Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 128

DOHNS 

Diploma in Otolaryngology Head and Neck 
Surgery Part 2 Revision Guide 

Editor  
Mr. Benjamin Stew, MBBCh, MRCS, DOHNS 

Authors and Contributors 
Mr. Tobias Moorhouse, MBBCh, BSc, MRCS, DOHNS  
Dr. Rhian Rhys, MBBS, FRCR  
Ms. Lucy Satherley, MBBCh, BSc, MRCS 
Ms. Ellie De Rosa 

Foreword 
Mr. Stuart Quine, BMedSc, BM BS, M Phil, FRCS (ORL‐HNS) 

 
 

Doctors Academy Publications 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         

DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
DOHNS 

Diploma in Otolaryngology Head and Neck 
Surgery Part 2 Revision Guide 

Editor  
Mr. Benjamin Stew, MBBCh, MRCS, DOHNS 
Specialist Registrar in ENT Surgery 
All Wales Higher Surgical Training Programme 
 

Authors and Contributors 
 

Mr. Tobias Moorhouse, MBBCh, BSc, MRCS, DOHNS 
Specialist Registrar in ENT Surgery 
All Wales Higher Surgical Training Programme 
Dr. Rhian Rhys, MBBS, FRCR 
Consultant Radiologist 
Royal Glamorgan Hospital, Llantrisant 
Ms. Lucy Satherley, MBBCh, BSc, MRCS 
Specialist Registrar in General Surgery 
All Wales Higher Surgical Training Programme 
Ms. Ellie De Rosa 
Doctors Academy Illustrators and Artists 
Year 4 Medical Student 
University of Cardiff 

Foreword  
Mr. Stuart Quine, BMedSc, BM BS, M Phil, FRCS (ORL‐HNS) 
Program Director for ENT ‐ All Wales Training Programme 
Consultant ENT & Head and Neck Surgeon 
University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
ii 
DOHNS 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

1st Edition, September 2012, Doctors Academy Publications 
Electronic version   Doctors Academy, PO Box 4283 
published at    :   Cardiff, CF14 8GN, United Kingdom 

Print version printed   Abbey Bookbinding and Print Co., 
and published at   :   Unit 3, Gabalfa Workshops, Clos 
    Menter, Cardiff CF14 3AY 

ISBN   :   978‐93‐80573‐21‐2  

Cover page Design   :   Sreekanth S.S 

Type Setting   :   Lakshmi Sreekanth 

Contact   :  publishing@doctorsacademy.org.uk 

Copyright: This educational material is copyrighted to Doctors Academy publications. Users are 
not allowed to modify, edit or amend any contents of this book. No part of this book should be 
copied or reproduced, electronically or in hard version, or be used for electronic presentation or 
publication without the explicit written permission of Doctors Academy publications. You may 
contact us at: publishing@doctorsacademy.org.uk 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
iii 
DOHNS 
 Preface 

The Diploma of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck surgery (DOHNS) is a qualification sought 
by most trainees with an interest in Ear, Nose and Throat surgery. The part 2 OSCE 
examination takes place at the Royal College of Surgeons and follows on from the part 1 
written examination.  

The original revision guide was written to accompany the Doctors Academy DOHNS 
course started in 2009. The course was developed with an aim to provide details of the 

exam set‐up, improve background knowledge and give candidates the opportunity to hone 

the skills required to pass the exam. This guide has been progressively assembled over 

the years as the course has gained popularity. The intention was, and is, to provide a 

framework around which to base your revision for the part 2 exam. Although we have 
attempted to cover most of the syllabus for the DOHNS part 2 exam, due to the wide range 
of conditions and disorders covered by this speciality, it needs to be acknowledged that 
covering every topic in depth is beyond the scope of this guide. It is hence suggested that 

this guide is used as a complementary resource in conjunction with time honoured ENT 
textbooks .  

It is our hope that this revision guide proves to be an invaluable tool for passing the DOHNS 
OSCE examination. Good luck!  
 

With very best wishes, 

Mr Benjamin Stew 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
iv 
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
DOHNS 
 Foreword 

The DOHNS Part B exam not only tests the clinical application of knowledge but also places   
emphasis on ‘soft skills’ such as information gathering and information giving. The candidate 
sitting the exam can also be expected to be tested on relevant radiology and common            
instruments used in managing patients presenting to the speciality. A successful candidate has 
to demonstrate a logical and precise approach to the OSCE stations in the examination. The 
overall structure of the exam, however, is such that individual components (domains) of the 
candidate’s ability to practice the speciality effectively are tested in addition to the global     
approach to patient management. 

I encourage you to enjoy and benefit from the hard and thoroughly structured frameworks   
offered by these authors. They have to be congratulated on producing this excellent aide     
memoir for the process of tackling the knowledge levels by providing a succinct description of all 
important topics pertinent to the exam. The extremely impressive and vivid illustrations,       
coupled with pertinent radiological images and a detailed instrument gallery, complements the 
text very nicely. The uninitiated will learn, the widely‐read should pass and the broadly but   
selectively experienced reader will derive a perspective from the subject matter.   

One of the challenges faced by junior surgeons is the ability to focus and integrate the           
information gathered to reach a diagnosis while at the same time developing the thought         
process to plan the management. The history taking and communication sections in this book 
are laid out nicely. With time and practice, surgeons develop their own internal patterns for 
recognising and diagnosing conditions. This expertise can only be acquired by personally       
interviewing as many patients as possible whilst being a trainee surgeon and thereafter on   
completion of training. 

This book is highly relevant for trainees preparing for the DOHNS Part B exam conducted by the 
UK Royal Colleges and will provide a framework around which to base the revision. In addition, 
this book should prepare the candidate for exams of a similar nature in other parts of the world. 

It must be borne in mind, however, that the DOHNS examination is not an end in itself but rather 
a beginning. As the trainee progresses through higher surgical training, the importance of clinical 
examination does not diminish and this book will act as a vade mecum well beyond the period of 
preparation for the exam. It is clear, practical and beautifully produced.  
 
I wish it and its authors well. 
 

Best wishes, 
 

Mr Stuart Quine, BMedSc, BM BS, M Phil, FRCS (ORL‐HNS) 
Program Director for ENT ‐ All Wales Training Programme 
Consultant ENT & Head and Neck Surgeon 
University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff  
Honorary Lecturer, Cardiff University 
 
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         

DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
DOHNS 
  Contents 
 

1. The DOHNS Syllabus in relation to Part 2  1 

SECTION ONE:  Common Topics for the DOHNS Part 2 

2. The Ear  7   

3. The Nose  17 

4. The Mouth and Oropharynx  21   

5. The Larynx  25   

6. Other common DOHNS Head and Neck pathology  31 

7. The Thyroid  37 

8. Cranial Nerves  41 

9. Hearing and Balance  47 

10. Imaging  55 

SECTION TWO: Communication Skills for the DOHNS Part 2 

11. Consent  69 

12. Information giving  77 

13. Operation note  81 

14. Discharge summary  83 

15. History taking  85 

16. Breaking bad news  87 

SECTION THREE: Appendicies 

17. Procedures / Examination  91 

18. Instrument gallery  93 

19. Acknowledgements  109 

   

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
vii 
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
DOHNS 
  Abbreviations 
 

AC  :   Air Conduction  


ACP  :   Air Conduction Pressure 
ARS  :   Acute Rhinosinusitis 
BCC  :   Basal Cell Carcinoma 
BC  :   Bone Conduction 
BPPV  :   Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo 
CI  :   Cochlear Implant 
CPD  :   Continuing Professional Development 
CRS  :   Chronic Rhinosinusitis 
CT  :   Computed Tomography 
CSF  :   Cerebrospinal Fluid 
DVLA  :  Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency 
ENT  :  Ear, Nose and Throat 
FDG  :  Fluoro Deoxy Glucose 
FESS  :   Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery 
FNAC  :   Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology 
FOSIT  :   Feeling Of Something In Throat 
GMC  :   General Medical Council 
GORD  :  Gastro‐Oesophageal Reflux Disease 
IAM  :  Internal Auditory Meatus 
ICP  :   Intracranial Pressure 
LMN  :   Lower Motor Neurone 
MEN  :   Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia 
MRI  :   Magnetic Resonance Imaging 
NICE  :  National Institute of Clinical Excellence 
OMU  :   Osteo‐Meatal Unit 
PET  :   Positive Emission Tomography 
PET‐CT  :   Positive Emission Tomography‐Computerised Tomography  
PNS  :   Post‐Nasal Space 
SCM  :  Sterno‐Cleido‐Mastoid 
SPL  :   Sound Pressure Level 
SCC  :   Squamous Cell Carcinoma 
TFT  :   Thyroid Function Test 
TRH  :  Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone 
URTI  :  Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 
USS  :   Ultrasound Scan 
UVB  :  Ultraviolet B 
VZV  :   Varicella Zoster Virus 
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         
viii 
The DOHNS Syllabus in relation to Part 2  DOHNS 
 1. THE DOHNS SYLLABUS IN RELATION TO PART 2: 

The original syllabus document can be found at: 

http://www.intercollegiatemrcs.org.uk/dohns/pdf/syllabus.pdf 

The syllabus is split in to three sections, each with subsections: 

PART ONE: 
 Good medical practice and care in otolaryngology  

 General principles of clinical care  

 The patient‐doctor relationship, including communication and consulting skills  

 Population, preventive and societal issues  

 Professional, ethical and legal obligations  

 Appraisal, monitoring the quality of performance, clinical governance and audit  

 Risk and resource management  

 Information management and technology  

 Understanding the importance of probity  

 Continuing professional development (CPD), learning and teaching. 

PART TWO:  Clinical knowledge 
 Applied Anatomy and Embryology 

 Applied Physiology  

 Applied Microbiology  

 Imaging   

 Pharmaco‐therapeutics  

 Acoustics  

 Applied Pathology  

 Applied Psychology  

 Epidemiology and Statistics  

 Medicolegal Issues  

 Clinical Practice. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         1
DOHNS  The DOHNS Syllabus in relation to Part 2 

PART THREE:  Clinical competencies 

Radiology 
Audiology and Vestibular testing  
Neurology 
Otology 
Rhinology 
Laryngology 
Neck 
Medical Statistics. 

PART ONE: 
The take home message from this part of the syllabus is that they are looking for safe,         
effective and professional doctors.  Themes involving judgement, autonomy, competence and   
consistency all appear frequently.  The patient‐centered holistic approach is praised and    
practitioners are expected to be excellent communicators to both patients and colleagues. 
Legal obligations, societal issues and political sensitivities are included in “keeping up‐to‐date” 
and are given as equal importance as clinical knowledge and understanding. 
Certainly the doctors they are looking for are aware of their own limitations and deal with  
criticism and management issues constructively, they aspire self‐improvement and the       
improvement of the service they provide. 
Nothing that is in this section is not in the GMC, Good Medical Practice publication. Although 
structured in general headings it is recommended that delegates spend time reading through 
this part of the syllabus, but also that they consult the GMC documentation listed. This adds a 
context that will help improve your communication skills during future practice sessions. 
Recommended reading referenced in the syllabus: 
Good Medical Practice (2001), GMC  
Duties of a Doctor (1995), GMC  
Seeking Patient Consent: the Ethical Considerations (1998), GMC  
Research: The Roles and Responsibilities of Doctors (2002), GMC  
Withholding and Withdrawing Life‐Prolonging Treatments: Good Practice in Decision   
Making (2002), GMC . 
Updated versions of these GMC publications are all available online: www.gmc‐uk.org  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         2
The DOHNS Syllabus in relation to Part 2  DOHNS 
PART TWO: Clinical knowledge 

This section provides a framework that delegates can use to structure their learning.  There are 
no specifics as to the depth of knowledge that is required, however it is helpful in framing the 
breadth of knowledge that is required. 

PART THREE: Clinical competencies 

This section is considerably more specific.  It goes in to detail regarding what competencies are 
expected and to what level you are expected to perform each of them.  This level of competence 
generally ranges from: “(1) knows about”, through “(2) able to apply knowledge, to “(3) able to 
perform under supervision” and finally “(4) able to perform independently”.  Common questions 
and scenarios used to assess this section are the operative note and discharge summary       
questions, the clinical examination stations, radiology interpretation stations and the instrument 
recognition questions.  Topics that have come up in previous DOHNS Part 2 exams are: 

Initial assessment and management of airway problems 

Initial management of foreign bodies in ENT 

Plain films of the neck and chest. 

CT scans of the sinuses, petrous bone, neck, chest and brain 

Contrast radiology of swallowing 

Examination of the ear – auriscope 

Myringotomy and grommet insertion (operative note) 

Examination of the nose and sinuses– anterior rhinoscopy 

Flexible nasendoscopy and examination of the postnasal space 

Adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy (operative note) 

Examination of the neck. 

For further details regarding the level of competency required please consult the syllabus     
directly. 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         3
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         4
DOHNS 

SECTION ONE: 
Common Topics for DOHNS Part 2 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         5
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         6
The Ear  DOHNS 
2. THE EAR 

How to draw a normal tympanic membrane? 
Rules to follow: 

1. The tympanic membrane is ovoid. 
2. The lateral process of the malleus points in the direction of the side (i.e., it points to the 
left for the left ear), this denotes anterior. 
3. The umbo of the malleus points downward to the opposite side. 
4. The long process of the incus is seen on this side.  
5.  Label left and right. 

A.  Pars Flaccida 
B.  Posterior Mallear Ligament 
C.  Long process of Incus 
D.  Pars Tensa 
E.  Annulus 
F.  Cone of light 
G.  Umbo of Malleus 
H.  Handle of Malleus 
I.  Anterior Mallear Ligament 
J.  Lateral process of Malleus 

Left tympanic membrane 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         7
DOHNS  The Ear 
Normal Ear 

Antihelix  Fossa triangularis 

Helix 
Conchal bowl 
Tragus 

Lobule 

PERICHONDRITIS 
 
Definition 
Skin and soft tissue infection of the pinna, commonly due to 
pseudomonas aeruginosa. 
Symptoms 
Painful, red ear. 
Signs 
Thickened, swollen, erythematous pinna. 
Management 
a) Intravenous antibiotics. 
b) Analgesics and Antipyretics.  Figure 2.1: Perichondritis of right pinna 

OTITIS EXTERNA 
Definition 
Inflammatory and infective process of the external auditory   
canal, commonly with pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or  
staphylococcus aureus. 
Symptoms 
Otalgia, otorrhoea, aural fullness, pruritis, hearing loss. 
Signs 
Pain on distraction of the pinna, external auditory canal 
erythema and oedema, otorrhoea, lymphadenopathy, cellulitis.
Figure 2.2: Note ‐ inflamed EAM commonly 
found in otitis externa 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         8
The Ear  DOHNS 
Management 
a) Aural toilet. 
b) Otic drops – antiseptic, acidifying or antibiotic with or without steroid. 
c) ± Aural packing. 
d) Analgesics. 

