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Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre

Research Training Programme 2018 19

Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre Research Training Programme 2018 – 19

Contents

Welcome to PAHC

1

The Research Training Programme

2

Who We Are!

2

Sessions �

3

Core Series

� Provocative Theory �

� Methods and Methodologies

3

7

9

Playful Practice

11

11

Practice-as-Research Group � Talking about Your Research �

� Professorial Series: My Brilliant Research Career �

12

14

Statistics for Your Research �

14

Writing Groups

� Come Together: Student Initiatives

15

16

Resources

� Manchester Metropolitan Graduate School

Library�

18

18

19

� Departmental Programmes �

21

Research Online �

� 23

Language Learning

� 25

RAH! �

� 25

At a Glance �

� 26

Welcome to

Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre

PAHC

Welcome to the Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre (PAHC) Research Training Programme! This booklet outlines some of the activities you can take part in through- out your time at Manchester Metro- politan University� Our team are proud of the wide variety of training oppor- tunities that PAHC offers� Traditionally a PhD is about simply ‘doing’ a project� But not only does the PhD reflect a variety of forms and norms depending on your discipline, we also regard it as a form of pro- fessional training that will help you become a well-rounded researcher� In the above spirit we hope to offer you new ways of thinking about re- search that can genuinely help inform your development as a reflexive re- searcher�

We encourage you to make the most of the opportunities provided and thus to think about research in this colle- giate fashion� The training will in this spirit strengthen the quality of your project and make you a part of the broader community of research stu- dents that PAHC represents� As I know from my own experience, the PhD environment you work in stays with you for life� The training opportunities you receive here will help mould you into the researcher that you become� We very much look forward to supporting you towards this goal�

Prof� Steve Miles Head of PAHC

The Research Training Programme

The programme is designed for MA by Research and PhD students� Much of it is of particular interest to first year students but some (for example sessions about vivas or publishing) are relevant to all years� Staff doing PhDs and early career researchers are very welcome to attend� Some sessions guide you through the procedures for doing your degree, whilst others will help you with the wider intellectual and creative elements of being an arts and humanities researcher� Note that many other activities take place in the Faculty and the whole Uni- versity throughout the year that are of

relevance� Watch out for notices about these in HARTS�online, social media, in emails, on noticeboards� Note too that Man Met’s Graduate School also runs a training programme, see pages 18–19, as does the Library, see page 19� Unless indicated otherwise, all ses- sions are in the Open Space on the first floor of the Righton Building and take place on a Wednesday� Apart from a few activities, you do not need to sign up — just come along!

Dr Myna Trustram Research Coordinator

Who We Are!

If you have any questions about the Research Training Programme contact Myna Trustram� Take any questions about the degree procedures (RD1,

RD2, viva etc) to the relevant degree administrator� Your director of studies is your first contact for all other issues�

Prof Steve Miles

s�miles@mmu�ac�uk

Dr Myna Trustram

m�trustram@mmu�ac�uk

Kate Johnson

k�johnson@mmu�ac�uk

Deborah Bown

pahcresearchdegrees@mmu�ac�uk

Rhiannon Patkai

pahcresearchdegrees@mmu�ac�uk

Katherine Walthall

pahcresearchdegrees@mmu�ac�uk

Head of Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre

Research Coordinator (Doctoral Support)

Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Support Tutor

Research Administrator, Departments of English, Languages and Information and Communications, and Sociology

Research Administrator, Department of History, Politics and Philosophy, Manches- ter School of Art and Manchester Fashion Institute

Research Group Officer (team leader and ethics administration)

Sessions

Core Series

Wednesdays, 13:00–14:30, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

These sessions are at the heart of the Research Training Programme� They are designed for all students across the Faculty regardless of the discipline within which you work� Here we will address critical questions about how to do a PhD and an MA by Research�

17

Oct

Making the most of your research journey

Prof� Steve

Miles

 

This is an introductory session to what it means to be a PhD or MA researcher, the challenges to be faced and the benefits to be gained from the Research Training Programme� How can you make the most of your research journey?

24 Oct

Literature reviews

Dr Ros Oates & Tom McGrath

This session will look at the process of writing a literature review, often the first piece of writing you will do for your PhD� The session will show you what a literature review is, what you should be trying to write and how to go about doing it� Tom McGrath (History, Politics and Philosophy), in the second year of his PhD, will talk about his experience of writing a literature review�

31 Oct

Approaches and practices for balancing work and wellbeing

Stephanie Mulholland

This session offers an overview of writing and planning strategies that enable us to work productively whilst prioritising wellbeing� Focusing on generative writing, creating a thesis outline, and managing super- visory feedback, we adopt the approach of 'deliberate practice' which encourages us to 'Do less� But do what you do with complete and hard focus� Then when you're done be done and enjoy the rest of the day�'

7

Nov

The research proposal: The RD1

Prof� Steve Miles

 

What makes a good research proposal? In this session we consider how best to put together an effective research proposal and in the process meet the needs of the RD1�

14

Nov

Ethics for postgraduate researchers Dr John Spencer

 

This is an introductory session on ethical thinking for researchers� It includes discussion around illustrations of ethical dilemmas drawn from postgraduate research and teaching�

21

Nov

Copyright and your research Nicola Beck & Louise Koch

 

This session focuses on copyright issues that you should be aware of during your research process� It is important to understand why copyright matters when presenting research in a thesis and/or a pub- lished article as this will involve the use of the work of others� You should also be aware of the rights that apply to your own work, and consider how you want others to use the content that you create�

28 Nov

The digital researcher

Dr Lewis Sykes

With social media and the World Wide Web increasingly prevalent in everyday life, this session explores how these technologies can also be useful tools for the 21st-century researcher� We'll introduce relevant academic networking and research portals, show a selec- tion of research journals and blogs, and discuss why taking a consid- ered approach to the ‘academic’ web is important for contemporary research�

5

Dec

Vivas

Dr Sam Colling & Jo Phillips

 

What can you expect in a viva? How can you best prepare for yours? Sam and Jo will address these questions, using their own recent ex- perience�

12

Dec

Student and staff forum

Dr Myna Trustram

Come and discuss with fellow students and staff your experience of doing research in the Arts and Humanities Faculty� What has worked for you and what needs to change?

