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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Seattle University
901 - 12th Avenue
PO Box 222000
Seattle, WA 98122-1090

The College of Education's Conceptual Framework


Preparing Ethical and Reflective Professionals for Quality Service in Diverse Communities

Program Mission
Developing professional educators who effectively serve adult populations as their teachers, trainers and
leaders

Course Information: EDUC 5130: Adult learning Fall 2017


Credits: 3 Delivery: Online- Asynchronous No required face to face meetings
Date of first session: September 20, Date of last session: December 2, Final Exam: N/A
2017 2017

INSTRUCTOR
Dr. Stacey E. Robbins
Office: Loyola 409
Office Hours: By appointment
Phone: 206.220.8257

REQUIRED TEXTS
Required
Merriam, S. & Bierema, L. (2014). Adult learning: Linking theory and practice. San Francisco:
Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Optional
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American
Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological
Association.

CONTENT AREAS
Course Description and Rationale: Survey of the major theories, research, and issues in adult
development and learning with the primary focus on how the theories and issues apply to adult
learning. This is a Core Course for the College of Education. A Core Course provides
foundational skills and knowledge that you will use throughout your program. As a Core Course,
I must address specific content each time I teach this course to ensure consistency. This course is
coordinated through the Master's in Adult Education and Training (AEDT) Program.

Adult education, training, and learning are increasingly emphasized in our society. For many
adults, lifelong learning is now a necessary part of life. While adults participate in various forms
of learning, our society challenges them to adapt to rapid change—changing economies,
workplaces, family structures, and values. And at the same time, many adults must also care for
children and aging parents—and understand their own aging process! Their needs are unique and
EDUC 5130 Summer 2017 College of Education
Robbins Seattle University

require unique approaches to education.

Professionals who work with adults must make ethical, reflective judgments about these issues—
especially in an increasingly diverse society. They should be able to apply adult developmental
and learning theories, including psychosocial, behavioral, social learning, information
processing, and cognitive developmental theory.

This course also fulfills a College of Education (COE) core outcome: "Each professional must
demonstrate an understanding of key human development and learning theory and research for
the particular life stage(s) at which she/he practices as an educator. Each professional must
demonstrate the capacity to apply that knowledge of human development to her/his practice as an
educator."

COURSE VISUAL

•Adult development
Self-
reflection

Discussio
n

•Adult learning Application to


your context

•Current issues: Culture,


globalization, technology

INSTRUCTOR POLICIES
Communication
I will check my email regularly. You can email me at any time, but you may not receive a
response outside regular business hours. Generally, emails will be returned within 24 hours.
Business h o u r s are Monday–Friday 9 AM – 5 PM, except holidays.

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Grading
Assignments will be returned within 5 business days.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO)
1. Describe what it means to “learn” in adulthood using one or more models from current
literature and examples from personal experience;
2. Describe major developmental tasks of adulthood using one or more models from current
literature and examples from personal experience;
3. Describe the influence of contextual elements, including culture, on adult learning and
development;
4. Identify societal trends influencing adult learning and development including
demographics, globalization, and technology
5. Analyze the reciprocal relationship between adult learning and adult development; and
6. Analyze professional roles and responsibilities related to fostering learning and
development in adults

Program Learning Outcomes (PLO) Addressed in this course


1. Interpret educational research and theoretical models and apply to adult education
practice.
2. Utilize technology and online learning modalities taking into account needs of adult
learners.
3. Develop greater self-awareness of multiple identities and intersections and advocate for
diversity, equity, and inclusion in adult education.

Graduate Learning Outcomes (GLO) Addressed in this course


1. Demonstrate mastery of competencies required in their profession or field.
2. Demonstrate effective communication in speech and in writing.
3. Develop a professional perspective focused on life-long learning that is informed by the
knowledge and skills of their graduate education.

COURSE INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS

This course is delivered entirely online. The course is divided into 8 modules, one for each week.
A module begins on Monday and ends on Sunday at midnight (except for Module 1, which
begins on Wednesday). Assignments are generally due Sundays at midnight.

To succeed in this fully online course you must engage regularly with such technologies as

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Canvas, Padlet, Zoom, and others. Some of you will likely encounter these for the first time.
Don’t worry; you are not alone. I’m here to help; please reach out to me if you are still unclear
how to use any of technology.

