnector | disabled}
! To change from VLAN to Front Connector (or the other way around),
! first set the DCN mode to disabled.
! This example sets DCN mode to disabled:
dcn-mode disabled

! Set the DCN mode:


! (config)#dcn-mode {vlan | frontConnector | disabled}
! This example sets DCN mode to VLAN:
dcn-mode vlan

! Switch to the (config-eth) submode to configure DCN-LAN:


! (config)#interface ethernet-eps <R/S/P> {lan | wan | lan-dcn}
! This example switches to the DCN-LAN configuration mode for
! the interface 1/7/2:
interface ethernet-eps 1/7/2 lan-dcn

! Connect the interface to a switch port:


! (config-eth)#[no] usage {bridge-port <PORT>|layer1}
! This example connects the interface 1/7/2 to switch port 1:
usage bridge-port 1

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Switch to the (config-eth) submode to configure LAN:


! (config)#interface ethernet-eps <R/S/P> {lan | wan | lan-dcn}
! This example switches to the LAN configuration mode for
! the interface 1/7/2:
interface ethernet-eps 1/7/2 lan

! Connect the interface to a switch port:


! (config-eth)#[no] usage {bridge-port <PORT>|layer1}
! This example connects the interface 1/7/2 to switch port 2:
usage bridge-port 2

! Switch to (config-lan) submode:


! (config-eth)#lan
lan

! Set the Ethernet speed:


! (config-lan)#speed {auto-detect|half-duplex10|half-duplex100| //
! half-duplex1000|full-duplex10|full-duplex100|full-duplex1000| //

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! full-duplexSlave1000|full-duplexMaster1000}
! This example sets the Ethernet speed to 100 Mbps full-duplex:
speed full-duplex100

! Enable or disable the selected interface:


! (config-lan)#[no] shutdown
! You can only enable an interface that is specified as connected,
! see the command usage.
! This example enables the selected interface:
no shutdown

! Return to the (config-eth) submode:


exit

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Switch to the (config-bridgeport) submode to configure the switch ports


! in the Ethernet switch:
! (config)#bridge-port <BRIDGEPORT>
! This example switches to the switch port configuration mode for switch
! port 1:
bridge-port 1

! Set the port role for switch ports:


! (config-bridgeport)#role {uni|inni|mirror|cep|cnp|layer1}
! This example sets the port role to Customer Network Port
! (called CN-UNI in MINI-LINK TN):
role cnp

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Switch to the (config-bridgeport) submode to configure the switch ports


! in the Ethernet switch:
! (config)#bridge-port <BRIDGEPORT>
! This example switches to the switch port configuration mode for switch
! port 2:
bridge-port 2

! Set the port role for switch ports:


! (config-bridgeport)#role {uni|inni|mirror|cep|cnp|layer1}
! This example sets the port role to I-NNI:
role inni

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Switch to the (config-vlan) submode:


! (config)#[no] vlan <VLANID> [<NAME>]
! This example switches to the VLAN configuration submode for VLAN 2:

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

vlan 2

! Specify an egress port list for the VLAN:


! (config-vlan)#[no] egressports [<PORTLIST>]
! In customer mode, this command is valid for UNI and I-NNI ports.
! In provider mode, this command is valid for CN-UNI and I-NNI (PN) ports.
! This example specifies an egress port containing switch ports 1 and 2
! for the selected VLAN:
egressports 1,2

! Add untagged ports to the VLAN:


! (config-vlan)#[no] untagged-ports <PORTLIST>
! This example adds switch port 1 as an untagged port to the selected VLAN:
untagged-ports 1

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.1.2.2 Configuring Double Tagging in Provider Mode

MINI-LINK TN can receive and handle management traffic (DCN over VLAN)
on Customer Network (CN) ports and Provider Network (PN) ports.

The management traffic can be tagged according to the following rules:

• On CN ports, management traffic can be either untagged or single-tagged


(S-tagged).

• On PN ports, management traffic can be S-tagged.

MINI-LINK TN also supports double-tagged DCN traffic. The operator can add
or remove the inner tag received on the LAN-DCN port. The operator must also
set up the pcp-bits to use for outgoing frames in the egress direction (from the
DCN handler to the Ethernet switch).

To enable double tagging, the LAN-DCN port role must be Customer Network
User-Network Interface (CN-UNI), and the LAN-DCN port must be an untagged
member of the VLAN.

If the DCN-LAN port configuration changes, then the double tagging function is
automatically disabled.

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Configuring DCN

Note: The double-tagged DCN feature cannot be used if L3 VLAN interfaces


are enabled on the node.

The following example script configures the double tagging function:

! In Global Configuration mode, enable double tagging:


! (config)#dcn-lan-ctag ctag <C-TAG> [priority <PRIORITY>]
! (To disable double tagging, use the command no dcn-lan-ctag ctag
! without any parameters.)
! This example enables double tagging with C-tag=101 and priority=4:
dcn-lan-ctag ctag 101 priority 4

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Display the status of the double tagging function:


! (config)#show dcn-lan-ctag
show dcn-lan-ctag

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.1.2.3 Removing DCN over VLAN Configuration

The following example script removes the DCN over VLAN configuration:

Note: In case of site LAN operation, the configured IPv6 address can be
reused on the site LAN of the NPUs.

! In Global Configuration mode, switch to the (config-vlan) submode:


! (config)#[no] vlan <VLANID> [<NAME>]
! This example switches to the VLAN configuration submode for VLAN 2:
vlan 2

! Remove untagged ports from the VLAN:


! (config-vlan)#[no] untagged-ports <PORTLIST>
! This example removes all untagged ports from the selected VLAN:
no untagged-ports

! Remove egress ports from the VLAN:


! (config-vlan)#[no] egressports [<PORTLIST>]
! This example removes all egress ports from the selected VLAN:
no egressports

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Switch to the (config-eth) submode to configure LAN:

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! (config)#interface ethernet-eps <R/S/P> {lan | wan | lan-dcn}


! This example switches to the LAN configuration mode for
! the interface 1/7/2:
interface ethernet-eps 1/7/2 lan

! Switch to (config-lan) submode:


! (config-eth)#lan
lan

! Enable or disable the selected interface:


! (config-lan)#[no] shutdown
! This example disables the selected interface:
shutdown

! Return to the (config-eth) submode:


exit

! Disconnect the interface:


! (config-eth)#[no] usage {bridge-port <PORT>|layer1}
! This example disconnects the interface 1/7/2:
no usage

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Set DCN mode to disabled:


! (config)#dcn-mode {vlan | frontConnector | disabled}
! To change from VLAN to Front Connector (or the other way around),
! you first have to set the DCN mode to disabled.
dcn-mode disabled

! Set DCN mode to front connector:


! (config)#dcn-mode {vlan | frontConnector | disabled}
dcn-mode frontConnector

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.1.3 Configuring C-VLAN ID Mapping


The following sections describe how to add or remove one or more mapping
rules in the C-VLAN ID registration table of a switch port. It is possible to define
one default mapping rule to handle C-tagged frames with C-VLAN IDs not
explicitly specified in the C-VLAN ID registration table. The default mapping

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Configuring DCN

rule is enabled when a C-VLAN ID–S-VLAN ID pair is added with C-VLAN ID


set to 0.

