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GMRIT

Academic Regulations, Curriculum and Syllabi

2016

B. Tech.
Chemical Engineering
(4 Year Program)

Department of Chemical Engineering


GMR Institute of Technology
Rajam, Andhra Pradesh
(An Autonomous Institute Affiliated to JNTU Kakinada, AP)
NBA Accredited and NAAC Accredited
Academic Rules and Regulations

2016

Undergraduate Programmes

GMR Institute of Technology


Rajam 532 127, Andhra Pradesh
(An Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to JNTU, Kakinada, AP)
Accredited by NAAC & NBA
GMR Institute of Technology (GMRIT) | Regulation 2016

Contents

1. Eligibility for Admission……………………………....................................................... iv


2. Duration of B. Tech. Programme……………………………………………………….. iv
3. Branches of Study…………………………………………………………………………….. iv
4. Programme Structure………………………………………………………………………. v
4.1. Credit Distribution for the Courses Offered………………………………… viii
4.2. Structure of the Curriculum……………………………………………………….. viii
4.3. Credits Break-up for Various Category of Courses………………………. x
4.4. Division of Marks for Continuous and Semester End Assessment.. xi
5. Evaluation Methodology…………………………………………………………………... xii
5.1. Continuous Assessment Pattern for all Courses…………………………... xii
6. Attendance Requirements………………………………………………………………... xvi
7. Promotion Policies…………………………………………………………………………… xvi
8. Graduation Requirements………………………………………………………………… xvii
9. Flexibility to Add or Drop Courses……………………………………………………. xix
10. Withdrawal from Examination…………………………………………………………. xix
11. Curriculum……………………………………………………………………………………… xx

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The Vision of GMRIT

 To be among the most preferred institutions for engineering and technological


education in the country
 An institution that will bring out the best from its students, faculty and staff – to learn,
to achieve, to compete and to grow – among the very best
 An institution where ethics, excellence and excitement will be the work religion, while
research, innovation and impact, the work culture

The Mission of GMRIT

 To turnout disciplined and competent engineers with sound work and life ethics
 To implement outcome based education in an IT-enabled environment
 To encourage all-round rigor and instill a spirit of enquiry and critical thinking among
students, faculty and staff
 To develop teaching, research and consulting environment in collaboration with
industry and other institutions

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GMR Institute of Technology (GMRIT) | Regulation 2016

Academic Regulations for B. Tech. Programme*


(For all the batches of candidates admitted in the Academic Year 2016–2017 and subsequently)

1. Eligibility for Admission


The total seats available as per the approved intake are grouped into two categories viz.
category A and Category B with a ratio of 70:30 as per the state government guidelines vide G.O
No.52
a. The admissions for category A and B seats shall be as per the guidelines of Andhra
Pradesh State Council for Higher Education (APSCHE) in consonance with
government reservation policy.
 Under Category A: 70% of the seats are filled through EAMCET counseling.
 Under Category B: 30% seats are filled based on 10+2 merits in compliance
with guidelines of APSCHE

b. Admission eligibility-Under Lateral Entry Scheme

Students with diploma qualification have an option of direct admission into 2nd year
B. Tech. (Lateral entry scheme). Under this scheme 20% seats of sanctioned intake
will be available in each course as supernumerary seats. Admissions to this three
year B Tech later entry Programme will be through ECET. The maximum period to
complete B. Tech. under lateral entry scheme is six consecutive academic years from
the date of joining.

2. Duration of the Programme

The course duration for the award of the Degree in Bachelor of Technology will be four
academic years, with two semesters in each year. However if a student is unable to complete the
course within 4 years, he/ she can do so by giving more attempts but within 8 consecutive
academic years from the date of admission.
Academic Calendar
For all the eight semesters a common academic calendar shall be followed in each semester by
having sixteen weeks of instruction, one week for the conduct of practical exams and with three
weeks for theory examinations and evaluation. Dates for registration, sessional and end
semester examinations shall be notified in the academic calendar of every semester. The
schedule for the conduct of all the curricular and co-curricular activities shall be notified in the
planner.
3. Branches of Study
B. Tech. Programmes
I. Chemical Engineering (CH)
II. Civil Engineering (CE)

*
Approved in the Academic Council Meeting held on March 24, 2018 (Satruday)

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III. Computer Science and Engineering (CS)


IV. Electrical and Electronics Engineering (EE)
V. Electronics and Communication Engineering (EC)
VI. Information Technology (IT)
VII. Mechanical Engineering (ME)
VIII. Power Engineering (PE)

4. Programme Structure

The curriculum will consist of courses of study (Theory, Practical, Contemporary Courses,
Mini Project, Term Papers, Project, Audit Courses, Self-study Courses, MOOCs, Summer
Internship and Full Semester Internship and Courses related Employability Skills) and
syllabi as prescribed by the respective Boards of Studies from time to time. The curriculum is
bifurcated into FSI and Non-FSI modes from 7th semester onwards.
Every student will be required to opt for six elective courses spanned across the semester from
4th to 8th semester from the list of electives as prescribed in the curriculum. Under Choice Based
Credit System (CBCS), the students may take one elective from the list of open electives offered
by other branches of engineering technology in consultation with their respective department.

a. Integrated Courses: Integrated courses are exclusively designed to provide a


unique learning experience to the students with the concept of layered learning
where in the students have the chances to practice while learning. These courses
designed by blending both theory and laboratory components in their core
curriculum and will be evaluated for 130 marks.
b. Contemporary Courses: These courses are designed with the help of experts from
industries and driven by experts from industries along with the internal faculty
members on the recent developments in core areas of engineering and technology.
These courses shall be registered as an elective course during their course of study
c. Mini Project: The curriculum offers Mini Projects in two different forms viz: (i) Mini
Project as a mandatory component in all lab courses (ii) 2 credit Mini Project during
5th or 6th semester. With respect to second one (ii) students will take mini project
batch wise and the batches will be divided as similar to lab courses. The report will
be evaluated by a committee as nominated by CoE constituted with internal &
external panels
d. Term Paper: The Term Paper is a self-study report and shall be carried out either
during 5th or 6th semester in choice with Mini Project. Every student will take up
this term paper individually and submit a report. The scope of the term paper could
be an exhaustive literature review choosing any engineering concept with reference
to standard research papers or an extension of the concept of earlier course work in
consultation with the term paper supervisor. The report will be evaluated by a
committee as nominated by HoD with the approval of CoE

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e. Project work: The final project work shall be carried out during the 8th semester in
the non- FSI Model. Projects will be taken up batch wise. Internal evaluation will be
done by the Project Review Committee (PRC), comprising of HOD and two senior
faculty members along with the project supervisor. Semester end evaluation will be
done by Project Evaluation Committee (PEC) comprising of three members
including HOD, project guide and an external examiner nominated by the CoE
f. Audit Courses: Audit courses are among the compulsory courses and do not carry
any credits. All the students shall register for one Audit courses in the beginning of
3rdsemester. List of the courses will be notified at the beginning of the third
semester for all students and the student has to choose one audit course under self-
study mode at the beginning of third semester. All the students (regular and lateral
entry students) shall complete the audit course similar to other regular courses and
the results will be indicated with “Satisfactory” or “Not Satisfactory” performance.
g. Self-Study Courses: Self-study courses are the courses which are more similar to
theory courses where in the students learn the courses on independent mode. The
evaluation and assessment pattern for such courses shall be carried out as similar to
regular theory course. These courses shall be opted after getting proper approval
from the respective head of the department as well from the other head of the
department which is offering the course. The credits earned through these self-
study courses over and above the mandatory courses, and it will not be accounted in
CGPA calculation.
h. MOOCs: Meeting with the global requirements, to inculcate the habit of self-learning
and in compliance with UGC guidelines, MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) have
been introduced as electives
 The proposed MOOCs would be additional choices in all the elective
groups subject to the availability during the respective semesters and
respective departments will declare the list of the courses at the
beginning of the semester, which are having a minimum of 45 hours in a
given semester
 Course content for the selected MOOCs shall be drawn from respective
MOOCs links or shall be supplied by the department. Course will be
mentored by faculty members and Assessment & evaluation of the
courses shall be done by the department
 Three credits will be awarded upon successful completion of each
MOOCs
i. Summer Internship: As a part of curriculum in all branches of Engineering, it is
mandatory for all students to undergo summer internship Programme at industries
(core or allied) / R & D organization to get practical insight of their subject domain
during summer break after the 4th semester. This summer internship Programme
shall be availed to a maximum duration of 4 weeks and the assessment shall be

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carried out with both internal and external experts leading to “Satisfactory” and
“Non-Satisfactory Performance” and it will not be accounted for the calculation of
CGPA
j. Employability Skills: It is mandatory for all students to take a course on
Employability Skills from 3rd Semester to 6th Semester. The Employability Skills are
covered under two broad streams viz. Aptitude skills and Soft Skills. The credits
earned through these courses will be indicated in the grade sheet and will not be
taken into account for CGPA calculation.
k. Industry Driven One Credit Courses (IDC): Meeting with the industry
requirements, to reduce the gap between industry and academia this one credit (15
hrs.) course has been introduced over and above regular courses from 3rd Semester
to 6th Semester for the interested students. The credits earned through these
courses will be indicated in the grade sheet and will not be taken into account for
CGPA calculation.
l. Full Semester Internship: Students can opt for full semester Internship
Programme at industries based on their self-interest either during 7th or 8th
semester to get practical insight relevant to their core branch of engineering or in
allied branch of study under the guidance of internal and external expert members
in the institute and at Industries respectively. All Students who wish to choose FSI
pattern shall exercise this option well before the commencement of 7th semester.
Students who wish to take FSI during 8th semester will have to take one additional
course in 7th semester when compared with Non FSI stream. In case of some
extraordinary cases, students may be permitted to choose the FSI pattern even
before the commencement of 8th semester. In all such cases student shall take one
additional course offered during 8th semester under self-study mode and acquire
the required credits.
i. Minimum CGPA cut-off up to 5th semester as prescribed by CDC
ii. Competency mapping
iii. Students who opt for FSI either in 7th or 8th will be provided with Internship
subject the availability/selection by the industries

Further the credits earned through FSI Programme will be indicated in the grade sheet
and will be accounted for the calculation of CGPA.
FSI final evaluation will be done by the FSI Review Committee (FSIRC), comprising of
HOD, one senior faculty member and External (Industry) expert nominated by HOD.

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4.1. Credit Distribution for Courses Offered

No Course Credits
1 Theory Course 3
2 Integrated Course 4
3 Laboratory/Drawing Course 2
4 MOOCs 3
5 Elective courses 3
6 Audit Course 0
7 Term Paper 2
8 Mini Project 2
9 Summer Internship 0
10 Project work 10
11 Full Semester internship 16
Co-curricular and Extra-Curricular
12 2
Activities(CCEC)
13 Employability Skills (ES) 2
14 Industry Driven One Credit Courses (IDC) 1

4.2. Structure of curriculum


Following are the TWO models of course patterns out of which any student shall choose
one model based on the notified criteria for selection.

a. Full Semester Internship (FSI) Model


b. Non Full Semester Internship Model
In the Full semester internship Model, the students selected/opted for internship will be
distributed in both the 7th and 8th semester based on the internships available. In the Non
Full Semester Internship Model, all the selected students shall carry out the Project work
as per the norms.

A. Course Pattern for Four year Regular Programme (FSI)

Total
Sem. No. of Theory Courses No. of Lab Courses
Credits
I 21
5 3
II 21
III 3 + Employability Skills+ CCEC 25
6(5 Theory + 1 Integrated) 3+ CCEC Activities+
IV 25 + 1 + 1
Employability Skills
Summer Internship (Audit course) 0
6 (4 Compulsory Theory + 1 1+ Term paper/Mini Project +
V 23
Integrated + 1 Elective) Employability Skills + CCEC
6 + Audit course 1 + Term paper/Mini project +
VI (3 Compulsory Theory + 1 CCEC Activities + Employability 23 + 1+1
Integrated + 2 Elective) Skills
VII Full semester internship 16

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VIII 4 (2 Compulsory + 2 Elective) 2 16


16+Term paper +Mini project+
Internship +CCEC +
Total 34+4+1 Audit courses 174
Employability Skills+ Audit
Course

B. Course Pattern for Four Year Regular Programme (Non - FSI)


Total
Sem. No. of Theory Courses No. of Lab Courses
Credits
I 21
5 3
II 21
III 3+ Employability Skills + CCEC 25
6 (5 Theory + 1 Integrated)
IV 3+ Employability Skills +CCEC 25 + 1+1
Summer Internship (Audit course) 0
6 (4 Compulsory Theory + 1 1+ Term paper/Mini Project +
V 23
Integrated + 1 Elective) Employability Skills+ CCEC
6+ Audit course 1 + Term paper/Mini project+
VI (3 Compulsory Theory + 1 CCEC Activities + Employability 23 + 1+1
Integrated + 2 Elective) Skills
VII 3 (1 Compulsory + 2 Elective) 2 13

VIII 3 (2 Compulsory + 1 Elective) Project work 19


16+Term paper + Mini project +
36+4+1 Audit courses Project work + CCEC + 174
Total
Employability Skills

C. Course Pattern for Three Year Lateral Entry Programme (FSI)

Total
Sem. No. of Theory Courses No. of Lab Courses
Credits
III 3 + Employability Skills+ CCEC 25
6 (5 Theory + 1 Integrated) 3+ CCEC Activities+ Employability
IV 25 + 1+1
Skills
Summer Internship (Audit course) 00
6 (4 Compulsory Theory + 1 1+ Term paper/Mini Project +
V 23
Integrated + 1 Elective) Employability Skills+ CCEC
6+ Audit course 1 + Term paper/Mini project
VI (3 Compulsory Theory + 1 CCEC Activities + Employability 23 + 1+1
Integrated + 2 Elective) Skills
VII Full semester internship 16

VIII 4 (2 Compulsory + 2 Elective) 2 16

Total 24+4+1 Audit courses 10 + Term paper +Mini project+ 132

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Internship report +CCEC +


Employability Skills

D. Course Pattern for Three year Lateral Entry Programme (Non FSI)

Total
Sem. No. of Theory Courses No. of Lab Courses
Credits
III 3 + Employability Skills+ CCEC 25
6 (5 Theory + 1 Integrated)
IV 3+ CCEC Activities+ Employability
24 + 1+1
Skills
Summer Internship (Audit course) 00
6 (4 Compulsory Theory + 1 1+ Term paper/Mini Project +
V 23
Integrated + 1 Elective) Employability Skills+ CCEC
6 + Audit course 1 + Term paper/Mini project +
VI (3 Compulsory Theory + 1 CCEC Activities + Employability 24 + 1+1
Integrated + 2 Elective) Skills
VII 3 (1 Compulsory + 2 Elective) 2 13

VIII 3 (2 Compulsory + 1 Elective) Project work 19


10 + Term paper +Mini project+
Total 26+4+1 courses Internship report +CCEC + 132
Employability Skills

4.3 Credit Break-up for Various Category of Courses


a. For Four year regular Programme (FSI)
Total Theory Courses : 34 @ 3 credits each = 102
(29 Core Courses + 5 Elective Courses)
Total Integrated Courses : 4 @ 4 credits each = 16
Total Laboratory Courses : 16 @ 2 credits each = 32
Term Paper with self-study report : 1 @ 2 credits = 2
Mini Project with self-study report : 1@ 2 credits = 2
CCEC Activities : 2 @ 1 credits = 2
Employability skills : 2@ 1 credits = 2
FSI internship : 1 @ 16 credits = 16
b. For Four year regular Programme (Non FSI)

Total Theory Courses : 36 @ 3 credits each = 108


(30 Core Courses + 6 Elective Courses)
Total Integrated Courses : 4 @ 4 credits each = 16
Total Laboratory Courses : 16 @ 2 credits each = 32
Term Paper with self-study report : 1 @ 2 credits = 2
Mini Project with self-study report : 1@ 2 credits = 2

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CCEC Activities : 2 @ 1 credits = 2


Employability skills : 2@ 1 credits = 2
Project work : 1 @ 10 credits = 10

c. For three year lateral entry Programme (FSI)

Total Theory Courses : 24 @ 3 credits each = 72


(19 Core Courses + 5 Elective Courses)
Total Integrated Courses : 4 @ 4 credits each = 16
Total Laboratory Courses : 10 @ 2 credits each = 20
Term Paper with self-study report : 1 @ 2 credits = 2
Mini Project with self-study report : 1@ 2 credits = 2
CCEC Activities : 2 @ 1 credits = 2
Employability skills : 2@ 1 credits = 2
Internship report : 1 @ 16 credits = 16

d. For three year lateral entry Programme (Non FSI)

Total Theory Courses : 26 @ 3 credits each = 78


(20 Core Courses + 6 Elective Courses)
Total Integrated Courses : 4 @ 4 credits each = 16
Total Laboratory Courses : 10 @ 2 credits each = 20
Term Paper with self-study report : 1 @ 2 credits = 2
Mini Project with self-study report : 1@ 2 credits = 2
CCEC Activities : 2 @ 1 credits = 2
Employability skills : 2@ 1 credits = 2
Project work : 1 @ 10 credits = 10

4.4 Division of Marks for Continuous and Semester End Assessment

Marks Marks for


Course Continuous Semester end
Assessment Assessment
Theory 40 60
Integrated Course 40 (60T+30L)
Drawing courses 25 50
Laboratory 25 50
Term Paper 50 --
Audit Courses 50 --
Mini Project 25 50
Industry Driven Courses (IDC) 25 --
Full semester Internship 200 200
Project work 100 100

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5. Evaluation Methodology
a. The assessment will be based on the performance in the semester-end examinations and /
or continuous assessment, carrying marks as specified in Clause 10
b. At the end of each semester, final examinations will normally be conducted during
October/November and during April / May of each year. Supplementary examinations may
also be conducted at such times as may be decided by the Institute
c. Continuous Assessment Marks will be awarded on the basis of Continuous Evaluation made
during the semester as per the scheme given in Clause 10
d. The letter grade and the grade points are awarded based on the hybrid grading system
having earned grades and awarded grades. Grading is done based on the percentage of
marks secured by a candidate in individual course as detailed below:

Range of Percentage Letter Qualitative Grade


of Marks Grade Meaning Point
90-100 A+ Outstanding 10
Earned grade
85-89 A Excellent 9
Due to relative B+ Very Good 8
grading system the B Good 7
ranges of marks may C+ Average 6 Awarded grade
vary for each course C Satisfactory 5
based on the normal D Pass 4
distribution of marks
< 40 for theory and F Fail 0
Earned grade
< 50 for Lab

e. After completion of the Programme, the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) from the I
Semester to VIII Semester (from III to VIII semester for lateral entry) is calculated using the
formula:


Where n is the number of courses registered for, ‘c i’ is the credits allotted to the given
course and ‘gi’ is the grade point secured in the corresponding course.

5.1 Continuous Assessment Pattern for all Courses


a. Theory Course

 Out of 40 marks allotted for continuous assessment 30 marks will be awarded based
on two tests (Each Test will be conducted for 40 marks and scale down to 30 marks)
conducted and 10 marks shall be awarded based on assignment test given below:
Internal Test 1 & Test 2 : 30 Marks (80 % of marks secured in 1st best internal tests
and 20% marks secured in 2nd best internal test)
 The duration of each internal test will be 90 minutes addressing predominantly
on lower order thinking skills and shall cover two units of syllabus in each test
 All the students will be notified with the marks secured within one week after the
completion of the sessional exams

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 Students are permitted for reconciliation with in a period of two working days
after the notification of marks
 The evaluation methodology of Design and Drawing Courses coming under
theory will be given in their respective course handouts which will be approved
by department HOD.

Assignment Test : 10 Marks (Test will be conducted for 30 marks and scale
scale down to 10 marks)
 The duration of each test will be 120 minutes predominantly focusing on Higher
Order Thinking Skills covering all the possible range of all such HOTs. In case, if
the course has little scope of HOTs, assessment shall be carried out with LOTs

b. Integrated Course
40 marks allotted for continuous assessment as given below:
Theory Course
20 marks will be awarded based on two tests conducted similar to theory( Each Test
will be conducted for 40 marks and scale down to 20 marks) as given below:
Internal Test 1 & Test 2 : 20 Marks (80 % of marks secured in 1st best internal tests
and 20% marks secured in 2nd best internal test)
Laboratory
20 marks are awarded for continuous assessment and following is the pattern for the
award of 20 marks
Preparation, Observation & Result : 10 Marks
Record : 05 Marks
Internal Test : 05 Marks
External Exam (Lab) : 30 Marks
External Exam (Theory) : 60 Marks
c. Laboratory Course:

25 marks are awarded for continuous assessment and following is the pattern for
the award of 25 marks
Without Mini Project:
Preparation, Observation & Result : 10 Marks
Record : 05 Marks
Internal Test : 05 Marks
Viva – Voce : 05 Marks
With Mini Project (through Augmented Experiments):
Preparation, Observation & Result : 05 Marks
Record : 05 Marks
Internal Test : 05 Marks
Viva – Voce : 05 Marks
Augmented Experiment : 05 Marks

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Engineering drawing course is evaluated in line with lab courses and the
pattern of awarding 25 marks for continuous evaluation is as following
Day-to-day work : 15 marks
Internal test : 10 marks

There shall be two internal tests for 10 marks each during the semester and the
average shall be considered.

d. Term Paper
Continuous Assessment : 50 Marks

Distribution
Literature Survey : 10 Marks
Review 1 : 15 Marks
Review 2 : 15 Marks
Final Presentation : 10 Marks
e. Audit Courses
Online Objective Test : 50 Marks
f. Mini Project
Continuous Assessment : 25 Marks
Distribution
Review 1 : 05 Marks
Review 2 : 05 Marks
Literature Survey : 05 Marks
Final Presentation : 05 Marks

g. Project
Continuous Assessment : 100 Marks
Distribution
Innovativeness of the Project : 05 Marks
Literature Survey : 10 Marks
Experimentation / Simulation : 20 Marks
Result Analysis : 05 Marks
Review 1 : 20 Marks
Review II : 20 Marks
Final Presentation : 10 Marks
Project Report : 10 Marks

h. Full Semester Internship


Continuous Assessment : 200 Marks
Distribution
Internship Progress Report : 20 Marks

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On Site Assessment : 30 Marks


Assessment by Industry : 100 Marks
(Intern Assessment Tool)
Final Assessement on Campus : 50 Marks
Total : 200 Marks
Distribution
Project Report : 120 Marks
Final Presentation : 80 Marks

i. Co-Curricular and Extra Curricular (CCEC) Activities

Students shall acquire 1 credit each in 2nd and 3rd years with the following
scheme:
Scheme of evaluation for the CCEC activities:
 No. of slots in each Semester @ 2 slots every week : 24
 No. of Stream (2-CC + 1-EC) :3
 No. of slots allotted for each stream :8
Requirement for the award of 1- Credit
 Students shall choose at least two streams of events in each semester
 Students shall secure 75% attendance in each stream of events to obtain
a certificate
 Students shall obtain 2 certificates of Participation in each semester.

The credits earned through these courses will be indicated in the grade sheet and
will not be taken into account for CGPA calculation.

j. Employability Skills (ES)

Students have to take up these courses from 3rd – 6th semesters. In both streams i.e
Aptitude Skills & Soft Skills (AS and SS) Students will be assessed in each semester.
Based on the marks secured in continuous assessment, students will be assessed for
AS. Based on the attendance for the various activities scheduled, students will be
assessed for SS. 16 periods are allotted for each stream per semester.

 Assessment for Aptitude skills


Continuous assessment : 30 Marks
Comprehensive Test : 20 Marks

For continuous assessment one examination will be conducted after every 5 weeks for
a maximum of 10 marks each (3x10=30). At the end of the semester a comprehensive
test will conducted for 20 marks. The student shall secure at least 40% marks in each
semester to get qualified.

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Assessment of Soft Skills


Continuous Assessment for Soft skill is done based on the participation of the students
in the various activities schedule during each semester. In every semester 6 activities
under SS will be organized and students are expected to attend at least 4 activities to
get qualified.

Student will secure 1 credit at the end of 4th semester and at the end of 6th semester
subject to the condition that he/she secures 40% marks in AS and 75 attendance in SS
in each semester.

h. Industry Driven One Credit Courses


Online Objective Test : 25 Marks
Grading:
Marks 25 ≤ and 20 ≥ : Excellent
Marks 20 < and 15 ≥ : Very Good
Marks 15 < and 10 ≥ : Good
Marks < 10 : Satisfactory

6. Attendance Requirements

a) It is desirable for a candidate to put on 100% attendance in all the subjects.


However, a candidate shall be permitted to appear for the semester end
examination by maintaining at least 75% of attendance on an average in all the
courses in that semester put together
b) The shortage of attendance on medical grounds can be condoned to an extent of
10% provided a medical certificate is submitted to the Head of the Department
when the candidate reports back to the classes immediately after the leave.
Certificates submitted afterwards shall not be entertained. Condonation fee as fixed
by the college for those who put on attendance between ≥ 65% and <75% shall be
charged before the end examinations. Attendance may also be condoned as per the
State Government rules for those who participate in sports, co-curricular and extra-
curricular activities provided their attendance is in the minimum prescribed limits
for the purpose and recommended by the concerned authority
c) In case of the students having overall attendance less than 65% after condonation
shall be declared detained and has to repeat semester again
d) In case of the student having less than 65% of attendance in any of the course
during a particular semester, he/she is not permitted to appear for that particular
course in the semester end examinations. In such cases, the students need to
undergo extra classes during the vacation or at convenient time to earn the shortage
of attendance. After completing the attendance requirements he/she may be
permitted to appear for the examination and it will be treated as a second attempt
e) His / her academic progress and conduct have been satisfactory

7. Promotion Policies

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 In four year B. Tech. Programme, a student shall be promoted from 2nd year to 3rd
year only if s/he fulfills the academic requirements and earning of minimum 50% of
credits up to 2nd year
 In four year B. Tech. Programme, a student shall be promoted from 3rd year to 4th
year only if s/he fulfills the academic requirements and earning of minimum 50%
credits up to 3rd year
 In three year lateral entry B. Tech. Programme, a student shall be promoted from 3rd
year to 4th year only if s/he fulfills the academic requirements and earning of
minimum 50% credits up to 3rd year

8. Graduation Requirements

a) The following academic requirements shall be met for the award of the B. Tech. Degree
 Student shall secure 174 credits for regular B. Tech. Programme and 132 credits for
the students who entered in second year through lateral entry scheme. However, the
CGPA obtained for the best 167 credits (Excluding any one 3 credit course, CCEC and
ES) and 125 credits(Excluding any one 3 credit course, CCEC and ES)respectively
shall be considered for the award of Grade/Class/Division
 A student of a regular Programme who fails to earn 174 credits within eight
consecutive academic years from the year of his/her admission with a minimum CGPA
of 4.0 shall forfeit his/her degree and his/her admission stands cancelled
 A student of a lateral entry Programme who fails to earn 132 credits within six
consecutive academic years from the year of his/her admission with a minimum CGPA
of 4.0 shall forfeit his/her degree and his/her admission stands cancelled

b) Award of degree

Classification of degree will be as follows:

i. CGPA ≥ 7.5 : Degree with Distinction


ii. CGPA ≥6.5 and < 7.5 : Degree with First Class
iii. CGPA ≥5.0 and < 6.5 : Degree with Second Class
iv. CGPA ≥4.0 and < 5.0 : Degree with Pass Class

 First Class with Distinction: A candidate who qualifies for the award of the Degree
(vide clause 8 (a) having passed all the courses of study of all the eight semesters
(six semesters for lateral entry candidates) at the first opportunity, within eight
consecutive semesters (six consecutive semesters for lateral entry candidates) after
the commencement of his /her study and securing a CGPA of 7.5 and above shall be
declared to have passed in First Class with Distinction. For this purpose the
withdrawal from examination (vide clause 9) will not be construed as an
opportunity for appearance in the examination
 First Class: A candidate who qualifies for the award of the Degree (vide clause 8 (a)
having passed all the courses of study of all the eight semesters (six semesters for
lateral entry candidates) within maximum period of ten consecutive semesters

xvii
GMR Institute of Technology (GMRIT) | Regulation 2016

(eight consecutive semesters for lateral entry candidates) after the commencement
of his /her study and securing a CGPA of 6.5 and above shall be declared to have
passed in First Class
 Second Class : A candidate who qualifies for the award of the Degree (vide clause 8
(a) having passed all the courses of study of all the eight semesters (six semesters
for lateral entry candidates) within maximum period of ten consecutive semesters
(eight consecutive semesters for lateral entry candidates) after the commencement
of his /her study and securing a CGPA of 5.0 and above shall be declared to have
passed in Second Class
 Degree with Pass Mark : All other candidates who qualify for the award of the
degree shall be declared to have passed in Degree with Pass Mark
c) Grafting
In order to extend the benefit to the students with one/ two backlogs after either 6th
semester or 8th semester, GRAFTING option is provided to the students enabling their
placements and fulfilling graduation requirements. Following are the guidelines for the
Grafting:
 Grafting will be done among the courses within the semester. Shall draw a
maximum of 7 marks from the any one of the cleared courses in the semester and
will be grafted to the failed course in the same semester.
 Students shall be given a choice of grafting only once in the 4 years Programme,
either after 6th semester (Option#1) or after 8th semester (Option#2)
 Option#1: Applicable to students who have maximum of TWO theory courses in 5th
and/or 6th semesters
 Option#2: Applicable to students who have maximum of TWO theory courses in 7th
and/or 8th semesters.
 Eligibility for grafting:
i. Prior to the conduct of the supplementary examination after the
declaration of the 6th or 8th semester results.
ii. She/he must appear in all regular or supplementary examinations as
per the provisions laid down in regulations for the courses s/he
appeals for grafting.
iii. The marks obtained by her/him in latest attempt shall be taken into
account for grafting of marks in the failed course(s).
d) Betterment chance
Student who clears all the subjects up to 6th semester and wish to improve their CGPA
can register and appear for one betterment chance for maximum of any five theory
courses up to 6th semester. Betterment chance can be availed along with 7th and 8th
semester examinations

e) Quick Supplementary Examination


Student who clears all the courses up to 7th semester shall have a chance to appear for
Quick Supplementary Examination to clear the failed courses of 8th semester

xviii
GMR Institute of Technology (GMRIT) | Regulation 2016

f) All the candidates who register for the semester end examination will be issued
memorandum of marks by the Institute. Apart from the semester wise marks memos,
the institute will issue the provisional certificate subject to the fulfillment of all the
academic requirements

9. Flexibility to Add or Drop Courses

a. It is mandatory that all the students need to earn the minimum number of credits (as
per clause 8) for the award of B. Tech. degree in their respective disciplines. However a
student can earn more number of credits if they wish, by registering one additional
course, from the list of courses available in the curriculum of all disciplines, over and
above to the existing courses from 4th semester to 6th semester
b. The students who are opting for full semester internship (FSI) in the 7th or 8th Semester,
they are permitted to take the courses as listed in 7th and 8th semester of the curriculum
are from the list of electives furnished in the curriculum
c. The students, who are in non FSI mode, shall register for the project work in the 8 th
semester only
d. The student shall be permitted to drop any SSC at any point of time
e. All the courses registered and cleared by a student in this mode will be mentioned in the
Cumulative Grade Memo (CGM) as additional acquired. However the CGPA is calculated
for the best 167/125 credits only (as mentioned in the clause 8)

10. Withdrawal from the Examination

a. A candidate may, for valid reasons, be granted permission by the Principal to withdraw
from appearing for the examination in any course or courses of only one semester
examination during the entire duration of the degree Programme. Also, only ONE
application for withdrawal is permitted for that semester examination in which
withdrawal is sought
b. Withdrawal application shall be valid only if the candidate is otherwise eligible to write
the examination and if it is made prior to the commencement of the examination in that
course or courses and also recommended by the Head of the Department
c. Such Withdrawal from the examination shall be treated as absent for the 1st attempt to
the respective examination and will lose the eligibility for First Class with Distinction
d. The student shall be allowed to drop FSI course either 7th or 8th semester within 4
weeks from the commencement of the FSI Programme due any uncertainty from either
side. In such case s/he will automatically entered into Non-FSI pattern of curriculum,
and s/he needs to register for respective courses in that semester and appear for
semester end examinations. In case if s/he has earned equivalent number of credits or
near to the equivalent number of credits with respect to clause 9, s/he shall forbid the
courses either partially or fully
e. If any student withdraws from FSI course after the stipulated period mentioned in the
clause 10.d, s/he will be considered as detained from the semester. S/he needs to
register for the semester in the next academic year

xix
GMR Institute of Technology (GMRIT) | Regulation 2016

General

a. s/he represents “she” and “he” both


b. Where the words ‘he’, ‘him’, ‘his’, occur, they imply ‘she’, ‘her’, ‘hers’ also
c. The academic regulations should be read as a whole for the purpose of any interpretation
d. In the case of any doubt or ambiguity in the interpretation of the above rules, the decision of
the Chairman, Academic Council will be final

The college may change or amend the academic regulations or syllabi from time to time and the
changes or amendments made shall be applicable to all the students with effect from the dates
notified by the institute.