HERPES ZOSTER OTICUS / RAMSEY HUNT SYNDROME 
Definition 
A syndrome of acute peripheral facial nerve palsy associated with otalgia and varicella‐like  
cutaneous lesions. Involvement may extend to cranial nerves V, IX and X, and cervical branches 
that have anastamotic communications with the facial nerve. 
Symptoms 
Facial weakness, facial pain, otalgia, hearing loss,  
vertigo. 
Signs 
Vesicular rash involving skin of the external ear, ear 
canal ± soft palate (can also include the face). 
Management 

a) Oral glucocorticoids. 
Figure 2.3: Vesicular rash typical of VZV infection 
b) Oral antivirals. 
c) Analgesics. 
d) Eye care. 
e) Topical emollients. 

OTITIS MEDIA WITH EFFUSION/GLUE EAR 
Definition 

Persistence of a serous or mucoid middle ear effusion for three months or more due to         
overproduction of mucus or impaired clearance. 

Symptoms 

Asymptomatic, hearing loss, recurrent infections, delayed speech and language development, 
behavioural problems, otalgia, tinnitus and balance impairment. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         9
DOHNS  The Ear 

Signs 

Dull, grey/yellow tympanic membrane with reduced 
mobility, an air‐fluid level or small bubbles within the  
middle ear effusion may be seen. 
‐ Tympanometry; flat, type‐B tympanogram. 
‐ Pure tone audiometry; of >25dB conductive hearing  
loss. 
Management 
a) Conservative – “Watch and wait”. 
Figure 2.4: Middle ear effusion, note air 
b) Hearing aid. 
bubble superiorly 
c) Grommet insertion with/without adenoidectomy. 
Reference: NICE guidelines ‘Surgical management of glue ear in children 2008’ 

ACUTE OTITIS MEDIA 

a) Nonsuppurative acute otitis media – inflammation of the middle ear cleft mucosa without the 
formation of an effusion or with a sterile effusion. 

b) Suppurative acute otitis media – inflammation of the middle ear cleft with suppuration. In 
most cases it presents following a viral upper respiratory tract infection, which leads to          
disruption of eustachian tube function and a middle ear effusion. Subsequent bacterial          
colonisation with Streptococcus pneumoniae (40%), Haemophilus influenzae (25‐30%) and 
Moraxella catarrhalis (10‐20%) occurs. 

Symptoms 

Otalgia, pyrexia, hearing loss, otorrhoea. 

Signs 

Thickened hyperaemic tympanic membrane with or  
without spontaneous rupture. 

Management 

a) Conservative – “Watch and wait”. 
b) Oral antibiotics such as amoxicillin or co‐amoxiclav. 
c) Adjuvant therapy such as analgesics and antipyretics. 
d) Myringotomy if medical measures fail. 
Figure 2.5: Otitis Media 
Reference: NICE guidelines ‘Antibiotic prescribing for 
respiratory tract infections’ 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         10
The Ear  DOHNS 
MASTOIDITIS 

Definition 
Infection of the mastoid air cells as a complication of an 
acute otitis media. 
Symptoms 
Pain and tenderness over the mastoid process, fever. 
Signs 
Oedema and erythema of the postauricular soft tissues 
with antero‐inferior displacement of the pinna.        
Thickened, hyperaemic tympanic membrane and 
posterior sagging of the canal wall. 
Figure 2.6: Mastoiditis; pinna is 
Management 
 distracted anteroinferiorly 
a) Intravenous antibiotics such as co‐amoxiclav or   
cefuroxime and metronidazole. 
b) CT scan. 
c) Cortical mastoidectomy with myringotomy and grommet insertion if evidence of           
subperiosteal abscess or if symptoms do not improve with 24‐48hours of intravenous     
antibiotics. 
d) Adjuvant therapy such as analgesics and antipyretics. 

CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA 

Definition 
Persistent or intermittent infected discharge through a non‐intact tympanic membrane 
(perforation or tympanostomy tube). 
Symptoms 
Otorrhoea (mucopurulent or blood‐stained), hearing 
loss. 
Signs 
Discharge within external auditory canal, which on 
microsuction may reveal oedematous middle ear 
mucosa visualised through tympanic membrane   
perforation. 
Management 
Figure 2.7: Large, discharging Pars Tensa 
a) Aural toilet.  perforation 
b) Topical +/‐ oral antibiotics.

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         11
DOHNS  The Ear 

CHOLESTEATOMA 

Definition 

Destructive and expanding keratinising squamous cell 
cyst. 

Acquired 

a) Primary acquired cholesteatoma – forms as a result 
of tympanic membrane retraction. 
b) Secondary acquired cholesteatoma – forms as a   
result of either disordered squamous epithelium      
migration or implantation of squamous epithelium into 
the middle ear cavity during surgery. 
Figure 2.8: Attic cholesteatoma  
Congenital 

Results from an abnormal focus of squamous epithelium in the middle ear cavity without 
 tympanic membrane perforation and without a history of ear infection. 

Symptoms 

Recurrent or persistent purulent and foul‐smelling otorrhoea, hearing loss, rarely pain, vertigo 
or dysequilibrium. 

Signs 

a) Primary acquired ‐ tympanic membrane retraction containing a matrix of squamous. 
epithelium, polyps, granulation tissue, ossicular erosion. 
b) Secondary acquired – keratin is usually visible through the perforation or through the  
tympanic membrane if of sufficient size. 
c) Congenital – occasionally visible behind an intact and normal‐looking tympanic  membrane. 

Management 

a) Imaging – High resolution CT or Diffusion weighted MRI. 
b) Audiometry – usually showing a conductive hearing loss. 
c) Nonsurgical measures include regular aural toilet, keeping the ear dry and preventing further 
contamination through use of ototopical agents. 
d) Surgical measures aiming to create a dry and safe ear including mastoidectomy or combined 
approach tympanoplasty. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         12
The Ear  DOHNS 

OSTEOMAS & EXOSTOSES OF THE EXTERNAL AUDITORY CANAL 

Definition 

Benign osseous neoplasms formed by reactive bone 
formation secondary to cold water exposure. 

Symptoms 

Usually asymptomatic but may cause cerumen     
impaction or otitis externa. 

Signs 

May lead to a conductive hearing loss. 

Management 

a) Most require no surgical intervention. 
Figure 2.9: Exostoses of external auditory 
b) Treat any infection.  canal  
c) ± Meatoplasty. 

OTOSCLEROSIS 

Definition 

Is a primary localised disease of the bony otic capsule. It is characterised by abnormal     
removal of mature bone of the otic capsule by osteoclasts, and replacement with woven 
bone of greater thickness, cellularity and vascularity. There is often a positive family history. 

Symptoms 

Slowly progressive unilateral or bilateral hearing impairment, with onset in early adult life. 
Hearing classically worsens during pregnancy or oestrogen therapy. 

Signs 

Normal otoscopic examination or positive Schwartze sign. 
‐ Pure tone audiometry; conductive hearing loss. 
‐ Tympanometry; type‐As tympanogram. 

Management 
a) High resolution CT scan. 
b) Conservative. 
c) Medical treatments – sodium fluoride or bisphosphonates. 
d) Surgical – Stapedotomy or Stapedectomy. 
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         13
DOHNS

ABNORMALITIES OF THE PINNA

Congenital

a) – auricular requiring auricular reconstruc on.


b) Protruding ears/Bat ears – increased distance from the helical rim to the mastoid is thought
to be due to a lack fold or prominent conchal bowl. The deformity commonly requires
otoplasty.
c) External auditory canal atresia – failure of canalisa on of the epithelial plug por n of the
first branchial cle . This deformity results in a hearing loss and may be associated
with concomitant ossicular

Acquired

a) Auricular haematoma – accumula n of blood in the subperichondral space secondary to


blunt trauma. This barrier for diffusion, between the ge and the perichondrium, leads to
necrosis and predisposes to infec Treatment involves evacua on of the haematoma and
to prevent reacculmula .

Figure 2.10a: Large pinna haematoma Figure 2.10b: Post-opera ve image er evacua on
of haematoma and sialas c splin ng

b) Auricular lacer s – expedi repair and preven on of infe n are essen al with or
without debridement.

NEOPLASMS OF THE EXTERNAL EAR

a) Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) – represent 45% of auricular carcinomas. UVB radia n has been
iden fied as a major carcinogen. Lesion appears nodular and ulcerated and typically occurs on
the posterior surface of the pinna and preauricular areas. May be treated with topical 5-
fluorouracil or surgical excision.

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Ed n. Doctors Academy Public ns 14
The Ear  DOHNS 

b) Squamous cell carcinoma  (SCC) – represent 20% of 
auricular carcinomas. Lesions appear as plaques or    
ulcerations typically over the helix and preauricular   
areas. Treatment is with surgical excision but              
radiatiotherapy may be indicated for unresectable     
lesions. 
c) Melanoma – 1% of all melanomas will occur on the 
auricle. Present as painless lesions over the helix which 
change in size, ulcerate and bleed. Metastatic evaluation 
is paramount. Treatment is with surgical excision but 
may include adjuvant radiotherapy. 
Figure 2.11: SCC of helix of right pinna 
 

TEMPORAL BONE FRACTURES 

General considerations 

Temporal bone fractures represent roughly 20% of all skull fractures. Blunt trauma to the  
lateral surface of the skull often results in longitudinal fractures (80%). A blow to the occipital 
skull may result in a transverse fracture pattern (20%). The otic capsule is spared in             
longitudinal fractures but damaged in transverse fractures. 

Symptoms 

Hearing loss, nausea, vomiting, vertigo. 

Signs 

Battle sign (postauricular ecchymosis), “Racoon” sign (periorbital ecchymosis), external       
auditory canal laceration, haemotympanum and bloody otorrhoea. Facial nerve paralysis   
occurs in 50% of transverse fractures and 25% of longitudinal fractures. 

Management 

a) Conductive hearing loss – largely conservative (Haemotympanum resolves) ± myringoplasty 
if persistent perforation. 
b) Facial nerve paralysis – largely conservative ± facial nerve exploration and decompression. 
c) CSF leak – consultation with neurosurgeon. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         15
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         16
The Nose  DOHNS 
3. THE NOSE 

Superior concha 
Orbit 

Ethmoidal air cells  Superior meatus 

Middle concha 
Nasal septum  Middle meatus 

Inferior concha 
Inferior meatus 

RHINOSINUSITIS & NASAL POLYPOSIS 

Definition/Diagnosis 
Inflammation of the nose and the paranasal sinuses  
characterised by two or more symptoms; 
‐ one of which should be either nasal congestion or nasal 
discharge (anterior/posterior nasal drip) 
‐ with/without facial pain/pressure 
‐ with/without reduction or loss of smell 
and/either 
‐ Endoscopic signs of polyps or mucopurulent discharge 
and/either 
‐ CT scan showing mucosal changes within the          Figure 3.1: Nasal polyp in left middle meatus 
osteomeatal unit and/or sinuses (Lund‐Mackay score) 
Acute (ARS) < 12 weeks with complete resolution of symptoms. 
Chronic (CRS) > 12 weeks without complete resolution of symptoms. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         17
DOHNS  The Nose 

Management 
a) Consider endoscopy. 
b) Consider imaging. 
c) Consider cultures. 
d) Consider Oral/Intravenous antibiotics (long‐term macrolides for CRS). 
e) Topical steroids. 
f) Nasal douches. 
g) Consider FESS. 
Reference: European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (2007) 

ANTROCHOANAL NASAL POLYPS 
Definition/Diagnosis 
Benign lesions arising from the mucosa of the maxillary sinus that grow into the nasal cavity and 
reach the choana. ACPs are usually unilateral and 
appear in younger patients. 
 

Signs and symptoms 
Nasal obstruction. 
Management 
a) Nasal endoscopy. 
b) CT and/or MRI. 
c) Surgery is the indicated treatment for ACP, with 
endoscopic resection the most recommended.   Figure 3.2: Antrochoanal nasal polyp  
 

NASAL TRAUMA 

Background 
Nasal fracture is considered the most common of head and neck fractures. Significant functional 
and aesthetic impairment may result if these injuries are not accurately diagnosed and addressed 
in a timely fashion. 

Complications 
Epistaxis: The initial oedema and epistaxis of nasal trauma usually resolve without intervention, 
however, persistent epistaxis may require tamponade with nasal packing or rarely identification 
and coagulation or ligation of the bleeding vessels. 

CSF leak: Usually caused by a significant mechanism of injury and requires consideration with 
Neurosurgeon.
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         18
The Nose  DOHNS 
Septal haematoma: Results from bleeding within the subperichondrial plane of the septum. 
This collection of blood leaves the cartilage devoid of its blood supply, which is followed by 
necrosis and perforation. Treatment involves urgent incision and drainage of the         
haematoma and splinting. Antibiotic prophylaxis is required. 

Saddle deformity:  Loss of structural support following a septal haematoma leads to septal 
collapse and a characteristic saddle nose deformity of the nasal dorsum and retraction of the 
collumella. 

Cosmetic deformity: External physical deformities include the creation of a dorsal hump, 
lateral deviation of the dorsum and tip, a widened nasal base and depression and splaying of 
the nasal tip. Complex septal deformities may also result including septal spurs, angular  
deflections, and complex alterations on nasal symmetry. 

NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA 

Background 

There two distinct types – 
a) Undifferentiated non‐keratinising squamous cell carcinoma, which is more common in 
people from Southern China and Hong Kong, and is associated with Epstein‐Barr virus     
infection. 
b) Differentiated keratinising squamous cell carcinoma, which has similar at risk groups as 
other head and neck cancers. 
Signs & Symptoms 

Epistaxis, nasal obstruction, middle ear effusion, cranial nerve palsies. 