Note:

• Switch Mode must be set to Provider Mode.

• Switch port role must be set to CE-UNI.

• The switch is connected to a LAN or a WAN interface.

3.1.3.1 Configuring a Non-Default Mapping Rule

The following sections describe how to configure a non-default mapping rule.

3.1.3.1.1 Adding a Non-Default Mapping Rule

The following example script adds a non-default mapping rule to the C-VLAN
ID registration table of a switch port.

Note: To add a non-default mapping rule, do not set C-VLAN ID to 0.

! In Global Configuration mode, add S-VLAN ID


! if it does not exist:
! (config)#vlan <VLANID>
! This example adds S-VLAN ID 14:
vlan 14

! In Global Configuration mode, change to the (config-bridgeport)


! submode and select the desired bridge port:
! (config)#bridge-port <BRIDGEPORT>
! This example changes to the (config-bridgeport) submode on
! bridge port number 2
bridge-port 2

! Add a non-default mapping rule


! to the C-VLAN ID registration table:
! (config-bridgeport)#[no] cvid-registration <CVID> <SVID>
! This example adds a non-default mapping rule
! with C-VLAN ID set to 11 and S-VLAN ID set to 14:
cvid-registration 11 14

! Exit the (config-bridgeport) submode:


exit

3.1.3.1.2 Deleting a Non-Default Mapping Rule

The following example script deletes a non-default mapping rule from the
C-VLAN ID registration table of a switch port.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

Note: To delete a non-default mapping rule, select a C-VLAN ID–S-VLAN ID


pair where C-VLAN ID is not set to 0.

! In Global Configuration mode, change to the (config-bridgeport)


! submode and select the desired bridge port:
! (config)#bridge-port <BRIDGEPORT>
! This example changes to the (config-bridgeport) submode on
! bridge port number 2
bridge-port 2

! Delete the non-default mapping rule


! from the C-VLAN ID registration table:
! (config-bridgeport)#[no] cvid-registration <CVID> <SVID>
! This example deletes the non-default mapping rule
! with C-VLAN ID set to 11 and S-VLAN ID set to 14:
no cvid-registration 11 14

! Exit the (config-bridgeport) submode:


exit

3.1.3.2 Configuring the Default Mapping Rule

The following sections describe how to configure the default mapping rule.

3.1.3.2.1 Adding the Default Mapping Rule

The following example script adds the default mapping rule to the C-VLAN
ID registration table of a switch port.

Note: To add the default mapping rule, set C-VLAN ID to 0.

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Configuring DCN

! In Global Configuration mode, add S-VLAN ID


! if it does not exist:
! (config)#vlan <VLANID>
! This example adds S-VLAN ID 15:
vlan 15

! In Global Configuration mode, change to the (config-bridgeport)


! submode and select the desired bridge port:
! (config)#bridge-port <BRIDGEPORT>
! This example changes to the (config-bridgeport) submode on
! bridge port number 2
bridge-port 2

! Add the default mapping rule


! to the C-VLAN ID registration table:
! (config-bridgeport)#[no] cvid-registration <CVID> <SVID>
! This example adds the default mapping rule with C-VLAN ID set to 0
! and S-VLAN ID set to 15:
cvid-registration 0 15

! Exit the (config-bridgeport) submode:


exit

Note: After adding the default mapping rule, all C-tagged frames are tagged
with an S-tag according to the rules specified in the C-VLAN ID
registration table.

3.1.3.2.2 Deleting the Default Mapping Rule

The following example script deletes the default mapping rule from the C-VLAN
ID registration table of a switch port.

Note: To delete the default mapping rule, select the C-VLAN ID–S-VLAN ID
pair where C-VLAN ID is set to 0.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! In Global Configuration mode, change to the (config-bridgeport)


! submode and select the desired bridge port:
! (config)#bridge-port <BRIDGEPORT>
! This example changes to the (config-bridgeport) submode on
! bridge port number 2
bridge-port 2

! Delete the default mapping rule


! from the C-VLAN ID registration table:
! (config-bridgeport)#[no] cvid-registration <CVID> <SVID>
! This example deletes the default mapping rule with C-VLAN ID set to 0
! and S-VLAN ID set to 15:
no cvid-registration 0 15

! Exit the (config-bridgeport) submode:


exit

Note: After removing the default mapping rule, all C-tagged frames with
C-VLAN IDs not specified in the C-VLAN ID registration table are
discarded.

3.1.4 Configuring DCN for Non-OSPF Equipment

This section describes how to configure DCN in MINI-LINK TN for equipment


not included in OSPF, for example, MINI-LINK CN 500.

The configuration contains the following parts:

• Create static routes, see Section 3.2.1 on page 23

• Configure PPP interfaces, see Section 3.1.1 on page 10

• Redistribute static routes into the OSPF routing table, see Section 3.1.4.1
on page 21

• Configure network services, see Section 3.1.4.2 on page 22

3.1.4.1 Redistributing Static Routes into the OSPF Routing Table

The following example script redistributes static routes into the OSPF routing
table:

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Configuring DCN

! In Global Configuration mode, switch to the (config-router) submode:


router ospf

! Redistribute static routes into the OSPF routing table:


! (config-router)#[no] redistribute static
redistribute static

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Display DCN configuration information:


show running-config 44

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.1.4.2 Configuring Network Services

The following example script sets a domain name, specifies a DCN server, and
makes the NE a relay for a DHCP server:

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! In Global Configuration mode, set a name for the domain for IPv4:
! (config)#[no] ip domainname <DOMAINNAME>
! This example sets the domain name to labdomain:
ip domainname labdomain

! In Global Configuration mode, set a name for the domain for IPv6:
! (config)#[no] ipv6 domainname <DOMAINNAME>
! This example sets the domain name to labdomain:
ipv6 domainname labdomain