11. Curriculum: The curriculum of all the UG Programmes is given below

xx
Department of Chemical Engineering,GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Department Vision
To be a nationally preferred department of learning for students and teachers alike, with dual
commitment to research and serving students in an atmosphere of innovation and critical
thinking.

Department Mission

1. To provide high-quality education in Chemical Engineering to prepare the graduates


for a rewarding career in Chemical Engineering and related industries, in tune with
evolving needs of the industry
2. To prepare the students to become thinking professionals and good citizens who
would apply their knowledge critically and innovatively to solve professional and
social problems

Program Educational Objectives


PEO 1: Acquire the fundamental principles of science and chemical engineering with modern
experimental and computational skills
PEO 2: Ability to handle problems of practical relevance to society while complying with
economical, environmental, ethical, and safety factors
PEO 3: Demonstrate professional excellence, ethics, soft skills and leadership qualities

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Department of Chemical Engineering,GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Program Outcomes
Engineering graduate will be able to

PO 1: Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals, and an


engineering specialization to the solution of complex engineering
problems.(Engineering knowledge)
PO 2: Identify, formulate, review research literature, and analyze complex engineering
problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics,
natural sciences, and engineering sciences.(Problem analysis)
PO 3: Design solutions for complex engineering problems and design system components or
processes that meet the specified needs with appropriate consideration for the public
health and safety, and the cultural, societal, and environmental
considerations.(Design/development of solutions)
PO 4: Use research-based knowledge and research methods including design of
experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of the information to
provide valid conclusions.(Conduct investigations of complex problems)
PO 5: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering
and IT tools including prediction and modeling to complex engineering activities with
an understanding of the limitations.(Modern tool usage)
PO 6: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to assess societal, health,
safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to the
professional engineering practice.(The engineer and society)
PO 7: Understand the impact of the professional engineering solutions in societal and
environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of, and need for sustainable
development.(Environment and sustainability)
PO 8: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and
norms of the engineering practice.(Ethics)
PO 9: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse teams, and
in multidisciplinary settings.(Individual and team work)
PO 10: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering
community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and write
effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give
and receive clear instructions.(Communication)
PO 11: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the engineering and management
principles and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and leader in a team, to
manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.(Project management and
finance)
PO 12: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in independent
and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change.(Life-long
learning)
PO 13: Utilize the knowledge of chemistry, thermodynamics, material and energy balances,
transport processes, reaction engineering, process dynamics and control in optimal
design of Chemical Engineering equipment and processes to meet the desired needs.
(Program Specific)

2
Department of Chemical Engineering,GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Department of Chemical Engineering


[Minimum Credits to be earned: 174 (for regular students)/132(for Lateral entry students)]

First Semester
Course Periods
No Course POs
Code L T P C
1 16HSX01 English Communication Skills I 10 3 1 - 3
2 16MAX01 Engineering Mathematics I 1,2 3 1 - 3
3 16PYX01 Engineering Physics 1,2 3 1 - 3
4 16MEX01 Engineering Mechanics 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
5 16CSX01 Problem Solving using C 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
6 16PYX02 Engineering Physics Lab 4 - - 3 2
7 16CSX02 Problem solving using C Lab 4 - - 3 2
8 16MEX02 Engineering Drawing 4,9,10 - - 3 2
Total 15 5 9 21
Second Semester
1 16HSX03 English Communication Skills II 10 3 1 - 3
2 16MAX02 Engineering Mathematics II 1,2 3 1 - 3
3 16CYX01 Engineering Chemistry 1,2 3 1 - 3
4 16EEX01 Basic Electrical Engineering 1, 3 3 1 - 3
5 16CHX01 Environmental Studies 1,3,6,7 3 1 - 3
6 16HSX02 English Communication Skills Lab 10 - - 3 2
7 16CYX02 Engineering Chemistry Lab 4, - - 3 2
8 16MEX03 Engineering Workshop 1,2,10,12 - - 3 2
Total 15 5 9 21
Third Semester
Course Periods
No Course POs
Code L T P C
1 16CY303 Physical & Analytical Chemistry 1,2 3 1 - 3
2 16CSX01 Object Oriented Programming 1,2,,4,5 3 - 2 4
3 16CH303 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
4 16CH304 Chemical Process Calculations 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
5 16CH305 Introduction to Chemical Engineering and 3 1 - 3
1,8,13
Professional Ethics
6 16CH306 Process Instrumentation 1,2,13 3 1 - 3
7 16CH307 Computational Tools for Chemical - - 3 2
4,5,13
Engineers
8 16CH308 Instrumentation Lab 4 - - 3 2
9 16CY304 Physical &Analytical Chemistry Lab 4 - - 3 2
10 16HSX05 CC&EC Activities I 9,10 - - 3 -
11 16ESX1A Employability Skills I - 2 - -
Total 18 6 12 25
Fourth Semester
1 16MA303 Engineering Mathematics III 1,2,4,5 3 - 2 4
2 16CY405 Organic Chemistry 1,2 3 1 - 3
3 16CH403 Mechanical Unit Operations 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
4 16CH404 Momentum Transfer 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
5 16CH405 Phase and Chemical Equilibria 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
6 16CH406 Process Heat Transfer 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
7 16CH407 MUO Lab 4,13 - - 3 2
8 16CH408 Momentum Transfer Lab 4,13 - - 3 2
9 16CH409 Process Heat Transfer Lab 4,13 - - 3 2
10 16HSX05 CC & EC Activities I 9,10 - - 3 1
11 16ESX1B Employability Skills II - 2 - 1
Total 18 7 12 27

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Department of Chemical Engineering,GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Fifth Semester
Course Periods
No Course POs
Code L T P C
1 16HSX04 Engineering Economics & Project 3 1 - 3
1,2,3,11
Management
2 16CH502 Chemical Technology 1,3,10,13 3 1 - 3
3 16CH503 Homogeneous Reaction Engineering 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
4 16CH504 Principles of Mass Transfer 1,2,3,4,13 3 - 2 4
5 16CH505 Process Dynamics & Control 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
6 Elective I/CC 3 1 - 3
7 16CH507 Process Control Lab 4,13 - - 3 2
8 16CH509/ Term Paper/ - - 3 2
All POs
16CH510 Mini Project
9 16HSX06 CC & EC Activity II 9,10 - - 3 -
10 Summer Internship All POs - - - -
11 16ESX2A Employability Skills III - 2 - -
Total 14 8 12 23
Sixth Semester
1 16CH601 Applications of Mass Transfer 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
2 16CH602 Chemical Engineering Plant Design & 3 1 - 3
3,11,13
Economics
3 16CH603 Chemical Process Equipment Design 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10,13 3 - 2 4
4 16CH604 Heterogeneous Reaction Engineering 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
5 Elective II/CC 3 1 - 3
6 Elective III (Open Elective) 3 1 - 3
7 16CH607 Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab 4,13 - - 3 2
8 16CH509/ Term Paper/ - - 3 2
All POs
16CH510 Mini Project
9 Audit Course - - - -
10 16HSX06 CC & EC Activity II 9,10 - - 3 1
11 16ESX2B Employability Skills IV - 2 - 1
Total 15 6 12 25
Seventh Semester
Course Periods
No Course POs
Code L T P C
1 16CH701 Process Modeling & Simulation 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
2 Elective IV/CC 3 1 - 3
3 Elective V/CC 3 1 - 3
4 16CH704 Mass Transfer Operations Lab 4,13 - - 3 2
5 16CH705 Process Simulation Lab 4,5,13 - - 3 2
6 16CH706 Full Semester Internship1 All POs - - - 16
Total 9 - 6 13/16
Eighth Semester
1 16CH801 Industrial Pollution Control Engineering 1,2,3,7 3 1 - 3
2 16CH802 Transport Phenomena 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
3 Elective VI/CC 3 1 - 3
4 16CH804 Project All POs - - - 10
5 16CH706 Full Semester Internship2 All POs 16
Total 9 - - 19/16

1
Student who opt for FSI-16CH706 during 7th semester, have to register one more additional elective and
16CH704 & 16CH705 as additional lab courses during 8 th semester
2
Student the who opt for FSI-16CH706 during 8th semester, have to register an additional course in consultation
with HoD during 7th semester

4
Department of Chemical Engineering,GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

List of Electives, Contemporary Courses,Audit Courses,Employability Skills and One Credit Courses
Elective I
Course Periods
No Course POs
Code L T P C
1 16CH001 Fertilizer Technology 1,2,13 3 1 - 3
2 16CH002 Pharmaceutical Technology 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
3 16CH003 Polymer Technology 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
4 MOOCs - - - 3
Elective II
1 16CH004 Material Science and Engineering 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
2 16CH005 Petroleum Refining and Petrochemicals 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
3 16CH006 Energy Engineering 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
4 MOOCs - - - 3
Elective III (Open Electives – Mathematics, Chemistry, Entrepreneurship Skills, Industrial Safety and
Engineering & Technology)
1 16CE007 Disaster Management 2 3 1 - 3
2 16EE004 Renewable Energy Sources 2,7 3 1 - 3
3 16ME007 Principles of Entrepreneurship 1,5,8,11 3 1 - 3
4 16EC004 Fundamentals of GPS 1,2,6 3 1 - 3
5 16CS006 Computational Intelligence 1, 5 3 1 - 3
6 16CS007 IoT for Engineering Applications 1,5 3 1 - 3
7 16CH007 Industrial Safety and Hazard Management 1,2,3,6,8 3 1 - 3
8 16IT005 Fundamentals of Cloud Computing 2,5,6 3 1 - 3
9 16PE006 Smart Grid Technology 3,5 3 1 - 3
10 16MA001 Computational Mathematics 1,2 3 1 - 3
11 16CY001 Nano Science & Technology 1,12 3 1 - 3
Elective IV
1 16CH008 Biochemical Engineering 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
2 16CH009 Clean Process Technology 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
3 16CH010 Novel Separation Techniques 1,3,7,13 3 1 - 3
4 16ME011 Computational Fluid Dynamics 3,4,5,13 3 1 - 3
5 MOOCs - - - 3
Elective V
1 16CH011 Corrosion Engineering 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
2 16CH012 Fluidization Engineering 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
3 16CH013 Fuel Technology 1,2 3 1 - 3
4 16CH014 Introduction to Nanotechnology 1,2 3 1 - 3
5 MOOCs - - - 3
Elective VI
1 16CH015 Chemical Engineering Mathematics 1,2,13 3 1 - 3
2 16CH016 Design and Analysis of Experiments 1,2,3,5 3 1 - 3
3 16CH017 Integrated Solid Waste Mangement 1,2,7 3 1 - 3
4 16CH018 Process Intensification 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
5 16CH019 Process Optimization 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
6 16CH020 Scale-up Methods in Chemical Engineering 1,2,3 3 1 - 3
MOOCs - - - 3
Contemporary Courses (CC)
1 16CH021 Bioprocess Engineering 1,2,3,13 3 1 - 3
2 16CH022 Green Engineering 2,3,6,7,11 3 1 - 3
3 16CH023 Chemical Process Safety 1,2,3,6,8,13 3 1 - 3
4 16CH024 Energy Audit in Process Utilities 2,3,11 3 1 - 3

5
Department of Chemical Engineering,GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Employability Skills
1 16ESX01 Employability Skills I 1 - - 1
2 16ESX02 Employability Skills II 1 - - 1
3 16ESX03 Employability Skills III 1 - - 1
4 16ESX04 Employability Skills IV 1 - - 1
One Credit Course(15 Hours)
1 16CHI01 Material and Energy Balance in Process Industry 1,2,3,13 1 0 0 1
2 16CHI02 Chemical Engineering Unit Operations 1,2,3,13 1 0 0 1
3 16CHI03 Reservoir Engineering 1,2,3,13 1 0 0 1
4 16CHI04 Beach Sand Mineral Processing 1,2,3,13 1 0 0 1
Audit Courses
1 16AT001 Contemporary India: Economy, Polity and Society - - - -
(ME)
2 16AT002 Indian Heritage and Culture (EEE) - - - -
3 16AT003 Intellectual Property Rights and Patents (ECE) - - - -
4 16AT004 Introduction to Journalism (CSE) - - - -
5 16AT005 Professional Ethics and Morals (CE) - - - -
6 16AT006 Science, Technology and Development (Chem) - - - -
7 16AT007 Industrial sociology (PE) - - - -
8 16AT008 Organizational Behavior (IT) - - - -
9 16AT009 Communication Etiquette in workplaces (BS & H) - - - -

6
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16HSX01 English Communication Skills I


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Infer explicit and implicit meaning of a text
2. Construct clear, grammatically correct sentences using a variety of sentence structures
3. Analyze and Produce various types & formats of emails, letters in formal & informal ways to meet particular
purposes
4. Select and apply appropriate words and phrases in different contexts
5. Formulate and present ideas effectively in spoken form
6. Discuss social issues with concern and imagine possible solutions

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO10
CO1 3
CO2 3
CO3 3
CO4 3
CO5 3
CO6 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
In London by M. K. Gandhi
Using appropriate word/phrases, synonyms and antonyms, nouns, pronouns, paragraph writing, changing
autobiography into biography
Montgomery Bus Boycott
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Pecuniary Independence by P. T. Barnum
Using appropriate word/phrases, synonyms and antonyms, Adjectives, Adverbs, Note-making, Rewriting sentences
and Short talk
TED-Sashi Tharoor
12+3 Hours
Unit III
The Drunkard by W. H. Smith
Similes, Rhythmic expressions, One-word substitution, Describing people, Synonym and Antonyms, Tenses (past and
present), Gerund and Verbal Adjective, Summarizing, essay writing, writing paragraph
Essay writing tips
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Three Days to see by Hellen Keller
Deriving words, adjective formation, Tenses (future), prefixes, ModalAuxiliary verbs, Dialogue writing, Expressing
opinions/ideas, collecting information
Famous Indians with disability
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. M. S. Rama Murty and M. Hariprasad, Prose for Communication Skills, Ravindra Publishing House,
Hyderabad, 2012

7
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reference (s)
1. J. Seely, Oxford Guide to Effective Writing and Speaking, OUP, 2013
2. Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech and Svartvk, A Comprehensive Grammar of the English language, Pearson, India,
2010
3. R. Murphy, English Grammar in Use, 4th Ed, CUP, Cambridge, 2012
4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montgomery_Bus_Boycott
5. https://www.ted.com/talks/shashi_tharoor?language=en
6. http://www.internationalstudent.com/essay_writing/essay_tips
7. http://www.thebetterindia.com/16449/famous-indians-with-disability

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 1 (%)
Remember 25 25 -
Understand 25 25 -
Apply 50 50 40
Analyze - - 30
Evaluate - - -
Create - - 30
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. Find a synonym for each of the following words.
i. Emulate ii. Mend
2. Find an antonym for each of the following words
i. Intensive ii. Extravagance

Understand
1. Sketch the personality of Edward Middleton as he emerges from the conversation in the play.
2. Summarize Gandhi‘s attempts to model himself on the English gentleman and which circumstances force him
to realize that he has been pursuing a false idea?

Apply
1. Construct a dialogue between students about organizing music club activities in their college.
2. Construct a dialogue between two friends about how they plan their own careers.

Analyze and Create


1. Prepare an essay in about 300 words on ‗some concrete measures to combat pollution.
2. Create an imaginary conversation between a blind boy and his friend on their visit to a drama.

1
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

8
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16MAX01 Engineering Mathematics I


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Classify and solve analytically a wide range of first and higher order ordinary differential equations with
constant coefficients
2. Apply the knowledge of Mean value theorems, Maxima and Minima of functions of several variables
3. Analyze the characteristics and trace the curve of an equation
4. Adapt methods for measuring lengths, volumes, surface area of an object and transformation of coordinates in
practical situations
5. Utilize basic knowledge of conservative field, potential function and work done in engineering problems
6. Identify the relationships between line, surface and volume integrals

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO1 PO2

1 3 2
2 3 2
3 3 2
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Differential Equations
Differential equations of first order and first degree–exact, linear and Bernoulli Applications to Newton‘s Law of
cooling, Law of natural growth and decay, orthogonal trajectories, Non-homogeneous linear differential equations of
second and higher order with constant coefficients with RHS term of the type e ax, Sin ax, cos ax, polynomials in x,
eaxV(x), xV(x)
Heat flow problems–Variation of parameters 11+4 Hours

Unit II
Mean Value Theroms and Functions of Several Variables
Generalized Mean Value theorem (All theorems without proof), Functions of several variables-Partial differentiation,
Functional dependence, Jacobian, Maxima and Minima of functions of two variables with constraints and without
constraints. Curve tracing-Cartesian-Polar and Parametric curves
Rolle’s, Lagrange’s and Cauchy’s mean value theorems–Generalized Mean Value theorem proofs
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Applications of Integration
Applications of Integration to Lengths, Volumes and Surface areas of revolution in Cartesian and Polar Coordinates.
Multiple integrals-double and triple integrals, change of variables (Cartesian and Polar coordinates), Change of order
of Integration
Applications of Integration–Centroid–Mass 12+3 Hours

Unit IV
Vector Calculus
Vector Differentiation-Gradient, Divergence, Curl and their related properties of sums-products, Laplacianoperator,
Vector Integration - Line integral, work done, Potential function, area, surface and volume integrals, Vector integral
theorems: Greens, Stokes and Gauss Divergence Theorems (All theorems without proof) and related problems
Vector identities–Proof of Green’s theorem 11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. B. S. Grewal, Higher Engineering Mathematics, 42 nd Ed., Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 2012
2. E. Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 9th Ed., Wiley, 2012

9
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

3. R. K. Jain, S. R. K.Iyengar, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 4 th Ed., NarosaPublishingHouse,


NewDelhi, 2014

Reference (s)
1. B. V. Ramana, Engineering Mathematics, 4th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2009
2. D. S. Chandrashekharaiah, Engineering Mathematics, Volume 1, Prism Publishers, 2010
3. T. K. V. Iyengar, B. Krishna Ghandhi, S. Ranganathan and M.V. S.S.N. Prasad, Engineering Mathematics,
Volume-I, 12th Ed., S. Chand Publishers, 2014
4. U. M. Swamy, P. VijayaLaxmi, K. L. Sai Prasad and M. Phani Krishna Kishore, A Text Book of
Engineering Mathematics–I, Excel Books, New Delhi, 2010

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test2 (%)
Remember 30 30 -
Understand 40 40 -
Apply 30 30 60
Analyze - - -
Evaluate -- - 30
Create -- - 10
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. Find the Integrating factor of  x y  2xy  dx   x
2 2 3

 3x 2 y dy  0

2. Define solenoidal and irrotational for a Vector point function f .
3. Find the volume of solid generated by the revolution of the cardioid r = a(1+cos ) about the initial line =0
Understand
1. Solve ( D 2  4 D  4) y  0
d2 y dy
2. Solve 2
 6  25 y  e2 x  Sin x
dx dx
3. Find the volume of the greatest rectangular parallelopiped that can be inscribed in the ellipsoid
x2 y 2 z 2
  1
a 2 b2 c 2
Apply
1. A body originally at 80 0Ccools down to 60 oC in 20 minutes, the temperature of the air being 40 oC.What
will be the temperature of the body after 40 minutes from original?
2. Evaluate the integral by the change of order of integration ∫ ∫
3. Show that the vector ̅+ ̅ ̅ is irrotational and find its Scalar potential

Create
1. Apipe 20 cm in diameter contains steam at 200 0C. It is covered by a layer of insulation 6cm thick and
thermal conductivity 0.0003. If the temperarature of the outer surface is 30 oC. Find the heat lose per hour
from 2 meter length of the pipe

2
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

10
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16PYX01 Engineering Physics


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Illustrate the concepts of Interference, Diffraction, Polarization and their applications
2. Summarize the concepts of electric fields, magnetic fields and superconductivity and make out the scope of
applications in various engineering fields
3. Outline the quantum mechanics to infer conductivity nature of metals
4. Explain the properties and application of dielectric, magnetic and Nano-materials
5. Demonstrate the emission of laser light, optical fibers and their applications in various Engineering fields
6. Analyze the engineering Applications based on Fundamental concepts

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2

1 3 2
2 3 2
3 3 2
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Optics
Interference:Superposition of waves-Coherence-Young's double slit experiment-Interference in thin films by reflection
(Qualitative treatment)–Newton's rings.Diffraction: Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffractions-Fraunhoffer diffraction at a
single slit-Diffraction grating-Grating spectrum, Polarization–Types of Polarization-Double refraction-Nicol prism-
Quarter and Half wave plate. Lasers: Characteristics of laser–Stimulated absorption–Spontaneous emission-Stimulated
emission–Population inversion–Pumping mechanism–Active medium–Laser systems: Ruby laser-He-Ne laser–
Semiconductor laser–Applications of Lasers
Wedge shaped film–Polarization–Holography
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Electrostatics and Electromagnetism
Gauss law in electricity and it‘s applications: Coulomb‘s law from Gauss law-spherically distributed charge- Infinite
line of charge-Infinite sheet of charges–Ampere's Law-Magnetic field due to current (Biot-Savart‘s Law)-B due to a
current carrying wire and a circular loop,-Faraday‘s law of induction-Lenz‘s law-Induced fields-Maxwell‘s equations
(Qualitative treatment)-Hall Effect-Electromagnetic Wave and poynting vector (Qualitative treatment),
Superconductivity–Superconductivity phenomenon-General properties-Meissner effect- Penetration depth-Type I and
type II superconductors-Flux quantization-DC and AC Josephson effect- Applications of superconductors
Infinite line of charge–Infinite sheet of charges Quantum Interference (SQUID)
11+3 Hours
Unit III
Quantum Theory of Solids–Semiconductors–Optical Fiber
Quantum theory of solids: Dual nature of matter, properties of matter waves-Schrödinger‘s wave equation– Physical
significance of wave function–Particle in a box (one dimensional)-Free electron theory of metals, electrical
conductivity-quantum free electron theory–Fermi Dirac Distribution-Kronig-Penney model (qualitative)-Classification
of materials into conductors-semi-conductors & insulators. Semiconductors: Carrier Concentration (Intrinsic and
Extrinsic, qualitative treatment only), Carrier drift, Carrier diffusion, Optical Fiber: –principle and propagation of light
in optical fibers–Numerical aperture and acceptance angle–types of optical fibers–single and multimode, step index
and graded index fibers–applications–fiber optic communication system
Uncertainty principle–Intrinsic and Extrinsic Semiconductor–Fiberoptic sensors
12+4 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Unit IV
Magnetic, Dielectric & Nanomaterials
Magnetic Materials: Origin of magnetic moment (Bohr Magneton)-Classification of Magnetic materials-Dia, para,
ferro, Anti-ferro and Ferri magnetism-Domain and Weiss field theory (qualitative treatment only)- Hysteresis Curve-
Soft and Hard magnetic materials-Applications of magnetic materials
Dielectric Materials: Dielectric Polarization-Electronic, ionic and orientation polarizations (Qualitative treatment) -
Dielectrics in alternating fields-frequency dependence of the Polarizability ((Qualitative treatment), Important
dielectric materials
Nanomaterials: Introduction to nano materials-Physical, mechanical-electrical and optical properties of nano materials-
Preparation techniques of nano materials (Sol-Gel, CVD, Ball Milling)-Nano tubes-Different methods of preparation
carbon nano tubes (CNT‘s) (CVD)-Applications of Nanomaterials
Permeability–Magnetization–Dielectric constant–Ferro and Piezo electric effect and materials
10+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. Halliday, Resnick and Krane, Physics Part-II, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd, 2012
2. S. O. Pillai, Solid State Physics, 6th Ed., Newage International Publishers, 2015
3. M. R. Srinivasan, Engineering Physics, 2 nd Ed., Newage International Publishers, 2014
4. A. S. Vasudeva, Modern Engineering Physics, S. Chand and Company, New Delhi, 2006
5. C. M. Srivastava and C.Srinivasan, Science of Engineering Materials, Wiley Eastern Pvt. Ltd, 1997
6. C. P. Poole and F. J. Owens, Introduction to Nanotechnology, Wiley, New Delhi, 2007
Reference (s)
1. R. K. Gour and S. L. Gupta, Engineering Physics, Dhanpathrai Publications, New Delhi, 2002
2. V. Rajendran, Engineering Physics, McGraw Hill Education (India) Private LTD, 2010
3. M. Armugam, Engineering Physics, Anuradha Agencies, 2007

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 3(%)
Remember 40 40 -
Understand 40 40 -
Apply 20 20 80
Analyze - - 20
Evaluate - - -
Create - - -
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. Define Principle of Superposition?
2. State Faraday‘s law of electromagnetic induction and Lenz‘s law.
3. Summarize Meissenr‘s effect of super conductors.

Understand
1. Explain the construction and working principle of Nicole‘s prism.
2. Construct Ruby laser and explain its working principle with energy level diagram.
3. Conclude the inferences from the M-H characteristics of Type-1 and Type-2 super conductors.
Apply
1. List any four applications of lasers with reference to their characteristics.
2. Apply Biot-Savart‘s law, and calculate the Magnetic field induction along the infinite length of a straight conductor
at points close to the conductor.
3. Calculate electric field intensity due to infinite line of charge by applying Gauss law.

3
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Analyze
1. Compare Fraunhoffer‘s diffraction and Fresnel‘s diffractions.
2. Discuss the role of Meta stable states in lasing action.
3. Discuss the BCS theory of Superconductors.