Investigations 

a) Cytology – biopsy. 
b) Imaging – CT and/or MRI. 
Management 

Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy ± Neck dissection. 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         19
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         20
The Mouth and Oropharynx  DOHNS 
4. THE MOUTH AND OROPHARYNX 

Uvula 
Palate 
Palatopharyngeus 
Palatine tonsil 
Palatoglossus 

TONSILLITIS 

Definition 
Infection of the tonsils commonly with β  
haemolytic streptococcus, pneumococcus and  
haemophilus influenzae. 
Symptoms 
Sore throat, difficulty swallowing, fever, malaise,  
halitosis. 
Signs 
Erythematous, swollen tonsils with exudates.  
Management 
a) Analgesia. 
b) Antipyretics. 
c) Oral/intravenous antibiotics.  Figure 4.1: Exudate on tonsil 
d) Intravenous fluids. 
e) Antiseptic mouthwash. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         21
DOHNS  The Mouth and Oropharynx 

QUINSY 

Definition 
Peritonsillar abscess lying in the potential space between 
the tonsillar capsule and the surrounding pharyngeal muscle 
bed. 
Symptoms 
Sore throat, difficulty swallowing, ‘hot potato’ voice, fever, 
malaise, otalgia. 
Signs 
Trismus, deviated uvula, peritonsillar collection. 
Management 
a) Abscess drainage. 
b) Intravenous antibiotics. 
Figure 4.2 Right sided quinsy 
c) Intravenous steroids. 
d) Analgesia. 
e) Antipyretics. 
f) Intravenous fluids. 
g) Antiseptic mouthwash. 

GLANDULAR FEVER (INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS) 
Definition 

Epstein‐Barr virus infection. 

Symptoms 

Sore throat, fevers, malaise, lethargy. 

Signs 

Cervical lymphadenopathy, dull/grey tonsils, white slough on tonsils, petechial haemorrhages on 
the palate, hepatosplenomegaly. 
Management 

a) Analgesia. 
b) Steroids. 
c) Intravenous fluids. 
d) ± Oral antibiotics. 
E) Advice regarding contact sports. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         22
The Mouth and Oropharynx  DOHNS 
ORAL CAVITY MALIGNANCY 

Background 
The most common malignancy found in the mouth is squamous cell carcinoma. Risk factors 
include smoking, drinking alcohol and betel nut chewing. 
Signs & Symptoms 
Persistent, non‐healing ulcer on the lateral     
border of the tongue, floor of mouth or gum, 
leukoplakia, erythroplakia.  
Investigations 
a) Cytology – biopsy. 
b) Imaging – CT ± MRI ± USS. 
Management 
Figure 4.3: Lesion on Left ventral aspect of 
Surgery and/or chemoradiotherapy. 
tongue 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         23
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         24
The Larynx  DOHNS 
5. THE LARYNX 

Pre‐epiglottic space 

Tongue 
Vallecula 

Median  
glosso‐epiglottic fold 
 Supraglottis 
Epiglottis   Ventricle 

  Aryepiglottic fold 
Pyriform sinus 
False cord  Subglottis 

True cord 

Cricoid cartilage 

Arytenoid cartilages 

Epiglottis 

False vocal cord 
Aryepiglottic fold 
True vocal cord 
Glottis (tracheal  Cuneiform 
wall visible)  cartilage 
Corniculate 
cartilage 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         25
DOHNS  The Larynx 

How to draw the superior view of the larynx as seen on  
Flexible Nasendoscopy 
Rules to follow: 

1.  Always label left and right. 
2.  Start with the vocal folds and work outwards. 
3.  Keep it as simple as possible. 

Left  Right  

Figure 5.1: Line diagram of normal larynx and surrounding structures  

A.  Epiglottis 
B.  Anterior Commisure 
C.  Ventricle 
D.  Vestibular fold (false cord) 
E.  Vocal fold (true cord) 
F.  Piriform fossa 
G.  Arytenoid cartilage 
H.  Rima glottidis 
I.  Aryepiglottic fold 
J.  Vallecula 
K.  Tongue base. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         26
The Larynx  DOHNS 
INNERVATION OF THE VOCAL CORDS 

Arises from Vagus nerve (CNX) 
Superior Laryngeal Nerve 
Two terminal branches: 
Internal Laryngeal Nerve (sensory/autonomic): Supplies mucous membrane of            
supraglottis and superior aspect of vocal folds 
External Laryngeal (Motor): Supplies Cricothyroid muscle. 

Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve 
Sensory function:  Supplies mucous membrane of inferior aspect of vocal folds and       
subglottis 
Motor function: All intrinsic muscles of the larynx except for Cricothyroid. 
 

Figure 5.2: Function of muscles supplied by Recurrent Laryngeal nerves 

  Light Blue: Thyroid cartilage 
  Dark Blue: Aretynoid cartilage 
  Yellow: Cricoid cartilage 
  Orange: Vocal ligament 
  Red: Muscle 
NB: Cricothyroid function: stretches and tenses vocal fold by rocking thyroid cartilage back and forth on cricoid 
cartilage 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         27
DOHNS  The Larynx 

VOCAL CORD DISEASE 

Background 

The larynx plays a pivotal role in airway protection, respiration and phonation. Laryngeal     
disease usually presents with dysphonia and a thorough head and neck examination is required 
to exclude malignancy. Onset, duration and progression of any voice changes are key parts of 
the history. 

BENIGN 

Vocal cord nodules (Figure 5.3) 

Usually affect children or individuals who use their voices        
professionally. Bilateral pale lesions are  seen at the junction 
of the anterior one‐third and posterior two thirds of the vocal 
cords. 

Vocal cord polyps 
Associated with smoking and vocal cord abuse. Commonly 
seen as unilateral pedunculated lesions at the junction of the 
Figure 5.3 
anterior and middle thirds of the vocal cords. 

Vocal cord granulomas 
Are commonly associated with endotracheal intubation and 
gastroesophageal reflux. Lesions are usually unilateral and are 
related to perichondritis of the underlying arytenoid cartilage. 

Reinkes oedema (Figure 5.4) 
Strongly associated with smoking and heavy voice use.       
Patients present with diffuse oedematous changes of both 
vocal cords.  Figure 5.4 

Intracordal cyst 
May be simple mucus retention cysts or epidermoid cysts containing keratin. Usually seen as 
unilateral lesions within the middle third of the cord, associated with an area of hyperkeratosis 
on the opposite cord.  
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         28
The Larynx  DOHNS 
Saccular cysts 
May be congenital or acquired. They occur as a result of obstruction to the mucus secreting glands 
within the laryngeal saccule. Examination reveals expansion of the aryepiglottic fold by the cyst 
within it, which may extend into the neck through the thyrohyoid membrane. 

Laryngocele 
Is an abnormal expansion of the laryngeal ventricle, which may be confined by the thyroid cartilage 
or extend through the cricothyroid membrane into the neck. They are associated with raised 
intralaryngeal pressure such as trumpet playing but may also occur secondary to a malignancy. 

Laryngeal papillomatosis 
Exophytic warty lesions of the true and false cords. Benign condition but associated with significant 
morbidity and mortality. Caused by human papilloma virus, subtypes 6 and 11. The aim of  treatment 
is remove symptomatic lesions as HPV cannot be eradicated from the larynx. 

MALIGNANT 

Background 

The vast majority of laryngeal malignancy is squamous cell 
carcinoma and is associated with smoking and drinking 
alcohol. Male to female ratio is 4:1 but the relative 
percentage of women is on the rise. 

Signs & Symptoms 

Hoarseness, dysphagia, haemoptysis, neck lump, pain,     Figure 5.5 
aspiration and airway compromise. 

Investigations 

a) Cytology – biopsy. 
b) Imaging – CT ± MRI ± PET ± USS. 

Management 

Surgery and/or Radiotherapy with or without 
Chemotherapy  

Treatment planning is best delivered through a 
multidisciplinary tumour team format because of the 
complex and multifaceted nature of the disease. 
Figure 5.6 
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         29
DOHNS  The Larynx 

VOCAL CORD PALSY 

Definition 
Loss of active movement of the “true” vocal cord, or vocal fold, secondary to disruption of 
the motor innervation of the larynx. Disruption can occur along any length of the recurrent 
laryngeal nerve and the vagi and may include damage to the motor nuclei of the vagus. This 
should be differentiated from fixation of the vocal cord secondary to direct infiltration of the 
vocal fold, larynx or laryngeal muscles. 
Aetiology 
Neoplastic, iatrogenic, idiopathic, traumatic, neurological. 
Signs & Symptoms 
Dysphonia, cough, haemoptysis, dyspnoea. 
Management 
a) Conservative. 
b) Injection laryngoplasty. 
c) Sialastic implants. 
d) Tracheostomy. 

LARYNGOMALACIA 

Definition 
It is a common condition of infancy where 
the soft immature cartilage of the upper 
larynx collapses inward during inhalation, 
causing airway obstruction.  
Signs and symptoms 
‘Squeaking’ stridor on inspiration, feeding 
difficulties. 
Management 
a) Conservative in the majority. 
b) Surgery – aryepiglottopexy/
aryepiglottoplasty. 
Figure 5.7 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         30
Other common DOHNS Head and Neck pathology  DOHNS 
6. OTHER COMMON DOHNS HEAD AND NECK PATHOLOGY 

EPIGLOTTITIS 

Definition 
Potentially life‐threatening inflammation of the epiglottis and/or supraglottic tissues that 
affects adults and children. It is now rare in children as a result of the haemophilus influenza 
B vaccination. 
Symptoms 
Difficulty swallowing, drooling, dysphonia, fever. 
Signs   
Pooling of saliva, gross supraglottic swelling. 
Management 
a) Stay calm & call for senior help. 
b) Do not attempt to examine the patient. 
c) Oxygen/Heliox. 
d) Adrenaline nebulisers. 
e) Steroids. 
f) Antibiotics. 
g) May require intubation or tracheostomy. 

BRANCHIAL CYST 

Definition 
Arise from the failure of the pharyngobranchial ducts to obliterate during fetal development. 
Another possibility is that they arise from elements of squamous epithelium within lymphoid 
tissue (ectopic epithelial cells). They most frequently present in late childhood or early 
adulthood, when the cysts become infected – usually after an URTI. 
Signs & Symptoms 
Usually asymptomatic and found on the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle 
at the junction of the upper third and lower two‐thirds. They may become painful and    
tender when infected. 
Management 
a) Control any infection. 
b) Incision and drainage avoided as a general rule. 
c) Definitive surgical excision. 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         31
DOHNS  Other common DOHNS Head and Neck pathology 

THYROGLOSSAL CYST 

Definition 
Midline cyst that occurs as a result of failure of the thyroglossal duct to obliterate during       
development. 
Signs & Symptoms 
Midline or para‐median swelling that rises with tongue protrusion. 
Management 
a) Control any infection. 
b) Ensure normal thyroid function. 
c) Sistrunk procedure. 

SALIVARY GLAND DISEASE 

Background 
Most clinically significant diseases of the salivary glands involve the parotid and submandibular 
glands. Eighty percent of primary salivary gland tumours occur in the parotid gland and 80% of 
these are benign. 

BENIGN 

Acute viral inflammatory disease 
Occurs most commonly in children aged 4‐6 with an incubation period of 14‐21 days where it is 
most contagious. Patients’ present with acute bilateral swelling of the parotid glands              
accompanied by pain, erythema, tenderness, malaise, fever and occasional trismus. 
Acute suppurative sialadenitis 
Occurs in the elderly with chronic medical conditions and postoperative patients. Risk factors 
include dehydration and immunosuppresion. Patients present with acute swelling of the salivary 
glands and fever. 
Chronic granulomatous siladenitis 
Chronic unilateral or bilateral salivary gland swelling with minimal pain. Differential diagnoses 
should include Cat‐scratch disease, Sarcoidosis, Actinomycosis and Wegener’s granulomatosis. 
Sialolithiasis 
Patients present with acute, painful swelling of the salivary gland, which is aggravated by eating. 
A stone may be palpated in the floor of the mouth. Treatment options include a ‘watch and wait’ 
policy, intra‐oral radiological extraction or salivary gland excision. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         32
Other common DOHNS Head and Neck pathology  DOHNS 
Sjogren syndrome 
Salivary gland swelling with dryness of the mouth and eyes. More commonly seen in               
postmenopausal women and often associated with other connective tissue disease. Diagnosis is 
confirmed by detection of autoantibodies SS‐A and SS‐B and salivary gland biopsy. It is a slowly 
progressive disease with a high risk for development of malignant lymphoma. 
Pleomorphic adenoma 
Present as isolated swellings with little associated pain and no known aetiological factors. They 
are benign mixed tumours histologically and treatment is complete surgical excision. 
Warthin’s tumour 
Also known as papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum and are almost exclusively found in the 
parotid gland. Histologically characterised by papillary structures composed of double layers of 
granular eosinophilic cells, cystic changes and mature lymphocytic infiltration. Treatment is  
complete surgical excision. 

MALIGNANT 

Malignant salivary gland disease has not been attributed to any specific carcinogenic factors. 
Twenty percent of parotid neoplasms, 50% of submandibular neopplasms and 70% of sublingual 
neoplasms are malignant. Patients usually present with an incidentally noted mass, however, 
pain, facial palsy and cervical adenopathy may be present. Histological types include 
mucoepidermoid   carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, acinic cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, 
squamous cell carcinoma, lymphoma and malignant mixed tumours. Treatment options include 
surgical excision with or without neck dissection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Optimal 
management of these patients is discussed at a multidisciplinary team meeting. 

PHARYNGEAL POUCH 

Definition 
Posteromedial pulsion diverticulum 
through Killian’s dehiscence. The 
herniation is between 
thyropharyngeus and cricopharyngeus 
muscles, both part of the inferior 
constrictor muscle of the pharynx. 
Symptoms 
Dysphagia, regurgitation, cough, 
weight loss. 
Signs 
Halitosis, gurgling on palpation of the neck.  Figure 6.1 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         33
DOHNS  Other common DOHNS Head and Neck pathology 

Management 
a) Conservative. 
b) Endoscopic stapling (Dohlmans procedure). 
c) Cricopharyngeal myotomy. 
d) Diverticulectomy. 