17 Dec – 4 Jan

Christmas

9 Jan

Come together: Student initiatives Dr Myna Trustram

In recent years students have organised symposia, exhibitions, screenings, talks, residencies and workshops� Students who have done this will discuss these collaborative, student-led activities and you will be encouraged to develop your own projects with others�

16

Jan

Beyond Google Scholar

Dr Geoff Walton, with Sheila Candeland & Elaine Cooke

Lab in

In this session we will look at how you can be more effective at

Geoffrey

finding good quality literature to contextualise your research� We will

Manton

 

tbc

explore how to devise better keyword searches and how to combine them on relevant subject databases; getting to know databases and e-journal collections for your area and making the most of the library portal� Finally, some tips on how to evaluate the literature you find for quality and relevance�

23

Jan

Sage Research Methods Sheila Candeland

 

This session will introduce you to Sage Research Methods, a valuable resource of material to guide you through every step of the research process� Comprising books, journal articles, case studies, sample datasets, videos and more, you can find information on topics such as developing a research proposal, data collection and interpretation methods, research ethics, writing and disseminating your work�

30

Jan

Academic writing

Dr Myna Trustram

 

What makes a piece of writing ‘academic’? How can you keep the reader of your thesis interested in what you have to say? We will look at some examples of fine academic writing and consider how you too can write in this manner�

6 Feb

How to secure funding or grants during your PhD

Dr� Ros Oates & Jessica Purdy

How do you gain funding or external grants during your research? Even small grants can be useful for your PhD journey, and they are a valuable addition to your CV� As well as exploring options for PhD students, we will look at how to write a funding bid and what re- sources Man Met can offer you to help you write a bid� Jessica Purdy, in the second year of her PhD, will share her experiences of bidding�

13

Feb

Open Research

Claire Wilson

Open Research is the process of sharing your research findings with others, for example through Open Access publications, Open Data or blogging� It increases the visibility and accessibility of your work� This session covers the key areas: how to create a simple data man- agement plan; obtaining informed consent for data sharing from research participants; anonymising and storing of sensitive data�

  • 20 Impact and public engagement

Feb

 

Helen Darby

 

This session will look at the current Higher Education landscape for public engagement and impact, for the Research Excellence Frame- work and beyond� Helen Darby will introduce you to a wealth of re- sources, toolkits and training materials that you can apply to your own research-dissemination practices�

  • 27 Research Excellence Framework (REF) Prof� Steve Miles

Feb

 

We live in an age of research measurement� In this session we consider the current form of the REF, how it effects both a university’s relationship with research and the developing careers of early-career researchers� The session will also consider what you can do to make sure you are best equipped and ‘in the know’ for the demands of the REF once you apply for and start an academic job�

6

Mar

RD2 / Annual review

Prof� Steve Miles

What is the role of the RD2? How can you best meet its demands? What are the expectations of the Annual Review process and how can you ensure you make the most of it?

  • 13 Multidisciplinary research

Mar

 
 

Prof� Amanda Ravetz & Dr Lucy Burke

In this session we will discuss multidisciplinary research, the reasons for pursuing it and some of the issues that can arise when working across disciplines, before taking questions from the floor�

  • 20 Publishing in academic journals

Mar

 

Dr Ros Oates

 

This session will examine how to publish in an academic journal during your PhD� We will look at the different types of journals you could publish in and explore various forms of publications including book reviews, conference proceedings and articles based on original research� A current PhD student will share his or her experience�

  • 27 Going to conferences

Mar

 

Dr Myna Trustram

 

Conferences are a sporadic but important element in academic life� What are they for? Why go to one? Why present your research at one? How can you get the most out of the experience?

3

Apr

Student and staff forum

Dr Myna Trustram

Come and discuss with fellow students and staff your experience of doing research in the Arts and Humanities Faculty� What has worked for you and what needs to change?

8 Apr – 26 Apr

Easter

19

Jun

Student and staff forum (see 3 Apr above)

Dr Myna Trustram

Provocative Theory

Wednesdays, 15:00–16:30, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

This is a series of staff-led presentations and student discussions on key areas of cultural theory relevant for postgraduate researchers, all intended to encour- age participants to think about interconnections between theory and practice in their own research� You may wish to participate in the entire series, but each session is designed to work independently so you can select topics that are most relevant to you� The first half of each session will be a presentation by staff from across the Faculty, introducing a specific theme as it figures across different disciplines� Presentations will be followed by a group discussion when you are encouraged to relate the material to the development of your own practice� There will be a short list of readings on a weekly basis� If you’re planning to attend, you should try to engage with this� Four of the sessions will focus on areas identified by students, commencing with the one on 28 Nov� These could be used to either develop ideas already raised, with directed reading selected by the group, or explore fresh theoretical ideas that have emerged throughout discussions in the series� The four stu- dent-led sessions are your opportunity to generate and provoke debate among yourselves�

17

Oct

Introduction: Theory as practice

Fionna Barber & Dr Andrew Moor

 

What sort of knowledge can theory produce? How do researchers situate themselves in relation to theories they are deploying? How can we conceive theory as practice?

31

Oct

Embodiment

Fionna Barber & Dr Esperanza Miyake

 

How does the female body’s materiality figure in contemporary politics? How do scholars in the arts and humanities engage in ‘sci- entific’ knowledges (such as in Disability Studies)? How does tech- nology interact with the construction of raced bodies?

14 Nov

Location

Dr David Cooper, Dr Beccy Kennedy & Dr Sian Bonnell

What is ‘literary geography’? How does cultural geography intersect with creative practice? How are experiences of borderlands and other ‘transitional spaces’ configured in contemporary culture?

28 Nov

Student-led reflective discussion and forward planning

This will be a student-led session – your chance to shape the course by proposing areas of interest to you, suggesting reading matter, and scheduling what you would like to cover in future student-led sessions�

12

Dec

Time/memory

Prof� Joanna Hodge, Dr Adi Kuntsman & Dr Gavin Macdonald

 

How do we conceptualise memory and forgetting? What challenges and opportunities do digital memory present to us?

16

Jan

Student discussion group

 

Using material decided on 28 Nov�

30

Jan

Movement: Diaspora/migration/ cosmopolitanism

Prof� Ola Uduku, Dr Benedicte Brahic & Alison Welsh

 

How do we render visible issues of race, migration and national identity? What can post-colonial and cosmopolitan theory tell us, and how do we frame vital issues like the plight of refugees?

13

Feb

Decolonizing research

Dr Sarah Ilott & Dr Muzna Rahman

 

How do we begin to recognise colonial or racist implications in our own work? How can we reimagine Western scholarship, the canon, teaching practice etc� in a way which is alert to the aftermath of white imperialism?

27

Feb

Student-led session

13

Mar

Fact-based research

Dr Lucy Burke

 

What do we do with empirical knowledge? How do we frame factual evidence in our research practice?