13
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16MEX01 Engineering Mechanics


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Draw the free body diagram of a given physical system and compute the resultant of a given coplanar system
of forces
2. Estimate the centroid of composite figures and bodies
3. Estimate area moment of inertia and mass moment of inertia of composite figures and bodies
4. Explain concepts of friction and principle of virtual work
5. Summarize power transmission through belts
6. Analyze plane truss (frame) by method of joints and method of sections
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3

1 3 2 2
2 3 2 2
3 3 2 2
4 3 2 2
5 3 2 2
6 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
System of forces-Equilibrium of system of forces
Types of Force systems-Coplanar Concurrent Forces–Resultant–Moment of a Force and its application– Couples and
Resultant of a Force System, Free body diagrams, equations of equilibrium of coplanar concurrent and non-concurrent
force systems, Lami‘s theorem, resolution of a force into a force and a couple
Polygon law of forces for resultant
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Centroid-Centre of Gravity-Area Moments of Inertia-Mass Moment of Inertia
Centroids of simple figures (from basic principles)-Centroids of Composite Figures, Centre of gravity of simple body
(from basic principles), center of gravity of composite bodies, Definition–Moments of Inertia of simple Figures, Polar
Moment of Inertia, Transfer Theorem, Moments of Inertia of Composite Figures. Definition, Moment of Inertia of
simple bodies, Transfer Formula for Mass Moments of Inertia
Mass moment of inertia of composite bodies
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Friction-Power transmission through belts
Theory of friction–Angle of friction–Laws of friction-static friction–Kinetic friction, friction in bodies moving up or
down on an inclined plane-Introduction to belt and rope drives, types of belt drives, velocity ratio of belt drives, slip of
belt drives, tensions for flat belt drive, angle of contact, centrifugal tension, maximum tension of belt
Condition for transmission of maximum power
11+4Hours
Unit IV
Analysis of perfect frames (Analytical Method)-Virtual Work
Types of Frames-Assumptions for forces in members of a perfect frame, Method of joints, Method of sections, Force
table, Cantilever Trusses, Structures with one end hinged and the other freely supported on rollers carrying horizontal
or inclined loads, Principle of Virtual Work-Application of the Principle of Virtual Work-potential Energy and
Equilibrium
Stable and Unstable Equilibrium 11+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. K. Vijay Kumar Reddy, J. Suresh Kumar, Singer's Engineering Mechanics Statics and Dynamics, BS
Publications, 3rd Edition, 2011
2. A. K. Tayal, Engineering Mechanics Statics and Dynamics, Umesh Publications, 14th Edition, 2011
3. S. S. Bhavikatti, Engineering Mechanics, New Age International, 2008
4. S. Timoshenko & D. H. Young, and JV Rao, Engineering Mechanics, 4th Ed., TMH Education, 2006
Reference (s)
1. Irving H. Shames and G. Krishna MohanaRao, Engineering Mechanics, 4 th Ed., Pearson, 2006
2. R. K. Bansal, Engineering Mechanics, Laxmi Publications, 3rd Ed., 2004
Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 4(%)
Remember 20 20 -
Understand 30 30 -
Apply 50 50 60
Analyze -- - 40
Evaluate -- - -
Create -- - -
Total (%) 100 100 100
Sample question (s)
Remember
1. Define centroid
2. List the different types of belt drives
3. Define angle of repose

Understand
1. Explain Lami‘s theorem
2. Compare mass moment of inertia and area moment of inertia
3. Explain the difference between frame and truss

Apply
1. Solve the resultant of three forces acting on a hook as shown in below figure

2. Identify the centroid of T-section shown in below figure

3. Solve to find the power transmitted by a belt running over a pulley of 600 mm diameter at 200 r.p.m. The
coefficient of friction between the belt and the pulley is 0.25, angle of lap 160° and maximum tension in the
belt is 2500 N

4
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

15
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CSX01 Problem Solving using C


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Develop the flow charts and algorithms, and then implement, compile and debug programs in C language for
solving a problem
2. Design programs involving decision structures, loops for problem solving
3. Design programs to develop applications using array data structure
4. Solve scientific problems using functions
5. Make use of pointers to design applications for efficient and dynamic memory allocation
6. Design programs to create/update basic data files

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO1 PO2 PO3
1 3 3 3
2 3 3 2
3 3 3 2
4 3 3 3
5 2 2 3
6 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Programming Basics
Introduction, Algorithm / pseudo code, flowchart, program development steps, structure of a C program, Types,
Operators, and Expressions: C-tokens, Variable Names, Data Types and Sizes, Constants, Declarations, C-operators,
Type Conversions, Precedence and Order of Evaluation
Control Flow: Statements and Blocks, If-Else, Else-If, Switch, Loops-While and For, Loops- Do-while, Break and
Continue
Comma and size of operators–Conditional Expressions–goto and Labels 12+3 Hours
Unit II
Arrays and Functions
Array concept, definition, declaration, accessing elements, storing elements, strings and string manipulations, 2-D
arrays, Multidimensional arrays, Array Applications
Basics of Functions, Functions Returning Non-integers, External Variables, Scope Rules, Static Variables, Block
Structure, Storage Classes, user defined functions, standard library functions, recursive functions, passing Arrays to
functions, Functions Applications
Arithmetic operations on string–nesting of functions–preprocessor commands 11+4 Hours
Unit III
Pointers and Structures
Pointer concepts, initialization of pointer variables, pointers and function arguments, passing by address, dangling
memory, address arithmetic, Character pointers and functions, pointers to pointers, dynamic memory management
functions
Basics of Structures, Structures and Functions, Arrays of Structures, Pointers to Structures, Self-referential Structures,
typedef, Unions
Programs on Dynamic memory management using functions–Table Lookup
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
File Structures
Standard Input and Output, Formatted Output-printf, Variable-length Argument Lists, Formatted Input-scanf, File
Access
Data Structures: Introduction to linear and non-linear data Structures, definition: stack, queue
Error Handling-stderr and exit–Introduction to Single Linked Lists
11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. B. W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie, The C–Programming Language-, 2nd Ed., PHI, 1990
2. H. Sahni and A. Freed, Fundamentals of Data Structures in C, 2nd Ed., Universities Press, 2008

Reference (s)
1. Y. Kanetkar, Let us C, 8th Ed., BPB Publication, 2004
2. F. E. V. Prasad, C Programming: A Problem-Solving Approach, Giliberg, Cengage, 2010
3. A. S. Tenenbaum, Y. Langsam and M. J. Augenstein,Data Structures using C, Pearson Education, 2009

Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 5(%)
Remember 25 20 -
Understand 35 40 -
Apply 40 40 40
Analyze - - 40
Evaluate - - 20
Create - - -
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. Define computer
2. List out operators
3. What is dangling pointer

Understand
1. Explain structure of a c program
2. Describe linear and nonlinear data structures
3. Explain multidimensional arrays

Apply
1. Implement matrix multiplication using arrays
2. Draw flow chart of program development steps
3. Demonstrate pointe to pointer concept.

Analyze
1. Compare structure and union
2. Differentiate logical and relational operators
3. Classify linear and nonlinear data structures

5
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

17
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16PYX02 Engineering Physics Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Build the knowledge in the scientific methods and learn the process of measuring different physical
parameters
2. Develop the laboratory skills in handling of electrical and Optical instruments
3. Demonstrate the interference and diffraction phenomena of light
4. Inspect and experience physical principles of Magnetic fields and optical fiber communications
5. Apply the principles of physics and measure the solid state properties of materials
6. Design and analyze experiment based on physics concepts
COs – POs Mapping
COs PO4

1 3
2 3
3 3
4 3
5 3
6 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1. Variation of magnetic field along the axis of current-carrying circular coil-Stewart and Gee‘s Method
2. Determination of wavelengths of spectral line of mercury spectrum using diffraction grating
3. Determination of radius of curvature of convex lens by forming Newton‘s rings
4. LCR circuit- Study of parallel and series Resonance
5. Measurement of thickness of a thin paper using wedge method
6. Fiber optics-Numerical aperture of a given fiber and study of bendig losses
7. Meldie‘s Experiment–Transverse and longitudinal modes
8. Determination of wave length of Laser by diffraction grating
9. Determination of Hall Coefficient and charge carrier density of semi-conductor
10. Determination of Band gap of a semiconductor

List of Augmented Experiments6


1. To study the magnetization (M) of a ferromagnetic material in the presence of a magnetic field B and to plot the
hysteresis curve (M vs. B)
2. Study theThermoemf of the thermo couple
3. LCR Series and Parallel–Design of circuit for various resonance frequencies
4. Determination of characteristics of Laser beam
5. Determination of Horizontal component of earth‘s magnetic field
6. Study of double refraction in calcite crystals
7. Dispersive power of various liquids using spectrometer
8. Photo cell–Characteristics and determination of Planks constant

Reading Material (s)


1. Physics Lab manual–Department of Physics, BS & H, GMRIT, Rajam, 2015
2. Y. Aparna and K. Venkateswararao, Engineering Physics–I and II, VGS Techno series, 2010
3. S. Panigrahi and B. Mallick, Engineering Practical Physics, Cengage leaning, Delhi, 2015

6
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

18
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CSX02 Problem Solving using C Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Implement, compile and debug programs in C language for solving a problem
2. Design programs involving decision structures, loops for problem solving
3. Design programs to develop applications using array data structure
4. Apply functions to solve real world problems
5. Make use of pointers to design applications with efficientuse of memory
6. Design programs to create/update basic data files

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO4
1 3
2 3
3 3
4 3
5 3
6 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1. Algorithms and Flow charts design and evaluation (Minimum 2)
2. Write C Programs to demonstrate C-tokens and operators
3. Write C Programs to demonstrate Decision Making And Branching (Selection)
4. Write a C program to demonstrate different loops
5. Write a C program to demonstrate arrays
6. Write a C program to demonstrate functions
7. Write a C program to implement the following
A. To manipulate strings using string handling functions.
B. To manipulate strings without using string handling functions
8. Write a C program to demonstrate different library functions
9. Write a C program to implement the following
A. To exchange two values using call by value and reference
B. To multiply two matrices using pointers
10. Write a C program to demonstrate functions using pointers
11. Write a C program to implement the following operations using structure and functions:
i) Reading a complex number ii) Writing a complex number
12. Write a C program
A. To copy data from one file to another
B. To reverse the first n characters in a given file (Note: The file name and n are specified on the
command line)
List of Augmented Experiments7
1. Merging of two arrays
2. Arithmetic operations on two complex numbers
3. Employee's Management System
4. Library management
5. Department store system
6. Personal Dairy Management System
7. Telecom Billing Management System
8. Bank Management System
9. Contacts Management
10. Medical Store Management System

Reading Material (s)


1. C Programming Lab manual–Department of CSE-GMRIT Rajam

7
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

19
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16MEX02 Engineering Drawing


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Understand Principles of engineering drawing
2. Construct Conic sections using general methods and other methods
3. Construct Orthographic projections of Points, Lines and Planes
4. Construct Orthographic projections of Solids using basic drafting software
5. Construct Isometric projections using basic drafting software
6. Construct Orthographic projections from given isometric projections of an object and vice versa

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO4 PO9 PO10
1 3 3 3
2 3 3 3
3 3 3 3
4 3 3 3
5 3 3 3
6 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
Unit I
Conic Sections-Introduction to Orthographic Projections
Construction of conics using general method and other special methods
Orthographic Projections of Points, Straight Lines parallel to both planes, parallel to one plane and inclined to other
plane
9 Hours
Unit II
Orthographic Projections of Straight Lines and Planes
Projections of Straight Lines inclined to both planes; Projections of Planes; Regular Planes Perpendicular Parallel to
one Reference Plane and inclined to other Reference Plane; inclined to both the Reference Planes
Practice the following topics by using any one 2D drafting software
9 Hours
Unit III
Projections of Solids &Isometric Projections
Projections of Prisms, Cylinders, Pyramids and Cones with the axis inclined to one Principal Plane and Parallel to the
other, Projections of Prisms, Cylinders, Pyramids and Cones inclined to both the Principal Planes
Introduction to Isometric Projections, Isometric axes, angles, Isometric views, Construction of Isometric views of
Simple planes and Solids in various positions
15 Hours
Unit IV
Conversion of Engineering Views
Conversion of Orthographic Views of Simple Solid objects into Isometric View, Conversion of Isometric View of
Simple Solid objects into Orthographic Views
9 Hours
Total: 42 Hours
List of Drawing Sheets
1. Conics by General Method
2. Conics by using Special Methods
3. Projections of Points and Straight lines in Simple Positions
4. Projections of Lines inclined to both planes
5. Projections of Planes in Simple positions
6. Projections of Planes inclined to both planes
7. Projections of Solids

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

8. Projections of Solids inclined to both planes


9. Isometric Projections
10. Conversion of Orthographic views into Isometric views
11. Conversion of Isometric views into Orthographic views

List of Augmented Experiments8


1. Draw the Knuckle Pin and fork end of the knuckle joint
2. Draw the Socket and spigot cotter joint
3. Draw the Tommy bar and body of the Screw jack
4. Draw the Cup and Big and Small screws of screw jack
5. Draw the Connecting rod of IC Engine using AutoCAD
6. Draw the Pipe spool with flanges and a valve
7. Draw a sample pipe line construction design in oil and gas industries using AutoCAD
8. Draw the Pipe truss design using AutoCAD
9. Draw a 3-D bolt and nut with Threads using AutoCAD
10. Draw a 3-D Cross head pattern using AutoCAD
11. Draw the sample Bridge using AutoCAD
12. Draw the pipe vice using AutoCAD
13. Draw the Ni-Cd Battery zapper circuit diagram using AutoCAD
14. Draw the circuit diagram of battery charger with automatic cutoff using AutoCAD
15. Draw the satellite dish and Antenna using AutoCAD

Reading Material (s)


Textbook (s)
1. N.D. Bhatt, V. M. Panchal, Pramod R. Ingle, Engineering drawing, Charotar Publications, 54th Edition, 2014
2. D. M. Kulkarni, A.P. Rastogi, Ashoke K. Sarkar, Engineering Graphics with Auto CAD, Prentice Hall of
India, 2nd Edition, 2010

Reference (s)
1. K. C. John, Engineering Graphics for Degree, PHI Publications, 2nd Edition, 2009
2. M. B. Shah and B. C. Rana, Engineering Drawing, Pearson Publishers, 2nd Edition, 2009
3. D. A. Jolhe, Engineering Drawing, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 1st Edition, 2008

8
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

21
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16HSX03 English Communication Skills II


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Build new academic vocabulary & phrases and make use of them in different contexts
2. Construct clear, grammatically correct sentences using a variety of sentence structures
3. Analyze and Produce various types & formats of emails, letters in formal & informal ways to meet particular
purposes
4. Compose and present ideas logically in written form
5. Organize ideas effectively in spoken form
6. Discuss social issues with concern and imagine possible solutions

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO10

1 3
2 3
3 3
4 3
5 3
6 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
The Knowledge Society by A. P. J. Abdul Kalam
Forming Negative words, Quantifiers, Letter Writing, Interviews, Scientific Terminology
Famous Indian Scientist Inventions
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Principles of Good Writing by L. A. Hill
Word definitions, Articles, e-mail writing, Debates, Noticing changes in English, Origin and meaning of borrowed
words
Effective writing tips
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Man’s Peril by Bertrand Russell
Deriving nouns, Prepositions, Phrasal verbs, Speeches, Report Writing, Problem solving
Bertrand Russell and Einstein Manifesto
12+3 Hours
Unit IV
Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell
Using an appropriate word, conjunctions, voices, Cover letters, Resume, Dialogue writing, Group Discussion
Abridged version of Animal Farm
11+4 Hours
Total :45+15Hours
Textbook (s)
1. M. S. Rama Murty and M. Hariprasad, Prose for Communication Skills, Ravindra Publishing House,
Hyderabad, 2012
Reference (s)
1. J. Seely, Oxford Guide to Effective Writing and Speaking, OUP, 2013
2. Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech and Svartvik, A Comprehensive Grammar of the English language, Pearson, India,
2010

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

3. Raymond Murphy, English Grammar in Use, 4th Ed, CUP, Cambridge, 2012
4. http://www.famousscientists.org/15-famous-indian-scientists-inventions/
5. http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/effWrite.asp
6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell%E2%80%93Einstein_Manifesto)
7. http://cbhs.portlandschools.org/UserFiles/Servers/Server_1098483/File/Migration/Animal-Farm-
Abridged.pdf

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 9(%)
Remember 25 25 -
Understand 25 25 -
Apply 50 50 40
Analyze 30
Evaluate -- - -
Create -- - 30
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. Write one synonym for each of the following words.
a) Generate (b) Vivid
2. Write an antonym for each of the following words.
a) Unique (b) Interesting
3. Fill in the blanks with some or any in the following sentences.
a) There isn‘t ______ milk here.
b) She has _____ books and pens.

Understanding
1. Read the following passage
There is no dearth of fake patriotism in the world to disguise one‘s weakness of failure in administration and
planning. It rather becomes an instrument in the hands of dictators and selfish rulers to keep their position safe. One
can hear the slogans of patriotism on both the sides of the line of demarcation in the Indian sub-continent. When there
is dissatisfaction among the masses these slogans would be raised—‗danger is lurking on the borders‘, ‗the enemy is
making preparation to attack our country‘. This is not patriotism but perverse thinking for selfish motives. Patriotism
does not require a whip to rouse the sentiments of the people—if it is true patriotism. The unity achieved during war
may be a result of apprehension of slavery, not necessarily true emotion generated by patriotism. It is in the blood of
the people to mould their life according to the needs of the motherland. It is not in the expediency to create
circumstances befitting one‘s own interests. It is rather regrettable that patriotism is the greatest casualty in almost all
the fields in our country. Political expediency and self-motives have become supreme, to the extent that even to talk of
patriotism is labeled as puerile of reactionary. Let us take inspiration from the young girl who wept and cried bitterly
for she could not offer flowers on the war memorial in London, for none of her forefathers had laid his life for the
cause of the nation. Let us inculcate this noble spirit among people if we have to bring back the glory that was India.
Answer the following question.
a) Show the effect of fake patriotism?
b) When are the slogans of patriotism raised?
c) Is this type of patriotism real patriotism? Whom does it benefit?
d) Is the unity during war real patriotism? Does true patriotism require any instigation?
e) What does the author regret?
f) Explain the result of political expediency and selfish motives?
g) Why did the little girl cry bitterly? Do we learn anything from her?
h) Locate the synonym of the word ‗conceal’ from the passage.
i) Find the antonym of the word ‗cheerful‘ from the passage.
j) Suggest a suitable title to the passage.
2. Read the following passage and answer the questions on it:
Many matters, however, are less easily brought to the test of experience. If, like most of mankind, you have
passionate convictions on many such matters, there are ways in which you can make yourself aware of your own bias.
If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no

9
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

23
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

good reason for thinking as you do. If someone maintains that two and two are five, you feel pity rather than anger,
unless you know so little of arithmetic that his opinion shakes your own conviction. The most savage controversies are
those about matters as to which there is no good evidence either way. Persecution is used in theology, not in arithmetic
because in arithmetic there is knowledge, but in theology there is only opinion. So, whenever you find yourself getting
angry about your difference of opinion, be on your guard; you will probably find, on examination, that your belief is
going beyond what the evidence warrants.

Answer the following questions


a) Do you consider the content of the passage, legal or logical? Ans: logical
b) Is the author of the passage finally telling you about changing your opinion? Ans: No giving info.
c) According to the passage when do we feel pity? Ans: When someone knowledge so poorer then minimum
standards.
d) What is the meaning of the word ‗savage‘ as used in the passage? Ans: uncivilized / unfair
e) What is the general reaction to an opinion contrary to your own? Ans: we get angry at first.
f) ‗In arithmetic there is no scope for opinion’-explain.

Apply
1. Develop an essay on the theme of ―Digital India and its consequences‖ in about 200 words.
2. Write a letter to your friend who is exclusively occupied with his studies. Advise him to take part in games

Analyze
1. Discuss the chief components of knowledge society with reference to India according to Dr. A. P. J. Abdul
Kalam.
2. Analyze L. A. Hill‘s principles of good writing in achieving ‗vivid expression, simple and conversational
tone‘ to make the writing interesting to the readers.
3. Explain how L.A. Hill‘s principles of good writing are helpful to become a successful writer. (in about 250
words)

Create

1. Imagine yourself to be the instructor of a course in which 75 students have registered. Draft an email to all
your students asking them to prepare a presentation on the topic of their choice.
2. Build a model essay on impact of social media on youth.

24
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16MAX02 Engineering Mathematics II


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Apply matrix knowledge to Engineering problems
2. Solve problems related to engineering applications using integral transform techniques
3. Make use of Laplace transforms in solving the differential equations with the initial and boundary conditions
4. Apply the concept of Fourier series of periodic functions and expand a function in sine and cosine series
5. Solve problems related to basic linear and non-linear partial differential equations
6. Formulate and solve some of the physical problems of engineering using partial differential equations

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2

1 3 3
2 3 2
3 3 2
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Matices
Linear systems of equations: Rank-Echelon form, Normal form–Solution of Linear Systems–Rank Method and Gauss
Seidal Method
Eigen values–Eigen vectors–Properties–Cayley-Hamilton Theorem (without proof)–Inverse and powers of a matrix by
using Cayley-Hamilton theorem, Quadratic forms-Reduction of quadratic form to canonical form– Rank–Positive,
negative, semi definite–index–signature
LU Decomposition Method
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Laplace Transforms
Laplace transforms of standard functions–Shifting Theorems, Transforms of derivatives and integrals–Unit step
function–Dirac delta function
Inverse Laplace transforms by Partial fractions–Convolution theorem (without proof)-Application of Laplace
transforms to ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients
Laplace Transform of Periodic Functions 11

11+4 Hours
Unit III
Fourier Series and Transformations
Fourier series–even and odd functions–Half-range sine and cosine series, Fourier integral theorem (without proof)–
Fourier transforms–sine and cosine transforms–properties–inverse transforms–Finite Fourier transforms
Fourier Transform of Convolution Products
12+3 Hours
Unit IV
Partial Differential Equations and Applications
Formation of partial differential equations-by elimination of arbitrary constants and arbitrary functions– solutions of
first order linear (Lagrange) equations and nonlinear equations (standard types)–Method of Separation of Variables-
Applications to wave equation, heat conduction equation in one dimension and homogeneous Laplace equation in
Cartesian coordinates in two dimensions
Charpits Method
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours

25
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. B. S. Grewal, Higher Engineering Mathematics, 42 nd Ed., Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 2012
2. S. R. K. Iyengar, R. K. Jain, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 4 th Ed., Narosa Publishing House, New
Delhi, 2014
3. B. V. Ramana, Engineering Mathematics, 4th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2009

Reference (s)
1. T. K. V. Iyengar, B. Krishna Ghandhi, S. Ranganathan and M. V. S. S. N. Prasad, Engineering Mathematics,
12th Ed.,Volume–I, S. Chand Publishers, 2014
2. U. M. Swamy, P. Vijaya Laxmi, K. L. Sai Prasad and M. Phani Krishna Kishore, A Text Book of
Engineering Mathematics–II, Excel Books, New Delhi, 2010
3. D. S. Chandrashekharaiah, Engineering Mathematics, Vol–1, Prism Publishers, 2010
4. Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 9th Ed., Wiley, 2012

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 10(%)
Remember 30 30 -
Understand 40 40 -
Apply 30 30 60
Analyze - - -
Evaluate -- -- 30
Create -- -- 10
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. Define rank of the matrix
2. Define unit step function
3. Write the Fourier sine transform of 𝑓( )

Understand
1. If 𝑓 in the interval[ ], then for what values of the Fourier series of 𝑓 contains only
sine terms

2. Form the partial differential equation by eliminating arbitrary constants from


z  ( x 2  a)( y 2  b)
3. Evaluate  
L 2t
Apply

1.
Use Laplace transform technique to solve the differential equation
y ''  2 y '  3 y  sin t if
y(0)  0, y '(0)  0.
2. Using Convolution theorem, find [ ]
3. A tightly stretched string with fixed end points x  0 and x  l is initially in a position given by
x
y  y 0 Sin 3 . If it is released from rest from this position, find the displacement y( x, t )
l

Create
1. Compare the direct and iterative methods in solving system of equations.
2. Identifying the method to solve sparse systems.
3. What is the advantage of Fourier series over the Taylor‘s series in some real time problems?

10
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

26
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CYX01 Engineering Chemistry


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Outline the fundamental chemistry with an applied perspective as future engineers with a focus on
engineering and industry
2. Analyze the quality of water and its treatment methods for domestic and industrial applications
3. Utilize the polymers, plastics, elastomers and advanced materials (Nano materials) as engineering materials
and apply them in domestic and industrial life
4. Infer the concepts of renewable & non-renewable energy sources, quality of fuels and apply a suitable fuel as
an energy source
5. Outline the corrosion factors and implement the prevention measures
6. Interpret the Nernst equation for electrode potentials and construction and working of various types of energy
storage devices

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2

1 3 2
2 3 2
3 3
4 3 2
5 3
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Water Technology & Advanced Materials
Water technology: sources of water–hardness of water–disadvantages of hard water–boiler troubles–internal treatment
methods, softening methods–lime soda, zeolite, ion exchange and reverse osmosis -specifications for drinking water–
BIS & WHO standards–municipal water treatment–analysis of water for hardness, chloride & fluoride, numerical
problems
Advanced materials–Nanomaterials–Introduction–Preparation by chemical methods–Characterization–SEM–
Applications in industry–solar, water purification and battery technology
Preparation of some important membranes for reverse osmosis process
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Polymers & Composites
Polymers: Introduction–Advantages of polymers over Metals and Alloys; Types of polymers–Types of
polymerization–Physical properties: viscosity, polydispersity, molecular weight distribution etc., and mechanical
properties–Plastics: Thermosetting & thermoplastics–Compounding of plastics–Moulding methods (Compression,
Injection, Transfer, Extrusion)–Preparation, Properties and Engineering applications of important industrial polymers–
Poly Ethylene, Poly Styrene, PVC, PTFE, Bakelite–Molecular Imprinting Polymers (MIP) –Conducting Polymers–
Biodegradable polymers-Fiber reinforced plastics-Glass fiber reinforced plastic–Bullet Proof Plastics–Rubbers:
processing of natural rubber–Vulcanization and compounding of rubber–Engineering applications of rubber
Inorganic rubbers-silicone rubbers
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Fuels & Energy Resources
Fuels–Introduction-Calorific value–determination of calorific value–Bomb calorimeter and Junker‘s calorimeters-
Classification of fuels–characteristics of a good fuel–classification and analysis of coal-Extraction of Crude Oils–
refining of crude oil–Cracking-Thermal and Catalytic cracking–Synthetic petrol–Polymerization, Fischer Tropsch and
Bergius processes–Knocking–Anti Knocking–Octane &Cetanenumber–ASTM standards of fuels–Energy Resources:
Energy scenario in India–working of thermal power plants–advantages and disadvantages–non Renewable energy–
solar energy–harnessing of solar energy–solar heaters–photo voltaic cells–bio energy–biodiesel
Rocket fuels

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Corrosion & Energy Systems
Introduction–process of corrosion–Dry corrosion–Wet corrosion–galvanic corrosion–concentration cell corrosion–
water line corrosion–pitting corrosion–stress corrosion–Factors influencing corrosion–Control of corrosion–Proper
designing–passivity–using alloys–modifying the environment–using corrosion inhibitors: Inorganic and Organic
inhibitors-Cathodic protection–Metallic coatings–galvanization and tinning-Industrial examples of high corrosion
Electrochemical energy systems:Introduction–Electrode potential–Nernst equation–EMF of cell–Storage devices–
Batteries: primary cell–dry cell; secondary cells–Lead acid battery, Lithium ion battery, flow batteries–H2–O2 fuel cell
and Photo galvanic cell
Organic coatings
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. P. C. Jain and Monica Jain, Engineering Chemistry, 16th Ed., Dhanpat Rai Publishing Company, New Delhi,
2015
2. S. S. Dara, A Textbook of Engineering Chemistry, S. Chand and Company Limited, New Delhi, 1994
3. C. N. R. Rao, A. Muller and A. K. Cheetham, Nanomaterials Chemistry: Recent Developments and New
Directions, 2010

Reference (s)
1. S. Chawla, A Textbook of Engineering Chemistry, 3 rd Ed., Dhanpat Rai& Co (Pvt) Ltd, New Delhi, 2012
2. P. Murthy, C. V. Agarwal, A. Naidu, Textbook of Engineering Chemistry, B. S. Publications, Hyderabad,
2006
3. T. Pradeep, Textbook of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, McGraw Hill Education,India, Pvt.Limited, 2013

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 11(%)
Remember 30 30 -
Understand 40 40 -
Apply 30 30 80
Analyze - - 20
Evaluate -- - -
Create -- - -
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. Define hardness. Which salts are responsible for different types of hard nesses?
2. Differentiate between polymer and plastic? List out the differences between thermoplastics and thermosetting
plastics?
3. Define calorific value, HCV and LCV

Understand
1. What is meant by desalination? Explain the procedure for softening of water by Reverse osmosis process?
2. What is compounding of plastics? Explain the role of Fillers and Stabilizers with examples
in compounding of plastics?
3. How a photo-voltaic cell constructed and what is is the working mechanism of it?

Apply
1. Water contains the constituents like CO2 , HCO3- , Mg(HCO3)2 , H+, CaSO4 , NaCl and Na2SO4 and this
water is subjected to Lime and Soda softening, which type of chemical reactions are involved between these
constituents with Lime and Soda?
2. Which moulding technique is involved in making a plastic ball in toys industry? Explain the process in detail
with neat sketch?
11
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

28
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

3. By which methods, the underground pipelines are protected from corrosion? Explain the involved
mechanisms?

Analyze
1. The Boiler fed water contains the following compositions: CaSO 4, CaCl2, MgCl2, SiO2 & Na2CO3.Suggest
the suitable methods and involved principle to prevent the formation of scale and sludge by these
constituents?
2. When a metal X (of reduction potential = 0.337V at 250C) is connected to another metal Y
(of reduction potential = -0.140V at 250C) and this structure is exposed continuously to sea
water, which type of corrosion would take place? Explain with suitable mechanism.
3. Which type of corrosion is involved in the following jointed pipeline and why? Explain the involved
mechanism in detail
Iron pipe Copper pipe
Sea water inlet Sea water outlet

29
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16EEX01 Basic Electrical Engineering


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Demonstrate the basic principles of electrical components
2. Outline electric circuits using network laws and reduction techniques
3. Illustrate the behavior of basic circuit elements for an AC excitation
4. Relate the laws of electro-magnetism and select a machine for practical applications
5. Outline the working principle and construction of the measuring instruments
6. Choose appropriate safety measures and wiring schemes

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2

1 3 1
2 3 1
3 2 1
4 3 1
5 3 1
6 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Basic Electrical Components
Definition of charge, electric potential, electric field, voltage, current, power and energy, Ohm‘s law, Faraday‘s Law
of Electromagnetic Induction, Classification of network elements, Basic circuit elements–R, L and C, Types of energy
sources-Dependent and independent sources, Kirchhoff‘s laws, Resistive, inductive and capacitive networks–series,
parallel circuits, Self Inductance, mutual inductance, Types of induced emfs, Dot Convention, Coefficient of coupling
Types of resistors–inductors and capacitors
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Fundamentals of Electrical Circuits
DC Circuits:Voltage and current division rule, Source transformation, mesh and nodal analysis, Star-delta
transformation. AC Circuits:Generation of alternating current, periodic waveforms and basic definitions, RMS and
average values of periodic and non-periodic waveforms, form factor and peak factor, AC through pure R and L,
Phasor representation, J-operator, Power in ac circuits
AC through pure capacitor
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Electrical Machines & Measuring Instruments
Electrical Machines:Principle of operation, Construction and Applications-DC Machines, 1-phase Transformers, 1-
Phase Induction Motors, Stepper motors. Measuring Instruments: Classification of Measuring Instruments,
Construction and basic working principle of Voltmeter, Ammeter, Wattmeter
Working principle of Energy meter
12+4 Hours
Unit IV
Electrical Safety, Wiring and Introduction to Power System
Indian electricity safety rules, Electric shock- effects, protective measures and first aid, Earthling-Basic principles and
types.Electrical wiring-wiring accessories, staircase, tube light.Single line diagram of power system
Design of corridor wiring 10+3Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. D. P. Kothari and I. J. Nagrath, Theory and Problems of Basic Electrical Engineering, 4th Ed., PHI Learning
Private limited, 2013

30
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

2. S. Ghosh, Fundamentals of Electrical & Electronics Engineering, 2nd Ed., PHI, 2010
3. V. K. Mehta and Rohit Mehta, Basic Electrical Engineering, S Chand and company Ltd, New Delhi, India,
Revised Edition, 2012
Reference (s)
1. K. Alice Mary, P. Ramana and Preethi Thekkath, Basics of Electrical Engineering, 1st Ed., S. Chand &
Company Ltd, 2016
2. J. B. Gupta, Basic Electrical and Electronics Engineering, 3rd Ed., S. K. Kataria & Sons, 2009
3. B. L. Theraja, Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, 5 th Ed., S. Chand & Company Ltd,
2013

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 12(%)
Remember 40 40 -
Understand 60 60 -
Apply - - 50
Analyze - - 50
Evaluate - - -
Create - - -
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample Question (s)


Remember
1. State Faradays laws of Electro-magnetic Induction.
2. Define
i. Charge ii. Power
iii. Energy iv. Potential
3. State any five Indian electricity safety rules
4. Define coefficient of coupling

Understand
1. Explain the principle of operation of transformer.
2. Describe the working of DC generator.
3. Explain the construction and working of Wattmeter.
4. Illustrate the emf equation of a transformer

12
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

31
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CHX01 Environmental Studies


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Translate the learner‘s attitude to think globally and act locally
2. Motivate environmental organizaions to create a concern about our present state of Environment.
3. Find solutions for conservation of natural resources
4. Identify the benefits of ecosystem conservation, biodiversity protection, implement pollution prevention and
control measures
5. Illustrate social issues of environmental protection and adopt sustainable developmental practices
6. Perceives the basic structure of environmental policy and law pertaining to specific environmental issues
(water quality, air quality, biodiversity protection, Forest, etc.)