! Specify DNS servers for both IPv4 and IPv6:


! (config)#ip name-server <NAMESERVER1> //
! [ <NAMESERVER2> | [<NAMESERVER3>] ]
! This example specifies a DNS server with the
! IPv6 address 2001::0001 :: 1.1.1.1:
ip name-server 2001::1 :: 1.1.1.1

! Make the NE a relay for a DHCP server for IPv4:


! (config)#ip dhcp relayaddress <DHCPRELAYADDRESS>
! This example makes the NE a relay for the DHCP server with IP address
! 192.168.0.1:
ip dhcp relayaddress 192.168.0.1

! Make the NE a relay for a DHCP server for IPv6:


! (config)#ipv6 dhcp relayaddress <DHCPRELAYADDRESS>
! This example makes the NE a relay for the DHCP server with IPv6 address
! 2001::1:
ipv6 dhcp relayaddress 2001::1

3.2 Configuring Static Routes


This section describes how to create, modify, and delete static routes.

3.2.1 Creating IPv4 Static Routes


The following example script sets up an IPv4 static route:

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Configuring DCN

! In Global Configuration mode, configure a static route:


! (config)#ip route {<DESTPREFIX><DESTPREFIXMASK>| //
! <DESTPREFIX/M>} <IPGATEWAYADDRESS>
! Note that the maximum number of static routes that can be added is 100.
! Use 0.0.0.0/0 to refer to the default gateway. M is mask length (0–32).
! This example configures a static route from the current NE
! to IP address 10.0.3.0, subnet mask 24, through the gateway 10.0.2.1:
ip route 10.0.3.0/24 10.0.2.1

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Display the static routes stored in the IP routing table:


show ip route static

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.2.2 Creating IPv6 Static Routes


The following example script sets up an IPv6 static route:

! In Global Configuration mode, configure a static route:


! (config)#ipv6 route <IPV6ADDRPREFIXLEN> <IPV6GATEWAYADDR>
! Note that the maximum number of static routes that can be added is 100.
! This example sets the default static route to 2001::3003:
ipv6 route 0::0/0 2001::3003

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Display the IPv6 routing table:


show ipv6 route

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.2.3 Modifying or Deleting IPv4 Static Routes

To modify a static route, delete it and create a new one.

The following example script deletes an existing static route:

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! In Global Configuration mode, delete a static route


! (config)#[no] ip route {<DESTPREFIX> <DESTPREFIXMASK>| //
! <DESTPREFIX/M>} [<IPGATEWAYADDRESS>]
! When executing the command without the gateway (IPGATEWAYADDRESS) operand,
! multiple static routes are deleted.
! This example deletes the existing static route from the current NE
! to IP address 10.0.3.0, subnet mask 24, through the gateway 10.0.2.1:
no ip route 10.0.3.0/24 10.0.2.1

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Display the static routes stored in the IP routing table:


show ip route static

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.2.4 Modifying or Deleting IPv6 Static Routes


To modify a static route, delete it and create a new one.

The following example script deletes an existing static route:

! In Global Configuration mode, delete a static route:


! (config)#no ipv6 route <IPV6ADDRPREFIXLEN> [<IPV6GATEWAYADDR>]
! This example deletes the existing default static route from the current NE
! to IP address 2001::3003:
no ipv6 route 0::0/0 2001::3003

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Display the IPv6 routing table:


show ipv6 route

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.3 Configuring OSPF Areas


This section describes how to create, modify, and delete OSPF areas for IPv4
and IPv6.

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Configuring DCN

The Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol (OSPFv2 for IPv4 and OSPFv3
for IPv6) uses automatically updated routing tables to determine the most
efficient transmission of data. OSPF networks are divided in sections, so called
OSPF areas. If there is only one ABR within an area, it is recommended to
define the area as a stub area to improve the performance of the routing.

3.3.1 Creating OSPF Areas


To enable OSPF for Ethernet site LAN and unnumbered IP interfaces,
configure the subnet mask to the same value as the Ethernet site LAN port.
To enable OSPF for numbered IP interfaces, configure the subnet mask to
255.255.255.255.

The following example script creates an OSPF area for IPv4:

! In Global Configuration mode, switch to the (config-router) submode:


router ospf

! Define an area as a stub area:


! (config-router)#[no] area <AREAID> stub [no-summary]
! This example defines the area 1.1.1.1. as a stub area:
area 1.1.1.1 stub

! Enable OSPF routing:


! (config-router)#[no] network {<NETWORKADDRESS> | //
! <NETWORKADDRESSMASK> | <NETWORKADDRESS/M>} //
! area <AREAID>
! This example enables OSPF routing with area ID 1.1.1.1 on interfaces with
! IP addresses that match 10.0.1.96/29:
network 10.0.1.96/29 area 1.1.1.1

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

Note: For an ABR it is possible to add the no-summary option to make the
area totally stubby. This stops the ABR from injecting inter-area routes
into the stub area. This reduces the routing table even more.

A router can be configured as an Autonomous System Boundary Router


(ASBR) with the command [no] default-information originate.

The following example script creates an OSPF area with an ASBR:

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! In Global Configuration mode, switch to the (config-router) submode:


router ospf

! Define the router as an ASBR by distributing a default route:


! (config-router)#[no] default-information originate [always | //
! metric | route-map | metric-type]
! This example defines the router as an ASBR:
default-information originate

! Define an area as a stub area:


! (config-router)#[no] area <AREAID> stub [no-summary]
! This example defines the area 1.1.1.1. as a stub area:
area 1.1.1.1 stub

! Enable OSPF routing:


! (config-router)#[no] network {<NETWORKADDRESS> | //
! <NETWORKADDRESSMASK> | <NETWORKADDRESS/M>} //
! area <AREAID>
! This example enables OSPF routing with area ID 1.1.1.1 on interfaces with
! IP addresses that match 10.0.1.96/29:
network 10.0.1.96/29 area 1.1.1.1

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.3.2 Creating OSPFv3 Areas


The following example script creates an OSPFv3 area for IPv6:

! In Global Configuration mode:


router ospfv3

! Define an area as a stub area:


! -ospfv3(config-router)#[no] area <AREAID> stub [no-summary]
! This example defines the area 1.1.1.1 as a stub area:
area 1.1.1.1 stub

! Return to Global Configuration mode


exit

! Assign the specified Ethernet interface to the specified area:

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Configuring DCN

! (config)#interface ethernet [<NUMBER>]