This course is grounded in the idea that meaningful learning happens when people are closely
engaged with both the content and one another. It works best when you are prepared, when you
bring your ideas and experience to the discussion, and when you interact with our community of
learners. As the course facilitator, I’ll be bringing my experience as an adult educator, my
research on adult learning, my reading of the literature, and my interactions with others who are
engaged in this work.

These are my expectations for you:

1. Be an active member of the learning community by engaging with the content, your
peers, and the instructor frequently. I suggest you log into the Canvas site daily.
2. Complete course readings. As a graduate level course, readings function as the primary
source of content. I assume that you complete the readings carefully and pose questions
that arise to the instructor and/or your peers. I will not lecture on material already
provided in the readings; my philosophy is that class activities should extend the
content, not repeat it, through synthesis, application, and evaluation.
3. Learn as a graduate student by extending, applying, and synthesizing what you read.
The aim is for you to interact with the content by challenging its assumptions and your
own.
4. Be open to the online learning environment by being responsive to learning in new
ways. This may be your first online, asynchronous course. At first, this may present a
myriad of challenges; work to view these as learning opportunities. It also offers the
flexibility to undertake your learning when and where you desire. Many of you will be
called to design or facilitate online learning. Use this as an experience you may draw
from.
5. Read the syllabus carefully
6. Expect to spend 8-12 hours per week, on average, on this course

STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES

Overview of Assignments
This course uses the following teaching and learning strategies: readings, discussions, and
presentations. This course has been designed in this manner so that I can model how to engage
adult learners using technology. My intent is to give you experiences that you might use in your
own practice as an adult educator

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Formatting requirements
Format your assignments using APA Publication Manual (6th edition).

Reference and citation policy


All citations must follow the APA Publication Manual (6th edition), since it is the standard
referencing system for this discipline. It may be different from other systems you have used,
so follow the Manual’s citation guidelines carefully.

Submitting an assignment
All your assignments must be submitted to me using Canvas on the given date and time.

Policy for late assignments


I do not accept late assignments unless you arrange this with me 24 hours prior to the due date.

Deadlines and extensions


An agreement to receive an Incomplete (I) grade may be negotiated if your circumstances do
not allow you to finish the course on time. The Incomplete Removal Policy of the university is
available on the Office of the Registrar web site: https://www.seattleu.edu/registrar/Policies.aspx

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Learning Percentage
Assignment Points Due Dates
Outcome of Grade
1) Participation: Discussion 1, 2, 3, 4 25% 250 Weekly;
and self reflection 1st reflection: 10/8;
A.) 1st reflection Final reflection:
B.) Final reflection 12/1
2) Learning team project GLO 2, 20% 200 2A: 10/8
groups PLO 2 2B:12/1

3) Learning life history paper 3, 5 5% 50 9/27

4) Case study project 1, 2, 3, 4, 50% 500


a) Project proposal 5, 6 10/1
b) Developmental theories (4b-4e worth 10/15
c) Learning theories 100 pts each; 10/29
d) Learning setting, barriers final 100 pts) 11/12
e) Current issue application 12/1
f) Integrated project 12/1

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Learning Percentage
Assignment Points Due Dates
Outcome of Grade

TOTAL 100% 1000

A. Grading Scale

A 100–94 Superior B– 82–80 D+ 69–67


A– 93–90 C+ 79–77 D 66–63 Poor
B+ 89–87 C 76–73 Adequate D– 62–60
B 86–83 Good C– 72–70 F 59 or less Failing

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B. Detailed Description of Assignments, Assessment Procedures,

Assignment 1: Participation and discussion- Weekly ongoing; 1A) First self-assessment, 1B)
Final self-assessment

Each week there will be a series of asynchronous discussion tasks for you to complete. There
will generally be 1-2 tasks per week. The purpose of these discussions is twofold:
 To engage deeply with the content from the readings
 To build a community of learners engaged in deepening their understanding of a given
topic