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO3 PO6 PO7

1 - - 3 3
2 - - - 3
3 3 3 - 3
4 - - 3 3
5 - - 3 3
6 - - - 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Multidisciplinary Nature of Environmental Studies & Natural Resources
Definition, Scope and Importance, Multidisciplinary nature of Environmental Studies, Value of Nature-Productive,
Aesthetic/Recreation, Option, Need for Public Awareness, Institutions (BNHS, BVIEER, ZSI, BSI) and People in
Environment (MedhaPatkar, Sundarlal Bahuguna, Indira Gandhi, Rachael Carson)
Natural Resources: Renewable and Non–renewable resources–Importance, uses, overexploitation/threats, and
conservation of (i) forest (ii) water (iii) mineral (iv) food and (v) energy resources, role of an individual in
conservation of natural resources
Biotic and abiotic components–Case studies of forest-water-mineral-food-energy resources
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Ecosystem & Biodiversity
Ecosystems: Concept of an ecosystem, Structure and function of an ecosystem, Biogeological cycles (Energy flow,
Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles), Ecological succession, Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids, Introduction,
types, characteristic features, structures and functions of the following ecosystems: a. Forest Ecosystem b. Aquatic
Ecosystem Biodiversity and its Conservation: Definition and levels of biodiversity, Bio–geographical classification of
India, hot spots of biodiversity–India as a mega diversity nation, Threats to biodiversity, Endangered and endemic
species of India, Conservation of biodiversity: In–situ and Ex–situ conservation
Phosphorus cycle–Desert ecosystems–Grassland ecosystem–Case studies on conservation of biodiversity
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Environmental Pollution & Social Issues
Environmental Pollution: Definition, Cause, effects, control measures and case studies of: Air pollution b. Water
pollution c. Soil pollution Solid waste Management: Causes, effects and control measures of urban and industrial
wastes. Disaster management (floods and cyclones) Social Issues and the Environment: Sustainability, Urban
problems related to energy, Water conservation and watershed management, Resettlement and rehabilitation of people;
Environmental ethics: Issues and possible solutions, global warming, ozone layer depletion, Consumerism and waste
products
Noise pollution–Case studies on pollution–Wasteland reclamation 11+4 Hours

32
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Unit IV
Human Population and the Environmental Acts
Human Population and the Environment: Population growth, Affluence, Technology and Environmental Impact
(Master Equation), Population explosion and Family Welfare Programme, Value Education, HIV/AIDS, Women and
Child Welfare, Role of information Technology in Environment and human health, Environment Protection Acts: Air
(Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, Water (Prevention and control of Pollution) Act, Wildlife Protection Act
and Forest Conservation Act. Issues involved in enforcement of environmental legislation
Human Rights–The environment (Protection) Act, 1986
10+3 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. E. Bharucha, Textbook of Environmental Studies, 1st Ed., University Press (India) Pvt. Ltd., 2005

Reference (s)
1. W. P. Cunningham, M. A. Cunningham, Principles of Environmental Science, 6 th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill,
2008
2. A. Kaushik, C. P. Kaushik, Perspectives in Environmental Studies, 4 th Ed., New Age International Publishers,
2008
3. H. S. Peavy, D. R. Rowe, G. Tchobanoglous, Environmental Engineering, 1 st Ed., McGraw Hill, 1984
4. T. E. Graedel, B. R. Allenby, Industrial Ecology and Sustainable Engineering, 1 st Ed., Pearson Publications,
2009

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 13(%)
Remember 40 35 15
Understand 45 50 50
Apply 15 15 35
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample question (s)


Remember
1. List important natural resources & important institutions related to the environment.
2. Recall a simple food chain.
3. List important acts in environment.
Understand
1. Money deposited in a bank- identify under which environment value.
2. Summarize the methods for creating public awareness regarding environment.
3. Explain the consequences of over utilization of water resources.
Apply
1. Select the economic method of conservation of biodiversity and describe it.
2. Predict the effects and control methods of water pollution.
3. Find the urban problems related to energy and suggest suitable alternatives.
4. Assess why women and children need special care and what are all the supports that our Government is
extending to them?

13
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

33
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16HSX02 English Communication Skills Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Develop the pronunciation ability by using their gained knowledge of the English sound system
2. Improve the articulation of sounds and pronunciation of words for intelligible English
3. Recognize the use of language in conversational style with focus on communication in English
4. Organize ideas effectively in spoken form
5. Discuss social issues with concern and imagine possible solutions
6. Develop the pronunciation abilityby using their gained knowledge of the English sound system

COs – POs Mapping

COs P010
1 3
2 3
3 3
4 3
5 3
6 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments

Module 1–Sounds of English-Consonants


Module 2–Interaction-1: Greeting and taking leave, introducing oneself to others.
Module 3–Sounds of English-Vowels
Module 4–Interaction-2: Making request and response to them ask for and give/refuse permission, Ask for and give
directions, thank and respond
Module 5–Some rules of Pronunciation
Module 6–Interaction-3: Invite, accept, and declining invitations, Make complaints and respond to them, Express
sympathy
Module 7–Word Stress and Sentence stress
Module 8–Interaction-4: Apologize and respond, advise and suggest, Telephone Skills
Module 9–Presentation Skills: Oral and PPT Presentations
Module 10 Group Discussion
Extra Module
Module 11–Debate

List of Augmented Experiments14


1. Common Errors in English
2. Listening Skills
3. Speaking Skills
4. Writing Skills
5. Presentation Skills–observations
6. Reading Skills
7. Public Speaking
8. Interview Skills
9. Office Communication
10. Telephone Skills
11. Report Writing
12. Vocabulary
13. Body Language
14. Resume Writing
15. Functional English

14
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

34
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reading Material (s)


1. K. Nirupa Rani, Jayashree Mohanraj and B. Indira, Strengthen Your Steps-Maruthi publications, 2012
2. K. Nirupa Rani, Jayashree Mohan Raj, B. Indira, (Ed) Speak Well (C.D) Orient Black Swan Pvt Ltd,
Hyderabad, 2012
3. D. Jones, English Pronouncing Dictionary (Software)CUP, Ver.1.0, 2003
4. J. Sethi, S. Kamlesh, D. V. Jindal. A Practical Course in English Pronunciation, Prentice-hall of India, New
Delhi, 2007
5. T. Balasubramanian, A Textbook of English Phonetics for Indian students, McMillan, 1981
6. K. Mohan and M. Raman, Effective English Communication, 1 st Ed., Tata McGraHills, 2000
7. R. K. Bansal and J. B. Harrison, Spoken English, 3 rd Ed., Orient Black Swan, Hyderabad, 1983

35
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CYX02 Engineering Chemistry Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Utilize different Analytical tools and develop the necessary skills in executing experiments involving estimation
of metals in alloys, raw materials, finished products and environmental samples etc.
2. Utilize modern instruments like flame photometer, ion analyzer, UV Vis spectrophotometer, Atomic
Absorption Spectrophotometer for characterization of materials used in industry & environmental monitoring
3. Determine the amount of hardness, chloride, fluoride, nitrite, DO of water for its quality and know its utility
in domestic and industry
4. Summarize the characteristics of lubricants and able to choose/modify lubricants according to purpose
5. Compose some cross-linked polymers like Bakelite, Nylon etc.
6. Identify the adulteration of food items such as milk, honey, tea, coffee & fertility of soil to increase crop
production

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO4
CO1 3
CO2 3
CO3 3
CO4 3
CO5 3
CO6 3

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
Introduction to Quantitative Analysis
1. Assessment of Quality of water
i) Hardness ii) Chloride iii) Fluoride iv) Dissolved Oxygen v) Nitrite
2. Testing quality of lubricants
i) Viscosity Index ii) Flash & Fire point iii) Acid Number
3. Quality Analysis of engineering materials
i) Cement ii) Al/Cu wire iii) Steel
4. Preparation of Engineering and Nano materials
i) Bakelite ii) Nylon iii) Silver nano particles
5. Estimation of Purity of Iron in Ingot
6. Analysis of fertility of soil
i) Sodium & Potassium ii) Micro Nutrients
7. Determination of acid strength (for a citrus fruit) by Conductometr
8. Detection of adulteration of Food in Honey/ Milk/ Tea
9. Estimation of heavy metals in fast food items by AAS.
10. Testing of corrosion of metal
Note: Student should perform minimum of 12 experiments at least one form each head.

List of Augmented Experiments15


1. Assessment of ground water quality of your village/Mandal
2. Preparation of desired Viscosity Index lubricating oil
3. Studies on the effect of various factors on corrosion

Reading Material (s)


1. K. Gouru Naidu, Engineering Chemistry Lab Manual, 1 st Ed., 2014

15
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

36
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

2. G. Svehla, Vogel‘s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, 7th Ed., Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2003
3. Standard methods for the examination of water and waste waters, American Public Health Association, 21 st
Ed., EPA, Washington, 2005
4. Metcalf and Eddy, Waste Water Engineering Treatment and Reuse, 4 th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi,
2003
5. D. Srinivasulu, Engineering Chemistry laboratory manual & Record, Parshva publications, 2010

37
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16MEX03 Engineering Workshop


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Utilize basic carpentry tools for the preparation of wooden joints
2. Make use of basic hand tools for the preparation of mild steel joints
3. Build simple house hold items with GI sheet using tin smithy tools
4. Make use of house wiring accessories to build simple electrical circuits
5. Build simple components with hand tools for making experimental setups
6. Build simple components with hand tools as per the drawing specifications

COs - POs Mapping


COs PO1 PO2 PO10 PO12
1 3 2 2 2
2 3 2 1 2
3 3 2 2 1
4 3 2 3 2
5 3 3 1 3
6 3 2 1 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of experiments

Trades
Carpentry : 1. Cross Lap joint
2. T-Lap joint
3. Dovetail Joint
4. Mortise and Tennon Joint
Fitting : 1. Square Fit
2. V- Fit
3. Half Round Fit
4. Dovetail Fit
Tin Smithy : 1. Square Box without lid
2. Taper Tray
3. Open Scoop
4. Funnel
House Wiring : 1. Parallel/Series Connection of three bulbs
2. Florescent Lamp Wiring
3. Stair Case Wiring
4. Godown Wiring
Total: 45 Hours
List of Augmented Experiments16
1. Prepare Tee–bridle joint
2. Prepare Corner dovetail joint
3. Make Corner bridge joint
4. Make Dovetail lap joint
5. Prepare 900 round elbow pipe
6. Prepare Ellipse using GI sheet
7. Make cylindrical pipe
8. Make Round T-pipe
9. Prepare hexagonal fitting
10. Prepare diagonal dovetail fitting
11. Prepare universal fitting
12. Make square fitting
13. Set the general house wring

16
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

38
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

14. Set the dim & bright lighting


15. Set the test lamping

Reading Material (s)


1. Engineering workshop Lab manual, Department of Mechanical Engineering, GMRIT Rajam

39
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CY303 Physical and Analytical Chemistry


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Understand the principles and applications of distribution law
2. Explain the importance of colligative properties of dilute solutions
3. Apply the fundamental concepts of colloidal chemistryto industrial needs and process engineering
4. Evaluate the quality of products in industry by using spectroscopic principles
5. Select a chromatographic instrument and test a given sample
6. Utilize GC, HPLC and other chromatographic techniques in pharmaceutical industry & forensic industry for
identification and isolation of products
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO 2
1 3 2
2 3 2
3 3 2
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

UNIT I
Distribution Law: Nernst distribution law – Distribution coefficient – Explanation and limitations of distribution law
- Modification of distributionlaw –Applications of distribution law – Determination of equilibrium constant from
distribution coefficient, Solvent extraction
Dilute Solutions: Types of solutions – Colligative properties – Lowering of vapor pressure – Elevation of boiling
point – Depression of freezing point – Osmotic pressure -Abnormality in colligative properties–Van‘tHoff factor
Binary systems
11+4 Hours
UNITII
Colloidal chemistry
Definition of colloids, Classification of colloids, Solids in liquids (Sols)- Kinetics, optical and electrical Properties,
Stability of colloids, Protective action, Hardy Schultz law, Gold number, Liquids in liquids (Emulsions), Types of
emulsions, Preparation, Emulsifier, Liquids in solids (Gels), Classification, Preparation and properties
General Applications of Colloids
11+4 Hours
UNIT III
Spectroscopy
Molecular Spectroscopy:Interaction of radiation with matter–electronic, vibrational, rotational spectra–Absorption and
emission spectra
UV-Vis Spectroscopy: Beer-Lambert law- Deviations from Beer‘s law- Block diagram of UV- visible
spectrophotometer – quantitative analysis; direct method for the determination of sample.
Infrared Spectroscopy: Principle of IR spectroscopy, Block diagram of IR spectrophotometer, sampling techniques,
Applications of IR spectroscopy.
Raman Spectroscopy: Basic principle and five applications
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS): Principle of absorption spectroscopy, Block diagram of AAS, sampling
techniques, Applications of AAS
XRD: Bragg‘s Law, seven Bravies lattices
Application of IR spectroscopy in process control
12+4 Hours
UNIT IV
Chromatography
Types of chromatographic techniques - paper chromatography - Thin layer chromatography - RF values -
Identification of spots by physical and chemical methods - applications
Gas Chromatography & HPLC: Principle of gas chromatography - block diagram of gas chromatograph –
chromatogram – Applications - qualitative and quantitative analysis. Principle of high performance liquid
Chromatography - block diagram of HPLC – Applications - qualitative and quantitative analysis.
Reverse phase HPLC
11+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook(s)
1. G.Raj,Advanced Physical Chemistry,33rded., Goel Publishing House, New Delhi, 2007
2. B.K.Sharma,Instrumental methods of Analysis,7th ed., GoelPublishingHouse,New Delhi, 1997
Reference (s)
1. A.I. Vogel, Inorganic Quantitative Analysis, 7thed.,Pearson education, 2003
2. G. R. Chatwal and S. K. Anand, Atomic &Molecular spectroscopy, 5thed.,Himalaya Publishing House Pvt.
Ltd, Mumbai, 2010
3. A. Bahl, B. S. Bahl and G. D. Tuli, Essentials of Physical Chemistry, 19 thed., S. Chand Publication, 2012
4. A. S. Negi and S. C. Anand, A Text book of Physical Chemistry, 2nded., New Age International, 2007

Sample question (s)

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test17 (%)
Remember 25 25 20
Understand 35 35 20
Apply 20 20 30
Analyze 20 20 30
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define Nernst distribution law.


2. State any two industrial applications of catalysis.
3. List the five important components of HPLC.

Understand

1. Explain any two major uses of distribution law.


2. Describe the solvent extraction and prove that multiple extractionis always better than single extraction.
3. Illustrate the working principle of Thin Layer Chromatography.
Apply

1. Using the following data prove that succinic acid exists as dimer in benzene layer
Amount of acid in water (g/100 ml) 0.2 0.4 0.6
Amount of acid in benzene (g/100 ml) 0.64 2.55 5.78
2. 5% of urea solution and an unknown organic acid solution in water freeze at -2.240C and -4.480C
respectively. Calculate molecular weight of organic acid.
3. If 10% (w/w) urea solution of water boils at 101 0C, then what would be the boiling points of 10% (w/w)
NaCl& 10%(w/w) of BaCl2 solutions upon complete dissociation?
4. 0.9%(w/v) NaCl solution is used in saline water in intravenous therapy while treating patients. What will be
the consequences if it is more or less than 0.9%?

Analysis

1. Compare the effect of pH on the rate constant of a reaction, in an acid-base catalysis.


2. How do you distinguish the following using IR spectroscopy?
i) Ethanol from Ether ii) Acetaldehyde from benzaldehyde
iii) Ortho-nitro benzoic acid from para-nitro benzoic acid.
3. Differentiate between paper chromatography & TLC.
4. We get exhausted quickly when we swim in the sea water than in normal water. Explain.
5. Salt is sprinkled to remove ice piled during winter on roads in western countries. Explain.

17
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

41
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CS307 Object Oriented Programming


3024
Course Outcomes
1. Apply object oriented concepts to real world problems
2. Develop applications using different types of inheritances
3. Create and use user defined packages
4. Analyze and recover runtime exceptions arise in the applications
5. Apply parallel processing applications using threads
6. Develop internet based interactive applications using peripheral functions

COs–POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO4 PO5


1 3 2 3 2
2 3 3 3 2
3 2 3 3 2
4 2 3 3 2
5 3 3 3 2
6 3 3 3 2

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Java
Overview of Object Oriented Programming principles, Importance of Java to the Internet, Byte code, Data types,
arrays, control statements, Classes and Objects– constructors, methods, access control, this keyword, overloading
methods and constructors, garbage collection
Features of object oriented programming–Java History–Computer Programming Hierarchy–Role of Java
Programmer in Industry
Practical Components
1. Write a Java program that prints all real solutions to the quadratic equation ax2 + bx +c = 0.
2. Write a Java program that uses both recursive and non recursive functions to print the nth value in the
Fibonacci sequence.
3. Write a Java program to demonstrate String handling methods and tokenizing given string/text using
StringTokenizer class
4. Write a Java program to implement matrix operations using multidimensional arrays.
10+9 Hours
Unit II
Inheritance, Packages & Interface
Inheritance: Hierarchical abstractions, Base class and subclass, Benefits of inheritance, super keyword, final keyword
with inheritance, polymorphism, abstract classes
Packages: Defining, Creating and Accessing a Package, Understanding CLASSPATH, importing packages, Member
access rules
Interface: Defining an interface, differences between classes and interfaces, implementing interface, variables in
interface and extending interfaces
Nested–Inner Class & Anonymous Classes–Generic Class Types
Practical Components
1. Write a Java program for creating one base class for student personal details and inherit those details into the
sub class of student Educational details to display complete student information.
2. Write a Java program that illustrates runtime polymorphism.
3. Write a Java program to create a package which has classes and methods to read Student Admission details.
12+6 Hours
Unit III
Exception Handling & Multithreading
Exception handling: Concepts and benefits of exception handling, exception hierarchy, usage of try, catch, throw,
throws and finally, built-in and User Defined Exceptions

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Multithreading: Definition thread, thread life cycle, creating threads, synchronizing threads
Control Flow In Exceptions– JVM reaction to Exceptions– Inter Communication of Threads– Critical Factor in
Thread–Deadlock
Practical Components
1. Write a Java program to define and handle User Defined Exceptions (make use of throw - throws).
2. Introduction to Eclipse Environment
11+6 Hours
Unit IV
Applets & Event Handling
Applets: Concepts of Applets, differences between applets and applications, life cycle of an applet, types of applets,
creating applets
Event Handling: Events, Delegation event model, handling mouse and keyboard events, Compare basic AWT
components with swing components, user interface components(Swings)-JLabel, JButton, JText componentsMore user
interface components-JCanvas, JScrollBar, JCheckBox, JChoice, JListsPanel–JScrollPane, JDialog, JMenuBar, Layout
managers.
Adapter classes, inner classes, Anonymous Inner classes
Practical Components
1. Write a Java program for handling mouse events.
2. Write a Java Program to design a Job Application/ Student Admission Form and store the values in a file.
12+9 Hours
Total: 75 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. H. Schildt, Java: The complete reference, 7th Ed., TMH, 2006
2. T. A. Budd, An Introduction to Object–Oriented Programming, 3rd Ed., Addison Wesley Longman, 2002

Reference (s)
1. Dietal&Dietal, Java: How to Program, 8th Ed., PHI, 2010
2. E. Balaguruswamy, Programming with Java A Primer, 4 th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill Companies, 2009
3. C. S. Horstmann and G. Cornell, Core Java, Vol 1. Fundamentals, 7th Ed., Pearson Education, 2004
4. C. Horstmann, BIG JAVA Compatible with Java 5 & 6, 3 rd Ed., Wiley Publishers, 2008

SAMPLE QUESTION (S)

Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test18 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 15 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 35 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. List out 6 different java buzz words


2. List the three OOP principles
3. Define Inheritance
4. List the 5 keywords used in exception handling

Understand

1. Summarize the OOP principles


2. Illustrate the procedure for creating a user defined package
3. Draw the Thread Life cycle

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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

43
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

4. Draw the Applet Life cycle


5. Define Encapsulation

Apply

1. Implement a java program that read an integer between 0 and 1000 and adds all the digits in the integer
2. Implement an abstract base class shape with two members base and height, a member function for
initializationand a function to compute area ( ). Derive two specific classes Triangle and Rectangle which
override the function area ( ). Use these classes in a main function and display the area of a triangle and a
rectangle.
3. Demonstrate an applet that receives two numerical values as input from the user and then displays the
sum of these numbers on the screen.
4. Given are two one dimensional arrays A and B which are sorted in ascending order. Develop a program to
merge them into a single sorted array C that contains every item from arrays A and B, in ascending order.
5. Implement a Java program for creating one base class for student personal details and inherit those details
into the sub class of student Educational details to display complete student information

Analyze

1. Compare and Contrast between procedure oriented and object oriented programming
2. Analyze the concurrent programming using threads
3. Differentiate method overloading and method overriding
4. Differentiate sleep and suspend
5. Analyze platform independency of java with the help of JVM

Evaluate

1. Judge whether AWT or Swings is better for internet programming


2. Asses the performance of threads
3. Determine the importance of run time polymorphism
4. Defend why pointer were removed in JAVA
5. Judge why do you java to develop a web based application

44
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH303 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics


3103

Course Outcomes
1. Explain the basic concepts and laws of chemical engineering thermodynamics
2. Make use of first law of thermodynamics to find heat, work & changes in internal energy and enthalpy
3. Apply the second law of thermodynamics & concept of entropy to analyze ideal & real systems
4. Compare and explain the different refrigeration and liquefaction processes
5. Apply equation of state to evaluate thermodynamic properties
6. Apply first and second law of thermodynamics to specific processes viz., pipe flow, nozzles, expansion and
compression
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
Scope of thermodynamics, Defined quantities: temperature, volume, pressure, work, energy, heat, First law and other
basic concepts: Joules experiment, First law of thermodynamics, Thermodynamic state and state functions, Enthalpy,
The steady-state -flow process, Equilibrium, Phase rule, The reversible process, Heat capacity, Constant–V and
Constant–P processes.
Applications of first law of thermodynamics-Temperature measuring devices-Pressure measuring devices
12 + 4 Hours
Unit II
Second Law of Thermodynamics & Entropy
Statements of the second law, Heat engines, Thermodynamic temperature scales, Thermodynamic temperature and the
ideal-gas scale.
Entropy: Entropy changes of an ideal gas, Mathematical statement of the second law, Calculation of ideal work and
last work, Steam Tables, Refrigeration and liquefaction: The Carnot refrigerator, The vapor compression cycle, The
comparison of refrigeration cycles, The choice of refrigerant, Absorption refrigeration, The heat pump
Third Law of Thermodynamics–Liquefaction processes
11 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Volumetric &Thermodynamic Properties of Pure Fluids
The PVT behavior of pure substances, Virial equations, The ideal gas, The applications of the virial equations, Cubic
equations of state, Generalized correlations for gases-Thermodynamic properties of pure fluids: Property relations for
homogeneous phases, Residual properties
Peng-Robinson equation of state
12 + 4 Hours
Unit IV
Applications of Thermodynamics in Flow Processes
Steady Flow Processes and Devices: Continuity equation and mass analysis of control volume, Energy analysis of
control volume and Bernoullis equation, Analysis of expansion processes: Turbines, Throttling devices, Nozzles,
Analysis of compression processes: Compressors, Pumps
Expansion and compression processes applications
10 + 3Hours
Total: 45 + 15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. J.M. Smith, H.C.Van Ness, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics,7 th ed.,Tata McGraw
Hill, 2010

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reference (s)
1. Y.V.C. Rao, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 2nd ed., University Press Ltd., 2001
2. K.V. Narayanan, A Textbook of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics,1st ed., PHI, 2006
3. B.G. Kyle, Chemical and Process Thermodynamics, 3 rd ed., Pearson, Prentice Hall, 1999
4. Y. Cengel, Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, 8th ed., Tata-McGraw Hill, 2014

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test19 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State first law of thermodynamics.


2. Write the statements of second law of thermodynamics.
3. Define residual property.
4. Define turbine efficiency.

Understand

1. Explain the Joule‘s experiment.


2. Describe principle involved in the refrigeration systems.
3. Derive the residual property relations between enthalpy and entropy.
4. Explain the throttling process.

Apply

1. An astronaut weighs 750N at Houston, Texas, where the local acceleration of gravity is g=9.8 m/sec2 . What
are the astronauts mass and weight on the moon were g=1.67m/sec 2?
2. Air is compressed from an initial condition of 1bar and 25˚C to a final state of 5bar and 25˚C by 3 different
mechanically reversible process. V1=0.02479m3/mole,V2=0.004958m3/moles. Heat capacity at constant
volume=5/2R,heat capacity at constant pressure=7/2R. Calculate thework required, heat transfer and the
changes in internal energy and enthalpy.
3. A central power plant heated at 800000 kw generates steam at 585K and discard it to a reservoir at 295K. If
the thermal efficiency of plant is 70% of maximum possible value. How much heat is discarded to the river at
rated power?
4. Water flowing upward to a vertical pipe enters a reducer with a velocity of 1m/sec. Diameter at the entrance
is 0.2m and diameter at the exit is 0.1m if the pressure at the entrance to the section is 105kpa. What is the
pressure at the exit? Given that the entrance and exit are 5m apart.
Analyze

1. A 70watt outdoor security light burns on avg. 10hrs a day. A new bulb costs $5 and life time is about
1000hrs. If electricity costs $0.1/KWH. What is the yearly price of security per light?
2. A large fraction of the thermal energy generated in the engine of a car is rejected to the air by the radiator
through the circulating water. Should the radiator be analyzed as a closed system or open system? Explain.
3. Suppose a Carnot refrigerator operating between -25˚C and 40˚C consumes 0.5kw power. Determine the rate
of energy removal from the cold body. If a carnot heat pump operating between the same reservoir is required
which rejects energy to the high temperature body at the same rate as the carnot refrigerator is extracting from
the cold body. Calculate the power consumption.
4. Consider two identical fans, one at sea level and the other on top of the mountain, running at identical speeds.
How would you compare (a) the volumetric flow rates (b) the mass flow rates of these two fans?

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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Evaluate

1. A 3kg plastic tank that has a volume of 0.2 m3 is filledwith liquid water. Assuming the density of water is
1000kg/m3, determine the weight of the combined system.
2. Consider a rigid tank that contains a mixture of two ideal gases. A valve is opened and some gas escapes.
As a result, the pressure in the tank drops. Will the partial pressure of each component change? How
about the pressure fraction of each component?
3. An inventor claims to have developed a refrigerator that maintains the refrigeratedspace at 35˚F while
operating in a room where the temperature is75˚F and that has a COP of 13.5. Is this claim reasonable?
4. Show that the internal energy of (a) an ideal gas and (b) an incompressiblesubstance is a function of
temperature only, u=u(T).
5. Steam at 250 psia and 700°F steadily enters a nozzle whose inlet area is0.2 ft 2. The mass flow rate of
steam through the nozzle is 10 lbm/s. Steamleaves the nozzle at 200 psia with a velocity of 900 ft/s. Heat
losses from thenozzle per unit mass of the steam are estimated to be 1.2 Btu/lbm. Determine
(a) The inlet velocity and (b) The exit temperature of the steam.

47
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH304 Chemical Process Calculations


3103
Course Outcomes

1. Make use of different methods expressing composition of mixture and transform a material from one measure
of concentration to another, including molarity, normality, ppm, moles per volume and mass per volume
2. Apply the behavior of ideal gas equation to bring the relation between temperature and pressure for pure
component & solutions and also to humidity concept
3. Analyze material balance calculations for steady state unit operations and process
4. Apply unsteady state material & energy balances to batch distillation and stirred tank
5. Evaluate material balance for a reactive and nonreactive systems
6. Make use of material & energy balance concept to combustion calculations

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 2 3
3 3 2 3 3
4 3 3 2 3
5 3 3 2 3
6 3 3 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Stoichiometric relations and behavior of ideal gases
Basis of calculations, Methods of expressing compositions of mixtures and solutions,API gravity scale and specific
gravity,Applications of ideal gas law ingaseous mixtures
Conversion factors–Specific Gravity Scale–Properties of Real Gases
11 + 4 Hours
Unit II
Vapor Pressure and Humidity Calculations
Vapor pressure and liquids: Antoine equation, Vapor pressure plots vapor pressure of immiscible liquids and ideal
solutions, Raoult‘s law, Non-volatile solutes-Humidity and Saturation: Relative and percentage saturation or dew
point, Wet bulb and dry bulb temperature, Use of humidity charts for engineering calculations involving condensation,
Evaporation in air water vapour mixture
Humidity Effect on Climate
12 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Material Balance Calculations in Unit Operations and Unit Processes
Solving material balance problems, Material balance calculations involving drying, dissolution, distillation, extraction
and crystallization, Tie substance, Yield, Conversion, Processes involving chemical reactions, Processes involving
recycles,Bypass and purge
M B calculations involving single effect Evaporation,–Oxidation of Sulphur compounds
11 + 3 Hours
Unit IV
Combustion and Energy Balance Calculations
Calorific value of fuels, Air requirement for fuels, Orsat analysis
Thermo physics: Heat capacity of gases, liquids and mixture solutions, Estimation of heat capacity by Kopp‘s rule,
Latent heats, Estimation of latent heats by Trouton‘s rule, Kistyakowsky equation for non-polar liquids;
Thermochemistry: Heat of reaction, Combustion, Formation and neutralization, Kirchhoff‘s equation, Calculation of
theoretical and actual flame temperatures
Energy balances in cyclic process–Energy Balance for flow process & non-flow process
11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. O. A.Hougen, K. M. Watson and R.A. Ragatz, Chemical Process Principles, Part-I, Material and Energy
Balance, 2nded.,Wiley and Sons, New York, 2009
2. B.I. Bhatt and S.M. Vora, Stoichiometry, 3 rded., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1996

Reference(s)
1. D.H. Himmelblau, Basic Principles and Calculation in Chemical Engineering, 5 thed., PHI, 2001
2. R.M. Felder and R.W. Rousseau, Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, 3 rded., Wiley, 2004

Sample Question (s)

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test20 (%)
Remember 15 10 --
Understand 15 10 --
Apply 50 50 50
Analyze 20 30 25
Evaluate -- -- 25
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define the fallowing: mole, stoichiometric coefficient, normality and molality.