BELL’S PALSY  
Definition 
Idiopathic lower‐motor neurone facial palsy. 
Symptoms 
Unilateral facial weakness affecting all five divisions of the facial nerve, hypoaesthesia, occasional 
fever, malaise and rhinorrhoea and rarely facial or retroauricular pain. 
Signs 
Facial weakness, inability to close eye in severe cases. 

Figure 6.2: Right‐sided facial palsy. Obvious asymmetry at rest and inability to close the affected right eye  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         34
Other common DOHNS Head and Neck pathology  DOHNS 
Management 
a) Ensure other causes of a LMN facial palsy have been excluded. 
b) Oral glucocorticoids. 
c) Eye care with ointment and artificial tears. 
c) Watch and wait with follow up as required. 

Grade and 
Characteristics 
Description 

I Normal  Symmetrical facial function normal in all areas. 

Gross: Slight weakness noticeable. Normal symmetry at rest. 
Dynamic: 
II Mild  
Forehead: moderate to good function. 
dysfunction 
Eye: complete closure with minimal effort. 
Mouth: slight asymmetry. 

Gross: Obvious but not disfiguring difference between the two sides.  
Noticeable but not severe synkinesis and spasms. Normal symmetry and 
tone at rest. 
III Moderate 
Dynamic: 
dysfunction 
Forehead: slight to moderate movement. 
Eye: complete closure with effort. 
Mouth: slightly weak during maximum effort. 

Gross: Obvious weakness and severe asymmetry. Normal symmetry and 
tone at rest. 
IV Moderately 
Dynamic: 
severe  
Forehead – no movement. 
dysfunction 
Eye – Incomplete closure. 
Mouth – asymmetric during maximum effort. 
Gross: barely perceptible motion. Asymmetry at rest. 
Dynamic: 
V Severe  
Forehead – no movement. 
Paralysis 
Eye – incomplete closure. 
Mouth ‐ slight movement. 

VI Total Paralysis  No movement. 

Table.6.1: House‐Brackmann scale 

*Reference: House JW and Brackmann DE. Facial nerve grading system. Otolaryngol. Head Neck 
Surg., 1985: 93, 146–147. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         35
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         36
The Thyroid   DOHNS 
7. THE THYROID  

HISTOLOGY 
   
 
Colloid 
 
 
Follicular cells 
 
 
  Follicle 
 
 
 
Follicles 
The thyroid gland is made up of follicles which selectively absorb iodide ions from the blood 
for the production of thyroid hormones. Twenty five percent of all the body’s iodide ions are 
in the thyroid gland. Within the follicles, colloid acts as a reservoir of materials for thyroid 
hormone production. Colloid is rich in thyroglobulin. 
Follicular cells (thyroid epithelial cells) 
Thyroid follicles are surrounded by follicular cells, which secrete T3 and T4.  
Parafollicular (C) cells 
Dispersed among follicular cells and between the follicles are the parafollicular cells which 
secrete calcitonin. 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         37
DOHNS  The Thyroid  

Hyperthyroidism  Hypothyroidism 
Irritability  Mental slowness 
Heat intolerance  Cold intolerance 
Insomnia  Hypersomnolence 
Sweatiness  Dry skin 
Weight loss  Weight gain 
Diarrhoea  Constipation 
Palpitations / Atrial Fibrillation  Bradycardia 
Hyper‐reflexia, tremor  Slow‐relaxing reflexes 
Amenorrhoea  Menorrhagia 
Table 7.1: Classic symptoms and signs of thyroid dysfunction 

T3/T4  TSH 
Primary Hyperthyroidism  Raised  Reduced 
Secondary Hyperthyroidism  Raised  Raised 
Subclinical Hypothyroidism  Normal  Raised 
Primary Hypothyroidism  Reduced  Raised 
Secondary Hypothyroidism  Reduced  Reduced 
Tertiary Hypothyroidism  Reduced*  Reduced* 

Table 7.2: Blood results (* check TRH; dysfunction at level of hypothalamus) 

HYPERTHYROIDISM 
Graves disease 
Autoimmune hyperthyroid condition, where antibodies mimic the effect of TSH. Particular 
eye signs include lid lag, exophthalmos, ophthalmoplegia, lid retraction, proptosis and 
chemosis. Treatment options include hormonal manipulation with carbimazole or surgery. 

Toxic thyroid adenoma 
Benign tumour of the thyroid gland classified according to its cellular architecture. Thyroid 
adenomas may be clinically silent or in this case produce excessive thyroid hormone. Most 
patients are managed by watchful waiting but some may undergo surgical excision. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         38
The Thyroid   DOHNS 

Toxic multinodular goitre 
A form of hyperthyroidism characterised by functionally autonomous nodules that emerges 
insidiously from non‐toxic multinodular goitre.  

HYPOTHYROIDISM 
Hypothyroidism tends to be classified according to the indicated organ dysfunction.  
Primary 
Automimmune disease (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis) and radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism 
are commonest forms of primary hypothyroidism, where the thyroid gland itself is responsible 
for the inadequate production of thyroid hormones. 
Secondary 
A dysfunctional pituitary gland and subsequent lack of thyroid‐stimulating hormone is usually a 
consequence of tumour, radiation or surgery. 
Tertiary 
Insufficient thyrotropin‐releasing hormone (TRH) from the hypothalamus. 

THYROID NEOPLASIA 
Background 
Thyroid tumours may arise from either the follicular cells or the supporting cells found in the 
normal gland. 

Papillary adenocarcinoma 

Usually affects adults aged 40‐50 years old with multiple tumours within the gland. Ninety 
percent of patients will survive 10 years if the disease is limited to the gland. Treatment 
involves near‐total thyroidectomy with or without post‐operative radio‐iodine ablation. After 
surgery patients require lifelong thyroid replacement. 

Follicular adenocarcinoma 

Usually affects adults aged 50‐60 years old with a well defined capsule enclosing the tumour. 
Hence, tumour spread is via the bloodstream and up to 30% of patients will have distant     
metastases at presentation. Treatment is as for papillary adenocarcinoma. 

Anaplastic adenocarcinoma 

Usually affects adults over 70 years of age and is more common in women. Patients present 
with rapid painful enlargement of the thyroid gland, commonly with airway, voice or           
swallowing problems. The prognosis is very poor with over 90% of patients dying within one 
year even with treatment. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         39
DOHNS  The Thyroid  

SUPPORTING CELL TUMOURS 

Medullary carcinoma 
Arises from parafollicular C cells, which secrete calcitonin. Neck metastases are present in 
30% patients. Treatment involves near‐total thyroidectomy and radiotherapy. When it    
coexists with tumours of the parathyroid gland and medullary component of the adrenal 
glands it is called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 (MEN2). 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         40
Cranial Nerves    DOHNS 
8. CRANIAL NERVES   

CN:  Name  Sensory/Motor  Foramina 

I  Olfactory  Sensory  Cribriform plate   

II  Optic  Sensory  Optic canal 

III  Oculomotor  Motor  Superior orbital fissure 

IV  Trochlear  Motor  Superior orbital fissure 


V1: Sensory  V1: Superior orbital fissure 

V  Trigeminal  V2: Sensory  V2: Foramen rotundum 

V3: Both  V3: Foramen ovale 
VI  Abducens  Motor  Superior orbital fissure 

VII  Facial  Both  Internal acoustic meatus 

VIII  Vestibulocochlear    Sensory  Internal acoustic meatus 

IX  Glossopharyngeal    Both  Jugular foramen 

X  Vagus  Both    Jugular foramen 

XI  Accessory  Motor  Jugular foramen (sp) 

XII  Hypoglossal  Motor  Hypoglossal canal 

Table 8.1 

CNI: OLFACTORY  

Olfactory receptor neurons with fibres extending to olfactory bulb through cribriform plate 
of ethmoid bone. Stimulation of olfactory receptors allows us to smell. Be sure to test each 
nostril with an odorous substance (not ammonia!). 
Signs of CNI lesion: 
Lesions may be due to blunt head trauma, meningitis or frontal lobe lesions 
Lesion to CNI causes reduced sense of smell but does not affect ability to sense pain 
from nasal epithelium (since this is carried in CNV). 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         41
DOHNS  Cranial Nerves   

CNII: OPTIC   

The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system. It travels via optic canal to the chiasm 
where there is partial decussation of fibres from nasal visual fields. Most axons terminate in 
the lateral geniculate nucleus and information is relayed to the visual cortex in the occipital 
lobe. 
Signs of CNII lesion: 
The site of nerve injury determines the visual field defect 
Injury to the optic nerve causes ipsilateral field loss 
Injury at the level of the chiasma causes a bitemporal hemianopia 
Injury at the level of the visual cortex causes homonymous hemianopia 
Lesions may be due to glaucoma, optic neuritis, trauma, compression by pituitary    
tumour or CVA. 

CNIII: OCULOMOTOR  
The occulomotor nerve arises from the midbrain and runs along the cavernous sinus where 
it divides into two branches which enter the orbit through superior orbital fissure. It controls 
eye movement, pupil constriction and opening of the eyelid. 
Signs of CNIII lesion: 
Fixed dilated pupil which does not accommodate 
Ptosis 
Deviation of eye down and out. 
 Causes of injury include trauma, demyelinating disease, increased ICP (causes    
herniation and compression), microvascular disease and cavernous sinus disease  

CNIV: TROCHLEAR 
 

The trochlear nerve emerges from the dorsal brainstem, passes through the cavernous sinus 
and superior orbital fissure and innervates the superior oblique muscle (causes depression 
and intorsion of eye). Lesions of nucleus affect the contralateral eye. 
Symptoms of injury: 
Vertical diplopia due to eye drifting up – difficulty reading/going down stairs, patient 
may tilt head down 
Torsional diplopia – patient may tilt the head to the opposite side 
 Causes of lesions include head injury, increased ICP, infection, demyelination, 
neuropathy, congenital defect, infarction and haemorrhage. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         42
Cranial Nerves    DOHNS 
 

CNV: TRIGEMINAL 
 

Supplies sensation of face and mouth as well as the motor supply to the muscles of          
mastication. 
Three branches: Ophthalmic (sensory), maxillary (sensory) and mandibular (mixed). 
Branches of V1 (passes through superior orbital fissure): 
Frontal nerve 
Nasociliary nerve 
Lacrimal nerve 
Branches of V2 (passes through foramen rotundum): 
Superior alveolar nerves 
Facial branches 
Nasal branches 
Branches of V3 (passes through foramen ovale): 
Meningeal branches 
Buccal nerve 
Auriculotemporal nerve 
Lingual nerve 
Inferior alveolar nerve 
Motor branches of CNV Distributed in V3: 
Supplies muscles of mastication, tensor veli palatini, mylohyoid, anterior belly of digastric 
and tensor tympani. 
Signs of injury: 
Reduced sensation over affected area 
Weakness of jaw clenching and side‐to‐side movement 
Injury to peripheral part of V3 causes deviation of jaw to the paralysed side. 

CNVI: ABDUCENS 
The abducens nerve controls the lateral rectus muscle, which abducts the eye. The nerve 
runs from brainstem through cavernous sinus into orbit through superior orbital fissure and 
is vulnerable to injury due to its length. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         43
DOHNS  Cranial Nerves   

Signs of injury: 
Diplopia, worse in lateral gaze 

Inability to abduct the eye 

 Causes of injury include compression, infarction, demyelination, infection and  
diabetic neuropathy. 

CNVII: FACIAL 

The facial nerve controls the muscles of facial expression, stapedius, stylohyoid, posterior 
belly of digastric and taste to anterior 2/3 of tongue. Parasympathetic fibres supply 
submandibular and sublingual glands, lacrimal glands and secretory glands of nasal and 
palatine mucosa. The motor portion originates in facial nerve nucleus in pons, whereas the 
sensory portion arises from nervus intermedius. The facial nerve enters petrous temporal 
bone into IAM, runs through facial canal (gives off the chorda tympani), emerges though 
stylomastoid foramen, passes through the parotid gland (but does NOT supply it). 
Divides into five major branches: 
Temporal 
Zygomatic 
Buccal 
Marginal mandibular 
Cervical. 
Other branches include: 
Branches of CNVII in IAM 
Greater petrosal nerve 
Parasympathetic supply to lacrimal gland, sinuses and nasal cavity 
Sensory fibres to palate 
Nerve to stapedius 
Chorda tympani  
Parasympathetic supply to submandibular gland and sublingual gland 
Special sensory taste fibres to anterior 2/3 tongue. 

CNVIII: VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR 

The vestibulocochlear nerve transmits sound and balance information. 
Signs of damage: 
Unilateral sensorineural deafness 
Tinnitus 
Vertigo. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         44
Cranial Nerves    DOHNS 
 

 Causes of injury include loud noise, Pagets disease, Menieres disease, Herpes zoster,     
neurofibroma, acoustic neuroma, brainstem CVA, aminoglycosides. 
Acoustic neuroma (Vestibular schwannoma) 
Benign primary intracranial tumour of myelin forming cells of CNVIII. It may occur sporadically or 
as part of von Recklinhausen neurofibromatosis. Symptoms occur due to compression of       
surrounding structures such as CN V, VII, IX and X. Patients present with ipsilateral sensorineural 
hearing loss, disturbed balance, vertigo and tinnitus. 
Investigations: MRI with contrast, audiology and vestibular tests 
Treatment: Conservative, surgical, radiotherapy 

CNIX: GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL 

The glossopharyngeal nerve supplies motor innervation to stylopharyngeus alone (elevates  
pharynx), parasympathetic innervation to otic ganglion and thus parotid and sensory innervation 
to upper pharynx, tonsils, posterior 1/3 tongue, external ear and internal part of TM. 
 Special sensory supply (for taste) to posterior 1/3 tongue 
 Visceral sensory supply to carotid body and sinus 
 Major branches  
Tympanic 
Carotid  
Phayngeal 
Muscular 
Tonsillar 
Lingual. 

CNX: VAGUS 
Most notably the vagus nerve supplies the larynx via the recurrent and superior laryngeal 
nerves. It also gives off an auricular branch (Alderman’s nerve) which may cause a cough reflex 
when examining the external auditory canal. 