While I strongly believe in the power of discussion as a learning tool, it is challenging to make
the experience authentic and meaningful, while also assessing and policing your participation. In
an effort to change the dynamic from forced participation to authentic discussion, there will be
no specific posting dates or word minimums and you will be responsible for assessing your own
participation in the discussion forum. However, please note that your participation in the
discussion forums and your self-assessment of your participation is worth 250 points, or 25% of
your total grade, so it is not optional. The expectation is that you participate in each weekly
discussion multiple times per week.
In order to give you some early feedback on your participation in the discussion, you will
self assess against the rubric after Module 3 (1A). I'll review your self-assessment and your
posts and let you know if I concur. If you aren't meeting expectations, you'll know early in the
course and be able to adjust.
Your final self-assessment (1B) will be submitted at the end of the quarter and should consider
the following criteria in a 1-2 page narrative reflection. You will also submit a completed rubric
(below). You may include examples of your postings in your self-reflection to demonstrate how
you have addressed each criterion.

Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible
Assignment 1: Participation
and discussion
1. Frequency and Posts 4-5 times throughout week; to the extent possible, 40
timing postings are distributed from Monday-Sunday
2. Initial posting Initial post is well developed and responds to all 40
elements of prompt, shows depth of conceptual
understanding
3. Follow up postings Follow up postings demonstrates analysis of others’ 40
contributions and engages in meaningful discussion by
building on previous posts
4. Content Posts are factually accurate and exhibit self reflection 40
contribution and critical thinking

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5. References and Uses references to assigned readings or other relevant 30


support resources to support comments and illuminate personal
experiences. Refers to assigned readings and outside
research by summarizing others’ work and relying only
sparingly on direct quotes
6. Clarity and Posts are edited to reflect grammar and spelling 30
mechanics conventions
7. Netiquette Demonstrates respect and sensitivity to peers’ gender, 30
cultural and linguistic background, sexual orientation,
political and religious beliefs
TOTAL 250

Adapted from Rubric for Asychronous Discussion Participation (Frey, N.D.)

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Assignment 2A:Learning team agreements; Assignment 2B: Learning team reflection


In this course you will work closely with 3-5 classmates to give and receive feedback on some
sections of your case study project. I will assign you to your team based your practice area as
described in your Participant Information Sheet (submitted in week 1). You will not be
developing your project as a group. You will ultimately have control of the project you create;
however, a successful learning team collaboration will make each individual’s work
products stronger.
This assignment will require you to establish and meet shared deadlines; it exposes you to
different perspectives and approaches; and it allows you to receive valuable and timely feedback
from others.
Assignment 2A: Learning team project team agreements asks you to develop working
agreements for your learning team. The purpose of this assignment is for your learning team to
determine how it will do its work together this quarter. There are several things for your team to
decide:

 Schedule Required Zoom Meeting: Purpose of this meeting is to get to know one another
and share your project topic; ideally this should be scheduled during the second week of the
course.
 Leadership: Each task should have a rotating leader
 Calendar: By what date will you share drafts of assignments? By what date will you post
your feedback?
 Norms:
o How will your team communicate?
o How often will your team communicate?
o How much time will you spend reviewing drafts?
o Depending on the number of teammates, how will you offer feedback? E.g., Will you
pair up? Rotate pairs? Give each team member feedback?
o How will you share feedback (E.g., comments on a doc, narrative, using the rubric?)
o What will you do if a team member is unresponsive?
o How will you handle conflicts if they arise?

Here are the assignments that you will be reviewing as a team:


4b. Developmental theories
4c. Learning theories
4d. Learning setting and barriers
4e. Current issue application

Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible

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Assignment 2A:Learning team


agreements
1. Leadership Each team member serves as team lead on rotating 5
basis, as possible
2. Calendar Determine dates for drafts of assignments to be shared 5
and for feedback for each assignment to be returned
3. Norms Determine how the team will communicate; how 10
much time will be spent reviewing each draft;
organization of draft review; how conflicts will be
resolved; actions to take if members are unresponsive
TOTAL 20

Assignment 2B: Learning team reflection


Upon completion of your work with your team, you will reflect on your team processes and that
reflection will help me to award the other 180 points. I will also be monitoring your group's
workspace periodically.
You will review your contributions to your learning team in a narrative of no more than two
double-spaced pages on the following dimensions:
 Leadership: How well did you support your team during your assigned leadership
week? During non-assigned weeks? What might you have done to be more supportive
to the work of your group?
 Intellectual/creative contributions: How did others’ feedback strengthen your own
work? How did you contribute to others’ work?
 Teamwork: How effectively did your team work together? What would improve team
processes? What could you have done differently?
 Overall: How useful was the learning team to you this quarter (Scale of 1 to 10, 10
highest, justify your response)? What could have made the learning team more useful?