! (interface-ethernet)#ipv6 ospf area <AREAID>
! This example assigns the Ethernet interface 0 to the area 1.1.1.1
interface ethernet 0
ipv6 ospf area 1.1.1.1

! Return to Global Configuration mode


exit

! Assign the specified serial interface to the specified area:


! (config)#interface serial <RSP>
! (interface-serial)#ipv6 ospf area <AREAID>
! This example assigns the 1/3/1 SC1 serial interface to the area 2.2.2.2
interface serial 1/3/1 SC1
ipv6 ospf area 2.2.2.2

! Return to Global Configuration mode


exit

! Assign the USB interface to the specified area:


! Note: If the USB interface uses the default IPv6 address (2001:db8::),
! it cannot be assigned to an area.
! (config)#interface usb <NUMBER>
! (interface-usb)#ipv6 ospf area <AREAID>
! This examples assigns usb0 to the area 0.0.0.1:
interface usb 0
ipv6 ospf area 0.0.0.1

! Return to Global Configuration mode


exit

! Configure a default static route:


! (config)#ipv6 route <IP6ADDRP> <IPV6ADDR>
! This example sets the default static route to 2001::3005
ipv6 route ::/0 2001::3005

! Specify the IPv6 address of the host:


! (config)#ipv6 address <IPV6ADDRESS>
! This example specifies the IPv6 address of the host to 2010::4
ipv6 address 2010::4

! Change to the (interface-ethernet) submode and specify


! the IPv6 address of the eth0 interface:
! (config)#interface ethernet
! (interface-ethernet)#ipv6 address <IPV6ADDRESS>
! This example specifies the IPv6 address of the eth0 interface to 2003::4
interface ethernet
ipv6 address 2003::4

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

Note: For an ABR it is possible to add the no-summary option to make the
area totally stubby. This stops the ABR from injecting inter-area routes
into the stub area. This reduces the routing table even more.

3.3.3 Modifying or Deleting OSPF Areas


To modify an existing OSPF area, use the commands in Section 3.3.1 on
page 26.

The following example script deletes an existing OSPF area:

! In Global Configuration mode, switch to the (config-router) submode:


router ospf

! Disable OSPF routing:


! (config-router)#[no] network {<NETWORKADDRESS> | //
! <NETWORKADDRESSMASK> | <NETWORKADDRESS/M>} area <AREAID>
! This example disables OSPF routing with area ID 1.1.1.1 on interfaces with
! IP addresses that match 10.0.1.96/29:
no network 10.0.1.96/29 area 1.1.1.1

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.3.4 Modifying or Deleting OSPFv3 Areas


To modify an existing OSPFv3 area, use the commands in Section 3.3.2 on
page 27.

The following example script deletes an existing OSPFv3 area:

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Configuring DCN

! In Global Configuration mode:


router ospfv3
! Modify the area type:
! -ospfv3(config-router)#no area <AREAID> stub [no-summary]
! This example modifies the area type of area 1.1.1.1 to not stub:
no area 1.1.1.1 stub

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Disable the Ethernet interface on an area:


! Disable OSPF on the Ethernet interface 0:
! (config)#interface ethernet <NUMBER>
! (interface-ethernet)#no ipv6 ospf area
! This example removes the Ethernet 0 interface from its area:
interface ethernet 0
no ipv6 ospf area

! Return to Global Configuration mode:


exit

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Save the configuration:


write

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.4 Configuring Syslog


This section describes how to configure a syslog server for IPv4 or IPv6.

3.4.1 Configuring Syslog with IPv4


The following example script configures a syslog server for IPv4:

Note: All servers must have a unique index number. A maximum of three
servers can be set up. If sending of syslogs is enabled and no remote
syslog server IP address is configured, syslog events are logged to a
local file in the node.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

! In Global Configuration mode, add a remote syslog server:


! (config)#rsyslog server <INDEX> <IPADDRESS> [<PORT>]
! This example adds a remote syslog server with index number 1,
! IP address 192.168.0.1, and port number 514:
rsyslog server 1 192.168.0.1 514

! Specify the trap severities that are sent to the remote syslog server:
! (config)#rsyslog trapseverity <HEXSTRINGBITMAP>
! This example configures the system to send alarms and events with severities
! Critical and Major to the remote syslog server:
rsyslog trapseverity 0x60

! Enable the remote syslog:


! (config)#rsyslog enable
rsyslog enable

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Display remote syslog configuration:


! #show rsyslog
show rsyslog

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

3.4.2 Configuring Syslog with IPv6


The following example script configures a syslog server for IPv6:

! In Global Configuration mode, add a remote syslog server:


! (config)#rsyslog6 server <INDEX> <IPADDRESS> [<PORT>]
! This example adds a IPv6 remote syslog server with
! index number 1 and port 514:
rsyslog6 server 1 2001:1b70:8180:c001::1011 514

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Display remote syslog configuration:


! #show rsyslog
show rsyslog6

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

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Configuring DCN

3.5 Configure Sending of NE Configuration Changed


Events
The NE sends the NE Configuration Changed event to the NMS if the NE
configuration is changed. The event is sent after the last NE configuration
change, when the configured time has passed. Each NE configuration change
within the configured time interval resets the timer. The timer makes it possible
to avoid flooding the NMS with the event. The valid timer value range is
30–86400 seconds. The default value is 900 seconds.

The following example script enables sending of notifications and configures


the timer:

! Enable sending of notifications:


! (config)#snmp-server trapenable <ENABLE>
! The following example enables sending of notifications:
snmp-server trapenable 1

! Configure the timer for sending of the NE Configuration Changed event:


! (config)#config-changed-timer <SECONDS>
! The following example configures the timer to send the event 900 seconds after a
config-changed-timer 900

! Return to Privileged Exec mode:


exit

! Display the configured value for the timer:


show config-changed-timer

! Switch to Global Configuration mode:


configure

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

Configuring DCN Using MINI-LINK


Craft

4 Configuration and Operations Tasks

To configure DCN parameters using MINI-LINK Craft, perform the tasks


described in the following sections.

Note: The configuration can be performed either remotely or on site.

The following additional information is applicable when using MINI-LINK Craft:

• How to access the node using MINI-LINK Craft, see Accessing a Network
Element, Reference [1].

• How to navigate in MINI-LINK Craft, see MINI-LINK Craft User Guide,


Reference [11].

• For a detailed description of the parameters on each MINI-LINK Craft page,


see MINI-LINK Craft User Interface Descriptions, Reference [12].