2. Write any two laws of equation of state.
3. List any 3 benefits of recycle in process industry.
4. Define Kopp‘s rule and Trouton‘s rule.

Understand

1. Derive an expression for mole fraction of single compound from Daltons law of partial pressures.
2. State the principle involved derivingClausiusClapeyron equation, state the assumptions made in that
derivation.
3. Cite three examples where recycle is used in process industries.
4. Explain the effect of air to fuel ratio on combustion.

Apply

1. A natural gas has the following composition, all figures being in volumetric per cent: Methane CH 4 83.5,
Ethane C2H6 12.5, and Nitrogen N2 4.0. Calculate composition in mole percent and weight percent, average
molecular weight.
2. Calculate the molarity of a solution that contains 12.5 g of sulfuric acid in 1.75 L of solution.
3. By adsorption in silica gel you are able to remove all the water (0.93 kg) of water from moist air at 15 °C and
98.6 kPa. The same air measures 1000m3at 20°C and 108 kPa when dry. What was the relative humidity of
the air?
4. The specific gravity of concentrated HCl is 1.185 and it is 36.31% w/w HCl. What is its molarity?
5. A gas having the following analysis is burned in a boiler with 100% excess air. CH 4 12%, CS228%, CO211%,
H29%, N240%. Calculate the flue gas analysis on an SO2free basis. Report the data as weight % and
volume%.
6. A waste acid from nitration process contains 23% HNO 3, 57% H2SO4 and 20% water by weight. This acid is
to concentrated to contain 27% HNO3, 60% H2SO4 by the addition of concentrated H2SO4 containing 93%
and concentrated Nitric acid containing 90%.Calculate the weights of waste and concentrated acid that must
be combined 1000 of desired mixture.

20
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

49
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

7. An aqueous solution of pyridine containing 27% (by wt.) pyridine and 73% (by wt.) water is to be extracted
with chloro-benzene. The feed and solvent are mixed well in a batch extractor and the mixture is then allowed
to stand for phase separation. The extract phase contains 11% pyridine, 88.1% chlorobenzene and 0.9% water
by weight. The raffinate phase contains 5% pyridine and 95% water by weight. Calculate: (i) The quantities
of two phases (layers); (ii) The weight ratio of solvent to feed based on 100kg of feed.
8. A mixture of methane and air is capable of being ignited only if the mole percent of methane is between 5%
and 15%. A mixture containing 9.0 mole% methane in air flowing at a rate of 700 kg/h is to be diluted with
pure air to reduce the methane concentration to the lower flammability limit. Calculate the required flow rate
of air in mol/h and the percent of oxygen in the product gas.
9. Calculate the standard heat of reaction ‗ HR‘ for the following
C2H5OH (l) + CH3COOH (l) C2H5OOCCH3 (l) + H2O (l)
Heat of combustion data;
C2H5OH; HC = -326700 cal
CH3COOH; HC = -208,340 cal
C2H5OOCCH3; HC = -538,760 cal

Analyze

1. A mixture of gases with an average molecular weight 43 contains by volume 40% CO 2, 20% CO, 5% O2and
rest an inert gas. What is the molecular weight of the inert gas?
2. For a two-component mixture, prove mathematically that the compositions on mole basis and weight basis
are the same only when their molecular weights are equal. Give an example of this case.
3. Ethylene oxide is produced by oxidation of ethylene as per the following reaction:
2
Fresh feed containing ethylene and air is mixed with recycle feed andmixed feed enters into a reactor. The
proportion of C2H4:O2:N2 in mixed feed is 1.0:0.5:5.65 (on molar basis). 50% per pass conversion is achieved
in the reactor. The product gases leaving the reactor are fed to the absorber where all C 2H4O formed is
removed. The gases from the absorber containing C2H4 , O2 and N2 are recycled back. To avoid built of N2 in
the system, small portion of recycle stream is continuously purged. Based on 100mol/s ethylene in mixed
feed, Calculate the fresh feed to the process, purge stream, recycle ratio, combined feed ratio and overall
conversion of ethylene.
4. Pure carbon is burnt in O2. The flue gas analysis in mole % is, CO2 = 75, CO=14, O2 =11. What was the %
excess oxygen used? Find the C/O ratio in the reaction.

Evaluate

1. A multiple effect evaporator has a capacity of processing 1 tonne per day of solid caustic soda when it
concentrates weak liquor from 4 to 25% (both on weight basis). When the plant is fed with 5% weak liquor
and if it is concentrated to 50% (both on weight basis) find the capacity of the plant in terms of solid caustic
soda assuming the water evaporating capacity to be the same in both cases.
2. Two students are calculating the average molecular weight of a gas mixture containing N 2and other gases.
One student using the correct molecular weight of nitrogen calculates the average molecular weight as 36.
Another student using an incorrect molecular weight of nitrogen as 14, calculates the average molecular as
29. This is the only mistake in computations. Calculate the composition in nitrogen in mole percent and
weight percent.
3. Natural gas with a calorific value of 34.5 MJ/m3 (NTP) is used as a fuel for the production of 50tons per day
of alumina in a roasting furnace. The heat losses to the surroundings may be taken as 6% of the total heat
input. The temperature of the reaction zone is 1200 °C and the feed is at 25°C. Heat of formation (MJ/kmol)
are: Al(OH)3: -1242, Al2O3: -1675, H2O: -241.5 and the information of Specific heats (kJ/kg K) are: Reaction
mixture (25°C): 0.89, Al2O3 (1200°C): 1.33, H2O (1200°C): 2.12. Calculate the amount of natural gas
consumed in the furnace per day.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH305 Introduction to Chemical Engineering and Professional Ethics


(Qualitative Treatment Only)
3103
Course Outcomes
1. Identify and describe typical aspects within chemical engineering
2. Develop simple flow sheets, block diagrams of basic chemical processes along with material balance
3. Explain fundamental laws and concepts transfer operations and reaction engineering
4. Familiarize professional ethics and Human Values
5. Develop a set of beliefs, attitudes, and habits that engineers should display concerning morality
6. Understand the moral values that ought to guide the Engineering profession
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO8 PO13


1 1 3
2 2 3
3 3 3
4 3
5 3
6 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction & Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering
Origin and development of the chemical process industry, Impact of chemical engineering, Functions of a chemical
engineer, Professional activities in chemical engineering, Scope of chemical engineering, Unit operations and
processes, Process categories, Representing chemical processes using process diagrams, Material Balance:
conservation of total mass, material balance for multiple species, material balance with and without
formation/consumption
Career opportunities for chemical engineer–Flow diagram for nitric acid 12+4 Hours

Unit II
Unit Operations
Fluid Flow: Concept of pressure, Non-flowing fluids, Principles of fluid flow
Heat & Mass Transfer: Fundamentals of heat transfer (Conduction, Convection & Radiation), Heat exchange devices
(Double pipe and Shell & tube heat exchangers) fundamentals of mass transfer operations – Distilation, extraction,
absorption, adsorbtion, leaching, and drying Reaction Engineering : Reaction rates, Types of reactions (elementary
and non-elementary reactions), Types of reactors
Humidification, crystalisation 12+4 Hours
Unit III
Human Values& Engineering Ethics
Morals, values and Ethics – Integrity – Work ethic – Service learning – Civic virtue – Respect for others – Living
peacefully – Caring – Sharing – Honesty – Courage – Valuing time –Cooperation – Commitment – Empathy – Self-
confidence – Character – Spirituality –– Variety of moral issues – Types of inquiry – Moral–dilemmas – Moral
Autonomy– Consensus and Controversy –Models of professional roles
Introduction to Yoga and meditation for professional excellence and stress management. 11+3Hours
Unit IV
Professional Engineering Ethics
Theories about right action Engineering as Experimentation – Engineers as responsible Experimenters – Codes of
Ethics – A Balanced Outlook on Law.– Industrial standards – Intellectual property rights
Global Issues: related to integration of countries through commerce, transfer of technology, and exchange of
information and culture –Ethics and codes of business conduct in MNC – Respect for Authority – Collective
Bargaining – Confidentiality – Conflicts of Interest – Occupational Crime – Professional Rights – Employee Rights –
Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) – Discrimination.
Kohlberg’s theory – Gilligan’s 11+3Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. K. A.Solen, J.N. Harb, Introduction to Chemical Engineering, 5 thed., Willey, 2015
2. S.K.Ghosal, S. K. Sanyal, S. Datta, Introduction to Chemical Engineering,1sted., Tata McGraw Hill, 1993
3. Naagarazan, R. S. Textbook on professional ethics and human values. New Age International, 2006

Reference(s)
1. W. L. Badger, J.T. Banchero, Introduction to Chemical Engineering,1 st ed., McGraw Hill, 1955
2. W. L. McCabe, J.C. Smith, P. Harriot, Unit Operations in Chemical Engineering, 5 thed., McGraw Hill, 1993
3. D. M. Himmelblau, Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical Engineering, 6 thed., Prentice Hall, 1996

Sample Question(s)

Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test21 (%)
Remember 35 20 --
Understand 45 60 60
Apply 20 20 40
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100
Remember

1. What is the difference between unit operation and unit process?Give some examples.
2. StateFouriers law of conduction.
3. What is meant by elementary and non-elementary reactions?
4. Define yield and efficiency in the manufacturing of any synthetic chemical.
Understand
1. Explain the scope of chemical engineer in the chemical engineering field.
2. Compare parallel flow with counter current flow in shell and tube heat exchanger.
3. Explain the differences you observed between batch, CSTR and PFR.
4. Describe the flow diagram representation for ammonia manufacturing process.
5. Draw the neat sketch of 1-2 shell and tube heat exchanger and explain briefly its construction.
6. Compare gas absorption and distillation.
7. Compare plate column and packed column.
8. Explain themechanically agitated vessels used for gas absorption.
9. Explain the analogy between heat, mass and momentum.
10. Discuss about the flux equations for diffusion in gases and liquids.
Apply
1. Illustrate the various unit operations and processes takes place in Petroleum Refining Industry
2. Draw the process flow diagram for sulfuric acid manufacturing using instrumentation symbols.
3. How to evaluate a given chemical reaction is exothermic or endothermic?
4. Develop a flow sheet for nitric acid manufacturing process.

21
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

52
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH306 Process Instrumentation


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain the functions of elements in measuring instruments
2. Illustrate the operation of temperature measuring instruments used in industries
3. Choose suitable pressure measuring devices for different ranges of pressure
4. Identify common operating problems associated with temperature and pressure measuring devices
5. Select the suitable level measuring devices for open and closed vessels
6. Classify the various flow measuring devices for industrial opearations
Program Outcomes

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO13


1 3 1 3
2 3 2 3
3 3 2 3
4 3 3 3
5 3 3 3
6 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Temperature measuring instruments
Elements of the instruments, Static and dynamic characteristics, Expansion thermometers - Mercury in glass
thermometer, Bimetallic thermometer, Pressure spring thermometer, Static accuracy of thermometers, Response of
thermometers, Thermo-electric temperature measurements – Thermoelectricity, Industrial thermocouple, Resistance
thermometers - Thermal coefficient of resistance, Industrial resistance, Radiation receiving elements, Radiation, Photo
electric and Optical pyrometers
Thermocouple lead wires, thermal wells, response of thermocouples
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Pressure-measuring instruments
Measurement of pressure and vacuum – Liquid column manometers, Measuring the elements for gauge pressure and
vacuum, Indicating elements for pressure gauges, Measurement of absolute pressure, Measuring pressure in corrosive
liquids, Static accuracy of pressure gauges
Response of pressure measuring devices
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Level measuring instruments
Relationship between head, density, and specific gravity, Direct measurement of liquid level, Pressure (level)
measurements in open vessels, Level measurements in pressure vessels, Measurement of interface level, Density
measurements, Level of dry materials
Capacitance probe,conductivity probe ,resistance probe, Plumb bob 11+4 Hours

Unit IV
Flow-measuring instruments
Differential pressureflow measurement devices - Orifice plate, Venture tube, Pitot tube, Head flow meters, Quantity
meters - Nutating disk, Helical gear, Rotary vane and Lobed impeller flow meters, Turbine flow meter, Magnetic flow
meter, Thermal flow meter, Mass flow meter, Coriolis flow meter, Viscosity measurements
Flow of dry materials
11+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. D.P.Eckman, Industrial Instrumentation, 1st ed., Wiley eastern, 1950

Reference(s)
1. Patranabis, Principles of Industrial Instrumentation, 3rd ed., TMH, 2001

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Sample Question (s)

Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test22 (%)
Remember 35 35 30
Understand 50 50 50
Apply 10 10 15
Analysis 5 5 5
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. List all the elements that an instrument need to have. Do all the instruments need to have these elements in
common.
2. What are the precautions to be taken while using ionization gage?
3. How to minimize the immersion effect & increase the speed of response of liquid expansion thermometers?
4. Name the different parts of a pressure gauge.
5. What are the three laws of thermocouples?

Understand

1. Describe ionization gage. How does it differ from the Pirani gage? What disadvantages does it have?
2. What type of temperature measurements does not require ambient temperature compensation?
3. Illustrate the procedure for the measurement of level of dry materials.
4. Explain the principle and working of an orifice meter.
5. Describe the principle, construction and working of displacement float liquid level system with the help of a
neat sketch.

Apply

1. The most common pressure gage systems employed for a liquid level measurement are bubbler system,
diaphragm system and the air trap system. Select a system which suits the corrosive fluids and explain the
reason behind it.
2. A certain flow meter can be effectively used for energy fuel and cryogenic flow measurements in aerospace
and airborne applications. Select the type of flow meter which can be used and explain the reason behind the
selection.

Analyze

1. It is desired to measure the temperature (about 1100˚F) in a furnace having a highly oxidizing atmosphere.
The temperature changes so rapidly that a bare thermocouple must be used. Which type would you select?
Why?
2. Two thermometers that are identical except that one has a brass bulb and the other a stainless steel bulb (no
well) are used to measure a temperature of 250˚F. If the temperature is measured in a fast moving fluid which
will the faster in response? Give reasons. If the temperature is measured in fast moving air (neglect radiation)
which will be the faster in response? Give reasons.

22
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH307 Computational Tools for Chemical Engineers


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Illustrate the use of programming language in handling of arrays, matrices and plots
2. Demonstrate the use of scripts and functions
3. Execute the programs using relational and logical operators
4. Compute the properties of a given compound using any computational tool
5. Use any computational tool to solve equation of state
6. Use any computational tool to solve material balance and energy balance problems

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO4 PO5 PO13


1 3 3
2 3 3
3 3 3
4 3 3 3
5 3 3 3
6 3 3 3
1.

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
Use of following techniques in C/C++ Language/MATLAB/any open source tool like SCILAB
1. Introduction to programming in MATLAB/SCILAB
2. Handling of arrays and matrices
3. Graphing data- two dimensional plots
4. Scripts and functions
5. Programming using loops
6. Programming using conditional statements
Chemical engineering problem solving
7. Property estimation for a given compound
8. Solving equation of state
9. Mass balances without recycle streams
10. Mass balances with recycle streams
11. Energy balance problems

List of Augmented Experiments23


1. Write a program to print reverse of given number
2. Write a programe to print the factorial of a given number
3. Write a programe to print the product of digits of given number
4. Write a programe to print whether the given number is palindrome or not
5. Write a programe to print right angle Fibonacci series pyramid
6. Write a programe to print rectangle using special characters using functions
7. Write a programe to print a number pyramid using functions
8. Write a programe to print greatest of three numbers using functions
9. Write a programe to print the roots of the quadratic equations using functions
10. Write a programe to print whether the number is prime number or not

Reading Material (s)


1. A.Gilat, MATLAB An Introduction with Applications, 4 th ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd., 2012
2. Y. K. Singh, B. B. Chaudhuri, MATLAB Programming,1 st ed., PHI learning Pvt. Ltd., 2010

23
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

55
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH308 Instrumentation Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Evaluate theprecisionofpressure and temperature detectors
2. Appraise the sensors like pressure gauges, temperature detectors and LVDT
3. Explain the working and operation of the sensors
4. Demonstrate the analytical systems usage and estimate the process variables
5. Inspect the working of different signal receivers
6. Function effectively in both single-team and also able to communicate verbal, written and graphical
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO4 PO13


1 3 3
2 2 3
3 1 3
4 3 3
5 2 3
6 2 1
7.

8. 3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked


List of Experiments
1. Calibration of pressure gauges
2. Calibration of thermocouple for temperature measurement
3. Determine the characteristics of RTD for temperature measurement
4. Calibration of capacitive transducer for angular displacement
5. Study and calibration of LVDT transducer for displacement measurement
6. Study and calibration of McLeod gauge for low pressure
7. Study and calibration of a rotameter for flow measurement
8. Determine the concentration of inorganic compounds using flame photometry
9. Study the workingof I/P converter
10. Study the working range of D.P converter
11. Study the characteristics of valve positioner
12. Study the operation of PLC

List of Augmented Experiments24


1. Comparative study of force measurement using LVDT, magnetic pickup and dial gauge.
2. Linearization of thermistor characteristics.
3. Level measurement using capacitance principle using overlap area
4. Comparative study of displacement measurement between LVDT and LDR based circuit.
5. Characterization of thermocouple at various temperature mediums.
6. Preparation of instrument air, free of dust and moisture to control the operation of instruments. The instrument
air should be at a regulated pressure
7. Manual control of process fluid outlet temperature
8. To calibrate the pressure sensor and pressure transmitter and to investigate the linearity and hysteresis of the
sensor/transmitter
9. Level measurement using capacitance principle using change in dielectric medium
10. Calibration of pressure measurement using various pressure measuring devices

Reading Material (s)


1. G. Svehla, Vogel‘s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, 7thed., Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2003

24
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

56
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CY304 Physical And Analytical Chemistry Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Interpret the kinetics of reactions and thereby design the process
2. Interpret the dynamics of distribution process that will be applicable in manufacturing industries
3. Utilize the adsorption and gravimetric methods of analysis in industry
4. Experiment with modern analytical instruments which are used in industries for monitoring & process
control, quality testing etc
5. Apply the knowledge of chromatographic techniques for isolation and identification of compounds
6. Determine the air quality at industrial/domestic areas
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO4
1 3
2 2
3 1
4 3
5 2
6 2
1.

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1.
Determination of rate constant of hydrolysis of ester
2.
Determination of rate constant of reaction between persulphate and iodide
3.
Determination of distribution coefficient of iodine between water and carbon tetrachloride
4.
Determination of degree of association of benzoic acid in benzene
5.
Determination of CST of phenol - water system
6.
Determination of BOD & COD in an industrial effluent
7.
Determination of phenol in environmental sample
8.
Simultaneous determination of Manganese and Chromium in an alloy
9.
Determination of Zn & Cu by AAS in a Brass sample
10.
Separation of mixture of amino acids by TLC method
11.
Separation and identification of a mixture of compounds by IC
12.
Determination of mol. wt. of a given compound by elevation of boiling point/depression in freezing point
using Beckmann thermometer
13. Functional group identification by IR
14. Assessment of quality of air SOx, NOx, TRPM, TSPM
15. Rate of chemical reaction with and without a heterogeneous catalyst
16. Adsorption studies
17. Preparation of Aspirin and characterization by TLC
Note: Student should perform minimum of 12 experiments at least one form each head
List of Augmented Experiments25
1. Air pollution studies
2. Kinetic studies
3. Removal of heavy metals by adsorption studies
Reading Materials (s)
1. K.Gouru Naidu, Physical and Analytical Chemistry Lab Manual, 2014
2. Vogels Text Book of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis, 7th ed., Pearson education, 2003
3. D.P. Shoemaker, J. W.Nibler, Experiments in Physical Chemistry, 7 thed.,Tata McGraw Hill, 2003

25
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16MA303 Engineering Mathematics III


3024
Course Outcomes

1. Utilize numerical techniques to find approximate solutions of non-linear Algebraic equations


2. Understand the concepts of interpolation, extrapolation to estimate the unknown
functional values
3. Make use of method of least squares to fit a best curve for the given data
4. Find approximate values of derivatives and finite integrals using numerical techniques
5. Understand basic probability axioms and apply Baye‘s theorem related to engineering problems
6. Identify the suitable distribution among Binomial, Poisson, normal to compute probabilities
COs–POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO 2 PO4 PO5


1 3 2 3 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 3 2 2
4 2 3 2 2
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equations
Introduction , Bisection Method , Method of False Position, Newton-Raphson Method.
Curve fitting: Fitting a straight line , Second degree curve, exponential curve, power curve by method of least squares.
Geometrical interpretation of Bisection Method, Method of False Position, Newton-Raphson Method.
Practical components

1. The Bisection method


2. Newton-Raphson Method
3. Linear Regression (Fitting of a straight line)
11 + 10 Hours

Unit II
Interpolation, Numerical Integration and Numerical solution of Ordinary differential equations
Introduction- Finite differences- Newton‘s- forward Differences- Backward differences, Symbolic relations.Numerical
Integration: Trapezoidal rule, Simpson‘s 1/3 Rule.
Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential equations: Solution by Taylor‘s series. Euler‘s, Modified Euler‘s Method,
Runge-Kutta Method
Predictor-Corrector Method-Milne’s Method.
Practical components

1. Trapezoidal rule
2. Simpson‘s 1/3 Rule
3. Solution of Initial Value Problem using Taylor‘s series method
4. Solution of Initial Value Problem using Runge-Kutta Method of order four
12 + 10 Hours
Unit III
Probability and Random variable
Probability, The axioms of probability, Conditional probability, Baye‘s theorem.
Random variables, Discrete and continuous Distributions and properties, Mathematical expectation, MGFs.
Addition, Multiplication theorems of probability.
Practical components
1. Baye‘s Rule 11 + 4 Hours

Unit IV
Probability Distributions, Correlation and Regression

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Binomial, Poisson and Normal distribution – related properties.


Correlation, Pearson‘s correlation coefficient and Spearman‘s Rank correlation coefficient, linear
Regression (construction of Regression lines)
Self study topics: Correlation of grouped data, curvilinear regression.
Practicalcomponents

1. Normal Distribution
2. Correlation related problems
11 + 6 Hours
Total: 45+30 Hours

Textbook (s)
1. B. S. Grewal, Higher Engineering Mathematics, 42 nd ed., Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 2012
2. B.V.Ramana, Engineering Mathematics, 4th ed., Tata McGraw Hill, 2009
3. Engineering Mathematics-III lab manual-Mathematics Department(BS&H)-GMRIT, Rajam
4. Steven C.Chapra, Applied Numerical Methods with MATLAB,3 rd ed., McGH Publications,2012
Reference (s)
1. T.K.V Iyengar, S.Ranganatham, B.Krishna Gandhi, Mathematical Methods, 2nd ed., S.Chand Co., New
Delhi, 2006
2. T.K.V Iyengar, K.B. Gandhi, Probability and Statistics, S.Chand Co., New Delhi, 2012
3. Ervin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 9 th ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd., 2012
4. S.S.Sastry, Introductory methods of Numerical Analysis, 4 thed, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., 2006
5. Wan Y.Yang, Wenwu Cao, Tae-Chang Chung and John Morris, Applied Numerical Methods using
MATLAB,2nd ed., Wiley Publ;ications,2005

SAMPLE QUESTION (S)

Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test26 (%)
Remember 25 25 30
Understand 45 45 40
Apply 30 30 30
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. List out the different methods to solve Algebraic and Transcendental Equations
2. List out the different methods for interpolation
3. Define axioms of probability
4. Write the importance of Normal distribution
5. Define Moment Generating function

Understand

1. Explain the procedure involved in Newton‘s forward and backward interpolation formulas to interpolate the
data.
2. Describe mathematical principle involved in Trapezoidal rule and Simpson‘s 1/3 Rule.
3. Illustrate the difference between discrete and continuous distributions.
4. Compare Binomial, Poisson, Normal distributions

Apply

1. Apply Newton‘s iterative method find the real root of the equation 3x = cosx + 1

26
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

59
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

2. A solid of revolution is formed by rotating about the x-axis, the area between the x-axis, the lines x = 0 and x
= 1 and a curve through the points with the following co-ordinates
x 0.00 0.25 0.5 0.75 1
y 1.0 0.9896 0.9589 0.9589 0.8415
Estimate the volume of the solid formed using Simson‘s rule
3. If three cars are drawn from a lot of 6 cars containing 2 defective cars, find (i) the probability distribution of
the number of defective cars, (ii) the expected number of defective cars
4. Two machines A,B produces 60% and 40% of items from the total output. 6% and 8% are the defective items
produced by machines A and B respectively. An item is chosen from the total output and found to be
defective. Find the probability that the defective item is produced by machine A.
5. Write a MATLAB program for method of false position.
6. Write a MATLAB program for fitting a second degree curve.

60
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CY405 Organic Chemistry


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Understand the basic principles of organic chemistry
2. Differentiate between electrophilic and nucleophillic reactions
3. Apply the concepts of named reactions in synthetic organic chemistry
4. Understand the preparation and uses of various heterocyclic compounds including dyes
5. Familiarize with the preparation and application of important polymers and syntheticrubber
6. Outline the preparation and application of important industrial chemicals and synthetic drugs

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO1 PO2
1 3 2
2 3 2
3 3 2
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Basic Organic Chemistry
Polar effects: Inductive effect, Electromeric effect, Resonance or Mesomeric effect, Hyper conjugation;Types of
intermediates: Carbocation–Carbanion-Free radical (factors influencing the reactions)
Types of reagents: Nucleophiles–electrophiles-Free radicals;some reagents of synthetic importance -N-
bromosuccinimide (NBS), Grignard reagent, Lithium Aluminum Hydride
Aluminiumisopropoxide, Cromium oxide (CrO3)
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Types and applications of Reactions
Types of Reactions: Electrophilic reactions-Markownikoff‘srule,Nucleophillic reaction-SN1 andSN2 reaction -Free
radical reactions-Halogenation.
Applications of some reactions of synthetic importance: Friedel Crafts reaction, Reimer-Tiemann reaction; Aldol
condensation, Perkin condensation, Benzoin condensation, Diels-Alder reaction,Beckmann rearrangement
Applications of Pinacol-pinacalone rearrangement
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Heterocyclic compounds& Dyes
Nomenclature, preparation, structure, properties and uses of Furan, Pyrrole, Thiophene, PyridineandQuinolineDyes:
Color and Constitution; Classification of Dyes, Preparation and uses
ofRosaniline,Congored,CrystalvioletandMethylene blue
Nomenclature, preparation, structure, properties and uses of Isoquinoline
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Polymers& Industrial Chemicals
Polymers: Preparation, Properties and Engineering applications of Nylon, Polyester, Silicone Resin, Synthetic
Rubbers-Buna S, Buna N, Thiokol; Industrial chemicals, Drugs & Pharmaceuticals: Introduction– Industrial
preparation and properties of Acetaldehydeand Benzene, synthetic drugs–paracetamol and aspirin
Industrial preparation of Nitro Benzene
11+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. Morrison and Boyd, Text book of Organic Chemistry,7 thed., Pearson, 2011
2. M.K. Jain,S.C. Sharma, Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry, Vishal Publishing Co, 2013

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

3. O.P. Agarwal, Reactions and Reagents, 38thed.,Goel publishing House, 2004


Reference (s)
1. I. L. Finar, Organic Chemistry, ELBS, 6th ed., Longman, 1995
2. G. R. Chatwal, Reaction mechanism, 4thed.,HimalayaPublishing House, 2005
3. R.K. Bansal,Text book of Organic Chemistry,3rded., New Age international Publishers, 1999
4. P.L. Soni, Text book of Organic Chemistry, 27 thed., Sultan Chand and sons, 1997

Sample Question (s)

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test27 (%)
Remember 25 15
Understand 35 15
Apply 20 25 70
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define Mesomeric effect


2. State the three types of intermediates formed in organic reactions
3. List three named reactions involving electrophilic addition.

Understand

1. What is inductive effect? Explain its influence in organic molecules with suitable examples.
2. Explain Reimer – Teiman Reaction with mechanism.
3. How is N-bromosuccinamide prepared? Mention its significance in organic synthesis.

Apply

1. Among trichloro acetic acid & acetic acid, which one is stronger acid? Justify your answer
2. Recommend a suitable method for preparation of Methyl Magnesium Bromide. Give its applications in
industrial preparation of organic molecules.
3. Write the products and give the reason for their formation.
(i) p-methyl Phenol + Acetyl chloride +AlCl 3
(ii) m-nitro Toluene + Methyl chloride + AlCl3

Analyze

1. In which of the following molecules, electrophilic substitution takes place easily and why?
(a) Toluene (b) Tertiary butyl benzene
2. Which of the following is more stable and why? (a) 1-Butene (b) 2-Butene
3. How do you distinguish between Maleic acid and Fumaric acid by using Diels-Alder Reaction?