Grading elements for Assignment Excellent work would look like… Points possible
2B:case study project team reflection

1. Leadership Supporting team during both assigned leadership 60


week and non-assigned weeks to complete tasks
2. Intellectual/creative Feedback given to peers strengthened their work 60
contributions products
3. Teamwork Met agreed upon norms for engagement; 50
supported effective team work processes
4. Writing conventions Final reflection is well written and free from 10
grammatical and spelling errors; no more than 2

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double spaced pages


TOTAL 180

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Assignment 3: Learning life history paper

The purpose of the Learning life history paper is to encourage you to reflect on important past
learning experiences in order to:
 identify past learning experiences that are meaningful to you in light of your present
practice or career
 recognize the multiple experiences that contribute to your sense of self as an adult learner
 identify the themes and questions from your practice that you are interested in addressing
in your graduate school experience
 re-organize and re-interpret your past through writing and representation.

There is no right way to write or represent your learning life history. You should think about
your narrative as a reinterpretation of the life experiences that helps you to make meaning of
your decision to pursue a master’s degree at this moment in your life and career. This paper will
be a personal document that can include insight, reflections and feelings. The structure of the
narrative depends on you. You can follow chorological logic or present critical events in your
life or use specific themes or questions to organize your narrative. You might consider the
environment where you were born and grew up, family and childhood experiences, experiences
with formal education, the influence of significant people in your life, first job experiences, early
and/or significant career experiences.

You won’t be expected to share this document with your peers. I’ll read it, but I won’t critique
it. If you complete the assignment you will receive full credit. I hope that writing your learning
life history will be an enjoyable experience. This is not an academic paper, but rather a personal
expression of what you wish to write and learn.

Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible
Assignment 3: Learning life
history
1. Elements Writing, organization and framing demonstrates deep 50 points
consideration of your learning life history (Credit/No-
credit)
TOTAL 50

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Assignment 4: Case study project

The case study project will be an application of learning theory to a specific adult learning situation.
You are to choose the case, which can be an individual, class or population. You are strongly
encouraged to choose a case that reflects your professional goals or experience. Examples of appropriate
cases would include: “Somali immigrant women participating in AIDS education programs” , “Michael,
a 42 year old enrolled in an adult literacy program” “First year elementary music teachers
participating in mentoring programs”, “Ella, a displaced forestry worker enrolled in technology
training classes”, “Masters level counseling interns”. If I were completing this project, my case would
be “Masters students in the Adult Education and Training program at Seattle University” because that
is the population with whom I do the majority of my work.

Although the assignment is to complete a single cohesive case study, it will be turned in and graded in
sections. Each section will be given feedback from either the instructor or your case study project team..
Theories should be presented in an integrated and cohesive manner. The project should reflect reading
beyond the assigned course textbook, including original sources for the theories and current research
regarding the population, context and specific learning issues. You will compile each section into a
single cohesive case study, due at the end of the quarter.

Course project sections:


a) Project proposal– Graded for completion (Instructor feedback)
b) Developmental theories– 100 pts (Instructor and Peer feedback)
c) Learning theories– 100 pts (Peer feedback)
d) Learning setting and barriers – 100 pts (Instructor and Peer feedback)
e) Current issue application (e.g., culture, technology, globalization, power, etc.) – 100 pts (Peer
feedback)
f) Integrated case study

Assignment 4A: Project proposal


 Define your population: What characteristics are typical of this population?
 Discuss relevance of population to your practice area

 Aim: 2-3 paragraphs


 Grading: Complete/Incomplete (instructor will provide feedback on direction)

Assignment 4B: Developmental theories


 Choose three adult development theories that are relevant to your population;
 Describe each theory in enough detail so that your reader can understand the theory if
they are unfamiliar with it;
 Make it clear why the theory is applicable and relevant to your population;
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 Apply each theory to your population; what does the theory suggest about your
population?
 What are some implications for your practice as you work with this population?