CNXI: ACCESSORY 
Motor supply to sternocleidomastoid and trapezius. Courses through posterior triangle of     
neck – may be damaged in neck surgery. 
Signs of injury: 
Wasting and weakness of SCM and trapezius. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         45
DOHNS  Cranial Nerves   

CNXII: Hypoglossal 
Supplies motor fibres to all muscles of the tongue expect palatoglossus. 
Tested by asking the patient to protrude their tongue – tongue points towards affected side 
Signs of injury: 
Signs of LMN disease include as atrophy and fasciculation. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         46
Hearing and balance   DOHNS 
9. HEARING AND BALANCE  

AUDIOMETRY 

The audiogram is a graph of a person’s hearing ability and is a standard way of representing a 
person’s hearing. The typical range of frequencies tested does not cover the entire range of 
human hearing (20‐20,000Hz), instead it includes frequencies considered to be essential in 
understanding speech (250‐8,000Hz). The assessment involves pure tones being presented to 
the ‘test‐ear’ at a specific frequency (pitch) and intensity (loudness). 

Thresholds can be obtained using air conduction (AC) or bone conduction (BC). The comparison 
of AC thresholds and BC thresholds provides an initial differentiation between conductive, mixed 
and sensorineural involvement. Sensorineural hearing loss is characterised by equivalent air and 
bone conduction ie air‐bone gaps of less than 10dB. Conductive hearing loss is characterised by 
BC thresholds within normal limits, with a concurrent gap between the poorer AC and better BC 
thresholds of at least 10dB. A mixed hearing loss contains air‐bone gaps with the bone 
conduction thresholds outside of the normal range. 

MASKING 

To ensure the auditory function of each ear is measured independently, masking is used. 

Rules of masking: 

1. Air conduction audiometry – mask if the difference between the right and left air conduction 
thresholds is 40dB or more. 
2. Bone conduction audiometry – mask where bone conduction threshold is better than air 
conduction by 10dB or more. 
3. Air conduction audiometry – mask where bone conduction of the better ear is 40dB or more 
better than air conduction threshold of the worse ear. 
Masking is required for BC testing whenever there is any difference in the AC and BC thresholds, 
since there is essentially no interaural attenuation by bone conduction. 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         47
DOHNS  Hearing and balance  

Figure 9.1: Definitions of hearing loss 

Example audiograms 

Figure 9.2: Sensorineural hearing loss (mild to moderate) 

Figure 9.3: Conductive hearing loss 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         48
Hearing and balance   DOHNS 

 
Figure 9.4: Mixed hearing loss 

Pure tone average = average over 0.5, 1, 2, 4kHz 

SYMBOLS 
Right  Left 
Air conduction  O    X 
‐ with masking  ∆  □ 
Bone conduction  <     >  
‐ with masking  [  ] 
No response     
 

HEARING AIDS 
A hearing aid is    
electroacoustic    Ear mould 
apparatus, which 
typically fits in or 
behind the ear, and is  Connecting tube 
designed to 
modulate sound for 
the wearer. There  Microphone 
are many types of  Battery 
hearing aid and  Volume control 
On/Off 
they vary in power, 
size and circuitry.

Figure 9.5: Hearing aids 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         49
DOHNS  Hearing and balance  

Scala vestibuli 
Reissners membrane 
Scala Media  

Organ of Corti  

Scala tympani 

Basillar membrane 

Figure 9.6: Histology of the cochlea 

Figure 9.7: BAHA abutment seen 2 weeks post‐op 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         50
Hearing and balance   DOHNS 
COCHLEAR IMPLANTS 
 

A cochlear implant (CI) is a surgically implanted        
electronic device that provides a sense of sound to a 
person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard of  
hearing. An absence or disturbance of cochlear hair 
cells causes most cases of deafness. This defect in 
normal cochlear function represents a broken link in 
the     delicate chain that constitutes the human sense 
of hearing. CI provide an artificial means to bypass this 
disrupted link and thereby allow the transmission of 
acoustic information through the central auditory   
pathway via direct electrical stimulation of auditory 
nerve fibres. Most deaf individuals maintain an        
adequate surplus of viable auditory nerve fibres to                                                                           
permit this intervention. Candidacy for cochlear        Figure 9.8: Cochlear implant probe 
implantation relies heavily upon the audiologic    
evaluation but other considerations and strict criteria exist including lack of medical        
contraindication.  

TYMPANOMETRY 
This examination is used to measure the transmission of energy through the middle ear 
(acoustic impedence). It is based on the amount of sound reflected back from the tympanic 
membrane when an 85‐B sound pressure level (SPL), low frequency (226Hz) probe tone is 
introduced into the sealed ear canal and pressure in the ear canal is varied. When the      
pressure in the ear canal corresponds with the pressure in the middle ear cavity, the       
tympanic membrane is at its most compliant point and thus absorbs, rather than reflects, 
the most sound. 

Classification of tympanograms 
Type A – normal tympanic membrane mobility and normal middle ear pressure. 
Type As – Reduced tympanic membrane mobility and normal middle ear pressure,           
consistent with stiff middle ear system eg; otosclerosis. 
Type Ad – Hypermobile tympanic membrane with normal middle ear pressure, consistent 
with flaccid tympanic membrane or disarticulation of ossicular chain. 
Type B – Reduced tympanic membrane mobility, consistent with presence of fluid in middle 
ear space. 
Type C – Normal tympanic membrane mobility and negative middle ear pressure, consistent 
with Eustachian tube dysfunction.
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         51
DOHNS  Hearing and balance  

Compliance (ml) 

Compliance (ml) 
Compliance (ml) 

Compliance (ml) 
Compliance (ml) 

Figure 9.9: The various types of tympanogram 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         52
Hearing and balance   DOHNS 
BALANCE 
Balance requires the integration of several body systems working together, including the 
eyes, ears and limbs. Balance disorders can occur whenever there is a disruption in any of 
the vestibular, visual, proprioceptive or cognitive systems. Symptoms may be due to a wide 
range of pathologies such as hypotension and brain tumours. There are many terms often 
used to describe dizziness including vertigo, dysequilibrium and pre‐syncope.                    
Otolaryngologists are primarily interested vestibular disorders such as benign paroxysmal 
positional vertigo (BPPV), labyrinthitis and Menieres disease. 

BPPV  

Vertigo usually lasts only for seconds. Brief and intense sensation of spinning that occurs 
because of a specific change in the head position. The cause of BPPV is the presence of nor‐
mal but misplaced otoconia within the inner ear. Treatment involves moving these otoconia 
through various exercises such as the Epley manoeuvre. 

Figure 9.10: The various stages of the Epley manoeuvre 

MENIERE’S DISEASE 

Vertigo lasts minutes to hours. Inner ear fluid balance disorder that causes lasting episodes 
of vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus and the sensation of fullness in the ear. Dietary 
changes may be helpful including reducing salt, alcohol and caffeine intake. Stress has been 
shown to exacerbate symptoms. Medications such as Betahistine and Furosemide have been 
shown to reduce the frequency of symptoms. Surgical treatment options include grommet 
insertion, vestibular neuronectomy and labyrinthectomy. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         53
DOHNS  Hearing and balance  

LABYRINTHITIS 

Vertigo lasts days. Inner ear infection or inflammation causing vertigo and hearing loss. 
Treatment involves vestibular rehabilitation. 

VESTIBULAR NEURONITIS 

Vertigo usually lasts for days. Viral vestibular nerve infection causing vertigo but no 
deafness. Treatment involves vestibular rehabilitation. 

Superior 
Cochlea 
Semicircular canals 

Ampulla 

Posterior 
Ampulla 

Lateral 

Ampulla  Scala tympani 

Figure 9.11: Labyrinth

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         54
Imaging    DOHNS 
10. IMAGING  
The DOHNS candidate will not be expected to discuss images in detail during the OSCE    
examination or comment on the pros and cons of certain imaging modalities. They will,      
however, be required to identify common conditions based on a selection of images and to   
describe the key diagnostic points.  

The role of radiology in ENT has developed greatly over the past few decades. It must be 
appreciated that the radiologist has a key role at multidisciplinary team meetings.  High 
quality imaging allows the extent and stage of disease to be demonstrated to all team   
members and this has contributed significantly to confident management advice and      
appropriate consenting of the patient. 

IMAGING MODALITIES 

I. X‐ray 

X–rays are indicated in selected circumstances. Please see illustrations below. 
 

Q: Identify and label the parts 
 
Answers: 
1 Mandible. 
2 Hyoid. 
3 Thyroid cartilage. 
4 Cricoid cartilage. 
5 Epiglottis. 
6. Valeculla. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         55
DOHNS  Imaging  

Larynx 

Identify the chicken bone 

This 43–year‐old lady presents with a 
mass in the left side of her neck. 
 
Q: What is the investigation? 
A: Cervical Spine X‐ray AP
 

Q: What is the abnormality seen? 
A: Left Cervical rib

II. Computerised tomography (CT):  
CT images are essentially density maps of the human body utilising fairly high diagnostic radiation 
doses. CT is good at demonstrating bone detail and this remains its major strength. Modern CT  
technology means scanners are incredibly fast requiring just a few seconds of exposure to acquire a  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         56
Imaging    DOHNS 
volume of data from which high spatial resolution images in all planes can be reconstructed.  

Examples of where CT is used in ENT 

1. Rhinosinusitis. 
2. Head and Neck malignancy. 
3. Temporal bone. 
4. Abscesses. 
Q: What is this investigation? 
A: CT sinuses demonstrating the 
OMU
Q: Name the arrowed air passages 
Answers:  
1. Ostium. 
2. Infundibulum. 
3. Middle meatus. 
4. Hiatus semilunaris. 
Q: What is the name of this unit? 
A: Osteomeatal unit 

Q: Which sinuses drain into this 
unit?

A: Maxillary, Anterior Ethmoids, 
Frontal sinuses 

Q: What is the investigation? 
A: CT neck at the level of the 
thyroid cartilage
Q: What does it demonstrate 
(blue arrows)? 
A: Large supraglottic tumour, 
crossing the midline. Bilateral 
cervical lymphadenopathy 
(asterisk) 
Q: Where do the yellow arrows 
point to? 
Answers:  
1. Sternomastoid. 
2. Thyroid cartilage. 
3. Internal jugular vein. 
4. Cervical vertebra. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         57
DOHNS  Imaging  

Q: What is the investigation? 
A: CT Sinuses, coronal and axial slices 
Q: What is the abnormality shown in asterisks? 
A: Antrochonal polyp – seen  filling the maxillary sinus and the nostril on the coronal image, 
and filling the post nasal space on the axial image 
Q: Where do the arrows point to? 
1  Cribriform plate. 
2  Optic nerve. 
3  Unerupted molar tooth. 

Q: What is the investigation? 
A: CT neck 
Q: What is the abnormality? (blue 
arrows and asterisks)  
A: Tumour base of tongue crossing 
the midline, bilateral necrotic  
cervical lymphadenopathy 
1.  Sternomastoid. 
2.  Mandible (ramus). 
3.  Spinal cord. 
4.  Internal jugular vein. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         58
Imaging    DOHNS 

Q: What is the investigation? 
A: CT petrous temporal bones 
Q: What do the numbers and 
circle correspond to? 
Answers:  
1. Internal acoustic meatus. 
2. Cerebellum. 
Circle ‐ cochlea. 

Q: What is the investigation? 
A: CT petrous temporal bone 
Q: What do the numbers and 
circle correspond to? 
Answers:  
1. Handle of the malleus. 
2. Round window. 
3. Mastoid air cells. 
Circle ‐ cochlea.

Q: What is the investigation? 
A: CT petrous bones 

Q: What do the numbers and 
circle correspond to? 

Answers:  
1. Bodies of malleus and incus. 
2. Internal acoustic meatus. 
3. Sphenoid sinus. 
Circle – lateral semicircular 
canal and vestibule. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         59
DOHNS  Imaging  

Q: What is this investigation? 
A: CT petrous temporal bones 

Q: What do the numbers and circle  
correspond to? 
1. Bodies of malleus and incus. 
2. Internal acoustic meatus. 
3. Mastoid air cells. 
Circle – lateral semicircular canal and 
vestibule. 

  Q: What is this investigation? 
  A: CT brain and orbits, with contrast 
  Q: What abnormalities are   
  demonstrated? 
  Right proptosis,  
  Right periorbital cellulitis 
  Right ethmoid sinusitis 
  Right subperiosteal abscess 
  Q: Name 2 intracranial complications: 
  1.Subdural empyema. 
  2.Venous thrombosis. 
  3.Osteomyelitis. 

 
CT orbits and brain pre and post contrast report. 
Clinical details:  Fits, confusion.  Right proptosis. 
“There is a severe right proptosis with extensive preseptal cellulitis extending up to the forehead and across 
the nasal bridge.   
In addition there is a large subperiosteal abscess extending along the medial wall of the right orbit to the 
orbital apex.  There is no radiological evidence of extension through the superior orbital fissure into the 
cavernous sinus, the cavernous sinus es are patent bilaterally.  
Soft tissue fills the frontal sinuses bilaterally and the right ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. 
The post contrast scans demonstrate increased gyral enhancement with slight effacement of the sulci in 
keeping with an evolving cerebritis, there is no convincing evidence of a subdural collection, however a small 
shallow isodense subdural collection is difficult to exclude. 
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         60
Imaging    DOHNS 
The deep venous sinuses are patent, the petrous bones are normally aerated. 
There is a lipoma of the splenium of the corpus callosum.” 

Conclusion 

 Right orbital cellulitis with large subperiosteal abscess 
 Right cerebritis with raised intracranial pressure 
 Urgent neurosurgical opinion advised 
 Results discussed directly with paediatric team.  

Q: What is this investigation? 
A: CT neck sagittal image 

Q: Blue asterisk demonstrates a      
tumour – where is it located? 

A: Base of tongue and valeculla 
Q: What do the numbers  
correspond to? 
Answers:  
1.Hyoid. 
2.Thyroid cartilage. 
3.Cricoid cartilage. 
4. Hard palate. 

Q; What is this investigation? 
A: CT petrous bones 
Q: Where is the abnormality (blue   
asterisk) 
A: Middle ear 
Q: Name some differential diagnoses? 
Answers:  
Glomus tympanicum. 
Small cholesteotoma. 
Q: What do numbers correspond to?  
1. Cochlea (basal turn).  
2. Mastoid air cells. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         61
DOHNS  Imaging  

III. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) 
MR images reflect tissue biochemistry and are particularly influenced by the presence of protons 
within the tissues. T1 weighted images carry a great deal of spatial resolution with excellent 
depiction of detailed anatomy. T2 weighted images are better at highlighting abnormal tissues. 
The STIR sequence retains this positive attribute of a T2 weighted image and suppresses all fat 
signal leaving all abnormal tissue and tissue with a high water content as high signal. Scan times 
compared to CT are much longer varying from around 2 to 5 minutes per sequence with scans 
sometimes taking 40 minutes in total during which the patient must be kept still. 