27

Mar

Beyond text

Dr Rosemary Shirley, Dr Myna Trustram & Dr Hannah Allen

 

How do we speak about ordinariness and the everyday? What sorts of knowledge can psychoanalysis open up for us? Can we see in moments of performance and gesture a potential cultural mecha- nism that escapes patriarchal written language?

3 Apr

Student presentations

Methods and Methodologies

Wednesdays, 10:00–12:00, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

Research in the real world has many challenges, one challenge is the need to draw upon other fields of enquiry and adopt an inter-disciplinary approach� There are varieties of methods and methodologies across various arts, human- ities, and social science disciplines including qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches� This is an introductory programme that will give post- graduate students a flavour of the expertise within the Faculty, and which is shared across arts, humanities and social sciences� The main thrust of this series will carefully examine a selection of methods, from traditional interviewing and questionnaire design, to the many and varied contemporary methods that push the boundaries of research� These sessions assume no prior knowledge, and are designed to engage students in a workshop environment� They are presented as stand-alones so that students can select the methods that are of interest to them�

  • 10 Participatory research

Oct

Dr Fatima Khan

Participatory research includes a variety of methodological approach- es, which aim to transfer the power to participants, who are members of a community or organisations run by community members� Partici- pants often set the research agenda and control the research process, and help to analyse and reflect on the data and findings� This form of research includes both action and research� Participants themselves explore problems, discuss possible solutions, and identify possible courses of action to be taken�

  • 17 Interviews in social research

Oct

Prof� Steve Miles

In this session we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of research interviews, what the challenges are, how to respond to them there and then, and what the value of interview data might be for a Social Science/Arts research project� The session will consider both one-to-one and group interviews�

  • 31 Incorporating philosophies of social sciences in your thesis

Oct

Dr Mansour Pourmehdi

Philosophical considerations and positions underlie all of the natural and social sciences� In the latter case, philosophical foundations and their emergent issues have a profound impact on methodology and empirical practice� Design decisions will usually depend on philo- sophical perspectives such as the fundamental decision to employ a quantitative or an interpretive design� This session will introduce students to key concepts and debates in the philosophy of social sciences�

7

Nov

Feminist methodologies Dr Susan O’Shea

What is feminist research? Feminist praxis and theory pose chal- lenges to dominant research discourses in the social sciences� Feminist methodologies seek to disrupt power imbalances between the researcher and participant� Beginning with the experiences and standpoints of women, it challenges social inequalities that inter- sect with gender, these include disability, race, class, sexuality and religion� Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods are open to all researchers but what makes feminist methodologies feminist are the approaches taken to epistemology and ontology�

  • 14 Creative methodologies

Nov

Dr Susan O’Shea

A relational approach to understanding society assumes that the connections individuals have and make can positively influence or constrain opportunities� In this session, we will look at approach- es that creatively combine participatory action research and social network analysis in a mixed-methods context to explore group dynamics�

  • 21 Creative writing as research method

Nov

Andrew McMillan

This session will consider how writing can be used not just as an output for a research project, but as a valuable and vital mode of enquiry for research�

5

Dec

Covert research in social research methodology

Dr David Calvey

This workshop will critically explore the role of covert research in social research methodology� This controversial and ethically stig- matised tradition is under-utilised within the social sciences and can provide creative and disruptive insights on the praxis and practice of fieldwork�

  • 23 Digital methods

Jan

Dr Adi Kuntsman

Feb

  • 20 The three sessions will explore different aspects of digital social
    20

Mar

15:00

–16:00

research� The first will look at strategies of doing digital research in a multi-platform environment and address the difference between textual, visual, social and quantifiable data� The second session will discuss what is 'digital ethnography'� The final session, a 'surgery for your digital troubles', is open and will be based on students’ ques- tions related to their research�

Playful Practice

Wednesdays, 10:00–12:00, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

Beginning a programme of research and study is pretty daunting� Investigating playful approaches to this can offer new experience and insight through making, doing, thinking and discussing�

28 Nov

Introduction, provocation and playful activities

Dr Sian Bonnell

The first session will start with a short introduction and provocation to playfulness; the rest of the session will incorporate some playful approaches to making and writing� Between the sessions, students will be invited to experiment by introducing some of these concepts into their work�

12 Dec

Student-led conclusions

Dr Sian Bonnell

In this session we will reflect on these experiences through a discus- sion and dissemination of how they have already, or might further, impact on students’ research and methodologies in the future�

Practice-as-Research Group

Wednesdays, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

  • 6 Feb

  • 6 Mar

15:00

– 16:30

3 April

10:00

– 12:00

Dr Myna Trustram

Practice as Research is a relatively new form for scholarly research�

As such, it provokes plentiful debate about the nature of knowledge and how to make knowledge� This group is for MA by Research and PhD students who use their practice in research and who would like to share the pleasures and demands of this form of enquiry� Invited members of staff will contribute to sessions, but the ap- proach will be primarily one of peer-learning through the exchange of ideas, work and experience� Contact Myna Trustram (m�trustram@mmu�ac�uk) if you have ques- tions about the group or if you would like to register a place� You will be expected to attend regularly� You will be encouraged to continue meeting together once this group has finished�

Talking about Your Research

To be able to talk about your research is as necessary a skill as actually doing it and writing about it� The more you talk about it, the more it will develop in your mind and body� We encourage you to make the most of the following opportu- nities in order to develop a relaxed and confident style, whether you are talking with friends or at a conference�

Conferences

10–11

Oct

Uni of

Salford

Media

City

North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership (NWDCTP) Annual Conference 2018

This year's conference, 'Human technologies, digital humanities', is hosted by the University of Salford at its MediaCity Campus� The conference seeks to examine how people understand and use tech- nology across the arts and humanities� Inextricably linked to human experience, technology has the power to transform, construct and disrupt daily lives, landscapes and cultures� How people have en- countered and responded to the changes that technologies bring, and the changes in technologies themselves, in both positive and negative ways, form the central concerns of this conference�

6 Mar

11th Man Met Postgraduate Research Conference

The conference serves as a platform for finding new ideas and dis- seminating them to a wider audience� It offers personal feedback compiled from comments by the judging panel and the audience� The conference will provide a supportive environment for postgrad- uate researchers to present their work� Find out more via mmu�ac�uk/ research/research-study/events or contact gscommunications@ mmu�ac�uk

17 May

7th PAHC Symposium

The symposium is an opportunity for doctoral students across the Faculty to meet and discuss their research with peers and other aca- demics� It is designed to be supportive but critical� Details from Kate Johnson (k�johnson@mmu�ac�uk)�

Workshops

24 Jan

12:00

–13:00

No 70,

G�09

Effective public speaking workshop

David Shirley

This two-part workshop is led by David Shirley, Director of the Man- chester Theatre School� It is timed to equip you with presentation skills for the annual Man Met Postgraduate Research Conference and PAHC Symposium later in the year� Past students have found the