27
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

62
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH403 Mechanical Unit Operations


3103

Course Outcomes
1. Summarize the characterization of particulate solids and explain the phenomenon of screening
2. Identify physico-chemical methods for the separation of heterogeneous mixtures
3. Determine the filter medium resistance and specific cake resistance
4. Select a suitable equipment for size reduction and mixing
5. Select a dense media separation equipment for fluid-solid operations
6. Estimate the power consumption of the equipments for mixing and size reduction operations
COs – POs Mapping
COs PO1 PO 2 PO 3 PO 13
1 3 2 1 3
2 1 3 1 3
3 2 3 1 3
4 1 2 3 3
5 1 2 3 3
6 1 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Particle characteristics and size analysis &Transportation of solids
Properties, handling and mixing of particulate solids: Characterization of solid particles, properties of particulate
masses, storage of solids and mixing of solids, types of mixers, mixers for non-cohesive solids and mixers for cohesive
solids.
Belt, screw, apron conveyors, bucket elevators, pneumatic conveyors. (Qualitative treatment)
Microscopic sizing and Image analysis–Electrical impedance method–Laser diffraction methods–Standard screens
11 + 4 Hours
Unit II
Size reduction & Screening
Principles, criteria for comminution, characteristics of comminution, size reduction equipment-crushers, grinders, ultra
fine grinders, cutting machines, Equipment operation.
Screening, Industrial screening equipments, general factors in selecting screening equipment, comparison of ideal and
actual screens, material balance over a screen and screening efficiency.
Ultra fine grinders, Cutting machines
11 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Filtration&Agitation and mixing of liquids
Cake filters, filter aids,Principles of cake filtration, principles of clarification and the principles of centrifugal filtration
centrifugal filters, clarifying filters, liquid clarification, and gas cleaning.
Equipment for blending and kneading, dispersion, power for agitation, correlations.
Flocculation–Dorr Oliver thickener design–Venturi scrubber
12 + 4 Hours
Unit IV
Separations based on the motion of particles through fluids, Centrifugal settling process & Flotation
Gravity sedimentation process: gravity classifiers, sorting classifiers, Clarifiers and thickeners, Equipment for
sedimentation, clarifier and thickener design.
Separations of solids from gases: Cyclones, Separations of solids from liquids: Hydroclones, principles of centrifugal
sedimentation, centrifugal classifiers.
General description, flotation reagents, applications, flotation machines, capacities, flotation economics.
Slow sand filters–Multi grain filtration–Membrane filtration–Flotation of pirates–Bagfilters
11 + 3 Hours
Total: 45 + 15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. W. L. McCabe, J. C. Smith and Peter Harriott, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 6th ed., McGraw–
Hill, 2001
2. J. M. Coulson, J. F. Richardson, Chemical Engineering, Vol. 2, 3 rd ed., Pergamon Press, 1977

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

3. A. S. Foust, L. A. Wenzel, C. W. Clump, L.Maus, L. Bryce Andersen, Principles of Unit Operation, 2nd ed.,
Wiley & Sons, 2008
Reference (s)
1. G. G Brown, Unit Operations, CBS Publishers, 1995

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test28 (%)
Remember 35 25 --
Understand 45 25 20
Apply 20 35 50
Analyze -- 15 30
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define the term characterization of solid particles.


2. Recall general factors in selecting screening equipment.
3. How sink and float method is useful in separation?
4. List various laws related to unit operations.

Understand
1. Summarize the properties of particulate masses.
2. Compare ideal and actual screens.
3. Explain the working of a leaf filter.
4. Summarize the technique of froth flotation in separation of a mixture of particles.
5. Compare various indices related to unit operations.

Apply
1. A certain crusher takes rock whose average particle diameter is 0.025m and crushes it to a product whose
average particle diameter is 0.018 cm, at the rate of 25ton/hr. At this rate the mill takes 10HP power and it
requires 0.75HP power to run empty. Solve the problem for power consumption from same capacity if
average product diameter is 0.008m using Rittinger‘s Law.
2. A rotary filter can deliver the filtrate at a rate of 450 kg/h when the drum speed is 0.6 rpm. Assuming the
fraction submerged and the pressure drop is un-changed, solve how much drum speed in rpm is necessary to
make a filtrate at the rate of 600 kg/h by assuming the density of the filtrate as 1000 kg/m3.
3. Solve for terminal settling velocity of particles of 40 micron size having a specific gravity of 2.6 falling
through still water. Assume that the settling zone is laminar and all particles are spherical and the wall effect
may be neglected. Viscosity of water may be taken as 1 cP for solving the problem.
4. Identify the suitable unit operations for the Grindability of ores & minerals of Andhra Pradesh for industrial
applications.
5. Organize various unit operation equipment based on overall efficiency.

Analyze
1. Distinguish between differential and cumulative analysis.
2. Examine the criteria for comminution.
3. Discover the role of the thickener in unit operations.
4. Distinguish between cake filters and clarifying filters.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH404 Momentum Transfer


3103
Course Outcomes

1. Apply the principle of fluid statics to understand the working of manometers and decanters
2. Develop the continuity, momentum, and energy balance equations and to solve the fluid flow problems in
pipes
3. Determine flow rates, pressure changes, minor and major head losses for viscous flows through pipes and
channels.
4. Illustrate subsonic, sonic, supersonic, hypersonic flows with respect to Mach number
5. Explain the effect of forces acting on flow past immersed bodies and fluidization
6. Identify the appropriate fluid moving and metering machinery based on the process requirement
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO 13


1 2 2 1 2
2 3 3 2 3
3 1 3 2 3
4 - 1 - 2
5 1 2 1 2
6 1 3 2 3
1.

2. 3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Basic concepts and equations of fluid static and fluid flow
Basic concepts,Fluid statics and its application: hydrostatic equilibrium, U-Tube and inclined manometers, Fluid flow
phenomena: Laminar flow, Shear rate, Shear stress, Rheological properties of fluids, Turbulence, Boundary layers,
Continuity equation, Equation of motion (Navier-Stoke‘sequation), Macroscopic momentum balances, Mechanical
energy equations
Centrifugal– Gravity decanters
11 + 4 Hours
Unit II
Incompressible and compressible fluid flow
The flow of incompressible fluids in pipes and channels: Shear stress and skin friction in pipes, Laminar and turbulent
flow in pipes and channels, Turbulent flow in pipes and channels, Frictional losses in contractions, Expansions and
fittings
Flow of compressible fluids: Definitions and basic equations, Processes of compressible flow, Isentropic flow through
nozzles, Adiabatic and isothermal frictional flow, Dimensional analysis
Bernoulli’s equation for compressible fluids
11 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Flow past immersed bodies and Fluidization
Flow past immersed bodies, Drag and drag coefficient, Flow through beds of solids, Motion of particles through fluids.
Fluidization, Conditions for fluidization, Minimum fluidization velocity, Types of fluidization, Expansion of fluidized
bed, Applications of fluidization, Continuous fluidization: Slurry and pneumatic transport
Free Settling–Hindered Settling–Applications of fluidization in reactors
12 + 3 Hours
Unit IV
Transportation and Metering of fluids
Transportation and metering of fluids – Pipes, Fittings and valves, pumps: Positive displacement pumps, and
centrifugal pumps. Measurement of flowing fluids – Full bore meters - venturi, Orifice meters, Variable area meters –
Rotameter, Insertion meters-pitot tube; fans, blowers and compressors
Specific speed of centrifugal pumps- Multistage centrifugal pumps
11 + 4 Hours
Total: 45 + 15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. W.L. McCabe, J. C.Smith& P.Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7 thed., McGraw- Hill, 2012
2. Ch. J. Geankopolis, Transport Processes and Unit Operations, 3 rded., PHI, 1993

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reference (s)
1. R. K. Bansal, A Textbook of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, 4thed., Laxmi Publications Ltd., 2005
2. R. K. Rajput, A Textbook of Hydraulic Machines, 3 rded., S. Chand Publishers, 2006

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test29 (%)
Remember 30 20 10
Understand 40 35 40
Apply 20 35 30
Analyze -- --- ---
Evaluate 10 10 20
Create -- --- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State the Bernoulli‘s equation and give the significance of each term in the equation.
2. Define compressible and incompressible fluids.
3. Define sphericity, drag coefficient and terminal velocity.
4. What do you mean by single acting and double acting reciprocating pumps?
5. List the various pumps used in chemical industries for the handling of fluids.
6. What are the various forces acting on a particle moving through a fluid?

Understand

1. Explain the behavior of Non-Newtonian fluids with the help of some examples.
2. How do you estimate the drag coefficient for Stoke‘s law regime?
3. Derive the Hagen- Poiseuille Equation for a laminar flow of Newtonian fluid using appropriate notations.
4. Formulate an expression for the motion of a spherical particle through fluid under the influence of
gravitational force and centrifugal fields.
5. Compare centrifugal pumps with reciprocating pumps.
6. How drag coefficient varies with the Reynold‘s number of different shapes?
7. Two pipelines of equal lengths are connected in series. The diameter of the second pipe is two times that of
the first pipe. Formulate the relation between ratio of frictional head losses of the first pipe and the second
pipe
8. Two pipelines of equal length and with diameters of 15 cm and 10 cm are in parallel and connect two
reservoirs. The difference in water levels in the reservoirs is 3 m. If the friction is assumed to be equal, what
is the ratio of the discharges due to the larger diameter pipe to that of the smaller diameter pipe?
9. A lube oil (specific gravity 0.8) is flowing through a 15 cm steel pipe at 1500 LPM. A 10 cm orifice attached
to a mercury manometer is placed in the pipeline and the orifice coefficient may be taken as 0.62. If the
manometer leg is inclined at an angle of 30˚ to the horizontal, what would be the manometer reading along
the sloping leg?

Apply

1. 60 % sulfuric acid is to be pumped at the rate of 4000 cm3/sec through a pipe 25 mm diameter and raised to a
height of 25 m. The pipe is 30 m long and it runs straight. Compute power required by the pump. The specific
gravity of the acid is 1.531 and its kinematic viscosity is 0.425 stokes. Friction factor is 0.0047.
2. Water is pumped from a reservoir to a height of 1000 m from the reservoir level, through a pipe of 15 cm I.D.
at an average velocity of 4 m/s. If the pipeline along with the fittings is equivalent to 2000 m long and the
overall efficiency is 70%, what is the energy required for pumping? Friction factor f = 0.046 Re-0.2.
3. A catalyst tower 50 ft high and 20 ft in diameter is packed with 1-in. diameter spheres. Gas enters the top of
the bed at a temperature of 500˚F and leaves at the same temperature. The pressure at the bottom of the bed is
30 lbf/in.2 abs. The bed porosity is 0.40. If the gas has average properties similar to propane and the time of
contact (based on superficial velocity of gas) between the gas and the catalyst is 10 s, what is the inlet
pressure?

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

4. An aero plane is flying at a height of 15 km where the temperature is -500˚C. The speed of the plane is
corresponding to M=2.0. Assuming k=1.4 and R=287J/kgK , find the speed of the plane
5. From a reservoir, water is drained through two pipes of 10 cm and 20 cm diameter respectively. If the
frictional head loss in both the pipes is same, determine the ratio of discharge through the larger pipe to that
through the smaller pipe.
6. Steam pressures at the inlet and exit of a nozzle are 16 bar and 5.2 bar respectively, and discharge is 0·28
m3/s. The critical pressure ratio is 0.5475. If the exit pressure is reduced to 3.2 bar, then what will be the flow
rate in m3/s?

Evaluate

1. The pressure difference between two points in a pipe due to turbulent flow depends on the velocity v,
diameter D, dynamic viscosity µ, density ρ, roughness k and the distance between the pints L. Using
dimensional analysis prove that f is a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness factor k/D.
2. Determine the minimum fluidization velocity for a bed of particles fluidized by water. Take d p=120µm,
Øs=1.0, ρp=2500 kg/m3, €mf=0.45, ρ=1000 kg/m3, µ=0.9 mPa.s. Also calculate the bed voidage, € and the
ratio of the height of the fluidized bed to that of the fixed bed for uo/ umf =10.
3. How do you assess the performance of centrifugal pumps?
4. How do you assess the performance of venture meter?
5. A liquid is flowing in a closed conduit having a rectangular cross section with sides 0.03 and 0.02 m, the flow
rate of the liquid is 43.2 kg/min. Calculate the pressure drop per meter length of the conduit. Kinematics
viscosity = 1.0x10 −6 m 2 /s, Density = 1000 kg/m3 Friction factor f = 16/NRe for NRe< 2000, f = 0.079 Re −
25.0
for NRe> 2000.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH405 Phase & Chemical Equilibria


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Estimate the thermodynamic properties, such as enthalpies, entropies, Gibbs energies, fugacity coefficients,
and activity coefficients of pure fluids as well as fluid mixtures
2. Choose appropriate models for calculating phase equilibrium data
3. Estimate VLE data for ideal and non-ideal chemical mixtures
4. Solve VLE data using equation of state
5. Explain VLE diagrams for partially miscible and immiscible systems
6. Solve chemical reaction equilibrium related problems using thermodynamic principles

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 3 - 3
2 3 3 3 3
3 2 3 3 3
4 2 3 3 3
5 3 3 - 3
6 3 3 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Solution Thermodynamics: Theory & Applications
Fundamental property relation, Chemical potential as a criterion for phase equilibrium, Phase equilibria, Partial
properties, Ideal gas mixtures, Fugacity and fugacity co-efficients for pure species, Fugacity and fugacity co-efficients
for species in solution, Generalized correlation for fugacity co-efficient, Ideal solutions, Excess properties, Model for
the excess Gibb‘s energy (Margules and van Laar and Wilson models), Properties change of mixing
NRTL, UNIQUAC and UNIFAC models (Qualitative treatment)
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Vapor /Liquid Equilibrium
Nature of equilibrium, Phase rule, VLE qualitative behavior, Dew point and bubble point calculations using Raoult‘s
law, VLE from K-value correlation, Flash calculations, Dew point and bubble point calculations and flash calculations
for non –ideal solutions
Minimum and Maximum boilingAzeotropes
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Phase Equlibria
The Gamma /Phi formulation of VLE, VLE from equations of state, Equilibrium and stability, Liquid/Liquid
Equilibrium (LLE), Vapor/Liquid/Liquid Equilibrium (VLLE), Solid /Liquid Equilibrium(SLE), Equilibrium
adsorption of gases on solids (Qualitative treatment only)
Solid vapor equilibrium
10+3 Hours
Unit IV
Chemical Reaction Equilibria
Sensible andlatent heat effects of pure substances, Standard heat of reaction, The reaction coordinate, Application of
equilibrium criterion to chemical reactions, The standardGibb‘s energy change and the equilibrium constant, Effect of
temperature on equilibrium constant, Relation of equilibrium constant to composition, Equilibrium conversion
forsingle reaction and multiple reactions, Phase rule for reacting systems
Equilibrium constant calculationsin various industries

11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook(s)
1. J.M. Smith, H.C.Van Ness, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics,7 th ed., Tata McGraw
Hill, 2010

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Reference(s)
1. K.V. Narayanan, A Textbook of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 1st ed., PHI, 2006
2. B.G. Kyle, Chemical and Process Thermodynamics, 3 rd ed., Pearson, Prentice Hall, 1999
3. Y. Cengel, M. Boles,Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, 8thed., Tata-McGraw Hill, 2014

Sample Question (s)

Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test30 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 25 15 --
Apply 30 35 40
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 30
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State Henry‘s law.


2. Define bubble and dew points.
3. What is the criterion of chemical reaction equilibria?
4. What is equation of state?
5. Define chemical potential.

Understand

1. Discuss the Gibb‘s-Duhem equation and its various forms. What are the major fields of application of the
Gibbs-Duhem equation?
2. Discuss in detail about the vapour – liquid equilibrium in partially miscible and immiscible systems.
3. Explain the procedure for the estimation of fugacity at any condition by knowing the fugacity coefficient at
saturation condition.
4. Write the steps for Bubble point temperature calculations.

Apply

1. The enthalpy of a binary liquid system of species 1 & 2 at fixed T & P is represented by the equation: H =
420x1 + 600x2 +x1x2(40x1+10x2) where H is in Jmol-1. Determine expressions for Ĥ1& Ĥ2 as functions of x1,
numerical values for the pure species enthalpies H 1& H2 and numerical values for the partial enthalpies at
infinite dilution.
2. The vapour pressure of Acetonitrile (1) and Nitromethane(2) confirms closely to Raoult‘slaw. Vapour
pressures for the pure species are given by the following Antoine equations.
ln = 14.2724 - 2945.47/(T-49.15)
ln = 14.2043 – 2972.64/(T-64.15) where T is in K & P is in kPa..
Prepare a graph showing t vs x1 and t vs y1 for a pressure of 70 kPa.
3. Derive the relationship between the standard Gibbs energy change and the equilibrium A gas mixture
containing 2 moles Nitrogen and 1 mole ammonia initially, is undergoing the following reaction:
N2 + 3H2->2NH3(i) Find the expression for the mole fractions of various components in the reaction mixture
interms of the extent reaction.(ii) Explain how the conversion of limiting reactant is related to the extent
reaction.
4. A system initially containing 2 mol C2H4 and 3 mol of O2 undergoes the reactions:
C2H4(g) + ½ O2(g) → (CH2)2+O(g) and
C2H4(g) + 3 O2(g) → 2CO2(g) + 2H2O(g)
Develop expressions for the molefractions of the reacting species as functions of the reaction coordinates for
the tworeactions.
5. When the compressibility factor Z is a function of V, T show that the residual Gibb‘s energy of fluids from
( )
virial equation of state is

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Analyze

1. Why does immiscibility occur in liquid solution? How would you estimate the composition of the vapor
phase in equilibrium with two immiscible liquid phase?
2. A liquid mixture contains 50%pentane (1), 30%hexane (2) and 20% cyclohexane (3) (all in mol%), i.e.,x1 =
0.5; x2 = 0.3; x3 = 0.2. At T = 400 K, the pressure is gradually decreased. What is the bubble pressure
andcomposition of the first vapor that is formed? Assume ideal liquid mixture and ideal gas
(Raoult‘s law).

Evaluate
1. The excess Gibb‘s energy for a binary system is given by , the pure component vapor pressure
are given by and where T is in ˚C and Psat is
in kPa. Obtain t-x-y diagram at 70kPa.
2. Hydrogen is to be formed by the steam cracking of methane according to the reaction CH4 + 2 H2O --> CO2
+ 4H2, the reaction will be performed at 600˚C, where the equilibrium constant Kp is 0.75. The standard
states are pure gas at 1 atm pressure. If the reaction pressure is 1 atm and a 50 percent excess of steam is used,
what is the fractional conversion of CH4 to H2? What is composition of exhaust stream?
3. N2O4 at a low temperature is mixed with air and heated at 25˚C and 1 bar pressure. The mole fraction of N2O4
in the N2O4 - Air mixture before dissociation begins is 0.19. What is the extent of decomposition and what are
the mole fractions of N2O4 and NO2 present at equilibrium? The reaction equilibrium constant K=0.154.
4. Given that T = 700 ˚C and P = 762 Torr
Component Intitial conc. , mmol Finalconc. , mmol
H2S 11.02
CH4 5.48
H2 0
CS2 0 0.711
Find Kp and ∆Gr˚.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH406 Process Heat Transfer


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Solve steady state and Un-steady heat conduction problems in simple geometries
2. Find the rate of heat transfer in laminar and turbulent flow conditions without phase change
3. Illustrate the heat transfer processes involved in boiling and condensation
4. Explain the heat transfer by radiation between ideal, actual surfaces and enclosures
5. Illustrate the construction details for various types of heat exchangers
6. Outline the principles of evaporation and crystallization
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 - 3
2 3 3
3 1 3 3
4 2 3 3
5 1 2 2 3
6 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Heat Transfer by Conduction and Convection
Nature of heat flow, Conduction, Fourier‘s law, Thermal conductivity, Steady state conduction in plane wall,
composite walls and cylinder, The equation for one-dimensional conduction, Lumped heat capacity systems.
Convection, Rate of heat transfer, Heat transfer coefficients and their relationship, Fouling factors, Critical radius of
insulation in circular conduits, Estimation of wall temperature.
Variation of thermal conductivity with function of temperature in plane wall,Transient heat conduction in infinite
solids
12 + 3 Hours
Unit II
Heat Transfer of Fluids with & without Phase Change
Forced convection, Thermal boundary layer concept, Heat transfer by forced convection in laminar & turbulent flow,
Transfer of heat by turbulent eddies, Analogy between momentum and heat transfer, Natural convection from vertical
shapes and horizontal planes, Heat transfer from condensing vapors, Heat transfer to boiling liquids.
Heat transfer to liquid metals, Effect of natural convection in laminar flow heat transfer
11 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Radiation and Heat Exchangers
Properties and definitions, Laws of black body radiation, Real surfaces and the grey body, Radiation between surfaces.
Double pipe and shell &tube heat exchangers: Parts of heat exchangers, types of Shell & Tube heat exchangers,
counter current and co-current flows, Energy balances, LMTD, Heat transfer calculations of double pipe heat
exchanger, LMTD correction factor for multi-pass heat exchangers, Extended surface heat exchangers.
Radiation shielding, combined heat transfer
11 + 4 Hours
Unit IV
Evaporation and Crystallization
Evaporators, Performance of tubular evaporators, Boiling point elevation, Vapor-recompression, Multiple effect
evaporators –methods of feeding, Area calculations for single effect evaporators.
Principles of crystallization, Super saturation, Homogeneous & heterogeneous nucleation, yield, Material balances,
MSMPR crystallizer
Crystallization equipment (Vacuum and draft tube-baffle crystallizers)
11 + 4 Hours
Total: 45 + 15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. W.L. McCabe, J. C.Smith & P. Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7thed., McGraw-Hill, 2005
2. J. P.Holman, Heat Transfer, 10th ed., McGraw Hill, 2009
3. Y.V.C.Rao, Heat Transfer, University Press, 1st ed., 2002

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reference (s)
1. B. K. Dutta, Heat Transfer Principles and Applications, 2 nded., PHI, 2009
2. D.Q. Kern, Process Heat Transfer, 1st ed., McGraw-Hill Publications, 1950
3. N. Ozisik, Basic approach to Heat Transfer, 1st ed., McGraw-Hill, 1985
4. P. L. E. Sissom, Schaum‘s Outlines of Heat Transfer 2 nd ed., McGraw-Hill publications, 2005

Sample Question (s)

Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test31 (%)
Remember 30 20 --
Understand 40 30 50
Apply 30 50 50
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define Fourier‘s law of conduction.


2. How does film boiling differ from nucleate boiling?
3. State and prove Kirchoff‘s law of radiation.
4. Define capacity, economy of an evaporator.
Understand

1. Derive the equation of rate of heat transfer by conduction for the composite walls in series.
2. For turbulent flow in a tube, the heat transfer coefficient is obtained from the Dittus-Boelter correlation. If the
tube diameter is halved and the flow rate is doubled, determine the factor by which the heat transfer
coefficient will change.
3. Explain the effect of non condensable gases on rate of condensation.
4. Explain the long vertical tube evaporator with a neat sketch.
5. Explain the requirements of MSMPR crystallizer.
Apply

1. A circular tube of outer diameter 5 cm and inner diameter 4 cm is used to convey hot fluid. The inner surface
of the wall of the tube is at a temperature of 80˚C, while the outer surface of the wall of the tube is at 25˚C.
What is the rate of heat transport across the tube wall per meter length of the tube of steady state, if the
thermal conductivity of the tube wall is 10 W/(m K) ?
2. Water at 75˚C flows through a 0.005m diameter tube with a velocity of 1 m/s, if the tube wall temperature is
25˚C, make calculations for the heat transfer coefficient.
Use the correlation, St Pr(0.667) = 0.023 Re(−0.2) Data: Density = 1000 kg/m3; Cp= 4187 J/kgK ; Viscosity =
1.977kg/m.hr.; Thermal conductivity = 0.647 w/mK.
3. Saturated steam at 1.8 bar pressure and 118˚C condenses on a 38 mm outside diameter vertical tube which is
1m long. The tube wall is maintained at 100˚C. Calculate the average film coefficient of heat transfer for
condensing steam and the rate of condensation of steam. Density of liquid = 947 kg/m 3; Viscosity = 0.25 ×
10−3 N-S/m2; thermal conductivity = 0.685 w/m K; Latent heat = 2239 KJ/Kg.
4. The overall heat transfer coefficient for a shell and tube heat exchanger for clean surfaces is U 0 = 400
W/m2K. The fouling factor after one year of operation is found to be h do = 2000 W/m2K. Determine the
overall heat transfer coefficient at this time.
5. Determine the view factors associated with an enclosure formed by two concentric spheres of radius r 1 and r2
and very long concentric cylinders of radii r1 and r2. Neglect the end effects.
6. It is desired to concentrate a 20% salt solution (20 kg of salt in 100 kg of solution) to a 30% salt solution in an
evaporator. Consider a feed of 300 kg/min at 30˚C. The boiling point of the solution is 110˚C, the latent heat
of vaporization is 2100 kJ/kg, and the specific heat of the solution is 4 kJ/(kg K). Determine the rate at which
heat has to be supplied (in kJ/min) to the evaporator.

31
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH407 Mechanical Unit Operations Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Analyze the basic methods of characterization of particles and bulk solids
2. Determine various indices and verify the laws associated with various unit operations
3. Calculate performance characteristics of a filter press, cyclones, flotation cells and clarifiers
4. Experiment the effectiveness of the crushers, mixers, sieves and filtration equipment
5. Examine the range of applicability of various unit operation equipment
6. Estimate the power consumption for various unit operation equipment

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO4 PO13
1 3 3
2 3 3
3 3 3
4 3 3
5 3 3
6 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1. Sieve analysis - determination of particle size - size distribution, mean diameter, specific surface area and
number of particles per unit mass
2. To determine the time of grinding in a ball mill for producing a product with 80% passing a given screen
3. To determine the optimum time of sieving for a given sample of material
4. To verify the Rittinger‘s and Kick‘s law using jaw crusher and to find out the work index of a given material
5. To analyze the performance of cyclone separator
6. To analyze the Motion of particles through fluid (Verification of Stoke‘s Law)
7. To separate a mixture of coal into two fractions using flotation technique
8. To find out the effectiveness of a given screen
9. To determine the batch sedimentation data and to calculate the minimum thickener area under given
conditions
10. To determine the specific cake resistance and filter medium resistance of slurry in plate and frame filter press
11. To determine capacity, reduction ratio and time of crushing to get 80% desired product of specific average
size using attrition mill
12. To determine the specific surface area of particles using air permeability
13. To verify the laws using hammer mill and to find out the work index of a given material and also determine
the capacity and reduction ratio
14. To determine the effectiveness of centrifugal filtration
15. To determine the efficiency of mineral jig
16. To determine the efficiency of drop weight crusher

List of Augmented Experiments32


1. To experiment with the ores through sampling techniques to understand the condition of the ores
2. To model empirical equations for comminution operations
3. To estimate the grindability index
4. To estimate the terminal velocity of solids
5. To simplify the separation of heavy media using organic liquids
6. To simplify the separation of heavy media minerals using pseudo liquids
7. To simplify the separation of solids by jigging & tabling operations
8. To study the coal beneficiation by elutriation process
9. To design thickeners and clarifiers required for the industry
10. To determine the permeability of particulates
11. To determine the specific cake resistance

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

12. To study the flotation characteristics of given mineral

Reading Materials (s)


1. M.Gangadhar and V.SrinivasaRao, MUO Lab Manual, 2016
2. McCabe and Smith, "Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering", 5 Edition, McGraw Hill, 1993.
3. Alan S. Foust, Leonard A. Wenzel, Curtis W. Clump, Louis Maus, L. Bryce Andersen -Principles of Unit
Operation,2nd edition , John Wiley & Sons, 2008 .

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH408 Momentum Transfer Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Explain the Bernoulli‘s equation and its applications
2. Assess the rotameter with the actual discharge
3. Compare the variation in orifice and venturi coefficients
4. Examine the centrifugal pump about its efficiency
5. Determine the frictional losses in flow through pipes by experiment and calculations
6. Choose appropriate equipment both individually and in teams through proper communication

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO4 PO13
1 3
2 3 3
3 3 3
4 3 3
5 3 3
6 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1. Verification of Bernoulis equation
2. Determination of fluid flow behaviour-using Reynolds apparatus
3. Determination of discharge coefficient for venturi meter
4. Determination of discharge coefficient for orifice meter
5. Determination of discharge coefficient for Rotameter
6. Determination of discharge coefficient for V-Notch
7. Determination of discharge coefficient for Rectangular-Notch
8. Determination of friction factor for flow through straight pipes of different diameters
9. Determination of friction factor for flow of water through non-circular pipes
10. Determination of friction factor for packed beds, flow through packed beds
11. Determination of minimum fluidization velocity for two phase (solid-liquid) fluidized bed
12. Determination of pressure drop through helical coils
13. Determination of characteristic curves for centrifugal pumps
14. Determination of characteristic curves for reciprocating pumps
List of Augmented Experiments33
1. Friction in a bend pipe
2. Friction in a pipe with sudden expansion or contraction
3. Friction in pipe with inserts
4. Friction in vertically mounted empty pipes
5. Determination of coefficient of discharge or Pressure recovery in venturimeter using short and long venturi
6. Determination of pressures of lower magnitudes using inclined tube manometer
7. Measurement of pressure in closed conduits using differential manometers
8. Determination of minimum fluidization velocity using sand as bed
8. Determination of minimum fluidization velocity in two phase fluidization using air and water
10. Determination of valve characteristics of globe valve, check valve and butterfly valve
11. Pneumatic conveying of sand particles in tubes
12. Determination of efficiency of peristaltic pump, gear pump and submerged pump
Reading Material (s)
1. W.L. McCabe, J. C.Smith&P.Harriot,Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7thed., McGraw- Hill,2012

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Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH409 Process Heat Transfer Laboratory


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Apply Fourier‘s law of heat conduction in finding out the thermal conductivity of a given material
2. Compare the heat transfer coefficients and rate of heat transfer between natural and forced convection
mechanism
3. Evaluate the efficiency of the pin fin in both natural and forced heat transfer operations
4. Apply Stefan–Boltzmann‘s law to find out Stefan - Boltzmann constant & unknown body emissivity
5. Identify different boiling regimes and evaluate the critical heat flux through pool boiling of water
6. Evaluate effectiveness of co-current and counter current heat exchanger
COs – POs Mapping
COs PO 4 PO 13
1 3
2 3 2
3 3 2
4 3
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1. Determination of thermal conductivity of a given metal rod
2. Determination of total thermal resistance and thermal conductivity of composite wall
3. Heat transfer through lagged pipe
4. Determination of natural convective heat transfer coefficient for a vertical tube
5. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficient for air flowing through a pipe
6. Study of the temperature distribution along the length of a pin-fin under natural and forced convection
conditions
7. Determination of heat transfer coefficient through drop and film wise condensation
8. Determination of critical heat flux point for pool boiling of water
9. Determination of Stefan–Boltzmann constant for a given test body with black body
10. Determination of emissivity of a given plate at various temperatures
11. Determination of effectiveness and overall heat transfer coefficient in double pipe heat exchanger
List of Augmented Experiments34
1. Heat transfer from a solid surface to its surroundings by means convection as temperatures and air velocity
are altered
2. Determination of the length of the double pipe heat exchange for given temperatures and flow conditions
3. Compare the heat transfer coefficient with changing the air flow rates or velocities in a pipe under turbulent
flow conditions
4. Estimate the number tubes used in a shell and tube heat exchanger for a given temperature and flow
conditions of the fluids
5. Compare the heat transfer effectiveness through drop wise film wise condensation with altering the flow
rates of the fluids
6. Enhancement of heat transfer coefficient using helical coil
7. Study heat transfer in agitated vessels
8. Compare the effectiveness of fin through forced convection with altering the fluid flow rates
9. Experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer through inclined surfaces
10. Heat transfer through vertical condensation

Reading Material (s)


1. W.L. McCabe, J. C.Smith &P.Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 7 thed., McGraw- Hill, 2012
2. R.K. Rajput, Heat & Mass transfer, S. Chand Publications, 2007

34
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16HSX04 Engineering Economics and Project Management


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain basic principles of engineering economics
2. Apply cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis in their business decision making
3. Evaluate investment proposals through various capital budgeting methods
4. Apply the knowledge to prepare the simple financial statements for measuring performance of business firm
5. Analyze key issues of organization, management and administration
6. Evaluate project for accurate cost estimates and plan future activities

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO11


1 3 - 2 -
2 1 3 2 -
3 2 3 1 -
4 - 2 1 3
5 - 1 3 -
6 - 2 - 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Engineering Economics - Demand Forecasting & Cost Analysis
Concept of Engineering Economics – Types of efficiency – Managerial Economics Nature and Scope – Law of
Demand – Types of Elasticity of demand
Demand Forecasting & Cost Analysis: Demand Forecasting: Meaning, Factors Governing Demand Forecasting,
Methods of Demand Forecasting (Survey and Statistical Methods) – Cost Analysis: Basic Cost Concepts, Break Even
Analysis
Factors affecting the elasticity of demand – Supply and law of supply
10 + 3 Hours
Unit II
Investment Decisions & Market Structures - Financial Statements & Ratio Analysis
Time Value of Money – Capital Budgeting: Meaning, Need and Techniques of Capital Budgeting –Types of Markets
Structures – Features – Price Out-put determination under Perfect Competition and Monopoly Financial Statements &
Ratio Analysis: Introduction to Financial Accounting – Double entry system – Journal – Ledger – Trail Balance –
Final Accounts (with simple adjustments) – Financial Analysis through Ratios: Interpretation of Liquidity Ratios
(Current Ratio and quick ratio), Activity Ratios (Inventory turnover ratio and Debtor Turnover ratio, Creditors
Turnover Ratio, Capital Turnover Ratio), Solvency Ratios (Debt- Equity ratio, Interest Coverage ratio), and
Profitability ratios (Gross Profit Ratio, Net Profit ratio, Operating Ratio, P/E Ratio and EPS)
Price output determination under monopolistic markets -Accounting concepts and conventions
11 + 6 Hours
Unit III
Introduction to Management - Strategic Management
Introduction to Management: Nature – Importance – Classical Theories of Management: F.W.Taylor‘s and Henri
Fayol‘s Theory – Functions and Levels of Management – Decision Making Process
Methods of Production (Job, Batch and Mass Production) - Inventory Control, Objectives, Functions – Analysis of
Inventory – EOQ
Maslow & Douglas Mc.Gregor theories of management - ABC analysis
12 + 2 Hours
Unit IV
Project Management
Introduction – Project Life Cycle and its Phases – Project Selection Methods and Criteria – Technical Feasibility –
Project Control and Scheduling through Networks – Probabilistic Models of Networks – Time-Cost Relationship
(Crashing) – Human Aspects in Project Management: Form of Project Organization – Role & Traits of Project
Manager

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Sources of long-term and short-term project finance


12 + 4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. Pravin Kumar, Fundamentals of Engineering Economics, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, 2012
2. Rajeev M Gupta, Project Management, 2nd Ed., PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, 2014

Reference (s)
1. Panneer Selvam. R, Engineering economics, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 2013
2. R.B.Khanna, Project Management, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, 2011
3. R. Panneer Selvam & P.Senthil Kumar, Project Management, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, 2010
4. A. Aryasri, Management Science, 4th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, 2014
5. A. Aryasri, Managerial Economics and Financial Analysis, 4 th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, 2014
6. Koontz & Weihrich, Essentials of Management, 6th Ed., TMH, 2010
7. Chuck Williams and Mukherjee, Principle of Management 7 th Ed., Cengage Learning, 2013

Sample Question (s)


Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test35 (%)
Remembering 25 20 --
Understanding 25 15 --
Application 20 20 30
Analysis 10 15 30
Evaluate 20 20 20
Create - 10 20
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define Managerial Economics. Explain its nature and scope
2. Explain the concept of efficiency? What are the serveral methods to enhacing the economic efficiency?
3. Define Production Function? What are the various types of production functions
4. What is meaning of productivity? Explain how productivity can be enhanced in the Indian industries
5. How are projects ―unique‖ and ‗temporary as defined by PMBOK?