This section covers general information and procedures related to the Data
Communication Network (DCN), providing IP-based transport of operation
and maintenance data between management systems and MINI-LINK TN
equipment.

The DCN parameters are normally set during the initial setup but can also be
changed later, following procedures in this section.

4.1 Configuring a DCN Channel


This section describes how to configure the following types of DCN channels:

• LTU 155, see Section 4.1.1 on page 34

• PPP interfaces for IPv4 and IPv6, see Section 4.1.2 on page 34

• DCN over traffic for IPv4 and IPv6, see Section 4.1.3 on page 39

• DCN over VLAN, see Section 4.1.4 on page 42

• DCN for non-OSPF equipment, see Section 4.1.6 on page 51

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Configuring DCN

It is also possible to use LTU2 155. This unit does not require any special
configuration.

4.1.1 Configuring an LTU 155

This section describes how to configure an LTU 155. LTU 155 can be
configured to use one single DCCm channel or three separate channels. Three
channels is the default value. Use single channel mode when the LTU 155 is
connected to equipment that only supports a single 576 kbps PPP DCN link
over DCCm.

Note: Always configure the opposite node first.

To configure number of DCCm channels for an LTU 155:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click an LTU 155.

2. Point to Configure and click General.

3. On the LTU 155 Configuration page, choose the number of DCCm


channels.

Note: DCN over DCCm is configured as three channels by default.


Change to single channel mode if the connected equipment
requires this.

Figure 2 Example of the LTU 155 Configuration Page

4. Click Save on the toolbar.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

4.1.2 Configuring the PPP Interfaces


This section describes how to configure the PPP interfaces. They can
specifically be used to change the default bandwidth of the STM-1 PPP
interfaces. When the PPP interfaces have been configured, the DCN
configuration should be checked. If more than one PPP link is configured
between two nodes, then the links are automatically combined into a Multilink
Point-to-Point Protocol (ML-PPP) link.

Note: Disable unused and unconnected PPP interfaces. This improves the
overall performance of the node.

To configure the PPP interfaces:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and click PPP. MINI-LINK Craft displays
the Configure PPP page.

Figure 3 Example of the DCN - Configure PPP Page (with IPv6)

3. For each interface, specify the Admin Status, Notifications, and MRU
Size.

4. For a numbered interface, specify IPv4 Address and for link-local interface,
specify IPv6 Address. For an unnumbered interface, enter 0.0.0.0 and for
link-local interface, enter ::.

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Configuring DCN

Caution!

It is recommended to set all interfaces destined to the same NE as either


numbered or unnumbered. Mixing both types may cause DCN instability.

Using a large number of PPP interfaces may cause DCN instability. This can
happen in nodes with a lot of high-capacity modems, since these have a high
DCN bandwidth. Only activate the required number of PPP interfaces, and do
not allocate all available bandwidth.

5. Click Save on the toolbar.

To check the DCN configuration:

6. Under Related Tasks, click PPP Status. MINI-LINK Craft displays the
PPP Status page.

Figure 4 Example of the PPP Status Page (IPv4 only)

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

Figure 5 Example of the PPP Status Page (with IPv6)

7. Check that PPP Status is Up.

8. Under Related Tasks, click OSPF Status for IPv4 and OSPFv3 Status
for IPv6. MINI-LINK Craft displays the OSPF Status page for IPv4 and
OSPFv3 Status for IPv6.

Figure 6 Example of the OSPF Status Page for IPv6

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Configuring DCN

Figure 7 Example of the OSPF Status Page for IPv4

9. Click the Neighbor tab.

10. Check that the NE is connected to its neighbors.

Note: It takes approximately one minute until already configured


neighboring nodes are visible.

Note: Numbered PPP links use 30-bits subnet masks and the subnet masks
are set automatically. Therefore, the IP address needs to be one of the
two IP addresses in a 30-bit subnet and not a network or broadcast
address. For example, use 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.1.2, do not use
192.168.1.0 (network) or 192.168.1.3 (broadcast). Use the same 30-bit
subnet mask if OSPF is to be configured on the numbered PPP links.

4.1.2.1 Changing the Bandwidth of the STM-1 PPP Interfaces

The STM-1 interface (stand-alone or MSP) on the LTU 155 provides PPP
interfaces in the RSOH and MSOH bytes of the SDH frame. Table 2, Table 3
and Table 4 show the possible and default bandwidth of the interfaces.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

For increased bandwidth it is recommended to change the administrative status


of the interfaces in accordance with the tables.

Table 2 Bandwidth of the STM-1 RSOH PPP Interfaces


Bandwidth [kbps] DCCr (D1–3) status
0 Down
192 Up (Default)

Table 3 Bandwidth of the STM-1 MSOH PPP Interfaces - Three Channel


Configuration
Bandwidth DCCm (D4–6) DCCm (D7–9) DCCm (D10–12)
[kbps] status status status
0 Down Down Down
192 Up (Default) Down Down
384 Up Up Down
576 Up Up Up

Table 4 Bandwidth of the STM-1 MSOH PPP Interfaces - Single Channel


Configuration
Bandwidth [kbps] DCCm (D4–12) status
0 Down
576 Up (Default)

4.1.3 Configuring DCN Over Traffic


Two unframed or framed (channelized) E1s can be used for transport of DCN
data. It can be a fixed E1 connected to an NPU1 C or LTU, an E1 transported
in an STM-1 frame, or an E1 transported over a radio link.

The DCN data can be transported over a dedicated E1 or use spare timeslots
in an E1 used for traffic. Depending on framing, a complete 2 Mbps or up to 31
timeslots can be used for DCN for the selected E1s.

4.1.3.1 Using a Dedicated E1 for DCN

To use a dedicated E1 for DCN:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and click DCN Over Traffic.

3. On the DCN Over Traffic page, select DCN over dedicated E1.

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Configuring DCN

Note: If any E1 interface previously has been assigned for DCN Over
Traffic, DCN E1 Mode is disabled.

Figure 8 Example of the DCN Over Traffic Page - DCN E1 Mode is "DCN over Dedicated E1"

4. Click to add a new row.

5. In the PPP Interface list select the PPP interface.

6. In the Unit for E1 list, select the unit that holds the E1 you want to use
for DCN.

7. In the E1 list, select the E1 to be used for DCN.

8. In the Clock Source list, select the clock to be used as transmit clock.

9. In the Framing list, select the framing mode. Go to Step 13 if you selected
Unframed.

10. Use the check boxes from the Idle Pattern drop-down to specify the bit
pattern for unused timeslots.

11. Use the check boxes from the Timeslots drop-down to specify which
timeslots to use for DCN. Timeslots that are already used for other
purposes are not selectable.