  • 4 Apr

12:00

–15:00

No 70,

G�09

workshop: 'one of the most invaluable workshops I've been to', 'inspi- rational' and 'so helpful'� Kate Johnson will send an invitation to you in mid-Nov and places will be awarded on a first-come-first-served basis� The workshop is always oversubscribed so please note that you must commit to both sessions�

20

Feb

  • 27 Feb

    • 6 Mar

10:00

–12:00

Open

Space

First-year-student talks

Dr Myna Trustram

Students will talk for five minutes about their research followed

by a five-to-ten minute discussion with a friendly audience of fellow students and staff� You are strongly encouraged to use this opportunity: it builds confidence and helps you find others with similar interests� Tell Myna Trustram (m�trustram@mmu�ac�uk) by 10 Dec which date would suit you�

12 Mar

10:00

–12:00

GM 1�12

Designing a poster for a conference presentation

Dr Peter Goodwin

The workshop has been specially organised for you to develop skills in order to submit a poster to the 7th PAHC Symposium� This year both postgraduate research and taught students are eligible to submit a poster presentation to the Symposium� You will need to bring an abstract (between 250 and 500 words) from which you can create a poster� Email Kate Johnson (k�johnson@mmu�ac�uk) to book a place�

What Next? Your Career after a Research Degree

Wednesday, 23 Jan, 17:00–19:00, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

The transition from being a student to employment is not easy� In this informal session students and staff will discuss their experiences and offer practical guidance on how to manage the beginnings of employment after a PhD, both in and out of academia� Two recent arts and humanities PhD graduates will talk about how they have made the transition, and found their current employment: Leanne

Green (Whitworth Art Gallery) and David Jackson (Man Met)� Professor Jess Edwards, Head of the English Department, will discuss his experience of hiring early-career re- searchers� What does he look for in an application and an interview? What should you be doing now to improve your chances of finding satisfying work?

Professorial Series: My Brilliant Research Career

Wednesdays, 15:00–16:30, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

We have invited six professors from across the Faculty to run a session entitled ‘My Brilliant Research Career’� The Faculty’s vision is to produce collegiate, re- flexive researchers; we have asked the professors to reflect on how they are embodying this in their career� If you’re not sure what this means for you and your career, come and find out�

10 Oct

Jim Aulich, Professor of Visual Culture

24

Oct

Ola Uduku, Professor of Architecture

7

Nov

Michael Symmons Roberts, Professor of Poetry

21

Nov

Hannah Smithson, Professor of Criminology and Youth Justice

5

Dec

Dawn Archer, Professor of Pragmatics and Corpus Linguistics

9

Jan

Amanda Ravetz, Professor of Visual and Social Practice

Statistics for Your Research

Thursdays, 13:00–17:00, Lab tbc

This eight-hour short course will provide you with everything you need to know in order to start constructing a survey and to interpret your data� We will use existing data sets and surveys to help inform your research design, whilst con- sidering strategies for data management and analysis� No previous knowledge is required, but you will be required to do some background reading in preparation� The course will be delivered in two four-hour sessions�

17 Jan

Survey Design

Q-Step Manchester team

24

Jan

Analysing your data

Q-Step Manchester team

Writing Groups

Wednesdays, 10:00–12:00

Dr Myna Trustram (m�trustram@mmu�ac�uk) is convening three writing groups� The groups include elements that are taught but they also rely on student par- ticipation and practice�

  • 9 Jan

  • 16 Jan

  • 23 Jan

  • 30 Jan

    • 6 Feb

    • 13 Feb

Venue

tbc

An introductory writing group

We will write, talk and read� The group is designed to help you become

a confident and creative writer of academic prose� The approach is

exploratory and experiential: you will draw on your practice whether

as a historian, artist, theorist, curator, designer, sociologist and so on�

You will be encouraged to develop a writing style that meets the requirements of an academic thesis but that also expresses your own idiom and the particularities of your research� Likely themes we’ll cover are: ‘love the words’ (Dylan Thomas); academic writing; ways of reading; the literature review; voices� You will be expected to write regularly both inside and outside the sessions and to come to all of the sessions� You will be encouraged to continue meeting together once this group has finished� If you have questions or would like to book a place (by 10 Dec), contact Myna�

  • 13 Mar

A writing-with-objects group

  • 20 Mar

  • 27 Mar

Special

These three experimental sessions will use objects from the Special

Collections Museum to help you develop a distinctive writing style� It will suit students from any arts and humanities discipline and from

  • Collec- any year of study� We will look, touch, talk and write� You will choose an object that resonates with your research and through that object practise paying creative attention to the world of physical objects and language� If you have questions or would like to book a place (by 25 Feb), contact Myna�

tions,

All

Saints

Library

8 May

15 May

22 May

Venue

tbc

A writing group for third-year students

The notion of ‘writing up’ implies a mechanical task of putting down what you have discovered� It is rarely as straightforward as this� As you approach the final stages of your research, you need to find a way to manage your data, the writing task and yourself� We will address the particular questions you have about how best to approach the writing of the thesis and you will share your writing with others for critical feedback� The approach will be peer learning and experiential� Guidance will be offered, but essentially you will learn together through sharing the pleasures and the difficulties of the final months� You will be expected to come to all three sessions and will be en- couraged to continue meeting together once the formal group has finished� If you have questions or would like to book a place (by 23 Apr), contact Myna�

Come Together: Student Initiatives

Throughout your studies, you are strongly encouraged to come together with other students in order to initiate your own activities and research events� After all, you know best the kind of activity that will push forward your research and your professional development� For example, in the past few years students have organised reading groups, seminars, workshops, writing groups, practice or crit groups, exhibitions, screenings, residencies, visits, seminars, workshops and so on� We can offer you help with the development of your ideas and mentor- ing� A good time for your events to take place is after Easter� If you have an idea, contact Myna Trustram (m�trustram@mmu�ac�uk)� We might be able to offer you funding to cover some costs� On 9 Jan (13:00–14:30) there will be a Core Session (p� 5) about collaboration and to help you develop ideas for such initiatives� The following two groups are current examples of initiatives set up by your peers�

New materialism is a new way of thinking about matter that is having an impact on a wide range of research subjects and disciplines� New material- ism elevates the materiality of things by recognising their natural vitality and potential to enact as a positive creative force, and thereby recognis- es their intrinsic agency� This necessi- tates a philosophical shift away from traditional dualisms such as nature/ culture, subject/object, mind/matter, towards recognising the self-organis- ing, and self-transformational capacity of matter in its broadest sense�

New Materialism Reading Group

The aim of the group is to open up new materialism to a wide range of participants, theorists and practition- ers� There will be workshops, seminars, introductory talks and reading groups These sessions are open to anyone who has an interest in new material- ism and associated theories such as object-oriented ontologies and spec- ulative realism� For more information, contact Paul Proctor (p�proctor@mmu�ac�uk)�

This is a new interdisciplinary research network that aims to bring together researchers working with queer themes across Manchester universi- ties and beyond� We are planning a programme of reading groups, discus- sions, screenings and guest speakers� Our first meeting will take place in October�

Queer Research Network Manchester

To find out about all events, please email queerresearchnetwork@gmail� com� For any questions or to register interest in organising events, please contact Lois Stone (lois�stone@ postgrad�manchester�ac�uk) and Sa- rah-Joy Ford (sarah_joy_ford@hotmail� co�uk)�

Resources

Manchester Metropolitan Graduate School

The University’s Graduate School promotes a community which includes all postgraduate research students, their supervisors and other internal and external colleagues involved in the research-student journey� The purpose of the Graduate School is to support you throughout your studies and to celebrate research excellence� Find out more about the Graduate School in the PGR Hub on Moodle� The School offers a variety of devel- opment opportunities, which include:

• University-wide events such as the postgraduate research conference and the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition

• Face-to-face sessions and work- shops on a variety of subjects, in- cluding research methods, writing for publication and using technolo- gy to enhance your research • Online courses and other resources on networking, career options with your research degree and more • Opportunities to obtain paid teaching experience with The Bril- liant Club, an award-winning charity that recruits PhD tutors to work with pupils in schools� For more details and to book onto face-to-face sessions, visit the PGR Hub on Moodle�

Wednesday, 10 Oct, Student Union

11:30

– 14:00

Postgraduate research bites and welcome

An event for all incoming students that will include presentations on services/support mechanisms, a panel of postgraduate alumni pro- viding tips and advice, and poster presentations and lightning talks from current students�

17:00

– 19:00

Postgraduate welcome drinks

An informal networking event for incoming students, supervisors, research administrators and other support staff�

Library

Manchester Met has a vast collection of print and online resources through its Library services� For help and guidance you may find it useful to look at the Researchers' Library Guide (libguides�mmu�ac�uk/us-

rresearch) and relevant Subject Guides ( libguides � mmu � ac � uk/subjectguides ) which are created by our Subject Li- brarians� You can contact the library via library@mmu�ac�uk, Online Chat or at the Library Help Desk� If you’d like to discuss appropriate resources for your research please get in touch to arrange a one-to-one with your Subject Librar- ian� The Library runs workshops through- out the year which are relevant to re- search students� For dates and times and to book a place please visit lib- guides�mmu�ac�uk/workshops� Here are three examples:

EndNote Online: taking the pain out of organising your references

Endnote software allows you to store your references while you

search for information, it can also automatically insert citations and references into your document� • MMU Harvard Referencing Make sorting out your references easier with this introduction to the MMU's Harvard style� We'll show you how to reference the most common type of material as well as guide you on tackling those trickier references you discover for your research� • Cited reference searching This technique will help you locate additional articles for your research� Previously published articles relevant to your research appear in the list of references at the end of a journal article� A cited reference search, however, helps you identify more recent articles which cite the original article that you located�

Special Collections Museum

Special Collections on the third floor of the All Saints Library is an Arts Council–accredited museum and holds more than fifty art-and-de- sign-related collections and archives� These include the most significant collection of Arts-and-Crafts objects in Manchester, one of the largest publicly accessible collections of Artists’ Books outside London and a Book-Design collection that focuses on finely printed and illustrated books� The archive collection is a resource of national significance for the study of twentieth-century book illustra- tion, art and design, and textile design and provides access to unique primary source material� Appointments can be made with the archivist or the curator to view

items from the archives and other col- lections not available in the Reading Room� Changing exhibitions in the Main Gallery and Spotlight Gallery display the diversity of material in the collections from the historic to the contemporary� Look out for our drop-in sessions designed to give you the opportunity to see and handle a range of material from our collections and archives� You can find out more by visiting our website (www�specialcollections�mmu� ac�uk) or our blog (https://mmuspe- cialcollections�wordpress�com), fol- lowing us on Twitter (@MMUspecial) or signing up for our e-newsletter�

The North West Film Archive

Located in the Central Library in Man- chester, NWFA collections support academic teaching and research across a wide range of disciplines� Cat- alogues of film records are available to search online and researchers may view material by appointment� It is the professionally recog- nised public home for the moving image heritage of the North West of England� Set up in 1977, the Archive preserves moving images made in or about Greater Manchester, Lancashire, Cheshire, Merseyside and Cumbria and offers a variety of services to users in

the public, academic and commercial sectors� The Archive cares for over 50,000 items from the pioneer days of film in the mid 1890s to regional television in the 1960s-80s, and digital productions of the present day� The work of both the professional and the amateur is collected� Complementary collec- tions of photographs, taped interviews and original documentation have also been established� This material relates to the Archive's moving image collection and also to the region's film and cinema industries�

Departmental Programmes

Many departments across the Faculty run a seminar programme throughout the year� Watch out for notices of these� Here are three examples of such pro- grammes�

The Royal Institute of Philosophy: Human Sciences Seminar

Thursdays/Fridays, from 17:00, Geoffrey Manton, GM 3�07

All are welcome to attend the meetings of the Human Sciences Seminar� The seminar series is run by Dr Christopher Thomas (C�Thomas@mmu�ac�uk) from the Department of History, Politics and Philosophy� For details, check the HSS website (www�facebook�com/mmuhss)�

4 Oct

Butler and Sellars: Unlikely bedfel- lows? The metaphilosophical potential of Butler’s critique of feminist identity politics

Dr Paul Giladi

19 Oct

Infinity and immortality

Prof� Adrian Moore

8 Nov

title tbc

Edward Thornton

29

Nov

On ‘Left Spinozism’

Dr Neil Turnbull

17 Jan

Dread and dialectic: Heidegger, Sartre and the interface of freedom and history

Matt Barnard

7 Feb

title tbc

Dr Rob Jackson

28

Feb

title tbc

Prof� Liz de Freitas

21 Mar

title tbc

Ass� Prof� Danielle Petherbridge

History Research Centre Seminar Series

Wednesdays, from 16:15 (seminar) and 17:30 (public lecture), Geoffrey Manton, GM 2�24 (seminar) and GM LT3 (public lecture)