 Aim: 4-6 pages double spaced

Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible
Assignment 4B:
Developmental theories
Analysis  Each theory is explained succinctly but with 60
enough detail that a novice could understand
 Justification provided for why theory is
applicable to population
 Each theory is applied to population to
derive insight
 Implications for your work with this
population provided
Sources Peer reviewed articles and book chapters used to 30
refer to original source for theories, current research,
and context specific information. Research should
go beyond textbook and other assigned readings.
(Expectation is at least 3 references per section)
Overall Format matches expectations with respect to style, 10
length, and layout. Document uses APA formatting
TOTAL 100

Assignment 4C: Learning theories


 Choose three adult learning theories that are relevant to your population;
 Describe each theory in enough detail so that your reader can understand the theory if
they are unfamiliar with it;
 Make it clear why the theory is applicable and relevant to your population;
 Apply each theory to your population; what does the theory suggest about your
population?
 What are some implications for your practice as you work with this population?

 Aim: 4-6 pages double spaced

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Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible
Assignment 4C: Learning
theories
1. Analysis  Each theory is explained succinctly but with 60
enough detail that a novice could understand
 Justification provided for why theory is
applicable to population
 Each theory is applied to population to
derive insight
 Implications for your work with this
population provided
2. Sources Peer reviewed articles and book chapters used to 30
refer to original source for theories, current research,
and context specific information. Research should
go beyond textbook and other assigned readings.
(Expectation is at least 3 references per section)
3. Overall Format matches expectations with respect to style, 10
length, and layout. Document uses APA formatting
TOTAL 100

Assignment 4D: Learning setting and barriers


 Describe the setting in which you interact with your population
 Situate the setting in the larger system (e.g., if I were describing masters students in the
AEDT program at SU, I would consider the College of Education as well as Seattle
University in my analysis)
 Describe relevant factors that impact the learning setting (e.g., economic or political
factors)
 Describe at least three barriers to learning that your population may face
 Describe (research supported) ways that one might address each of these barriers

 Aim: 3-5 pages double spaced

Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible
Assignment 4D: Learning
setting and barriers
1. Analysis  Setting is described succinctly but with 60
enough detail for an outsider to understand
its relevant features
 Larger system in which setting sits
described
 Relevant factors that impact learning setting

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described
 At least three barriers to learning described
 Research supported solutions to barriers
provided
2. Sources Peer reviewed articles and book chapters used to 30
refer to original source for theories, current research,
and context specific information. Research should
go beyond textbook and other assigned readings.
(Expectation is at least 3 references per section)
3. Overall Format matches expectations with respect to style, 10
length, and layout. Document uses APA formatting
TOTAL 100

Assignment 4E: Current issue/trends application (submit as part of Part F- Integrated case
study)
 Choose at least two current issues/trends (possible issues include culture, technology,
globalization, power) in adult learning that are applicable to your population;
 Describe how each issue issue/trend impacts your population
 Offer solutions for how you might refine your work with this population to address each
issue/trend

 Aim: 3-5 pages double spaced

Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible
Assignment 4E: Current
issue/trends application
1. Analysis  Two current issues/trends described 60
 Justification provided for why issue/trend is
applicable to population
 Each issue/trend is applied to population to
derive insight
 Research supported solutions provided
2. Sources Peer reviewed articles and book chapters used to 30
refer to original source for theories, current research,
and context specific information. Research should
go beyond textbook and other assigned readings.
(Expectation is at least 3 references per section)
3. Overall Format matches expectations with respect to style, 10
length, and layout. Document uses APA formatting
TOTAL 100

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Assignment 4F: Integrated case study

Revise and compile Assignment 4 Parts B-E into a single cohesive case study for Assignment
4F: Integrated case study.

 Include an overall introduction and conclusion to your case study.


 Include a summary of revisions that you have made to each section based on instructor
and peer feedback. (You may do this for each section or as a summary document.)