12. Click Save on the toolbar.

13. Repeat from Step 4 to use a second E1 for DCN.

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4.1.3.2 Using Spare Timeslots in an E1 Used for Traffic

To use spare timeslots in an E1 used for traffic:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure , point to DCN, and then click DCN Over Traffic.

3. On the DCN Over Traffic page, select DCN over channelized E1 with
traffic pass-through.

Note: If any E1 interface previously has been assigned for DCN Over
Traffic, DCN E1 Mode is disabled.

Figure 9 Example of the DCN Over Traffic Page - DCN E1 Mode is "DCN over Channelized E1
with Traffic Passthrough"

4. Click to add a new row.

5. In the PPP Interface list select the PPP interface.

6. In the Unit for E1 list, select the unit that holds the E1 you want to use
for DCN.

7. In the E1 list, select the E1 to be used for DCN and click Select.

8. Select the Error AIS check box if AIS should be sent in case of connection
failure.

9. In the Clock Source list, select the clock to be used as transmit clock

10. In the Framing list, select the framing mode and click Select.

11. Use the Idle Pattern check boxes to specify the bit pattern for unused
timeslots.

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Configuring DCN

12. Use the Timeslots check boxes to specify which timeslots to use for DCN.
Timeslots that are already used for other purposes are not selectable.

13. Click Save on the toolbar.

14. Repeat from Step 4 to use a second E1 for DCN.

4.1.3.3 Modifying or Deleting DCN Over Traffic

To modify or delete :

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click DCN Over Traffic.

3. On the DCN Over Traffic page, do one of the following:

• To delete DCN Over Traffic:

1 Select the E1 to be deleted and click .

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

• To modify DCN Over Traffic:

1 Specify new parameters for the E1 to modify

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

Note: To change the mode, for example change from using a


dedicated E1 to using timeslots, first delete the current DCN
Over Traffic configuration. After that configure DCN Over
Traffic as usual.

4.1.4 Configuring DCN over VLAN


Note: The DCN VLAN traffic cannot have priority 7, due to a conflict with the
control plan traffic.

Before configuring DCN over VLAN, consider the following:

• A USB connection to the nodes or DCN over PPP must be configured.

• The nodes must be in the same subnet.

Note: Use numbered PPP links or disable all PPP links between two nodes
configured together with DCN over VLAN. Nodes connected by PPP
links must be on different subnets for the routing to work.

To configure DCN over VLAN:

1. In the Management Tree, expand the AMM and the NPU.

2. Right-click LAN-DCN and select Configure.

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The Configure LAN-DCN page is shown.

Figure 10 Example of the LAN-DCN Configure Page

3. When LAN-DCN is configured for IPv6, specify the IPv6 Address under
General IPv6.

4. Under Interface Usage, select Unused in the Connect To menu.

5. Click Save on the toolbar and click OK in the warning pop-up window.

Note: A new LAN interface with the same number as the LAN-DCN
interface appears above the LAN-DCN interface.

6. In the Management Tree, right-click the new LAN, select Configure and
click General.

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Configuring DCN

The Configure LAN page is shown.

Figure 11 Example of the LAN Configuration Page

7. Under Interface Usage, select a port in the Connect To menu.

8. Under General, set Admin Status to Up.

9. Click Save on the toolbar.

10. In the Management Tree, right-click the LAN-DCN interface and click
Configure.

The Configure LAN-DCN page is shown.

11. Under Interface Usage, select a port in the Connect To menu.

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12. Click Save on the toolbar.

13. In the Management Tree, expand Ethernet and the Ethernet Switch.

14. In the Ethernet Switch, right-click the ports selected above, and select
Configure. The Configure Switch Port page is shown.

Figure 12 Example of the Switch Port Configuration Page

15. Select UNI as Port Role for each port and click Save on the toolbar.

16. In the Management Tree, right-click the Ethernet Switch.

17. Select Configure and click VLAN. The Configure VLAN page is shown.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 13 Example of the Ethernet Switch - Configure VLAN Page

18. Click to add a VLAN or a range of VLANs.

19. In Ports / Member, select the correct ports for the VLAN or VLANs.

20. In Name, enter a suitable name, for example ‘‘DCN VLAN’’.

21. In Unregistered Multicast, use default value, Forward.

22. In Ports / Untagged, select the correct ports.

23. Click Save on the toolbar.

4.1.4.1 Removing DCN over VLAN configuration

To remove the DCN over VLAN configuration:

1. In the Management Tree , right-click the Ethernet Switch.

2. Point to Configure, and click VLAN. The Configure VLAN page is shown.

3. On the Configure VLAN page, unselect the ports at Ports / Member for
the DCN VLAN.

4. Select the DCN VLAN and click to delete it from the list.

5. Click Save on the toolbar.


6. In the Management Tree, right-click the LAN, select Configure and click
General.

The Configure LAN page is shown.

7. Under Interface Usage, select Unused in the Connect To menu.

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8. Under General, set Admin Status to Down.

9. Click Save on the toolbar.

10. In the Management Tree, right-click the LAN-DCN interface and click
Configure. The Configure LAN-DCN page is shown.

11. Under Interface Usage, select Front Connector in the Connect To menu.

12. Click Save on the toolbar.

4.1.5 Configuring C-VLAN ID Mapping


The following sections describe how to add or remove one or more mapping
rules in the C-VLAN ID registration table of a switch port. It is possible to define
one default mapping rule to handle C-tagged frames with C-VLAN IDs not
explicitly specified in the C-VLAN ID registration table. The default mapping
rule is enabled when a C-VLAN ID–S-VLAN ID pair is added with C-VLAN ID
set to 0.

Note:

• Switch Mode must be set to Provider Mode.

• Switch port role must be set to CE-UNI.

• The switch is connected to a LAN or a WAN interface.

4.1.5.1 Configuring a Non-Default Mapping Rule

The following sections describe how to configure a non-default mapping rule.

4.1.5.1.1 Adding a Non-Default Mapping Rule

1. In the Management Tree, expand Ethernet and Ethernet Switch.

2. Right-click a Switch Port and select Configure.

3. Under Related Tasks, click to Configure Provider Bridge Settings.

MINI-LINK Craft displays Switch Port – Provider Bridge Settings page.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 14 Example of the Switch Port - Provider Bridge Settings Page (without Default
Mapping Rule)

4. Under C-VLAN ID Registration, click to add a new pair of VLANs to


the C-VLAN ID registration table.