Examples of where MRI is used in ENT: 

1. Acoustic neuroma. 
2. Head and Neck malignancy. 
3. Vertigo. 

Q: What is this investigation? 
A: MRI Internal Auditory Meati 
Q: What is the abnormality? (blue     
arrows) 
A very large vestibular schwannoma   
bulging into the cerebellum, compressing 
the fourth ventricle. 

Q: Where do the yellow arrows point to? 
Answers:  
1. Cerebellum. 
2. Pons. 
3. Temporal lobe. 

Q: What is this investigation? 

A: MRI IAMs T1 with contrast axial. 
Q: What is the abnormality? (asterisk) 
A: An enhancing intracanicular vestibular 
schwannoma. 
Q: What do the numbers corresponds 
to? 
1. Pons. 
2. Cerebellum. 
3. Fourth ventricle. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         62
Imaging    DOHNS 

Q: What is this investigation? 

A: MRI IAMs T1 with contrast coronal 
Q: What is the abnormality? (blue 
asterisk) 
A: An enhancing intracanicular     
vestibular schwannoma 

Q: What do the numbers              
corresponds to? 
1. Pons. 
2. Temporal lobe. 
3. Odontoid peg. 
4. Lateral ventricle. 

What is this investigation? 
MRI  neck  (coronal T1 image) 
What is the abnormality? (Blue    
asterisk) 
Tumour left lateral tongue, not    
crossing the midline. 
Q: What do the numbers corresponds 
to? 
1.  Mylohyoid muscle. 
2.  Inferior turbinate. 
3.  Maxillary sinus. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         63
DOHNS  Imaging  

IV. Ultrasound (USS) 
USS in experienced hands provides useful and rapid imaging assessment of patients with an 
undiagnosed neck lump. As well as providing imaging information on neck masses USS can be 
used to guide fine needle aspiration (FNA). USS is particularly useful in delineation of thyroid 
pathology, cervical lymphadenopathy and evaluating salivary gland tumours. 

Examples of where USS is used in ENT 

1. Metastatic cervical lymphadenopathy. 
2. Paediatric neck lumps. 
3. Thyroid pathology. 
4. Salivary gland disease 
 

Q: What is this investigation? 

A: Ultrasound of the parotid gland 
Q: What is the measured lesion most likely to be?  

A: Pleomorphic adenoma 

V. Positive Emission Tomography‐Computerised Tomography fusion scan (PET‐CT) 
PET images are maps reflecting levels of glucose metabolism within tissues. A short half‐life  
isotope 16 fluoro deoxy glucose (FDG) is injected intravenously. The PET scanner detects gamma 
rays caused by interaction of positrons emitted by the isotope with electrons within the tissues. 
Modern scanners incorporate a CT scanner which co registers the activity with its exact 
anatomical location. PET‐CT will detect the clinically occult primary in approximately one third of 
cases. It is also  valuable in the assessment of suspected recurrence of head and neck cancer.  

 Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         64
Imaging    DOHNS 
VI. Contrast swallow 
 Routine barium swallows can be useful in demonstrating oesophageal function and pathology including reflux, 
pharyngeal pouches, malignant and benign strictures. Water‐soluble contrast swallow are useful when there is a 
perceived risk of aspiration. 

Q: What is this investigation?  
A: Barium swallow 
 
Q: What does it show? 
A: Pharyngeal pouch 
 
Q: What symptoms might the patient have? 
A: Regurgitation of food, nocturnal cough 
 
Q: Where does the arrow point to? 
A: Oesophagus 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         65
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         66
DOHNS 

SECTION TWO: 
Communication skills for DOHNS Part 2 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         67
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         68
Consent  DOHNS 
11. CONSENT 

TOP TIP 

Spend some time asking about the patient’s knowledge of the procedure, as this may well 
be the key point of the station.  Maybe ask if he knows anyone who has had the  
procedure. 

This station assesses your ability to obtain an informed consent for an invasive procedure.  
It requires you to have a clear and structured approach, and have some understanding of 
the procedure. 

You are the ST2 trainee with an ENT firm. You have been asked to consent Mr Campbell 
for a submandibular gland excision.  

Station set up: 

Mr. Campbell will be a simulated patient 
What you need to cover 
Recap clinical history 
Establish reason for procedure 
Explore patient’s ideas, concerns and expectations 
Explain procedure, benefits and complications 
Check patient understanding of information 
Give an estimate of duration of hospital stay 
Allow patient the opportunity to ask questions. 
 

Hidden Agendas 

Patients who are due to have an interventional procedure tend to be nervous for a number 
of reasons, including misconceptions about the procedure. It is therefore essential that the 
doctor obtaining consent from a patient establishes their ideas, concerns and expectations 
before the procedure. It is during the consenting process that any problems or issues 
should be identified and addressed.  Mr. Campbell will probably have a few issues... 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         69
DOHNS  Consent 

How to approach this station: 

Introduce yourself, confirm the patient’s identity and obtain consent for the consultation. 
Recap the clinical history. Focus on: 
Does the patient know why they are in hospital? 
What has happened in the lead up to procedure (what symptoms the patient has 
experienced, etc.)? 
What does the patisent know about the procedure already? 
 

Provide appropriate information regarding the procedure i.e. what will occur (talk Mr. 
Campbell through step‐by‐step from arriving on the ward to going home afterwards). 
Explain the risks and the benefits of the procedure. 

TOP TIP 

This station is not about demonstrating your knowledge of the fine details of how to 
perform the procedure. Instead the station is focused on determining whether the 
patient has any reservations and adverse ideas, which would disrupt the success or the 
outcome of the procedure. However, in a station like this it is beneficial to know and 
provide some pertinent statistics regarding the procedure.  

You must also remember that a patient with capacity has the right to refuse treatment!  

Explore his main concerns. 
 What does the patient expect? 

 Does the patient understand/retain the information about the procedure? 

If the patient is happy to proceed: 
 Complete the consent form ‐ providing patient has capacity. 

If the patient refuses: 
 Explore the reasons behind this 

 Does the patient have capacity? 

 Respect patient’s autonomy. 

The facts: 
GMC guidelines on obtaining consent are summarised below.  You must demonstrate your 
knowledge of these guidelines throughout this station, and structure the station around 
them. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         70
Consent  DOHNS 
Key points to tell a patient undergoing key ENT procedures are considered below. (Adapted 
from GMC guidelines: Seeking patients’ consent: the ethical considerations). 
Obtaining informed consent:  

‐ Who can obtain consent? 
Ideally the doctor discussing a procedure and obtaining consent from a patient should be 
the person who will perform the procedure.  This is because they will best know how and 
why the procedure is performed and any risks. It may not always be possible for this to take 
place, however, so a suitably trained and qualified delegate may be appointed with the task.  
This person (often a junior doctor) must understand and relay information about the 
proposed procedure or treatment, and risks involved. 

‐ When should consent be obtained? 
It is good practice to give the patient time to consider their procedure and therefore, except 
in emergency situations, obtaining consent should be done well in advance of the operation 
date. This allows the patient time to reflect on their options, weigh up the risks and benefits 
and ask for further questions if they wish.  It is generally considered undesirable to consent 
on the day of the procedure, although this is common practice.  It is felt this places undue 
pressure on the patient to consent.   
An ideal scenario for elective procedures would be to discuss the operation in clinic a week 
or more prior to admission, providing the patient with written information to take home, 
and contact details if they have further questions.  On the day of the procedure a formal 
written consent should be obtained, if the patient is prepared to proceed. 

‐What information to provide? 
“Patients have a right to information about their condition and the treatment options 
available to them”. GMC guidelines highlight that the amount of information given to each 
patient will vary, according to factors including: 
The nature of the condition and its severity. 
The complexity of the treatment/procedure. 
The risks of the treatment. 
The patient’s wishes (how much they want to know). 
The information the patient ought to know (and which therefore the practitioner obtaining 
consent should provide) includes: 
Details of diagnosis and prognosis (including what will happen if the condition goes 
untreated) 
Treatment options (including the option of not treating) 
The purpose of the proposed treatment (i.e., the benefits of treating) 
Details of the proposed treatment, including: 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         71
DOHNS  Consent 

 Preparation for the procedure 

 What the patient may experience during and after treatment 

 Subsidiary treatments, such as pain relief, that may be necessary 

 How the procedure might affect their lifestyle 

 Risks of the procedure, including common and serious side effects 

 Who will perform the procedure (and if trainees will be involved). 

Other considerations: 
It is also necessary to remind patients that they have the right to change their mind and 
withdraw consent at any time if they wish. 
If the patient has questions about the procedure, you must answer them fully and        
honestly. If you don’t know the answer you should find out for them. 
You cannot withhold information about the treatment because you feel it may upset the 
patient, or cause them to refuse treatment. 
You must provide information to the patient in a sensitive manner, and in ways in which 
they can understand. If the information is very complex, you should consider breaking the 
information into more accessible sections. 

Benefits/risks of key ENT procedures:  
Below are listed the main benefits/risks of ENT procedures commonly examined in      
communication stations. It is a good idea to read about these procedures prior to your 
DOHNS examination to gain further information about the indications for the procedure, 
the technical aspects, the pre‐operative tests and post‐operative issues that may be    
encountered as well as the important things the patient needs to know about the recovery 
phase. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         72
Consent  DOHNS 
  Benefits  Risks 

Tonsillectomy  – Relief from rec. tonsillitis   – Pain  


– Improve snoring   – Earache  
– Diagnostic   – Bleeding  
   – Injury to teeth  
– Jaw pain  
– Infections/sore throats 

Grommet insertion  – Improve hearing   – Earache  


– Improve earache, tinnitus,  – Bleeding  
dizziness   – Infection  
– Scarring of TM 
– Residual perforation  
– Early extrusion  
– Loss of grommet behind the 
ear drum  
– Hearing loss  
Myringoplasty  – Closure of perforation   – Bleeding  
– Relief of discharge   – Dizziness  
   – Infection  
– Altered taste  
– Numbness of ear  
– Painful scar 
– Facial nerve injury  
– Worsening of hearing  
– Risk of failure (20%)  
– Protruding ears  

Septoplasty  ‐ Attempt to improve nasal ob‐ – Pain  


struction   – Nasal bleeding  
– Woody feel of the nose  
– Septal perforation  
– Septal haematoma  
– Nasal adhesions  
– Risk of failure 
– Altered sensation of upper 
teeth  
  
FESS (Functional  – Improve nasal or sinus symp‐ – Pain  
endoscopic sinus  toms   – Nasal bleeding  
surgery)  – Clear sinus disease   – Nasal crusting/adhesions  
   – Damage to the eye  
– CSF leak  
– Periorbital swelling  
– Periorbital bleeding  
– Failure of procedure  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         73
DOHNS  Consent 

Excision of neck  – Diagnostic   – Pain  


mass  – Removal of mass   – Bleeding/haematoma  
– Drain insertion  
– Infection  
– Weak shoulder  
– Weak angle of mouth  
– Skin/earlobe numbness  
– Thickened/painful scar   
Nasal polypectomy  – Removal of nasal polyps   – Pain  
– Improve nasal obstruction   – Bleeding  
– Adhesions/crusting  
– Infection  
– Recurrence  
– Damage to the eye  
– CSF leak 

Mastoid exploration  ‐ Clear ear disease   – Bleeding/haematoma  


– Dizziness  
– Hearing loss / Dead ear  
– Facial nerve injury  
– Infection/discharge 
– Thickened/painful scar  
– Altered taste sensation  
– Tinnitus  
– Protruding ears  
– Meningitis/brain abscess  
– Recurrence 

Submandibular  – Diagnostic   – Pain  


gland excision  – Relief of pain/swelling   – Bleeding/haematoma  
– Infection  
– Weakness of angle of mouth  
– Altered tongue sensation 
– Weakness of tongue  
– Thickened/painful scar  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         74
Consent  DOHNS 
Stapedectomy  ‐ Improve hearing   – Earache  
– Bleeding  
– Dizziness  
– Tinnitus  
– Perforation  
– Dead ear  
– Deafness  
– Facial nerve injury  
– Altered taste sensation  
– Intolerance to loud noise  
– Failed procedure   

Septorhinoplasty  – Improve nasal obstruction   – Pain  


– Improve external shape of  – Nasal bleeding  
nose   – Woody feel to nose  
– Septal perforation  
– Septal haematoma  
– Nasal adhesions  
– Failure  
– Recurrence  
– Altered sensation upper teeth  

Ossiculoplasty  ‐ Improve hearing   – Bleeding  


– Dizziness  
– Tinnitus  
– Altered taste  
– Residual perforation  
– Facial nerve injury  
– Deafness  
– Failure  
– Painful scar  
– Protruding ears  
– Numbness of ear  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         75
DOHNS  Consent 

Previous DOHNS Part 2 scenarios: 

‐ Consent for Superficial Parotidectomy in young female model / actress with a pleomorphic 
adenoma (she doesn’t elude to her career straight away). 

‐ Consent for Myringoplasty for chronically discharging ear in a ten‐year‐old with concerned 
parent. 

Extra scenarios for practice: 

‐ Consent for Septoplasty in 35 year‐old gentleman for which the indication is nasal  obstruc‐
tion, but he believes it will cure his snoring. 

‐ Consent for nasal polypectomy in a 45 year‐old, the patient is a professional wine‐taster and 
has lost work but is hoping to get back to work soon following the operation. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         76
Oral – Information giving  DOHNS 
12. Oral – Information giving 

This station assesses your ability to give information to patients, or parents, in a way that 
they understand and that allays their fears. These stations are not about taking a clinical 
history. 

TOP TIP 

There is always a “hidden agenda” of some sort. Actors are not as good as patients at 
hiding these, it can be easily brought to the surface by asking: “Is there anything else you 
are particularly worried about?” or “Have we missed anything you would like to talk 
about?” 

Always begin by introducing yourself, stating your position. 

Most scenarios involve explaining a relatively complicated concept to a patient or parent and 
will require you to break the information up in to manageable “chunks”.  A good way of    
ensuring that you are not either patronising the patient or pitching the information at too high 
a level is to check what they know first. 