The History Research Centre welcomes you to its seminar series� Tea, coffee and biscuits are served from 16:00; please join the organisers in a local pub af- terwards to continue the discussion� Each public lecture is followed by a wine reception� For further information, please contact Andy Crome (a�crome@mmu� ac�uk) and Craig Griffiths (c�griffiths@mmu�ac�uk)�

3 Oct

Sacrilege,

folly,

and

divine

retribution:

Punitive madness in the post-conquest miracles of Saint Edmund the Martyr at Bury

10 Oct

Is God a white racist? ‘Woking’ gospel music in Britain

Dr Claire Trenery

16:15 GM 2�24

Prof� Robert Beckford

17:30 GM LT3

24 Oct

7 Nov

Donations of children in 8th-century Islamic Egypt

Considering eighteenth-century prophecy as transformative fan fiction

Dr Jennifer Cromwell

16:15 GM 2�24

Dr Andy Crome

16:15 GM 2�24

21 Nov

5 Dec

Fallen is Babylon: Ascetic salvation in the 'Vitae' of redeemed prostitutes

Rosie Jackson

16:15 GM 2�24

The ghetto and antisemitism Prof� Bryan Cheyette

17:30 GM LT3

16 Jan

30 Jan

27 Feb

6 Mar

Influence and skullduggery: A look at the vetting of inquisition officials in 17th-century Spain

A family affair: Shakespeare, Racine and cultural anxiety over the role of the second son in 17th-century Britain and France

Quirks of nature: Lord Berners, his circle, and the queering of the natural world

title tbc

Dr Karl McLaughlin

16:15 GM 2�24

Dr Jonathan Spangler

16:15 GM 2�24

Prof� Laura Doan

17:30 GM LT3

Dr Anna French

16:15 GM 2�24

20 Mar

3 Apr

Reinventing French aid: Displaced persons in French-occupied Germany, 1945-47

Nursing a plague: Care-crafting and the rise of the expert patient in HIV and AIDS care,

1981-96

Dr Laure Humbert

16:15 GM 2�24

Dr Tommy Dickinson

16:15 GM 2�24

The Tuesday Talks series invites leading artists, thinkers and curators to explore the driving forces, influenc- es and sources of inspiration in con- temporary art and its critical and his- torical contexts� Recent speakers have included, Anya Gallacio, John Stezaker, Gilda Williams, Joseph Kosuth, Charles Esche, David Batchelor, Dora Garcia

Tuesday Talks

Tuesdays, from 11:00, The Whitworth

and Sonia Boyce� The talks are pro- grammed by Pavel Büchler and sup- ported by Manchester School of Art�

Details

of

the

forthcoming pro-

gramme can be found on The Whit- worth website� The autumn series starts on 9 Oct and runs until 4 Dec (except 13 Nov)�

Through the HARTS�online News site (news�harts�online) we are keen to feature the best of current digital prac- tices across the Faculty� We would like research students to help us evaluate whether we are managing to do this� The HARTS�online Group (HOG) is an open forum for students and staff to develop more considered ap- proaches to the ‘academic’ Web� It is a forward-looking, student-led initiative seeking to develop strategies for how PAHC might respond to current Infor- mation Communication Technologies�

Research Online

HARTS.online Group: Call for Involvement

If you use – or are interested in how you might use – the web and/or social media in your research, then we would welcome your involvement� Participating in HOG requires no technical expertise or time commit- ment over and above a bi-termly meeting (unless you want it to)� The next HOG meeting is on 23 Oct (16:00–17:00)� RSVP to Lewis Sykes (L�Sykes@mmu�ac�uk), HARTS�online Coordinator, if you would like to attend�

Web-Tech ‘121’ Sessions

Wednesdays, 11:00 and 15:00, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

Lewis Sykes offers training, support and technical advice on: online docu- mentation, working with social media, setting up and structuring practice blogs and online research journals� You can book a one-hour session with him for 11:00 or 15:00 on the sign-up sheet outside room 1�11 in the Righton Building (from 10 Oct)�

Research-Online ’Drop-in’

If you would like to chat with Lewis but can’t make these particular times, arrange an alternative time� He can be found on the first floor of the Righton Building most Wednesdays, 10:00– 17:00 during term times, or drop him an email (L�Sykes@mmu�ac�uk)�

Wednesdays, bi-weekly, 12:15–13:15, Righton Building, 1st floor, Open Space

For

anyone

who

currently

runs

a

practice blog, online research journal or is interested in setting one up, there will be a bi-weekly 'Drop-in’ from

  • 10 Oct 2018 until the end of Spring

term� Bring your laptop and some lunch and find out how other students are

using the web, social media and other Information Communication Technol- ogies to help structure, document and disseminate their research� There is no

fixed agenda – the group will decide how to use the time to best effect� If you would like to attend, drop Lewis an email (L�Sykes@mmu�ac�uk)�

Course: Writing a Research Degree Proposal

PAHC runs an online course on how to write a research degree proposal� You can use this to help you prepare for your RD1 submission or to submit fel- lowship and funding applications� The course enables students to un- derstand the core components of a research degree proposal: what makes

a good research question, how to scope the field and write a literature review, what are appropriate methods

and how to package it all as an excit- ing proposal� Access the course at: collectiveon-

linelearning�harts�online/courses/writ-

ing-a-research-degree-proposal

Make the most of the resources beyond the Faculty by brushing up on your foreign-language skills� Or simply have a refreshing change from your study and meet students from all over Man Met� The Uniwide Languages scheme offers language learning opportuni- ties to all students and staff� Courses run over a year and all four skills are taught (speaking, listening, reading and writing)� Languages can be taken for credits or as an extra� For all stu- dents there are two contact hours of tuition per week, in both term one and term two, with assessments in terms 1, 2 and 3� The fee for Uniwide

Language Learning

Extra 2018-19 is £220; Uniwide Extra students are welcome to take the as- sessment or not as they wish free of charge – if the unit is passed, a certifi- cate of attendance is available� Languages offered are Latin, Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German, English as a Foreign Language, Spanish, and Italian� Levels range from Beginners to Mastery: check individ- ual language levels available on the website or with your tutor when you enrol� Enrolment is face to face or online (if your level is known, e�g� complete beginner) via the link on the website (mmu�ac�uk/uniwide)�

RAH! (Research in Arts and Human- ities) is the public-engagement pro- gramme of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at Man Met� It builds on the enormous success of our ‘Humanities in Public’ (HiP) Festival, which has run since 2013/14� RAH! presents a rolling programme of events, throughout the academic year� The RAH! programme is designed to highlight the Faculty's creative prac- tice and critical analysis as it intersects with and intervenes in cultural move- ments and social justice issues as well as governmental planning and policy- making�

RAH!