5. In the C-VLAN ID and S-VLAN ID columns, set the VLAN IDs.

Note: For C-VLAN ID, do not use 0.

For more information about the parameters, see MINI-LINK Craft User
Interface Descriptions, Reference [12].

6. Click Save in the tool bar to apply changes.

4.1.5.1.2 Deleting a Non-Default Mapping Rule

1. In the Management Tree, expand Ethernet and Ethernet Switch.

2. Right-click a Switch Port and select Configure.

3. Under Related Tasks, click to Configure Provider Bridge Settings.

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MINI-LINK Craft displays Switch Port – Provider Bridge Settings page.

4. Under C-VLAN ID Registration, select a pair of VLAN with C-VLAN ID


not set to 0.

5. Click to delete the row.

6. Click Save in the tool bar to apply changes.

4.1.5.2 Configuring the Default Mapping Rule

The following sections describe how to configure the default mapping rule.

4.1.5.2.1 Adding the Default Mapping Rule

1. In the Management Tree, expand Ethernet and Ethernet Switch.

2. Right-click a Switch Port and select Configure.

3. Under Related Tasks, click to Configure Provider Bridge Settings.

MINI-LINK Craft displays Switch Port – Provider Bridge Settings page.

4. Under C-VLAN ID Registration, click to add a new pair of VLANs to


the C-VLAN ID registration table.

5. In the C-VLAN ID and S-VLAN ID columns, do as follows:

• For C-VLAN ID, set 0.

• For S-VLAN ID, set a number within the allowed range as needed.

For more information about the parameters, see MINI-LINK Craft User
Interface Descriptions, Reference [12].

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Configuring DCN

Figure 15 Example of the Switch Port - Provider Bridge Settings Page (with Default Mapping
Rule)

6. Click Save in the tool bar to apply changes.

Note: After adding the default mapping rule, all C-tagged frames are
tagged with an S-tag according to the rules specified in C-VLAN ID
Registration table.

4.1.5.2.2 Deleting the Default Mapping Rule

1. In the Management Tree, expand Ethernet and Ethernet Switch.

2. Right-click a Switch Port and select Configure.

3. Under Related Tasks, click to Configure Provider Bridge Settings.

MINI-LINK Craft displays Switch Port – Provider Bridge Settings page.

4. Under C-VLAN ID Registration, select the row with C-VLAN ID set to 0.

5. Click to delete the row.

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6. Click Save in the tool bar to apply changes.

Note: After removing the default mapping rule, all C-tagged frames with
C-VLAN IDs not specified in the C-VLAN ID Registration table are
discarded.

4.1.6 Configuring DCN for Non-OSPF Equipment


This section describes how to configure DCN in MINI-LINK TN for equipment
not included in OSPF, for example, MINI-LINK CN 500.

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click Services. The Configure
DCN Services page is displayed.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 16 Example of the DCN - Configure Services Page

3. Under Related Tasks, click Configure Static Routing. MINI-LINK Craft


displays the Configure Static Routing page.

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Figure 17 Example of the DCN - Configure Static Routing Page IPv6

4. For IPv4, specify Destination, Route Mask, and Gateway.

For IPv6, enter Destination, Prefix Length, and Next Hop.

5. Click Save on the toolbar.

6. Under Related Tasks, click Configure PPP. MINI-LINK Craft displays


the Configure PPP page.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 18 Example of the DCN - Configure PPP page (with IPv6)

7. Specify Admin Status and Notifications and MRU Size for each interface.

8. For a numbered interface, specify the IPv4 Address and IPv6 Address.

For an unnumbered interface, leave the IP Address box empty.

Caution!

It is recommended to set all interfaces destined to the same NE as either


numbered or unnumbered. Mixing both types may cause DCN instability.

9. Click Save on the toolbar.

10. Use the CLI Tool to perform the CLI command redistribute static.
See the CLI Tool User Guide, Reference [3].

To check the DCN configuration:

11. Under Related Tasks, click PPP Status. MINI-LINK Craft displays the
PPP Status page.

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Figure 19 Example of the PPP Status Page for IPv4

Figure 20 Example of the PPP Status Page for IPv6

12. Check that PPP Status is set to Up.

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Configuring DCN

4.2 Configuring Static Routing for IPv4


This section describes how to create, modify, and delete static routes.

Static routing means that a fixed routing scheme is used where the address of
the router that a message is sent to, has to be entered manually. A maximum
of 100 static routes is possible.

To create a static route:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click Static Routing.

3. On the Configure Static Routing page, click to add a new static route.

Figure 21 Example of the DCN - Configure Static Routing Page for IPv4

4. For IPv4, enter Destination, Route Mask, and Gateway.

5. Click Save on the toolbar.

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See also CLI User Guide, Reference [4] on how to use the CLI to create static
routes.

4.2.1 Modifying or Deleting Static Routes

To modify or delete an existing static route:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure and click DCN and then click Static Routing.

3. On the Configure Static Routing page, do one of the following:

• To modify a route:

1 Select the route and modify the parameters.

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

• To delete one or multiple routes:

1 Select the routes to be deleted and click .

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

4. The Configure Static Routing page is displayed reflecting the changes.

4.3 Configure Static Routing IPv6


This section describes how to create, modify, and delete static routes.

To create a static route:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click Static Routing.

3. On the Configure Static Routing page, click to add a new static route.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 22 Example of the DCN - Configure Static Routing Page for IPv6

4. Enter Destination, Prefix Length and Next Hop.

5. Click Save on the toolbar.

See also CLI User Guide, Reference [4] on how to use the CLI to create static
routes.

4.3.1 Modifying or Deleting Static Routes


To modify or delete an existing static route:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure and click DCN and then click Static Routing.

3. On the Configure Static Routing page, do one of the following:

• To modify a route:

1 Select the route and modify the parameters.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

• To delete one or multiple routes:

1 Select the routes to be deleted and click .

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

4. The Configure Static Routing page is displayed reflecting the changes.

4.4 Configuring OSPF Areas


This section describes how to create, modify, and delete OSPF areas for both
IPv4 and IPv6.

The Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol makes use of automatically
updated routing tables to determine the most efficient transmission of data.
OSPF networks are divided in sections, so called OSPF areas. MINI-LINK
Craft can be used to create OSPF areas as described below. If there is only
one ABR within an area, it is recommended to define the area as a stub area to
improve the performance of the routing.