A good tool to use is the “Check – Chunk” method of relaying information that is commonly 
taught on Communication Skills courses. 

Check – Chunk: 

Begin by establishing what the patient means when they say certain words or refer to certain 
symptoms or diagnoses (“Check”) and then give a small bit of information relative to that 
(“Chunk”) then repeat the process. A common pitfall is to assume you know exactly what the 
patient is talking about and give them a lot of information that is entirely irrelevant to what 
the scenario is geared towards. 

Patient:  “My GP says that I suffer with BPPV, this means nothing to me all I know is that I get 
dizzy when I look left.  Can you tell me what is wrong with me?” 

Doctor: “What do you understand about BPPV?” [CHECK] 

Patient:  “To be honest, it could mean anything” 

Doctor:  “It stands for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo; it’s a long name which is why we 
shorten it. The most important thing you can take from that is it is a benign condition and 
does not represent anything life threatening [CHUNK]. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         77
DOHNS  Oral – Information giving 

Patient: “It doesn’t stop me from feeling dizzy!  The GP said something about crystals in my 
ear, I think he’s making it up!” 

Doctor:  “I know it sounds a bit far‐fetched, but what do you understand about these 
crystals?” [CHECK] 

Patient: “The GP gave me a big explanation about the inside ear but he rushed through it so 
fast it sounded like a lot of complex words to me.” 

Doctor: “Your dizziness is certainly caused by crystals in the inner ear these are generally a 
loose fragment of a larger organ in the ear that spins around inside the ear and causing you 
to feel dizzy.” [CHUNK] 

Etc. etc. 

It is very tempting to dive in with the answer without checking, the process does feel      
unnatural to most people; particularly surgeons who want to give answers straight away. It 
is a long process, but you can be sure you are addressing all of the concerns that the patient 
has.  

If at any stage you are feeling lost a quick recap will not only help you get back on track but 
it will score you marks as this is something that helps your patient appreciate that you were 
listening to them and is accommodated for on the mark sheet. 

Draw the conversation to a close with a quick summary and always ask: “Is there anything 
else you are particularly worried about?” or “Have we missed anything you would like to talk 
about?”.  It is good practice to ask if the patient has any questions or whether they want 
anything explaining again in more detail. This will almost always flag up the “Hidden 
Agenda” in an actor, if there is one. 

An important factor to accommodate is that the information is generally emotionally loaded 
for the individual, so be very careful how you word your explanation. A good way of ensuring 
you don’t put your foot in it is to make sure that you don’t end up doing all the talking.  This 
is when you can veer off on a tangent and either lose the patient or not address the 
concerns that the examiner has marks for.  

TOP TIP 

If you are the only one doing the talking, you are doing it wrong! 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         78
Oral – Information giving  DOHNS 
Summary: 

‐ Environmental considerations 
‐ Introduce yourself 
‐ Establish rapport 
‐ Check – Chunk 
‐ Recapitulate when required 
‐ Address hidden agenda 
‐ Draw consultation to a close 
‐ Summarise the information 
‐ Allow time for further clarification and questions 

Previous DOHNS Part 2 scenarios: 

‐ Gentleman had diagnosis of BPPV given by GP. Has come to ENT for treatment, has   
questions about condition and treatment. (Hidden Agenda: Is a van driver by occupation, 
need to give information re: DVLA) 

‐ Mother has a 3 year‐old child who is deaf in one ear, she has not noticed this but the 
school has referred to audiology. Play audiometry shows a dead ear on the right hand side 
(Hidden Agenda: Mother has questions about cochlear implantation) 

Extra Scenarios for practice: 

‐ Reassure a patient with globus that their Barium swallow is normal and that they do not 
require an examination under anaesthetic. The most likely cause for their symptoms is 
reflux (Hidden Agenda: The patient believes that they have cancer). 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         79
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         80
Written – Operation note   DOHNS 
13. Written – Operation note  

This station assesses your ability to provide written information in an operation note. It 
requires you to have a clear and structured approach, and provide concise information 
about what was done during the procedure as well as provide post‐operative instructions 
You are the ST2 trainee with an ENT firm. You have been asked to write the operation note 
for a microlaryngoscopy and biopsy.  
Station set up: 
‐ Blank operation note provided 
What you need to cover: 
‐ Name of operation 
‐ Indication for procedure 
‐ Incision 
‐ Findings 
‐ Procedure 
‐ Post‐operative plan. 
How to approach this station: 
‐ Document clearly and concisely the steps of the operation 
‐ If the operation was particularly difficult document this 
‐ Record any intra‐operative complications and what was done to deal with these 
‐ Document that haemostasis was checked prior to closure 
‐ Document any biopsies or tissue sent for histology or swabs for microscopy 
‐ Post operative instructions should include any relevant information regarding frequency 
of observations, diet and fluids, antibiotic use, whether the patient needs to stay in       
overnight, anticipated time for review/discharge and follow up plan. 
Example: Microlaryngoscopy and biopsy 
Indication:   Hoarse voice 
Incision:     N/A 
Findings:    Reinkes oedema 
Procedure:  Laryngoscopy performed using Lindholm laryngoscope 
    Microscope used to assess vocal cords 
    Microinstruments used to take multiple biopsies 
    1:1000 adrenaline patty used for haemostasis 
    Teeth/TMJ/PNS clear 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         81
DOHNS  Written – Operation note  

Post‐op:                    Close airway observations 

    Can eat and drink as able 

    To stay in overnight, home tomorrow if well 

    Follow up in OPD in 2 weeks with results of histology  
Previous DOHNS Part 2 questions: 

‐ Operation note for grommet insertion and adenoidectomy, for enlarged adenoids in     
recurrent glue ear.  The anaesthetist is happy for the patient to go home later today. 

Additional questions for practice: 

‐ Operation note for oesophagoscopy and removal of impacted meat bolus (no bone) at level 
of cricopharyngeus. 

‐ Operation note for excision of lymph node for confirmation of lymphoma in level one 
lymph node, submental region. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         82
Written – Discharge summary   DOHNS 
14. Written – Discharge summary  

This station assesses your ability to provide written information in a discharge summary.  It 
requires you to have a clear and structured approach and to provide concise information 
about investigations/interventions performed during the patients admission as well as     
provide post‐discharge instructions/ follow up information to the patients GP. 

Station set up: 
You are the ST2 trainee with an ENT firm. You have been asked to write the discharge 
summary for a patient who was admitted for total thyroidectomy.  
Blank discharge summary provided 
What you need to cover: 
‐ Patient details 
‐ Consultant responsible for care 
‐ Methods of admission (elective/emergency) 
‐ Dates of admission 
‐ Diagnosis 
‐ Operation/procedure 
‐ Clinical narrative (reason for admission, presenting complaint, relevant clinical findings, 
investigations and results, progress during admission, any complications) 
‐ Outstanding investigations/results 
‐ Medications at discharge and any changes/additions made 
‐ Discharge destination 
‐Follow up plan. 
 
Example: Elective admission for total thyroidectomy 
 
              July 1st 2012 
 
Dear Doctor Jones, 
 
Re:   Mrs Brown, 123 Any Street, Anytown 
  DOB: 24/5/1975 
Admitted:     June 10‐11th 2010 (Elective admission) 
Consultant:    Mr. Smith (Consultant ENT Surgeon) 
Diagnosis:    Multinodular goitre 
Procedure:    Total thyroidectomy on June 10th 2011 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         83
DOHNS  Written – Discharge summary  

This lady was admitted on June 10th for an elective total thyroidectomy of a multinodular 
goitre, which was causing compressive symptoms. Clinically she was euthyroid and             
ultrasound, performed prior to admission, confirmed a multinodular goitre with the FNA   
inconclusive. Based on her ongoing unpleasant symptoms, Mrs Brown was keen to proceed 
with a total thyroidectomy. Bloods, including her thyroid function tests (TFTs) were normal on 
admission and pre‐operative flexible nasendoscopy performed at the bedside revealed      
normally functioning vocal cords. There were no intra‐operative complications.                     
Post‐operatively she complained of tingling in her fingers but calcium was within the normal 
range and her symptoms resolved spontaneously. She was commenced on thyroxine 100mcg 
daily on day one post‐operatively and has been advised that she will require life‐long         
thyroxine replacement. She was discharged home on 11th June. We would be most grateful if 
you could arrange for her to attend the surgery for her TFTs and calcium level to be checked 
next week and we have arranged to see her in clinic in 2 weeks time with the results of the 
histology. Her sutures are absorbable and therefore do not require removal. We have advised 
her to contact you immediately if she gets any further symptoms of hypocalcaemia. 
 
Yours sincerely, 

Mr Green 
ST2 to Mr Smith 

 
Additional cases for practice: 
‐ Emergency admission for quinsy (second episode), aspirated once successfully. Discharged 
following 48 hours of IV antibiotics with 10 day course to complete on discharge (no drug 
allergies).  Bacterial swab not available on discharge. 
‐ Elective admission for septorhinoplasty for post‐traumatic nasal obstruction and cosmetic 
deformity, uneventful recovery. 
‐ Elective admission for diagnositic laryngoscopy and biopsy.  Lesion highly suspicious for  
laryngeal cancer.  Appropriate investigations have been organised and the patient will be  
reviewed in outpatients as a matter of urgency. 
 
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         84
Oral – Taking a history  DOHNS 
15. Oral – Taking a history 

This station assesses your ability to take a focused history.  It requires you to have a clear 
and structured approach, and to use both open and closed questioning to gain the       
information required to reach a diagnosis and determine appropriate investigations. 
You are working in an ENT outpatients clinic. You have been asked to take a history 
from Mr Davies who has been referred to the clinic by his GP with a hoarse voice. 
Station set up:  
Mr Davies is a simulated patient. The examiner may ask you questions about your working 
diagnosis and what investigations you may arrange. 
What you need to cover: 
‐ Duration of presenting complaint 
‐ Progression of symptoms 
‐ Any associated symptoms 
‐ Past medical history and fitness for investigation/surgery 
‐ Medication use including anticoagulants 
‐ Social history especially smoking and alcohol intake 
‐ Family/occupational history 
‐ Patients ideas and concerns and expectations (hidden agendas) 
‐ Summarise history to patient to check understanding 
How to approach this station: 
‐ Prepare the environment appropriately i.e. at 45 degree to the patient, no barriers 
between you 
‐ Introduce yourself  
‐ Check the patients name 
‐ Ascertain the presenting complaint through open questioning 
‐ Use closed questions to clarify the symptoms and determine if there are any other  
associated symptoms or red flags 
‐ Determine any relevant past medical history and ask about relevant social history   
without being judgemental about smoking/alcohol intake 
‐ Summarise the pertinent points from the history 
‐ Discuss the patient’s ideas about what the problem might be and their concerns 
‐ Determine a management plan and inform the patient 
Example: History taking of hoarse voice 
“How long have you had a hoarse voice?” 
“Is the hoarseness constant or intermittent?” 
“Have you had any other symptoms?” 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         85
DOHNS  Oral – Taking a history 

‐ Pyrexia 
‐ Sore throat 
‐ URTI symptoms 
‐ Dysphagia and/or weight loss 
‐ Pain 
‐ Otalgia 
‐ Neck lump and/or FOSIT 
‐ GORD symptoms 
“Is it getting worse?” 
“Do you use your voice at lot (i.e., voice abuse) 
“Are you a smoker?” 
“Do you drink alcohol?” 
Previous DOHNS Part 2 scenarios: 
‐ Take a history off this 40‐year‐old non‐smoker with anosmia (Hidden agenda: the patient is 
a chef) 
‐ Take a history off this 21‐year‐old patient with facial pain (Hidden agenda: the patient 
thinks they have a brain tumour) 
Extra scenarios for practice: 
‐ Take a history off this 50‐year‐old patient with BPPV (Hidden agenda: he operates a crane 
in a steel works and gets dizzy when looking down and to the left) 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         86
Oral ‐ Breaking bad news   DOHNS 
16. Oral ‐ Breaking bad news  

This station assesses your ability to deal with difficult situations and break bad news to 
patients with empathy. 
You are an ST2 trainee working in ENT. Two weeks ago you saw a 55‐year‐old lady with 
a hoarse voice. On flexible nasendoscopy she had a lesion on her vocal cord so you         
arranged a laryngoscopy which she had last week. At operation she was found to have a 
T3 laryngeal cancer. 
Station set up: 
Mrs. Jones will be a simulated patient.  The examiner may ask you questions at the end of 
the station. 
What you must cover: 
‐ Prepare the environment appropriately for breaking bad news 
‐ Make sure patient is expecting test results. 
‐ Briefly recap history and investigations so far 
‐ Break the bad news using lay person terms 
‐ Give the patient a plan of what will happen next 
‐ Ascertain if she has any questions and deal with these appropriately 
‐ Offer to speak to her family 
‐ Arrange follow up 

Hidden Agendas 

This station is not about knowing all about laryngeal cancer.  The focus of the                
consultation is likely to be about breaking bad news and dealing with the patient’s      
reaction.  Patients may deal with bad news in a number of different ways – they may 
become very upset, angry or may be in denial. They may already have fears about cancer 
due to family history or personal experience or may have been doing their own internet 
research. 

How to approach this station: 
‐ Prepare the environment appropriately i.e., no barriers between yourself and the 
patient, tissues on hand, give your bleep to someone else 
‐ Take a nurse with you and ask the patient if they would like their partner or a family 
member to be present 
‐ Introduce yourself and the nurse  
‐ Check the patients name 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         87
DOHNS  Oral ‐ Breaking bad news  

‐ Briefly recap the history‐ what symptoms she’s had, when they started etc and recap the 
investigations performed so far 
‐ Discuss the patient’s ideas about what the problem might be and her concerns (she may 
volunteer that she is worried about cancer) 
‐ Give a warning shot that you have bad news 
‐ Empathically break the news of her cancer using lay person terms 
‐ Give her time for the diagnosis to sink in and to react 
‐ Give the patient time to ask questions 

Advise her on:  

‐ Treatment options 
‐ Support available for her and her family 
‐ Establish if the patient wishes to inform her family or if she would like you to do so 
‐ It may be helpful to offer written information or contact with a specialist support service 
e.g., Head and Neck Specialist nurse 
‐ Ensure the patient goes away with a clear plan of what will happen next 
‐ Ensure the patient has a follow up appointment and knows whom to contact if they have 
any questions/concerns. 