The University's research seeks to make a real difference to people’s lives and RAH! is there to shout about it! Working with our partners and diverse communities in Greater Manchester and beyond, RAH! includes public lec- tures and seminars, film screenings, fairs and shows, discussion, show-'n'- tell workshops, artist happenings and augmented reality� Find out about RAH! via the website (www�mmu�ac�uk/rah) and stay in touch through Twitter (@mmu_rah)�

At a Glance

3

Oct

10:00

 

– 17:00

from

DEPART

16:15

PROGR

4

Oct

10:00

 

– 17:00

from

DEPART

17:00

PROGR

9

Oct

from

DEPART

 

11:00

PROGR

10

Oct

10:00

METHO

 

– 12:00

DOLOGY

11:30

– 14:00

15:00

PROF

– 16:30

SERIES

17:00

– 19:00

from

DEPART

17:30

PROGR

all

TALKING

day

ABOUT

11 Oct

all

TALKING

day

ABOUT

16

Oct

from

DEPART

 

11:00

PROGR

17

Oct

10:00

METHO

 

– 12:00

DOLOGY

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

15:00

PROV

– 16:30

THEORY

19

Oct

from

DEPART

 

17:00

PROGR

PAHC induction

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Claire Trenery

Departmental and library inductions Human sciences seminar (p� 21)

Paul Giladi

Tuesday talks (p� 23)

Participatory research (p� 9)

Fatima Khan

PGR research bites and welcome (p� 19) My brilliant research career (p� 14) PGR welcome drinks (p� 19)

Jim Aulich

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Robert Beckford

NWCDTP conference (p� 12)

NWCDTP conference (p� 12)

Tuesday talks (p� 23)

Interviews in social research (p� 9)

Steve Miles

Making the most of your research journey (p� 3)

Steve Miles

Introduction: Theory as practice (p� 7)

Fionna Barber

Human sciences seminar (p� 21)

Adrian Moore

23

Oct

from

DEPART

 

11:00

PROGR

16:00

– 17:00

24

Oct

13:00

CORE

 

– 14:30

SERIES

15:00

PROF

– 16:30

SERIES

from

DEPART

16:15

PROGR

30

Oct

from

DEPART

 

11:00

PROGR

31 Oct

10:00

METHO

– 12:00

DOLOGY

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

15:00

PROV

– 16:30

THEORY

6

Nov

from

DEPART

 

11:00

PROGR

7

Nov

10:00

METHO

 

– 12:00

DOLOGY

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

15:00

PROF

– 16:30

SERIES

from

DEPART

16:15

PROGR

8

Nov

from

DEPART

 

17:00

PROGR

14

Nov

10:00

METHO

 

– 12:00

DOLOGY

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

15:00

PROV

– 16:30

THEORY

Tuesday talks (p� 23)

HARTS�online group meeting (p� 23)

Lewis Sykes

Literature reviews (p� 3)

Ros Oates & Tom McGrath

My brilliant research career (p� 14)

Ola Uduku

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Jennifer Cromwell

Tuesday talks (p� 23)

Incorporating philosophies

Mansour

of social sciences (p� 9)

Pourmehdi

Balancing work and well-

Stephanie

being (p� 4)

Mulholland

Embodiment (p� 7)

Fionna Barber & Esperanza Miyake

Tuesday talks (p� 23)

Feminist methodologies (p� 10)

Susan O’Shea

The research proposal: The RD1 (p� 4)

Steve Miles

My brilliant research career

Michael Symmons

(p� 14)

Roberts

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Andy Crome

Human sciences seminar (p� 21)

Edward Thornton

Creative methodologies (p� 10)

Susan O’Shea

Ethics for postgraduate researchers (p� 4)

John Spencer

Location

(p� 7)

David Cooper, Beccy Kennedy & Sian Bonnell

from

  • 20 Tuesday talks (p� 23)

Nov

DEPART

11:00

PROGR

  • 21 Creative writing as research method (p� 10) Copyright and your research (p� 4) My brilliant research career (p� 14) History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Nov

10:00

– 12:00

METHO

DOLOGY

13:00

– 14:30

CORE

SERIES

15:00

– 16:30

PROF

SERIES

from

16:15

DEPART

PROGR

from

  • 27 Tuesday talks (p� 23)

Nov

DEPART

11:00

PROGR

  • 28 Introduction, provocation and playful activities (p� 11) The digital researcher (p� 4)

Nov

10:00

– 12:00

PLAYFUL

PRACTICE

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

15:00

– 16:30

PROV

THEORY

Reflective discussion and forward planning (p� 8)

  • 29 Human sciences seminar (p� 21)

Nov

17:00

PROGR

from

DEPART

from

  • 4 Tuesday talks (p� 23)

Dec

DEPART

11:00

PROGR

  • 5 Covert research in social research (p� 10)

Dec

10:00

– 12:00

METHO

DOLOGY

13:00

– 14:30

CORE

SERIES

Vivas (p� 4)

Andrew McMillan

Nicola Beck & Louise Koch

Hannah Smithson

Rosie Jackson

Sian Bonnell

Lewis Sykes

Student-led

Neil Turnbull

Dave Calvey

Sam Colling

15:00

– 16:30

from

17:30

12 Dec

10:00

– 12:00

13:00

– 14:30

15:00

– 16:30

PROF

SERIES

DEPART

PROGR

PLAYFUL

PRACTICE

CORE

SERIES

PROV

THEORY

My brilliant research career (p� 14)

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Dawn Archer

Bryan Cheyette

Student-led conclusions (p� 11)

Student and staff forum (p� 4)

Sian Bonnell

Myna Trustram

Time/me mory

(p� 8)

Joanna Hodge, Adi Kuntsman & Gavin Macdonald

17 Dec – 4 Jan

 

Christmas

9 Jan

10:00

WRITING

An introductory writing

Myna Trustram

– 12:00

GROUP

group (p� 15)

13:00

CORE

Come together: Student

Myna Trustram

– 14:30

SERIES

initiatives (p� 5)

15:00

PROF

My brilliant research career

Amanda Ravetz

– 16:30

SERIES

(p� 14)

16

Jan

10:00

WRITING

An introductory writing

Myna Trustram

 

– 12:00

GROUP

13:00

– 14:30

CORE

SERIES

group (p� 15) Beyond Google

Geoff Walton, Sheila Candeland & Elaine Cooke

15:00

PROV

Scholar (p� 5) Discussion group (p� 8)

 

Student-led

– 16:30

THEORY

from

DEPART

History Research Centre

Karl McLaughlin

16:15

PROGR

seminar series (p� 22)