Grading elements for Excellent work would look like… Points possible
Assignment 4F: Integrated
case study
Elements  Introduction and conclusion included 30
 Each section addressed (4b-4e)
 Content of each section conveys necessary
information
Integration Document edited to read as coherent case study rather 30
than series of separate assignments. Transitions used
between sections; heading and subheading used
effectively
Sources Peer reviewed articles and book chapters used to refer 20
to original source for theories, current research, and
content specific information. Research should go
beyond textbook and other assigned readings.
(Expectation is at least 15 references- although 25 or
more is likely)
Overall Format matches expectations with respect to style, 20
length, and layout. Document uses APA formatting
TOTAL 100

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C. Course Expectations

Student responsibilities for learning

 Participate regularly in Canvas by engaging in online activities throughout the week, not
just on the day the assignment is due. Since this course does not have 3 hour in person
sessions, I expect that you spend that time engaging on canvas. This is in addition to the
time you spend reading materials or completing assignments.
 Complete readings. Online posting should demonstrate that you have read and reflected
on the topic being discussed.
 Communicate with peers in a timely and respectful manner especially when engaging in
paired or grouped assignments.

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SCHEDULE OF COURSE ACTIVITIES:

**Please note: Readings should be completed by the first day of the module they are listed in.
There are no readings for Module 1 so that you can complete readings expected for Module 2.

Module 1: Course overview, learner introductions


(9/20-9/24)
Readings
√ Purchase texts from bookstore
Review syllabus
Assignments
9/24 Participant information sheet due
9/27 Assignment 3: Learning life history due
Module 2: Adult development
(9/25-10/1)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 1 and Choose 3 of 4 articles below
Ross‐ Gordon, J. M. (1999). Gender development and gendered adult development. New directions for
adult and continuing education, 1999(84), 29-37.
Chavez, A. F., & Guido‐ DiBrito, F. (1999). Racial and ethnic identity and development. New Directions
for Adult and Continuing Education, 1999(84), 39-47.
Edwards, K., & Brooks, A. K. (1999). The development of sexual identity. New directions for adult and
continuing education, 1999(84), 49-57.
Levitt, H. M., & Ippolito, M. R. (2014). Being transgender: The experience of transgender identity
development. Journal of Homosexuality, 61(12), 1727-1758.
Assignments
10/1 Assignment 4a: Case study project proposal due
Module 3: Traditional learning theories and Motivation
(10/2-10/8)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 2, 3, 8
Ginsberg, M. B., & Raymond, J. (2009). Professional learning to promote motivation and academic
performance among diverse adults. Learning Never Ends, 23.
Nakamura, J., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2014). The concept of flow. In Flow and the foundations of
positive psychology (pp. 239-263). Springer Netherlands.
Assignments
10/8 1st Self Assessment on Participation and Discussion using rubric
10/8 Assignment 2A: Case study project team agreements due
Module 4: Self directed and experiential learning
(10/9-10/15)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 4, 6
Merriam, S. B. (2001). Andragogy and self‐ directed learning: Pillars of adult learning theory. New
directions for adult and continuing education, 2001(89), 3-14.

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Assignments
10/15 Assignment 4b: Developmental theories due
Module 5: Transformative learning
(10/16-10/22)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 5
Mezirow, J. (2000). Learning to think like an adult. Learning as transformation: Critical perspectives on
a theory in progress, 3-33.
Cranton, P., & Wright, B. (2008). The transformative educator as learning companion. Journal of
Transformative Education, 6(1), 33-47.
Module 6: Non-traditional perspectives
(10/23-10/29)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 7
Tisdell, E. J. (2008). Spirituality and adult learning. New Directions for Adult and Continuing
Education, 2008(119), 27-36.
Brendel, W., & Bennett, C. (2016). Learning to Embody Leadership Through Mindfulness and Somatics
Practice. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 18(3), 409-425.
Assignments
10/29 Assignment 4c: Learning theories due
Module 7: Critical perspectives
(10/30-11/5)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 11
Kilgore, D. W. (2001). Critical and postmodern perspectives on adult learning. New directions for adult
and continuing education, 2001(89), 53-62.
Module 8: Cognition and neuroscience
(11/6-11/12)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 9
Cozolino, L., & Sprokay, S. (2006). Neuroscience and adult learning. New Directions for Adult and
Continuing Education, 2006(110), 11-19.
Taylor, K. (2006). Brain function and adult learning: Implications for practice. New Directions for Adult
and Continuing Education, 2006(110), 71-85.
Assignments
11/12 Assignment 4d: Learning setting and barriers due
Module 9: Culture and context: Implications for practice
(11/13-11/19)
Readings
Merriam & Bierema (2014): Ch 10
Lange, E., & Baillie Abidi, C. (2015). Rethinking Social Justice and Adult Education for Welcoming,
Inclusive Communities: Synthesis of Themes. New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education,
2015(146), 99-109. doi:10.1002/ace.20135
Kasl, E., & Yorks, L. (2016). Do I really know you? Do you really know me? Empathy amid diversity in
differing learning contexts. Adult Education Quarterly, 66(1), 3-20. (Links to an external site.)Links to an
external site.
THANKSGIVING WEEK- NO MODULE (11/20-11/26)