Understand
1. What do you understand by engineering economics? Discuss
2. What is law of demand? Explain its exceptions
3. Explain different elements of costs used in cost analysis
4. Illustrate the effect of price on demand and supply with the help of a diagram
5. Compare and contrast long-run equilibrium under monopolistic competition with that under perfect
competition.

Application
1. Determine price elasticity of demand given that the quantity demand of a product is 1000 units when the price
is Rs.100 and when the price declines to Rs.70, demand increases to 1100 units
2. Consider the following data of company for the year 2015

Sales = Rs.2,40.000/-
Fixed cost = Rs.50,000/-
Variable caost = Rs.75,000/-
Find our the followings
a) Contribution
b) Profit
c) BEP
d) Margin of safety
3. ―Every debit must have a corresponding credit‖ Explain
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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

4. Identigy the factors that are to be diagnosed both in the external and the internal environment to make enough
ground for strategy formulation. Illustrate appropriately
5. ―Poor technology selection can lead to total failure for a manufacturing firm‖, Do you agree? Give reasons in
support of your answer with suitable examples

Analysis
1. ―Management is regarded as an art by some, science by othes‖. In the light of this statement, explain the
exact nature of management
2. Make a comparative analysis of the features of different methods of production
3. Analyse the Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) technique for appraising large investment decisions
4. Is there any lind between mission, goal, objective, strategy and programmes in an industrial environment?
5. Compare and contrast the project evaluation and review technique (PERT) with the critical path method
(CPM)

Evaluate
1. Evaluate survey based demand forecasting methods with appropriate examples
2. The logical sequence of management functions cannot be subordinated even by one fuction. Do you agree?
Support your answer
3. Can there be a strategy without a mission? Give a mission statement for following organization:
A) An internet servce provider
B) A large private hospital
C) State electricity board
4. From the following information calculate ARR of the project, with initial cost of Rs.2,00,000/- and scrap
value is Rs.10,000/-
5. Following data relates to a certain project
Year Project
1 20000
2 50000
3 70000
4 60000
5 40000
Activity to tm tp
1-2 2 5 14
1-3 3 12 21
2-4 5 14 17
3-4 2 5 8
4-5 1 4 7
3-5 6 15 30

a) Construct the network b) Find the project duration c) Identify the critical path

Create
1. Discuss the flow of goods, services, resources and money payments in a simple economy with the help of a
suitable diagram
2. Sketch and explain the demand relationship in each of the following statements
a. I would never buy a Britney Spears CD! You couldn‘t even give me one for nothing
b. I generally buy a bit more coffee as the price falls. But once the price falls to Rs.2/-, I‘ll buy out the
entire stock of the supermarket
c. I spend more on orange juice even as the price rises. (Does this mean that I must be violating the law
of demand?)
3. ―Managerial Economics is the discipline which deals with application of economic theory to business
management‖, Discuss
4. How information technology has enabled the development of project management in recent times?
5. ‗GE Matrix is an extension of BCG Matrix‘, Discuss

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH502 Chemical Technology


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Demonstrate skills for the schematic representation of important unit operation/ unit processes
2. Illustrate chemical technologies used in the manufacturing of Chloro-alkalis & industrial gases
3. Interpret manufacturing process for sulfur, sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid
4. Explain organic chemical technologies involved in plant operations such as phenol-formaldehyde and
Styrene - Butadiene Rubber polymerizations
5. Construct flow diagram for the extraction and refining of vegetable oils and soaps
6. Explain the manufacturing operations for the production of natural products (sugar, pulp and paper)

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO1 PO3 PO10 PO13
1 1 - 3 -
2 1 - - 3
3 1 - - 3
4 1 1 - 3
5 1 - 2 3
6 1 2 2 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Chemical Technology and Chlor-alkali Industries
Schematic representation of Unit operations and Unit processes, Soda ash, Caustic soda, Chlorine, Industrial gases:
Hydrogen, Nitrogen industries: Synthetic ammonia, Urea and SSP and TSP
Unit operations- engineering diagramtic representations-crushing-grinding-mixing
13+5 Hours
Unit II
Manufacturing of Industrial Acids
Sulfur and sulfuric acid: Elemental Sulfur by oxidation-reduction of H2S, Sulfuric acid by Contact process, DCDA
Process, Phosphoric acid (wet process, Electric Arc process)
Unit Process–Engineering diagramtic representations–Absorption–Uses of inorganic acids
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Manufacturing of Organic Chemicals, Polymers & Food Products
Manufacture of Phenol from cumene, formaldehyde, phenol-formaldehyde resin, SBR, Oils: expression and extraction
of vegetable oils, hydrogenation of oils, Sugar from sugar cane
Properties of polymer and plastics–Vegetable oils–Cakes–Ice creams
10+3 Hours
Unit IV
Manufacturing of Daily Life Products
Soaps: continuous process for productions of fatty acids, glycerin, and soap, Pulp & Paper industry: production of pulp
by sulfate, sulfite process, black liquor recovery and production of paper by wet process
Bathing soap–Detergent powder–Types of paper
11 + 3Hours
Total: 45 + 15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. G.T.Austin, Shreve‘s Chemical Process Industries, International Student Edition, 5 th Ed., McGraw Hill Inc.,
1998
2. A. S. M, M. GopalaRao, Dryden‘s Outlines of Chemical Technology for the 21st Century, 3rd Ed., WEP East
West Press, 2010
Reference (s)
1. B. K. Sharma, Industrial Chemistry, Goel Publishing House, Meerut, 1997

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Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 36 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25+5 65
Analyze 20 25+5 35
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Draw schematic diagram for absorber, desorption system & name the streams.
2. Describe the uses of sulfuric acid.
3. Define thermo plastics & thermo setting resins.
4. Define pulp.

Understand
1. Explain the construction of membrane cell.
2. Describe principle involved in the Hydrocarbon steam reforming process
3. Why vegetable oils are hydrogenated.
4. Explain conical refiner.

Apply
1. List the Raw materials, reactions at anode, cathode and present the sequential steps in Caustic soda
manufacture process employing diaphragm electrolytic cell.
2. Show the steam reforming reactions (3) for the hydrogen manufacture from propane as feed stock; discuss the
effect of temperature, pressure and catalyst used.
3. Describe the production of phenol-formaldehyde with a neat flow sheet, present the raw materials used?
4. Explain oil extraction from cotton seeds employing mechanical expeller process and soybeans using solvent
extraction.

Analyze
1. Differentiate the reactions and neat flow sheet for Caustic soda manufacture using electrolysis process & a
combination of mercury and diaphragm cells
2. Organize the manufacturing of Urea process with a neat flow diagram and describe the process with
chemical reactions.
3. Which method of Sulfuric acid manufacturing results in higher conversion of SO3 and describe its technical
steps and its merits over contact process.
4. Differentiate the digestor solutions used in Sulfate and Sulfite pulping processes and describe Sulfite process
briefly

36
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

81
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH503 Homogeneous Reaction Engineering


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Classify various reaction types and understand fundamentals of kinetics including definitions of rate and
forms of rate expressions
2. Analyze and interpret experimental data from batch reactors and determine the order of simple chemical
reactions
3. Design and compare the performance of ideal reactors (batch, CSTR and PFR)
4. Develop skills to choose the right reactor among single, multiple, recycle reactor etc. schemes
5. Determine optimal ideal reactor design for multiple reactions for yield or selectivity
6. Predict reactor performance when the temperature is not uniform within the reactor

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO 13


1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Kinetics of Homogeneous Reactions
Classification of reactions, Rate equations of elementary and non-elementary reactions, variables affecting the rate of
reaction, Reaction rate constant, Reaction order and molecularity, Reversible reactions, non-elementary reactions;
Concentration dependent term of rate equation, Temperature dependent term of rate equation, Predictability of reaction
rate from theory
Relationship between equilibrium and specific rate constants–Relationship among Arrhenius theory, Collision theory
and Transition state theory 9 + 3 Hours

Unit II
Interpretation of Batch Reactor Data
Constant volume batch reactor, Variable volume batch reactor, Integral and differential methods of kinetic analysis,
empirical reactions of nth order, irreversible reactions in series and parallel, Analysis of total pressure data obtained in
a constant-volume system, First and second order reversible reactions, Reactions of shifting order, Biochemical
Reaction systems (Enzymatic reactions)
Method of half-lives–Method of initial rates 13 + 5 Hours

Unit III
Isothermal Reactor Design
Ideal reactors for a single reaction - Ideal batch reactor, Steady-state mixed flow reactor, Steady-state plug flow
reactors; Design for single reactions - Size comparison of single reactors, Multiple reactor systems, Recycle reactor,
Autocatalytic reactions
Semi-batch reactor–Pressure drop in reactors 9 + 3 Hours

Unit IV
Design for Multiple Reactions and Temperature & Pressure Effects
Introduction to design of parallel reactions, Qualitative and quantitative discussion on product distribution, Contacting
patterns, Reactor Size and arrangement, Selectivity & Yield
Reversible first order reaction, First order followed by zero order reaction, Zero order followed by first order reaction
Non-isothermal operation of reactors: Optimum temperature progression; Adiabatic and non-adiabatic batch, mixed
flow and plug flow reactors; Exothermic reactions in mixed flow reactors
Non-isothermal continuous flow reactors 14 + 4 Hours
Total: 45 + 15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. O. Levenspiel, Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Ed. John Wiley & Sons, 2007

Reference (s)
1. H. S.Fogler, Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 4 th Ed., PHI, 2005
2. K.G.Denbigh, J.C.R Turner, Chemical Reactor Theory: An introduction, Cambridge University Press, 3 rd Ed.,
1984
3. K. A.Gavhane, Chemical Reaction Engineering – I, Nirali Prakashan, 2004

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test37 (%)
Remember 30 20 --
Understand 40 30 --
Apply 20 40 50
Analyze 10 10 50
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Which subject in chemical engineering separates the chemical engineers from other engineers?
2. What is the difference between homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions?
3. Write down the rate expression for solid-fluid reaction
4. Give two examples of non-elementary reactions

Understand
1. Design of a chemical reactor depends on various factors. Explain
2. What are the advantages of flow reactors over batch reactor?
3. Write the rate expression for the following reaction:
CH4 (g) + 2O2 (g)  CO2 (g) + 2H2O (g)
4. Write down the performance equations of batch reactor and PFR
5. What happens to equilibrium conversion (XAe) and the rate of reaction for endothermic reactions with a rise
in temperature?

Apply
1. If 70 feet3/hour of a reactant enter a reactor with an internal volume of 250 feet 3, calculate the space velocity?

Analyze
1. For any nth-order reaction (n>0), for any given duty which of the two flow reactors require larger volume?
2. For an exothermic first order irreversible reaction in MFR, how would the conversion change at high
temperature for a given τ?

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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

83
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH504 Principles of Mass Transfer


3024
Course Outcomes
1. Identify the various modes of mass transfer and solve mass transfer rates in fluids
2. Compute diffusion coefficients fluids and solids
3. Formulate convective mass transfer coefficients & compute mass transfer rates
4. Interpret the equilibrium and construct operating line equations to steady state cascading system & compute
number of theoretical plates by analytical solutions
5. Summarize construction, operation & differentiate various Gas–Liquid contacting equipment and estimate the
number of transfer units/stages and height requirements for a packed/tray columns
6. Conclude investigations on diffusivity and mass transfer co-effients for fluids and interpret equilibrium data
on solid liquid, liquid liquid & vapour liquid

COs–POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO13


1 3 3 3
2 3 3 3
3 2 3 3
4 2 3 3 3
5 3 3 3 3
6 3 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Mass Transfer Operations & Molecular Diffusion
Introduction to Mass Transfer Operations: Classification of the Mass-Transfer Operations-Molecular Diffusion In
Fluids: Molecular Diffusion, Equation of Continuity, binary solutions, Steady State Molecular Diffusion in Fluids at
Rest and in Laminar Flow, estimation of diffusivity of gases and liquids
Molecular diffusion in solids

Practical Components
1. Estimation of diffusivity coefficients
i. Vapors, ii. Solids, iii. Liquids
10+9 Hours
Unit II
Mass Transfer Coefficients
Mass Transfer Coefficients in Laminar Flow (Explanation of equations only and no derivation), Mass Transfer
Coefficients in Turbulent Flow, eddy diffusion, Film Theory, Penetration theory, Surface-renewal Theory,
Combination Film-Surface-renewal theory, Surface-Stretch Theory, Mass, Heat and Momentum Transfer Analogies,
Turbulent Flow in Circular Pipes
Mass transfer data for simple situations

Practical Components
1. Evaluation of Mass transfer coefficients
i. Surface Evaporation, ii. Wetted wall column
10+9 Hours
Unit III
Inter Phase Mass Transfer
Inter Phase Mass Transfer: Concept of Equilibrium, Diffusion between Phases, Material Balances in steady state co-
current and counter current stage processes, Stages, Cascades, Kremser –Brown equation
Flux variation with concentration
Practical Components
1. Interpretation of Equilibria

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

i. Solid–Liquid, ii. Liquid–Liquid, iii. Vapor–Liquid 10+9 Hours

Unit IV
Equipment for Gas-Liquid Operations
Gas dispersed-sparged vessels (bubble columns), mechanical agitated equipments, tray towers-general
characteristics, sieve tray design for absorption and distillation, different types of tray efficiencies-Liquid
dispersed-venturi scrubbers, wetted-wall towers, packed towers-counter current flow of liquid & gas, mass
transfer coefficients, end effects and axial mixing, design of packed column-HTU concept, tray towers vs
packed towers
Propriety trays–End effects & axial mixing

Practical Components
1. Estimation of HETP 15+3 Hours
Total: 45+30 Hours
Text book (s)
1. R.E. Treybal, Mass transfer operations, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill, 1980

Reference (s)
1. B. K. Datta, Principles of Mass Transfer and Separation Processes, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 2009
2. W. L. McCabe, J. C. Smith and Peter Harriott, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 6th Ed,
McGraw- Hill, 2001
3. P. C. Wankat, Equilibrium Staged Separations, Prentice Hall PTR, 1988

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test38 (%)
Remember 15 15 --
Understand 25 25 --
Apply 50 25 50
Analyze 10 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Match the following based on separation process and separating agent
Membrane separation Solvent
Crystallization Heat
Ion exchange Solvent
Adsorption Solvent
Drying Heat /drying gas
Solid–liquid extraction Solid
Liquis–liquid extraction Resin
Distillation Heat removal
Gas absorption & stripping Membrane
2. Define Fick‘s law
3. Write three quantities that have influence on the mass transfer coefficient
4. How do you define the Stanton number for mass transfer?
5. Define dynamic liquid holdup in a packed tower

Understand
1. Under what conditions are the mass average velocity and the molar average velocity of the components
of a mixture equal?
2. The breathing process within the lungs involves what kind of diffusion?
3. What are the predictive relations to calculate diffusivities of gases and liquids?

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

4. Discuss the basic differences between Film Theory, Penetration Theory, and Film - surface renewal
theory
5. Which is the preferred operation between counter current and concurrent mode?
6. By retrofitting a sieve tray distillation column by structural packings, the column capacity can be
increased. Justify

Apply
1. Consider the box, which is separated in to two parts by partition P. into one section I, 1 kg of water (A)
is placed and into section II 1 kg of ethanol (B) (the densities of the liquids are different, and the
partition is so located that the depths of the liquids in each section are the same). Imagine the partition
is carefully removed, thus allowing diffusion of both liquids to occur. When diffusion stops, the
concentration will be uniform throughout at 50 mass percent of each constituent. Calculate and the
masses and moles of each constituent in the two regions
2. The gas-phase reaction 2A + B =C + D occurs on the surface of a catalyst pellet at steady state. What is
the value of the flux ratio NA/NC?
3. In an oxygen–nitrogen gas mixture at 1std. atm. 25°C, the concentrations of oxygen at en at two planes
2 mm apart are 10 and 20 vol %, respectively. Calculate the flux of diffusion of oxygen for the cases
where:
The nitrogen is not diffusing
There is equimolar counter diffusion of the two gases
3. Estimate the Knudsen diffusivity of ethylene with in a 100Å pore of a catalyst at 600K
4. Large volume of pure N2 gas at atmospheric pressure is flowing over a pool of methanol, which is
evaporating. The gas phase mass transfer coefficient methanol(K G) is 2X10–5Kmol/m2s.KPa.Assume
the vapour pressure of methanol at 298K is 10KPa
a. Calculate KY, Kc and F?
b. If the diffusivity of methanol at 298K is 2X10 –4m2/s. Calculate the thickness of the film?
5. A refining gas stream contains 10% of undesirable component B. it is desired to remove 95% of the
component B. the feed gas stream enters at the bottom of the separation column at a flow rate of
5000kg/h. the pure solvent is fed at the top of the column at a flow rate of 5000kg/h. the equilibrium
relation y=mx. Obtain the equation of operating line. Calculate the no. of theoretical stages required for
the given degree of separation by algebraic method

Analyze
1. The absorption of pure CO2 is carried out at 1 atmosphere pressure and 25°C by using water film
flowing down a vertical wall of 1m long. The water is essentially CO2 free initially. The average
velocity of the water is 0.2m/s. the solubility of the CO 2 in water at 25°C and 1 atm. Pressure is
CAi=0.0336 kmol/m3. Calculate the film thickness and the rate of absorption of CO 2. Use the following
properties DAB=2X10–9 m2/s; solution density= 997kg/m3; and the viscosity=8.95X10–4 kg/ms
2. Consider a sphere of naphathalene of diameter 20mm is suspended in a flowing air at 45°C. the
velocity of the air is 1m/s. the diffusivity of the naphathalene in air at 45°C is 6.9X10-6 m2/s. given that
at 45°Cdensity of air is 1.2 kg/m3 and viscosity of the air 1.9X10–5 kg/m.s and the sublimation pressure
of naphathalene is kPa. Use the followingcorrelation for the Sherwood number
Sh=2+0.55(Re) 0.53 (Sc)0.33
3. For the absorption of certain gas from an air stream by water the value of KG was found as 2X10–
6
kmol/m2s(kPa). The absorption takes place at 298K and 1 atm. Pressure. At a particular location of the
absorber the gas phase concentration is 5 mol% and liquid phase concentration is 0.2 mol%. Only 10%
of the total resistance lies in the liquid phaseion obeys Henry‘s law at 298K & the value of m=1.5
when the total pressure is 1 atm. Calculate the individual gas & liquid side mass transfer coefficients
4. A refining gas stream contains 10% of undesirable component B. it is desired to remove 95% of the
component B. the feed gas stream enters at the bottom of the separation column at a flow rate of
5000kg/h. the pure solvent is fed at the top of the column at a flow rate of 5000kg/h. the equilibrium
relation y=mx. Obtain the equation of operating line. Calculate no. of theoretical st ages graphically
5. An aqueous solution contains 300 μg/l of chloroform. It is necessary to remove 95% of chloroform. A
sparged vessel of 1.5 m diameter and 3 m deep is used to strip chloroform using air at 300K. the air
flows upwards and the liquid flows down wards . The mass flow rate of air and the water is 0.05 kg/s
and 10–3 kg/s respectively. The slip velocity of the gas and the liquid is 1.5 m/s. The sparger is a
circular disc of diameter 0.3 m containing 60 orifices each 3 mm in diameter. Given the density of the
liquid =1000kg/m3, viscosity of the gas =1.85X10–4 kg/ms, DL=1.2X10–9 m2/s at 300K. Assuming
the density of the gas at the average pressure in the vessel is 1.3kg/m2. Calculate the sp. Interfacial
area. (5 marks). Calculate volumetric mass transfer coefficient in the above problem
6. Ammonia is absorbed by pure water from air-ammonia mixture using sieve –tray tower. The mixure
contain 10% ammonia and 90% air. It is desired to remove 90% of NH3. The gas enters at the bottom

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

of the tower at a flow rate of 150 kmol/h. assume surface tension of the liquid is 72dynes/cm at 298K.
the diameter of the sieve tray is 2mm. assuming 40mm weir height, molecular weight of nH3=17 and
air=29. The density of the liquid is 1000kg/m3. The recommended foaming factor is 0.75. Design the
tower for 75% approach to the flooding velocity

Evaluate
1. At 1 std. atm, 100°C, the density of air=0.9482kg/m3, the viscosity=2.18X10–5kg/m.s, thermal
conductivity=0.0317W/m.K, and specific. heat at constant pressure =1.047kJ/kgK. At 25°C,
viscosity=1.79X10–5 kg/ms. Calculate the kinematic viscosity, thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number
at 100°C. Assuming that for air at 1std atm, Pr=Sc and that Sc=constant with changing temperature,
calculate D for air at 25°C

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16CH505 Process Dynamics and Control


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Identify, formulate and solve linear chemical process dynamics problems
2. Execute dynamic mass and energy balance equations
3. Find a control configuration to meet desired needs for a given process
4. Analyze stability of transfer functions
5. Determine control settings suitable for a system needs
6. Explain advanced control strategies like cascade, smith predictor, feed forward control to
implement in operating decisions through DCS

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 3 2 3
2 3 3 2 3
3 3 3 3 3
4 3 3 2 3
5 3 3 2 3
6 3 3 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

UNIT I
Introductory Concepts of Process Control
The chemical process, The Concept of a Process Control System, Overview of Control System Design,
Evolution of control system implementation, Elements of a digital computer ControlSystem, direct digital
control. final control elements-Control valves
Elements of a distributed control system network
12+4 Hrs
UNIT II
Dynamic Analysis of indusrial process
Formulating Process Models, The Concept of a Transfer Function, Linearization First Order Systems Response
of First-Order Systems, Two First-Order Systems in Series, Second-Order Systems
N-First-Order Systems in Series
11+3 Hrs

UNIT III
Control systems analysis
Properties of Closed-loop transfer functions. Properties of Block diagram, Choice of controller type P, PI, PD,
PID. Specifications and performance criteria, Controller tuning by Ziegler-Nichols methods
Controller tuning by Cohen-Coon methods
11+4 Hrs
UNIT IV
Stability of a dynamic process Analysis
Definitions of Stability, Routh-Hurwitz‘s stability criterion, Routh test, root locus, bode stability criterion, bode
plots, Stability margins
Process Applications Cascade Control, Feed-Forward Control, Ratio Control, Selective and Override Control,
Split-Range Control
Control of distillation towers and heat exchangers
11+4 Hrs
Total:45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. D. R. Coughnowr, Process System Analysis and Control, 3 rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Inc., 2013
2. G.Stephanopoulos, Chemical Process Control: An Introduction to Theory & Practice, PHI, 1983
3. W. B.Bequette, Process Control: Modeling, Design and Simulation, Prentice Hall, 1998

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Reference (s)
1. D.Seborg, T.F. Edgar Duncan, A. Mellichamp, Process Dynamics and Control,3rd Ed., John Wiley &
Sons, Inc, 2010
2. B.Roffel, B.Betlem, Process Dynamics and Control: Modeling for Control & Prediction, John Wiley &
Sons, 2006
3. N.E. Battikha,The Condensed Handbook of Measurement and Control, 3rdEd.,ISA, 2006

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test39 (%)
Remember 20 10 --
Understand 30 20 --
Apply 30 20 50
Analyze 20 30 30
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- 20 20
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define time constant and gain of a process.
2. Explain servo and regulatory control problems with an example.
3. List four basic elements of a feedback control system.
4. Define residual property.
5. Define turbine efficiency.
6. Define controller tuning
7. Definefllowing terms (i) overshoot (ii) decay ratio and (iii) Period of oscillation for a second order
system

Understand
1. Explain linearization procedure
2. Define transportation lag and derive its transfer function.
3. Explain servo and regulatory control problems with an example.
4. Explain Ziegler-Nicholas method of a feed back control system tuning.
5. Explain linear resistance and a linear system.
6. Explain a method to obtain the time constant to a step change to a first order system.
7. A unit impulse is applied to a second order system. What is the impulse response relation in terms of
step response.
8. Discuss merits and demerits of feed forward controller with respect to feed back controller.
9. Explain what are linear, equal percentage and square root characteristics of control values.

Apply
1. A liquid level process shown in below Fig. is operating at steady state condition, when the following
disturbances occurs at time t = 0, 2ft3 of water is added suddenly (impulse) to the tank; at t = 1, 3 FT 3
of water is added suddenly to the tank. Sketch the response of the tank in terms of level versus time
and determine the level at t = 0,0.5, 1.0 and 1.5.

2. Derive unit-step response of a second order non-Interacting system with gain of unity and time
constants 40 sec. and 1 min
3. For the control system shown in below figure determines.
a) C(s)/R(s) b) C() c) Offset d) C(0.5)

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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

e) Whether the closed loop response is under damped.

4. A step change of magnitude 4 is introduced into a system having the transfer function.
Y ( s) 10
 2
X ( s) s  1.6s  4
Determine: (a) Percent overshoot (b) Rise time (c) Maximum value of Y(t)
Ultimate value of Y(t) (e) Period of Oscillation
5. Draw the Root locus diagram for the control system given by its open-loop transfer function:

G (s) = 4
 3
K c 1   0.5s  1 0.5s 2  s  1
 s
6. The time constant of a thermometer is 6 seconds. It is at a steady state value of 90 oF. At time t = 0, the
thermometer is placed in a bath which is maintained at 100 oF. Calculate the time when it reads 98oF.

Analyze
1. Show the time constant of a mixing process as a product of resistance and capacitance
2. Consider a feed back control system described by the following transfer functions:
Process: Gp(s) = 4/(2s+1)
 1
PI Controller: Gc(s) = Kc 1  
 s
1
0.1s  1
Measuring Element :Gm(s) =

1
0.2s  1
Final Control Element: Gv(s) =

Obtain characteristic equation. Use Routh Method to determine the value of K c for the system to be
stable.
3. Compare the responses to a unit-step change in set point for the system shown in below Fig. for both
negative feedback and positive feedback. Do this for K c of 0.5 and 1.0. Compare these responses by
sketching C(t)

4. Determine the stability of the control system shown in below Fig. use Routh method

5. The transfer function of a process and measurement element connected in series is given by
0.4 s
e
2s  12
a) Sketch the open-loop Bode diagram (gain & phase) for a control system involving this process
and measurement lag
b) Specify the gain of a proportional controller to be used in this control system

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6. What do you understand by distance velocity lag? What is the transfer function? How is it
compensated by smith predictor? Explain
7. For the open loop transfer function of a control system shown below:
k
G H(s) =
 
s 2s 2  3s  1
Draw the root locus plot-Determine the value of k when the system becomes unstable

Evaluate
1. Consider an overall process consists:
Primary process:
GPI (s) = 1 / (0.5s+1)(s+1) and
Secondary process:
GPII(s) = 1 / (0.2s+1)
Compare by plotting the response of cascade control system with that of a conventional feedback
control system for a unit load change entering in secondary process. Assume all controllers of
proportional type with gains
KCI = KC (Conventional) = 2.0
KCII = 5.0
K
2. 1  0 , sketch the root-locus diagram
S(S  1)(2S  1)
Also find the roots of the systems.
Discuss about stability of the systems.