17

Jan

13:00

STAT

Part I: Survey Design (p� 14)

Q-Step Man-

 

– 17:00

ISTICS

chester team

from

DEPART

Human sciences seminar

Matt Barnard

17:00

PROGR

(p� 21)

23

Jan

10:00

WRITING

An introductory writing

Myna Trustram

 

– 12:00

GROUP

group (p� 15)

13:00

CORE

Sage research methods

Sheila Candeland

– 14:30

SERIES

(p� 5)

15:00

METHO

Digital methods (p� 10)

Adi Kuntsman

– 16:00

DOLOGY

17:00

TALKING

What Next? (p� 13)

 

Kate Johnson

– 19:00

ABOUT

24

Jan

12:00

TALKING

Effective public speaking

David Shirley

 

– 13:00

ABOUT

workshop: Part I (pp� 12–13)

13:00

STAT

Part II: Analysing your data

Q-Step Man-

– 17:00

ISTICS

(p� 14)

chester team

30

Jan

10:00

WRITING

An introductory writing

Myna Trustram

 

– 12:00

GROUP

group (p� 15)

13:00

CORE

Academic writing (p� 5)

Myna Trustram

– 14:30

SERIES

 

15:00

– 16:30

from

16:15

6

Feb

10:00

 

– 12:00

13:00

– 14:30

15:00

– 16:30

7

Feb

from

 

17:00

13 Feb

10:00

– 12:00

13:00

– 14:30

15:00

– 16:30

20

Feb

10:00

 

– 12:00

13:00

– 14:30

15:00

– 16:00

27

Feb

10:00

 

– 12:00

13:00

– 14:30

15:00

– 16:30

from

17:30

28

Feb

from

 

17:00

PROV

THEORY

DEPART

PROGR

WRITING

GROUP

CORE

SERIES

PRAC AS

RESEARCH

DEPART

PROGR

WRITING

GROUP

CORE

SERIES

PROV

THEORY

TALKING

ABOUT

CORE

SERIES

METHO

DOLOGY

TALKING

ABOUT

CORE

SERIES

PROV

THEORY

DEPART

PROGR

DEPART

PROGR

Movement: Diaspora/migra- tion/cosmopolitanism (p� 8)

Ola Uduku, Benedicte Brahic & Alison Welsh

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Jonathan Spangler

An introductory writing group (p� 15)

Myna Trustram

How to secure funding during your PhD (p� 5)

Ros Oates & Jessica Purdy

Practice-as-research group (p� 11)

Myna Trustram

Human sciences seminar

Rob Jackson

(p� 21) An introductory writing

Myna Trustram

group (p� 15) Open research (p� 5)

Claire Wilson

Decolonizing research (p� 8)

Sarah Ilott & Muzna Rahman

First-year-student talks (p� 13)

Myna Trustram

Impact and public engage- ment (p� 6)

Helen Darby

Digital methods (p� 10)

Adi Kuntsman

First-year-student talks

Myna Trustram

(p� 13) Research Excellence Framework (p� 6) Student-led session (p� 8)

Steve Miles

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Laura Doan

Human sciences seminar (p� 21)

Liz de Freitas

6 Mar

10:00

– 12:00

TALKING

ABOUT

13:00

– 14:30

CORE

SERIES

First-year-student talks (p� 13) RD2 / Annual review (p� 6)

Myna Trustram

Steve Miles

15:00

– 16:30

PRAC AS

RESEARCH

from

16:15

DEPART

PROGR

Practice-as-research group (p� 11)

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

all

day

TALKING

ABOUT

11th Man Met postgraduate research conference (p� 12)

  • 12 Designing a poster for a conference (p� 13)

Mar

10:00

– 12:00

TALKING

ABOUT

13 Mar

10:00

– 12:00

WRITING

GROUP

13:00

– 14:30

CORE

SERIES

15:00

– 16:30

PROV

THEORY

Writing-with-objects group (p� 15) Multidisciplinary research (p� 6) Fact-based research (p� 8)

  • 20 Writing-with-objects group (p� 15) Publishing in academic journals (p� 6) Digital methods (p� 10)

Mar

10:00

– 12:00

WRITING

GROUP

13:00

– 14:30

CORE

SERIES

15:00

METHO

– 16:00

DOLOGY

from

16:15

DEPART

PROGR

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

  • 21 Human sciences seminar (p� 21)

Mar

17:00

PROGR

from

DEPART

  • 27 Writing-with-objects group (p� 15) Going to conferences (p� 6)

Mar

10:00

– 12:00

WRITING

GROUP

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

Myna Trustram

Anna French

Peter Goodwin

Myna Trustram

Amanda Ravetz & Lucy Burke

Lucy Burke

Myna Trustram

Ros Oates

Adi Kuntsman

Laure Humbert

Danielle

Petherbridge

Myna Trustram

Myna Trustram

15:00

– 16:30

PROV

THEORY

3 Apr

10:00

– 12:00

PRAC AS

RESEARCH

Beyond text

(p� 8)

Rosemary Shirley, Myna Trustram & Hannah Allen

Practice-as-research group (p� 11)

Myna Trustram

 

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

15:00

PROV

– 16:30

THEORY

from

DEPART

16:15

PROGR

4 Apr

12:00

TALKING

– 15:00

ABOUT

8 Apr – 26 Apr

8 May

10:00

WRITING

– 12:00

GROUP

15

May

10:00

WRITING

 

– 12:00

GROUP

17

May

all

TALKING

 

day

ABOUT

22 May

10:00

WRITING

– 12:00

GROUP

19 Jun

13:00

CORE

– 14:30

SERIES

Student and staff forum (p� 6)

Myna Trustram

Student presentations (p� 8)

History Research Centre seminar series (p� 22)

Tommy Dickinson

Effective public speaking workshop: Part II (pp� 12–13)

David Shirley

Easter

A writing group for third- year students (p� 16)

Myna Trustram

A writing group for third- year students (p� 16)

Myna Trustram

PAHC annual symposium (p� 12)

A writing group for third- year students (p� 16)

Myna Trustram

Student and staff forum (p� 6)

Myna Trustram

Cover image: Paul Proctor, ‘Untitled Planes #1’, 2017�

Design: Tilo Reifenstein

Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre

Stay up to date with PAHC: news.harts.online @hartsmanmet

Contact us:

Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre Righton Building Manchester Metropolitan University Cavendish Street Manchester M15 6BG

Head of PAHC:

Prof� Steve Miles

  • 0161 247 1917

s�miles@mmu�ac�uk Research Coordinator:

Dr Myna Trustram

  • 0161 247 1118

m�trustram@mmu�ac�uk