4.4.1 Creating OSPF Areas with IPv4


To create an OSPF area:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click OSPF Areas.

3. Select the IPv4 tab.

4. On the Configure OSPF Area page, click to add a new OSPF Area.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 23 Example of the DCN - Configure OSPF Areas Page

5. Type Net Address, Subnet Mask, Area ID and select Area Type.

Note: To enable OSPF for Ethernet site LAN and unnumbered IP


interfaces, configure the subnet mask to the same value as
the Ethernet site LAN port. To enable OSPF for numbered IP
interfaces, configure the subnet mask to 255.255.255.255.

6. Click Save on the toolbar.

4.4.2 Modifying or Deleting OSPF Areas


To modify or delete an existing OSPF area:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click OSPF Areas.

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3. On the Configure OSPF Area page, do one of the following:

• To modify an OSPF area:

1 Select the OSPF area and modify the parameters.

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

• To delete one or multiple OSPF areas:

1 Select the OSPF Areas to be deleted and click .

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

4. The Configure OSPF Area page is displayed reflecting the changes.

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Configuring DCN

4.4.3 Creating OSPFv3 Areas with IPv6

To create an OSPFv3 area:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click OSPF Areas.

3. Select the IPv6 tab.

4. On the Configure OSPF Area page, click to add a new OSPFv3 Area.

Figure 24 Example of the DCN - Configure OSPFv3 Areas Page

5. Specify Interface, Area ID and select Area Type.

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Note: The following rules are used for the Local Access interface:

• When the USB Interface Address for IPv6 on the Basic


NE page is not set to the default value (2001:db8::), the
Local Access interface is displayed in the table and its
parameters can be modified (manual configuration). OSPFv3
is automatically configured on the Local Access interface if
the IPv6 address for the USB interface is not set to the default
value. Automatic configuration runs during start-up and each
time when the IPv6 address of the USB interface is changed.

• When the USB Interface Address for IPv6 on the Basic NE


page is set to the default value, the Local Access interface
is automatically removed from the table.

6. Specify the Router Id: under Config. Router Id.

Note: The router ID is used for identifying the sender of the Link
Statement Advertisement (LSA) messages. All IP addresses can
be used. The Auto conf. option is enabled when the Router Id:
is set to 0.0.0.0. When Auto conf. is selected, the router ID is
automatically generated by the following rule:

• If the IPv4 NE address is default (192.168.0.1), the router


ID is generated from the last 4 bytes of the MAC address
belonging to the NE.

• If the IPv4 NE address is not default, the router ID is the IPv4


NE address.

7. Click Save on the toolbar.

4.4.4 Modifying or Deleting OSPFv3 Areas


To modify or delete an existing OSPF area:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click OSPF Areas.

3. On the Configure OSPF Area page, do one of the following:

• To modify an OSPFv3 area:

1 Select the OSPF area and modify the parameters.

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

• To delete one or multiple OSPFv3 areas:

1 Select the OSPF Areas to be deleted and click .

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Configuring DCN

Note: It is not possible to delete the Local Access interface


in the table unless the USB Interface Address for
IPv6 on the Basic NE page is set to the default value
(2001:db8::).

2 Click Save on the toolbar.

4. The Configure OSPF Area page is displayed reflecting the changes.

5. Click Save on the toolbar.

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

4.5 Configuring Syslog


This section is only visible if the NE supports syslog.

To configure parameters for syslog:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, point to DCN, and then click Services. The Configure
DCN Services page is displayed.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 25 Example of the DCN - Configure Services Page

3. Under Syslog, select or clear Send Syslogs. Specify which trap severities
that shall be sent to the remote syslog server (Indeterminate, Critical,
Major, Minor, Warning, Cleared). Enter IP address to Remote Syslog

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Server and Port number (maximum three servers can be set up). If
sending of syslogs is enabled and no remote syslog server IP address is
configured, syslog events are logged to a local file in the node.

Note: A syslog server needs to be configured and available to collect


and use logs on a central site.

4. Click Save on the toolbar.

4.6 Configuring an SNMP Manager


This section describes how to configure an SNMP manager (Trap Receiver) for
the NE.

Perform the following steps to configure an SNMP manager:

1. In the Management Tree, right-click the NE.

2. Point to Configure, click DCN, and then click Services. The Configure
DCN Services page is displayed.

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Configuring DCN

Figure 26 Example of the DCN - Configure Services Page

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Configuration and Operations Tasks

3. Under SNMP Manager (Trap Receiver), select Send of Alarms and


Events.

4. In NE Configuration Changed Timer, set a timer for sending of each


NE Configuration Changed event.

The NE sends the NE Configuration Changed event to the NMS if the NE


configuration is changed. The event is sent after the last NE configuration
change, when the configured time has passed. Each NE configuration
change within the configured time interval resets the timer. The timer
makes it possible to avoid flooding the NMS with the event. The valid timer
value range is 30–86400 seconds. The default value is 900 seconds.

5. Click to add an SNMP manager.

6. Specify the IP address in SNMP Manager and the port in Port. The default
port number is 162. The port number can be set to any integer value
between 2 and 65535.

7. On the toolbar, click Save.

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Reference List

Reference List

[1] Accessing a Network Element , 3/1543-HRA 901 20

[2] CLI Descriptions, 22/1551-HRA 901 20

[3] CLI Tool User Guide, 3/1553-HRA 901 20

[4] CLI User Guide, 2/1553-HRA 901 20

[5] Configuring Routed DCN VLANs, 108/1543-HRA 901 20

[6] Configuring IPv6, 99/1543-HRA 901 20

[7] Configuring Network Element Basics, 66/1543-HRA 901 20

[8] Installing and Managing Licenses, 9/1543-HRA 901 20

[9] Library Description, 1551-LZN 712 0425

[10] Migrating to Routed DCN VLANs, 26/1553-HRA 901 20

[11] MINI-LINK Craft User Guide, 1/1553-HRA 901 20

[12] MINI-LINK Craft User Interface Descriptions, 7/1551-HRA 901 20

[13] Personal Health and Safety Information, 124 46-2885

[14] Planning and Dimensioning DCN, 1/1551-HSD 101 16/1

[15] Preparing a CLI Script File Offline, 16/1553-HRA 901 20

[16] Supplementary Safety Information for MINI-LINK, 124 46-HSD 101 16/1

[17] System Safety Information, 124 46-2886

[18] Technical Description, 46/221 02-HRA 901 20

[19] Transferring a CLI Script File on Site, 17/1553-HRA 901 20

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