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Module 10: Course summary and evaluation


(11/27-12/2)
Assignments
12/1 Assignment 4E: Current issue/trends application (Submit as part of Assignment 4F)
12/1 Assignment 4F: Integrated case study project due
12/1 Assignment 2B: Reflection on Case study project learning groups due
12/1 Assignment 1B: Reflection on discussion participation due

POLICY FOR COURSE CANCELATION

The university makes every effort to notify students of course cancellations due to weather or
unexpected events that result in campus closure. Notify your instructor if you live in a Greater
Seattle region experiencing an unexpected event preventing you from travel. If your instructor is
more than 15 minutes late with no notice or communication via e-mail or CANVAS, please
contact the Department Chair for your program. Additional Course Specific Information:

ACADEMIC RESOURCES

NOTICE to STUDENTS concerning TWO Important Student Academic Resources


(Required in all syllabi):

Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons (including such resources as:
Learning Assistance Programs, Research [Library] Services, Writing Center, Math Lab) can be
accessed at the following url: http://www.seattleu.edu/learningcommons

DISABILITY ACCOMODATION POLICY AND PROCEDURE STATEMENT

NOTICE to STUDENTS concerning DISABILITIES

If you have, or think you may have, a disability (including an ‘invisible disability’ such as a
learning disability, a chronic health problem, or a mental health condition) that interferes with
your performance as a student in this class, you are encouraged to discuss your needs and
arrange support services and/or accommodations through Disabilities Services staff in the
Learning Center, Loyola 100, (206) 296-5740.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

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Robbins Seattle University

NOTICE to STUDENTS concerning Seattle University’s ACADEMIC INTEGRITY


POLICY which includes the issue of plagiarism:

Academic Integrity Tutorial: Visit the following url:


https://www.seattleu.edu/academicintegrity/

The Academic Integrity policy and procedures (academic honesty) of the university define what
the university considers academic dishonesty, what penalties can be imposed for violations of
academic integrity, and the appeal process if a student is found to have violated academic
integrity.

The Academic Integrity policy and procedures can be downloaded at the following URL:
https://www.seattleu.edu/redhawk-axis/academic-policies/

Academic Grading Grievance - Procedure for Challenging Course Grades

This grade grievance policy and procedure defines the policies and outlines the processes that
govern in those cases when a student wishes to challenge a final course grade.

The academic grading grievance policy and procedure document can downloaded using the
following URL: https://www.seattleu.edu/redhawk-axis/policies/

RELIGIOUS OBLIGATIONS

NOTICE to STUDENTS concerning Seattle University’s commitment to supporting students


with religious obligations and special circumstances.

The Seattle University Provost has requested that faculty extend courtesy to students with
religious obligations and special circumstances. Students are encouraged to discuss any planned
absences prior to the start of the quarter in order to have an understanding of the instructor’s
expectations. Faculty and students may contact the SU Multifaith Campus Minister in Campus
Ministry at 206.296.6049 for assistance.

PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

The purpose of this policy is to define the appeal policies and processes related to the following
professional program decisions that are related to professional conduct/behavior/dispositions:
retaining or graduating a student; permitting a student to enter or continue in a practicum, an

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internship, or student teaching; or recommending a student for a professional certificate.

The Professional Conduct policy can be viewed at the following URL:


https://www.seattleu.edu/deanofstudents/policies/conduct/

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