Previous DOHNS Part 2 scenarios: 
 FNAC of this elderly gentleman’s thyroid nodule has come back as Anaplastic          
carcinoma.  Explain the diagnosis and address any concerns he may have 

Extra scenarios for practice: 
 Following pharyngoscopy and oesophagoscopy for odynophagia and aspiration, 
explain to the patient that the biopsy from their hypertrophied right piriform fossa has 
come back as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. 
 Explain to this patient with a neck lump that FNAC contains poorly differentiated           
carcinoma.  Explain the diagnosis and further management, address any concerns they 
may have. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         88
OSCE Examinations  DOHNS 

SECTION Three: 
Appendices 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         89
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         90
OSCE Examinations  DOHNS 
17. OSCE Examinations 
Listed below are recommended structures for the commonly occurring examination stations.  
It is recommended that candidates practice summarising their findings, though it has not been 
a required step in recent DOHNS OSCEs. 

Ear 

1. Introduction 
2. Consent 
3. Test otoscope (ensure speculum is clean) 
4. Inspection:  external ear, canal and tympanic membrane 
5. Tuning fork testing (512Hz) 
6. Free field testing 
7. Fistula sign 
8. Facial nerve assessment (check if required) 
9. Special tests for vertigo (check if required) 

Neck 

1. Introduction 
2. Consent and exposure to level of clavicles 
3. Inspection (swallowing and tongue protrusion for obvious midline lesions) 
4. Palpation (systematic, recommended starting‐point: tail of parotid, commonly forgotten) 

Flexible Nasendoscopy 

1. Introduction 
2. Consent 
3. Local anaesthetic 
4. Systematic endoscopic examination, whilst talking to actor 
  (i) Nasal cavity 
  (ii) Post‐nasal space (including fossae of Rosenmüller) 
  (iii) Oropharynx (tongue base and vallecula) 
  ‐“Stick your tongue out” 
(iv) Epiglottis and supraglottis 
(v) Vocal cords, appearance and mobility 
‐“Say Eeeee” (two pitches) or “Count to 5” 
(vi) Piriform fossae 
‐ Puff cheeks with nose held (warn patient first) 
Observe for lesions and obvious asymmetry.  Comment on any abnormality seen, stating its 
anatomical location.  Also note quality of mucosa and secretions. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         91
DOHNS 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         92
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 
18. Instrument gallery 

Head and Neck  

Oesophagoscope and handle assembly showing fibre light inserted along internal groove and connection to 
fibre optic lead from light source

Assorted Adult Oesophagoscopes (top to bottom: 50cm, 30cm, 20cm) 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         93
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Bronchoscope assembly and description of ports 
(a) ventilation connection 
(b) fibre‐optic connection (light source) 
(c) suction connection (using fine plastic tubing via perforated rubber tip) 
(d) viewing window and instrumentation port (sliding interchangeable port mounted). Note rubber  
adaptor for Hopkin’s rod, instrumentation is via open aperture 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         94
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 

Hopkin’s rod attachment to optical bronchoscopy forceps 
(a) suction connection 
(b) fibre optic connection (light source) 
(c) sleeve in downward position locking Hopkin’s rod in place  

Assorted Adult Bronchoscopes (top to bottom): Size 6.5, 7.5, 8.5); side vents distinguish 
these from oesophagoscopes  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         95
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Laryngoscopes; LEFT, Lindholm laryngoscope; RIGHT, anterior commissure laryngoscope  

(C)

Other laryngoscopy items:  (b) wet gauze or blue gum‐shield (gum/teeth 
protection) 
 a) suspension and laryngoscope attachment   
  (c) laryngeal suction 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         96
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 

Close‐up of tip  Close‐up of tip  Close‐up of tip 

Laryngeal instruments 
 
(a) laryngeal grasping forceps; angled to the left 
 
(b) laryngeal scissors; angled upwards 
 
(c) laryngeal cupped biopsy forceps; straight

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         97
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Commonly used retractors 
 
    (a) Volkmann retractor (large) 
    (b) Volkmann retractor (small) 
    (c) Kilner retractor 
    (d) Langenback retractor (small)     
    (e) Langenback retractor (large)

MaGills forceps 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         98
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 

Tracheal dilator   Cuffless, non‐fenestrated tracheostomy tube 
with introducer and inner tube 

Otology  

Auroscope 

Assorted aural specula 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         99
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Seigle’s pneumatic speculum   512Hz Tuning fork; longer decay than 
higher frequencies, less vibratory 
stimulus than lower frequencies  

Barani box; effective for masking up to 100dBHL   Myringotome, ends can be straight or angled  

Graft press forceps  Screw‐type vein press. Both used to prepare graft tissue in 
otological procedures  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         100
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 

Jobson Horne probe  

Wax hook  

Aural suction catheters   Crocodile forceps, small and large  

Rhinology  

(C)
(a) (b)

(a) Thudicum’s speculum  (b) Alar retractor  (c) Killians speculum

 Selection  nasal speculae 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         101
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Selection of FESS instruments: 
 
    (a) Large straight Blakesley forceps 
    (b) 90 degree Blakesley forceps 
    (c) 45 degree Blakesley forceps 
    (d) Backward punch 
    (e) Small straight Blakesley forceps 
    (f)  Downward biter 
    (g) Round‐ended suction 
    (h) Antral probe 

Rapid Rhino 
nasal pack 

  

Merocel nasal 
pack 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         102
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 

Items required for posterior packing in epistaxis 
(a) Urinary catheter (female) 
(b) 20ml syringe (inflate balloon of catheter with air) 
(c) Vaseline gauze 
(d) Tilley’s nasal packing forceps 
(e) Gauze pads (protect alar cartilage) 
(f) Umbilical clamp  
 

Walshingham’s forceps; for manipulating 
nasal bone fractures.  Different forceps 
for left and right side (note “L” and “R” 
Tilley’s nasal packing forceps   markings), plastic covered end applied to 
skin surface of respective nasal bone 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         103
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Tonsillectomy  

Draffin rods 

Boyle‐Davis gag with Daughty tongue depressor 

Burkitts straight forceps 

Mollisons pillar retractor  

Curved negus forceps 

Luc’ holding forceps   Mollisons pillar retractor  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         104
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 

Negus ligature pusher  

Gwyn‐Evans dissector 

Eve tonsil snare  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         105
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Miscellaneous  

Commonly used preparations: 
 
(a) Otological creams and drops 
(b) Proflavine cream: topical bacteriostatic disinfectant commonly used for packing post‐drainage of 
pinna haematoma 
(c) Ichthammol glycerin: used in aural packing in severe otitis externa.  Ichthammol exhibits anti‐
inflammatory and mild antimicrobial effects, the hyperosmolar glycerin draws out oedema 
(d) Naseptin cream: Peanut oil is a base, check allergy to peanuts and soya before use.  Also contains 
chlorhexidine (bactericidal) and neomycin (bacteriocidal) 
(e) Bismuth Iodoform Paraffin Paste (BIPP) pack; Bismuth (bacteriostactic and bacteriocidal) Iodine 
(Bacteriocidal). Commonly used as a pack after otological procedures and can be used as a nasal pack for 
epistaxis.  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         106
Instrument gallery  DOHNS 

Co‐phenylcaine: 5% Lidocaine Hydrochloride & 0.5% 
Phenyephidrine Hydrochloride. Used topically to    
prepare nasal mucosa 

Silver nitrate cautery sticks. Nitric acid is 
produced on contact with water, creating a 
chemical burn

Dental syringe, commonly used with “Lignospan” 
cartridges (2% Lignocaine and 1:80,000 Adrenaline)  
 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         107
DOHNS  Instrument gallery 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         108
DOHNS 
19. Acknowledgements 

 Clinical Images from:  

Otolaryngology Houston: www.ghorayeb.com 

 Current  diagnosis and treatment in Otolaryngology‐Head and Neck Surgery. Lalwani A; et al 

 Hand drawn vector images based on:  

Grays Anatomy. 40th Edition, 2008. Churchill Livingstone, Elsevier Publications. 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         109
DOHNS 
Index 

THE DOHNS SYLLABUS IN RELATION TO PART 2  1‐3 
Part one:  1 
‐ Medical Practice publication  1 
Part two:  Clinical knowledge  1 
Part three:  Clinical competencies  2 
SECTION ONE: Common Topics for DOHNS Part 2  5‐66 
THE EAR  7‐16 
Abnormalities of the pinna  14 
‐Microtia  14 
‐Protruding ears/Bat ears   14 
‐External auditory canal atresia   14 
‐Auricular haematoma   14 
‐Auricular lacerations   14 
Acute otitis media  10 
‐  Non‐suppurative acute otitis media  10 
‐ Suppurative acute otitis media  10 
Acoustic neuroma   45 
Cholesteatoma  12 
‐Acquired  12 
Primary acquired cholesteatoma  12 
‐Secondary acquired cholesteatoma   12 
‐ Congenital  12, 29, 42 
Chronic suppurative otitis media  11 
Herpes zoster oticus / Ramsey Hunt syndrome  9 
‐ Oral glucocorticoids  9 
Mastoiditis  11 
Neoplasms of the external ear  14 
‐Basal cell carcinoma (BCC)  14 
‐Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)   15 
‐Melanoma  16 
Otitis externa  8, 13,106 
Otitis media with effusion/glue ear  9 
Osteomas & exostoses of the externa auditory canal  13 
Otosclerosis  13, 51 
Perichondritis  8, 28 
‐ Pseudomonas aeruginosa  8 
Temporal bone fractures  15 
‐Conductive hearing loss  15 
‐Facial nerve paralysis   15 
‐CSF leak   1, 73 
Tympanic membrane  7, 10, 11, 30, 91 
THE NOSE  17‐20 
Antrochoanal nasal polyps  18 
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma  19 
‐Undifferentiated non‐keratinising squamous cell carcinoma  19 
‐Differentiated keratinising squamous cell carcinoma  19  

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         111
DOHNS 
Nasal trauma  18 
‐  Epistaxis  18, 4, 103, 106 
‐  CSF leak  18 
‐  Septal haematoma  19 
‐  Saddle deformity  19 
‐  Cosmetic deformity  19 
THE MOUTH AND OROPHARYNX  21‐24 
Glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis)  22 
Oral cavity malignancy  22 
Quinsy   22, 84 
Tonsillitis  21, 73 
THE LARYNX  25‐30 
Benign   28, 32,45, 53 
‐  Vocal cord nodules  28 
‐  Vocal cord polyps  28 
‐  Vocal cord granulomas  28 
‐  Reinkes oedema   28 
‐  Intracordal cyst  28 
‐  Saccular cysts  29 
‐  Laryngocele  29 
‐  Laryngeal papillomatosis  29 
Flexible Nasendoscopy  26 
Innervation of the vocal cords  27 
‐  Superior Laryngeal Nerve  27 
‐  Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve  27 
Laryngomalacia  30 
Malignant  29 
Vocal cord disease  28 
Vocal cord palsy  30 
OTHER COMMON DOHNS HEAD AND NECK PATHOLOGIES  31‐35 
Bell’s palsy  34 
‐  House‐Brackmann scale  34 
Benign   32 
‐  Acute viral inflammatory disease  32 
‐  Acute suppurative sialadenitis  32 
‐  Chronic granulomatous siladenitis  32 
‐  Sialolithiasis  32 
‐  Sjogren syndrome  33 
‐  Pleomorphic adenoma  33 
‐  Warthin’s tumour  33 
Branchial cyst  31 
Epiglottitis  31 
Malignant  33 
Pharyngeal pouch  33 
Salivary gland disease  32 
Thyroglossal cyst  32 
THE THYROID  36‐40 
Histology  37 
‐  Classic symptoms and signs of thyroid dysfunction  38 
‐  Blood results  38 
Hyperthyroidism  38 
st
Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1  Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         112
DOHNS 
‐Graves disease  38 
‐Toxic thyroid adenoma  38 
‐Toxic multinodular goitre  38 
Hypothyroidism  39 
‐Primary  39 
‐Secondary  39 
‐Tertiary  39 
Supporting cell tumours  40 
‐Medullary carcinoma  40 
Thyroid neoplasia  39 
‐Papillary adenocarcinoma  39 
‐Follicular adenocarcinoma  39 
‐Anaplastic adenocarcinoma  39 
CRANIAL NERVES  41‐46 
CNI: Olfactory  41 
CNII: Optic  42 
CNIII: Oculomotor  42 
CNIV: Trochlear  42 
CNV: Trigeminal  43 
CNVI: Abducens  43 
CNVII: Facial  44 
CNVIII: Vestibulocochlear  44 
CNIX: Glossopharyngeal  45 
CNX: Vagus  45 
CNXI: Accessory  45 
CNXII: Hypoglossal  46 
HEARING AND BALANCE  47‐54 
Audiometry  47 
Balance  53 
‐ Disease  53 
‐Labyrinthitis  54 
‐Vestibular Neuronitis  54 
‐Labyrinth  45, 54 
Cochlear Implants  51 
Hearing Aids  49 
‐Histology of the cochlea  50 
‐BAHA abutment seen 2 weeks post‐op   50 
Masking  47 
Air conduction audiometry  47 
Bone conduction audiometry  47 
‐ Air conduction audiometry   47  
‐ Example audiograms  48 
Symbols  49 
Tympanometry  51 
IMAGING  55‐65 
Computerised tomography (CT)  55 
Examples of where CT is used in ENT  57 
Imaging Modalities  55 
Larynx    26‐31, 45, 56 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         113
DOHNS 

SECTION TWO: Communication skills for DOHNS Part 2  67‐88 
Consent  69‐76 
Oral ‐ Breaking bad news  87‐89 
Oral – Information giving  77‐79 
Oral – Taking a history  85‐86 
Written – Operation note  81‐82 
Written – Discharge summary  83‐84 
SECTION Three: Appendices  89‐109 
OSCE Examinations  91 
Flexible Nasendoscopy  3, 26, 84, 91 
Instrument gallery  93‐107 
Head and Neck   93‐105 
Miscellaneous  106‐107 
Otology   2, 99 
Rhinology   2, 101 

Exam Revision Guide to DOHNS OSCE. Stew B (Editor). September 2012. 1st Edition. Doctors Academy Publications                         114