Create
1. Draw the Bode diagram for the system described by the transfer function:
G(s) = e-0.5s / (2.5s+1)3
Design proportional controller for this control system
2. The frequency response data involving a process and PI Controller gave the following results
W (rad/min) 2.5 4.0 6.3 10.0 15.8
A. R. 0.87 0.72 0.57 0.35 0.14
Phase lag(deg) 30 60 100 150 200
Design the controller as per Zeigler-Nicholas rules.
3. Consider the following over all transfer function G o(s) of process. Measuring element and final
control element of a certain system. Using cohen-coon method, obtain Pin – controller parameters
Go(s) = 0.5 / (s+1) (0.5s+1) (2s+1)

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16CH507 Process Control Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Interpret the dynamic behavior of Physical systems and control systems
2. Evaluate the response and controllability of control systems
3. Select proper control valve to meet process needs
4. Make use of direct digital control systems and DCS systems in handling of industrial proceses
5. Propose PID modes that effect controllability, speed of response the control systems
6. Function effectively in both single-team and also able to communicate verbal, written and graphical
COs – POs Mapping
COs PO4 PO13
1 2 3
2 2 3
3 2 3
4 2 3
5 2 3
6 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1. Study of step response of Mercury-in-Glass thermometer
2. Study of control valve flow coefficient
3. Study of installed characteristics of control valve
4. Study of hysteresis of control valve
5. Study of step response of manometer
6. Step response of first order systems arranged in non- interacting mode
7. Step response of first order systems arranged in interacting mode
8. To study impulse response of first order systems arranged in non-interacting mode
9. To study impulse response of first order systems arranged in interacting mode
10. Step response of single capacity system
11. Study of open loop response control system
12. Study of response of Temperature controller with proportional integral derivative controller mode
13. Study of response of Level controller with proportional integral controller mode
14. Study of response of pressure controller with proportional integral derivative controller
15. Study of response of Flow controller with proportional controller mode
16. Closed loop method Tuning of cascade controllers
List of Augmented Experiments40
1. Tuning of controller in Process reaction curve method in cascade control trainer
2. Tuning of controller in Ultimate gain method in cascade control trainer
3. Stability analysis by using bode plots
4. Study of flow measuring devices
5. Stability of Single loop feedback control
6. Stability of Multi-loop control
7. Study of control system components
8. Identification of process from process reaction curve using Cohen Coon method
9. Controller tuning by Ziegler Nichols method
10. Controller tuning by Cohen Coon method
11. Development of controller in mat lab
12. Tuning of controller in Process reaction curve method in mat lab
13. Tuning of controller in Ultimate gain method in cascade control trainer
Reading Material (s)
1. C.R. Coughnowr, Process System Analysis and Control, 3 rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Inc., 2013
2. A.W. B. Bequette, Process Control: Modeling, Design and Simulation, Prentice Hall, 1998
3. C.P. Eckman, Industrial instrumentation, Wiley, 1950

40
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH601 Applications of Mass Transfer


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Design humidifier& dehumidifier and classify humidification equipment
2. Design Absorption and stripping Columns by graphical and analytical methods
3. Design distillation column using McCabe–Thiele and Ponchon–Savarit methods and illustrate
azeotropic& Extractive distillation
4. Evaluate number of theoretical stages for liquid–liquid and liquid-solid systems and classify the
equipment used for unit operations
5. Estimate rate of drying and classify drying equipment
6. Design steady state adsorber and its applications

COs–POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 3 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Humidification, Absorption and Stripping
Vapor pressure curve, definitions, psychometric charts, enthalpy of gas-vapor mixtures, humidification and
dehumidification, operating lines and design of packed humidifiers, dehumidifiers and cooling towers, spray
chambers–Absorption equilibrium, ideal and non-ideal solutions selection of a solvent for absorption, one
component transferred: material balances, Determination of number of plates (graphical)
Non adiabatic Operation: Evaporative cooling–Adiabatic absorption & stripping
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Distillation
Fields of applications, VLE for miscible liquids, immiscible liquids, steam distillation, Positive and negative
deviations from ideality, enthalpy-concentration diagrams, Flash vaporization and differential distillation for
binary mixtures–Continuous rectification-binary systems, multistage tray towers–method of McCabe and Thiele
and Ponchon and Savarit method, enriching section, exhausting section, feed introduction, total reflux,
minimum and optimum reflux ratios, use of steam, condensers, partial condensers, cold reflux, tray efficiencies
Azeotropic distillation-Extractive distillation
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Extraction and Leaching
Extraction: Liquid-liquid equilibrium, equilateral triangular co-ordinates, choice of solvent, stage wise contact,
multistage cross-current extraction, Multi stage counter current without reflux. Extraction Equipment:
Differential (continuous contact) extractors, spray towers, packed towers, mechanically agitated counter-current
extractors, centrifugal extractors
Leaching: Fields of applications, preparation of solid for leaching, types of leaching, leaching equilibrium,
single stage and multi stage leaching calculations, constant under flow conditions, equipment for leaching
operation
Multi stage counter current with reflux –Rate of leaching
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Drying and Adsorption
Equilibrium, definitions, drying conditions- rate of batch drying under constant drying conditions, mechanisms
of batch drying, drying time through circulation drying. Batch and continuous drying equipment, material and

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energy balances of continuous driers, rate of drying for continuous direct heat drier–Adsorption equilibrium-
single gases and vapors, vapor and gas mixtures-one component adsorbed, Liquids-adsorption of solute from
dilute solution, the Freundlich equation, adsorption operations-stage wise operation, application of Freundlich
equation to single and multistage adsorption (cross current & counter current), Adsorption of vapor from a gas-
fluidized bed, continuous contact, unsteady state–fixed bed adsorbers (break through curve)
Rate of drying for continuous direct-heat driers–Two components adsorbed fractionation–Breakpoint–Ion
Exchange–Rate of Ion Exchange
12+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. R.E. Treybal,Mass transfer operations, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill, 1980

Reference (s)
1. B. K. Datta, Principles of Mass Transfer and Separation Processes, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 2009
2. W.L. McCabe, J.C. Smith & Peter Harriot, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 6th Ed.,
McGraw–Hill, 2001
3. P. C Wankat,Equilibrium Staged Separations, Prentice–Hall PTR, 1988

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test41 (%)
Remember 10 10 --
Understand 20 20 --
Apply 40 30 50
Analyze 30 30 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Can a forced draft tower operate with cross flow?
2. What is the physical significance of NTU?
3. What are the important factors that determine the selection of a batch distillation column for the
separation of liquid mixtures
4. Write down the equation of the operating lines of the column that runs under total reflux
5. Define selectivity
6. Consider the distribution of the solute C in two partially miscible solvent A and B. what is the
selectivity of the separation at plait point?
7. Can the moisture content of a solid(dry basis) be above 100%?

Understand
1. What is the inference you notice when psychometric ratio is equal to one?
2. For distillation of an equimolar binary mixture of A and B, the equation of the operating lines are
rectifying section: y=0.663x+0.32; Stripping section : y=1.329x-0.01317
What is the condition of the feed?
3. What is the inference you notice when psychometric ratio is equal to one?
4. Show that xn1=[A/A+Sm]nxF1 for a crosscurrent system if equilibrium is represented as y 1=mx1 and
equal amount of fresh solvent is used in the each stage
5. Prove that for cross-current two-stage treatment of liquid solution by contact filtration, when the
adsorption isotherm is linear, the least total adsorbent results if the amounts used in each stage are
equal
6. For adsorption in dilute liquid solutions in stage wise counter current operation, where the Freundlich
equation describes the adsorption equilibrium, derive analytical expression in terms of n, m, Y 0 and
YNp for the minimum adsorbent / solvent ratio when fresh adsorbent is used

41
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Apply
1. Determine the psychometric properties of a moist air sample having a dry–bulb temperature of 27°C
and a humidity of 0.015 kg/kg dry air using the vapor pressure equation for water: lnP(bar)=11.96481–
3984.928/(T–39.729). The total pressure is 1 atm
2. A coal gas is to be freed of its light oil by scrubbing with wash oil as an absorbent. Coal gas enters at
0.250m3 /s at 26°C, and Gs = 0.01068 m3 /s, pt=1.07*105N/m2 containing 2.0% by volume of light oil
vapours. The light oil is assumed to be entirely benzene, and a 95% removal is required. The wash oil
is to enter at 26°C, containing 0.005 mole fraction of benzene. At 26°C, the vapour pressure of benzene
is Pas =13330 N/m2. Wash oil-benzene are ideal. Calculate minimum Ls. Determine the no. of
theoretical trays required for the absorber of above problem by analytical method
3. A 25% solution of dioxane in water is to be continuously extracted at the rate of 1000 Kg/hr in a
counter current manner with benzene. To remove 95% of dioxane, What is the minimum solvent
required?If 900 Kg/hr solvent is used, how many theoretical stages are required?
Wt% dioxane(x) 5.1 18.9 25.2
Wt% dioxane(y) 5.2 22.5 32.0
4. A sol of 5wt% acetaldehyde in touelene is to be extracted with water in a five stage co-current unit. If
25 kg water /100 kg of feed is used, what is the mass of acetaldehyde extracted and the final
concentration. The equilibrium relation is given bykg acetaldehyde/kg water=2.20kg acetaldehyde/kg
touelene
5. A batch of solid is to be dried from 35 to 5% moisture. The initial weight of the wet solid is 200Kg,
and the drying surface is 2 m2 /50 Kg dry weight. Determine the drying of time for constant- rate
period. (Data: Xc=0.20, Nc= 0.40 * 10^-4)
6. Experiments on decolourisation of oil yielded the following equilibrium relationship Y=0.4 x 0.4, where
y= (gr colour removed/gr of adsorbent) and x= (colour in oil, gr -colour/1000 gr colour free oil). 100 kg
oil containing 1 part of colour to 3 parts of oil is agitated with 25 kg of adsorbent. Calculate the %
colour removed if all 25Kg of adsorbent is used in one step
7. A batch of water containing the residual chlorine from a treating process, at a concentration 12 ppm, is
to be treated activated carbon at 25°C to reduce the chlorine concentration to 0.5 ppm. The equilibrium
distribution coefficient =C*/X=0.8(kg Cl2/m3 solution)/(kg Cl2/kg carbon). Calculate the minimum
mass of carbon/unit volume of water which can be used

Analyze
1. Discuss the step wise procedure for a packed counter current water–cooling tower using a gas flow rate
of G (kg dry air/s.m3) and a water flow rate of L is to cool the water from TL2 °C to TL1°C. The
entering air at TH1°C has a wet bulb temperature of Tw °C. The mass transfer coefficient K Ga(kg
mol/s.m3 .pa) and hLa/kGaMBP(J/kg.K). Calculate the height of the packed tower z with model plot
2. A coal gas is to be freed of its light oil by scrubbing with wash oil as an absorbent. Coal gas enters at
0.250m3/s at 26°C, pt=1.07X105N/m2 containing 2.0% by volume of light oil vapors. The light oil is
assumed to be entirely benzene, and a 95% removal is required. The wash oil is to enter at 26°C,
containing 0.005 mole fraction of benzene, and have an avmolwt 260. At 26°C, the vapor pressure of
benzene is Pas=13330 N/m2. Wash oil-benzene are ideal: p*=13330x
(a) Calculate minimum Ls
(b) An oil circulation rate of 1.5 times the minimum is to be used, what will be concentration of
benzene at the exit and estimate no.of theoretical plates.
3. A solution of carbon tetrachloride and carbon disulfide containing 50wt% each is to be continuously
fractionated at standard atmospheric pressure at the rate 400 kg/h. the distillate product is to contain
95wt% carbon disulfide, the residue 0.5%. the feed will be 30mol% vaporized before it enters in to the
tower. A total condenser will be used, and the reflux will be returned at the bubble point
Determine the minimum reflux ratio
Determine the minimum number of theoretic trays graphically

x 0 00296 0.0615 0.1106 0.1435 0.2585 0.3908 0.5318 0.663 0.757 0.8604 1

y* 0 0.0823 0.1555 0.266 0.3325 0.495 0.6340 0.747 0.8290 0.878 0.932 1
4. A
pyridine –water solution, 50% pyridine, is to be continuously and counter currently extracted at the
rate of 2.25kg/s with chlorobenzene to reduce the pyridine concentration to 2%
(a) Determine the minimum solvent rate required
(b) If 2.3 kg/s is used, estimate the number of theoretical stages

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Pyridine Chlorobenzene Water Pyridine Chlorobenzene Water


0 99.95 0.05 0 0.08 99.92
11.05 88.28 0.67 5.02 0.16 94.82
18.95 79.90 1.15 11.05 0.24 88.71
24.10 74.28 1.62 18.90 0.38 80.72
28.60 69.15 2.25 25.50 0.58 73.92
31.55 65.58 2.87 36.1 1.85 62.05
35.05 61.00 3.95 44.95 4.18 50.87
40.60 53.00 6.4 53.20 8.90 37.90
49.0 37.8 13.2 49.0 37.8 13.2

5. A plant wishes to dry a certain type of fibreboard sheets 1.2 by 2m by 12mm. to determine the drying
characteristics, a 0.3 by 0.3m sample of the board, with the edges sealed so that drying took place from
the two large faces only, was suspended from a balance in a loboratory cabinet drier and exposed to a
current of hot, dry air. The initial moisture content was 75%. The sheet lost weight at the constant rate
of 1X10–4 kg/s until the moisture content fell to 60% whereupon the drying rate fell. Measurements of
the rate of dying were discontinued, but after long period of exposure to this air it was established that
the equilibrium moisture content was 10%. The dry mass of the sample was 0.9kg. All the moisture
contents are on the wet basis. Determine the time of drying the large sheets from 75% to 20% moisture
under the same conditions
6. The equilibrium adsorption of acetone on an activated carbon at 30 0C is given by the following data.
The vapour pressure of acetone at 30 0C is 283 mmHg.A one liter flask contains air and acetone vapour
al 1 stdatm and 30 0C, with a relative saturation of vapour of 35%. After 2 gr of fresh activated has
been introduced in to the flask, the flask is sealed. Compute the vapour concentration at 30 0C and the
final pressure. Neglect the adsorption of air
g adsorbed/g carbon 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.35

Partial Pressure of acetone(mmHg) 0 2 12 42 92

Evaluate
1. Would you expect the wet-bulb temperature of hydrogen-water vapor mixture to be equal to, greater
than, less than the adiabatic–saturation temperature? Take the pressure as 1 std atm. Diffusivity for
H2O–H2=7.5X10–5m2/s at 0°C, 1 std atm. Heat capacity of H2=14650N.m/kg.K, thermal
conductivity=0.173w/m.K
2. A recently installed induced–draft cooling tower was guaranteed by the manufacturer to cool 0.1262
m3/s of 43°C water to 30 °C when the available air has a wet-bulb temperature 24°C. a test on the
tower, when operated at a full fan capacity, provided the following data; inlet water, 0.1262m3/s,
46.0C;outlet water, 25.6°C; inlet air, 24.0°C dry bulb, 15.6°C wet bulb temperature; out air, 37.6°C,
essentially saturated
a. What is the fan capacity?`
b. Can the tower be expected to meet the guarantee condition?

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH602 Chemical Engineering Plant Design and Economics


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Identify the general design considerations and steps in the process design, development of a successful
project
2. Estimate fixed capital investment and total production cost
3. Make use of interests and taxes involved and ways and means of getting the capital requirements
4. Utilize different depreciation methods to find the present value of the equipment
5. Identify different profitability techniques and various alternatives for capital investments for important
equipment in the project
6. Demonstrate the optimization techniques for process variables such as optimum pipe diameter,
optimum production rates

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO3 PO11 PO13


1 2 1 3
2 2 3 3
3 2 3 3
4 2 3 3
5 2 3 3
6 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Chemical Engineering Plant Design
Introduction:, General overall design considerations, General design considerations: health and safety hazards,
environmental protection, plant location, plant layout, plant operation and control, Process design development:
Development of Design Database, Process Creation, Process Design, Process Flow diagrams, Piping and
Instrumentation diagrams, equipment design and specifications, Materials and Fabrication Selection
Flow synthesis-Analysis-Optimization–ISO 10628–ISO 10617
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Cost &Asset Accounting and Cost Estimation
Cash flow for industrial operations, factors affecting investment and production cost, capital investments,
estimation of capital investments, cost indices, cost components in capital investment, methods for estimating
capital investments, estimation of total product of cost, Gross Profit, Net Profit and Cash flow
Operating cash flow–Engineering news–Record-Chemical Engineering Index–Marshall and Swift cost index
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Economic Evaluation of Process
Interest and Time Value of Money: types of interest, nominal and effective interest rates, continuous interest,
Cost of Capital, Time value of Money, Cash Flow Patterns. Income Taxes, Fixed Charges: Depreciation: types
of depreciation, services life, salvage value, present value, methods for determining depreciation, Insurance
Business interest rates–Indian taxation on different process–Physical life Vs service life
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Process Profitability and Cost Optimization
Profitability, alternative investments and replacements: profitability standards, Methods for Calculating
Profitability, Alternative Investments, Replacements, Optimum design and design strategy: Selecting an
Objective function, Optimization solution methodologies Optimization Applications: Optimum Production rates
in plant operation, Cyclic Operations, Economic pipe diameter
Effect of interest on profitability–Perpetuity–Economic cycle time–Batch size–Reflux ratio
11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Text book (s)


1. M. S. Peters, K.D.Timmerhaus and R.E.West, Plant Design and Economics for Chemical Engineering,
5th Ed., McGraw Hill, 2003

Reference (s)
1. J. R.Couper, Process Engineering Economics, Marcel DekkarInc, 2003
2. Harry Silla, Chemical Process Engineering, Design and Economics, Marcel DekkarInc, 2003
3. H.E. Schweyer, Process Engineering Economics, McGraw-Hili, New York,1955

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test42 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. List out the various flow diagrams can be used in the chemical and manufacturing process
2. What is six-tenths-factor rule? Where is it used?
3. Define salvage value and scrap value
4. What is payout period?

Understand
1. Explain the different stages in the plant design?
2. What is HAZOP? Explain it by giving a case study in any process industry of your choice
3. Enlist the costs involved in total product cost for a typical chemical process plant
4. Derive the expression for the asset value by the sinking fund method. Compare the salient features of
sinking fund method with straight line method for determining depreciation
5. Illustrate the principles of an optimum economic design by means of an example
6. Discuss about capitalizing cost method for determining profitability

Apply
1. Compare materials of construction with homogeneous metal or alloy with glass lined equipment
2. A mixture of benzene and toluene containing 40 percent benzene and 60 percent toluene is to be
separated in a fractionating column to give the product (distillate) containing 96 percent benzene and a
bottom product containing 95 percent toluene. Feed is a mixture of two third vapor and one third liquid.
Find out the number of theoretical stages required if the reflux ratio of 1.5 times the minimum is used
and if relative volatility is 2.5
3. The original cost of a property is Rs. 30,000, and it is depreciated by a 6% sinking fund method. What
is the annual depreciation charge if the book value of the property after 10 years is the same as if it had
been depreciated at Rs. 2,500 per year by the straight line method?
4. A new piece of completely installed equipment costs Rs. 12,000 and will have a scrap value of Rs.
2000 at the end of its useful life. If the useful-life period is 10 years and the interest is compounded at
6% per year, what is the capitalized cost of the equipment?
5. A plant produces refrigerators at the rate of P units per day. The variable costs per refrigerator have
been found to be Rs.47.73 + 0.1P1.2. The total daily fixed charges are Rs.1750, and all other expenses
are constant at Rs.7325 per day. If the selling price per refrigerator is Rs.173, determine: a) The daily
profit at a production schedule giving the minimum cost per refrigerator b) The daily profit at a
production schedule giving the maximum daily profit c) The production schedule at the break-even
point

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Analyze
1. Discuss the important factors to be considered in selecting a location for a chemical process plant
2. Explain the concept of cash flow for industrial operations with the help of a tree diagram
3. Illustrate the principles of an optimum economic design by determining the optimum thickness of
insulation for a given steam pipe installation
4. An investigation of a proposed investment has been made. The following result has been presented to
management: The minimum payout period based on capital recovery using a minimum annual return of
10% as a fictitious expense is 10 years; annual depreciation costs amount to 8% of the total investment.
Using this information, determine the standard rate of return on the investment

Evaluate
1. Give an account of air pollution abatement in a chemical plant design
2. A piece of equipment originally costing Rs. 40,000 was put into use 12 years ago. At the time the
equipment was put into use, the service life was estimated to be 20 years and the salvage and scrap
value at the end of the service life were assumed to be zero. On this basis, a straight line depreciation
fund was set up. The equipment can now be sold for Rs. 10,000, and a more advanced model can be
installed for Rs.55,000. Assuming the depreciation fund is available for use, how much new capital
must be supplied to make the purchase?
3. The original investment for an asset was Rs. 10,000, and the asset was assumed to have a service life of
12 years with Rs. 2,000 salvage value at the end of service life. After the asset has been in use for 5
years, the remaining service life and final salvage value are reestimated at 10 years and Rs. 1000,
respectively. Under these conditions, what is depreciation cost during the sixth year of the total life if
straight line depreciation is used?
4. A proposed chemical plant will require a fixed-capital investment of Rs.10,000,000. It is estimated that
the working capital will amount to 25% of the total investment and annual depreciation costs are
estimated to be 10% of the fixed-capital investment. If the annual profit will be Rs.3,000,000,
determine the standard percent return on the total investment and the minimum payout period

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16CH603 Chemical Process Equipment Design


3024
Course Outcomes
1. Develop a flow diagram and selection of materials for the for the given chemical process plant
/equipment
2. Classify and design of internal and external pressure vessels
3. Design of heat exchangers using Kern and NTU method
4. Design of multiple effect evaporator system
5. Design of the plate and packed columns for the mass transfer operations
6. Identify suitable physical separation equipments e.g., Filters, cyclone separators

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO10 PO 13
1 3 2 - - - - 2 - 3 3
2 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to design
Design preliminaries, Factor of safety, Design codes, MOC selection procedure-Design of Pressure Vessels:
Classification of pressure vessels, Theories of failure, Design considerations of pressure vessels, Stresses in thin
& thick walled vessels, The design of thin walled vessels under internal pressure: Minimum shell thickness of
Cylinders & Spherical Shells, Choice of heads or enclosures used in pressure vessels, Design of vessels subject
to combined loading.
Design of pressure vessels under external pressure
8 Hours
Unit II
Process design of shell and tube heat exchanger
Construction details, General design considerations, Basic design procedure, Kern‘s method of rating, Kern‘s
method of Sizing, design of heat exchangers using NTU method.
Heat exchanger effectiveness
7 Hours
Unit III
Process design of mass transfer equipments
Distillation column:Selection of Trays, calculation of number of equilibrium stages using smoker equations, the
diameter of the column, pressure drop and the height of the column, Packed columns: Types of packing, Height
of transfer unit, Number of Transfer units, overall column height, Pressure drop calculations, Column diameter
using flooding correlations
Sieve tray hydraulic design-Down comer design
8 Hours
Unit IV
Process design of fluid moving devices
Classification of pumps, Performance measurement of Reciprocating, Centrifugal pumps & compressors,
Physical separation equipments: Filtration equipments, cyclone separators
Process design of flow meters
7 Hours
Total: 30 Hours

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List of Experiments
30 Hours
1. Drawing of process equipment symbols for fluid handling, heat transfer, and mass transfer
2. Drawing of basic instrumentation symbols for flow, temperature, level, and pressure and combined
instruments
3. Process flow diagrams
4. Instrumentation diagrams
5. Process design of Batch reactor
6. Mechanical aspects of Pressure vessel design
7. Process Design of cooling tower
8. Process Design of multiple effect evaporation System.
9. Sieve tray hydraulic design
10. Process Design of Distillation Column (Multi component Distillation Using F-U-G Method)

List of Augmented Experiments43


1. Design the suitable heat exchanger network for atmospheric crude fractionation unit
2. Development of process flow diagram for manufacture of Formaldehyde
3. Development of Piping & Instrumentation diagram for Liquifying Oxygen at low pressure (Linde
Process)
4. Design of Cyclone separator
5. Process design of flow meters
6. Sizing of shell and tube heatexchanger for given heat duty
7. Design of counter current multistage Extractor

Text book (s)


1. R. K. Sinnot, Coulson and Richardson's Chemical Engineering Vol. 6, 4 th Ed., Butterworth–
Heinemann, 2005
2. D. Q. Kern, Process Heat Transfer, McGraw Hill, 1950
3. S. B. Thakore, B. I. Bhatt, Introduction to Process Engineering and Design, 4 th Ed., McGraw Hill
education, 2010 Reference (s)
4. P. Chattopadhyay, Unit operations of Chemical Engineering, 3 rd Ed., Khanna Publishers, 2004

Reference (s)
1. M. V. Joshi, V. V.Mahajani, Process Equipment Design 3 rd Ed., Macmillan Publishers, 2009
2. B. C. Bhattacharya, Introduction to Chemical Equipment Design, CBS Publisher, 2003

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test44 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define joint efficiency and corrosion allowance
2. What do you mean by equivalent diameter?
3. Define weeping and entrinment of a distillation column
4. State Bernoulli‘s theorem
Understand
1. Explain about the various types of materials of construction used in the construction of high pressure
vessels

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Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments
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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

2. Compare fixed tube sheet and floating head shell and tube heat exchangers
3. Present the comparison of double pipe heat exchangers versus shell and tube heat exchangers with
respect to performance, utility and economy
4. How to classify the heat exchangers based on TEMA standards?
5. How do you select the tray for the given gas – liquid contact operation?
6. Compare the centrifugal pumps with reciprocating pumps

Apply
1. Suggest the applications for the following materials of construction. i. Synthetic rubber ii. Glass - fiber
reinforced plastics. iii. Polyvinylidine fluoride iv. Poly vinyl chloride v. Borosilicate glass lined vessels
2. A mixture of benzene and toluene containing 40 percent benzene and 60 percent toluene is to be
separated in a fractionating column to give the product (distillate) containing 96 percent benzene and a
bottom product containing 95 percent toluene. Feed is a mixture of two third vapor and one third liquid.
Find out the number of theoretical stages required if the reflux ratio of 1.5 times the minimum is used
and if relative volatility is 2.5
3. Explain the important features of the design of a Centrifugal pump
4. A liquid of density 1200kg/m3 is being lifted to a height of 25 m at the rate of 3 m3/hr by an air lift
pump operating with 30 % efficiency. Air is available at the pump suction at 0.45 Mpa. Assuming
isentropic compression of the air, calculate the power requirement of the pump. Take Cp/Cv = 1.4
5. A filtration is carried out for 10 min at a constant rate in a leaf filter and thereafter it is continued at
constant pressure. The pressure that is attained at the end of the constant rate period. If one quarter of
the total volume of the filtrate is collected during the constant rate period, what is the total filtration
time? Assume that the cake is incompressible and the filter medium resistance is negligible

Analyze
1. A pressure vessel of 1.5 m in diameter subjected to combined loading operates as an internal pressure
of 12 kg/cm2. The allowable stress of fabrication is 1000 kg/cm2. Welded joint efficiency is 85%. The
weight of the vessel with all its contents is 6000 kg. The torque exerted over the vessel is 50 kg-cm.
Neglect the bending moment. Corrosion allowance of 2 mm may be taken. Calculate the various
induced stresses and find whether it is higher than the allowable stress of the material
2. A large fraction of the thermal energy generated in the engine of a car is rejected to the air by the
radiator through the circulating water. Should the radiator be analyzed as a closed system or open
system? Explain
3. A tower, packed with 25mm Intalox saddles, is to be designed for stripping C 2HCl3, from a
contaminated groundwater stream. A volumetric stream of 0.0436 m3 / search is to be fed to the top of
the tower, which will operate at 288 K and 1.013x10 5 pa. A 0.237 m 3 /Sec air stream, flowing
countercurrent in the aqueous stream reduces the C2HCl3 concentration from 50 µg / lit to 5 µg / lit
.Under the stated flow conditions, the overall liquid coefficient KLa will be equal to 0.016 s-1. At 288
K, Henry‘s law constant for the C2HCl3-air system is 11.7x10-3 atm.m3/mole. Determine a. The partial
pressure of C2HCl3 in the existing air stream. b. The height of the packing required for the stripping
operation.
4. The absorption of water in sulfuric acid is an exothermic process. Describe the effect this would have
on the required height of a mass-transfer column as compared to the height that is evaluated if
isothermal conditions are assumed.
5. A constant pressure filtration test gave data that can fit an expression, dt/dV = 9.3V + 8.5; (t in seconds,
V in liters). If the resistance of the filter medium is assumed unaffected with pressure drop and the
compressibility coefficient of the filter cake is 0.3, what will be the time taken for the collection of 3.5
liters of filtrate at a filtration pressure twice that used in the test?

Evaluate
1. Calculate the thickness of a Torispherical head and Elliptical head (2:1) for a pressure vessel having
design pressure 7 kg/cm2.Diameter of the vessel is 1.5 and the permissible stress is 1250 kg/cm2.
Welded joint efficiency is 85%. (Rc = Diameter of the vessel, Rk = 6 % of Rc )
2. In an ammonia manufacturing process condensation of ammonia vapors, suggest the suitable heat
exchanger and justify your answer
3. A sieve tray tower with 60 cm plate spacing and liquid cross flow contains straight segmental down
comers. The overflow weir at the downcomer entrance is formed by an extension of the down comer
plate. The height of this weir is 7.5 cm. The inside diameter (D) of the tower is 1.5 cm. The inside
diameter (D) of the tower is 1.5 m and weir length is 0.6D. If the liquid with a density of 880 kg/m 3
flows across the plate at the rate of 3.8 kg/sec. Estimate the holding time in the downcomer

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4. Water at 20oC is pumped from a storage tank through 100 meters of 3 cm diameter pipe. The pipeline
has two globe valves which are fully open and three 90 O elbows. Water is discharged into another tank
through a spray nozzle. The discharge is at a height of 20 meters above the level of water in the storage
tank. The pressure required at the nozzle entrance is 3 kg/cm 2 gauge. The estimate Pump work required
per kg of water. Data: Viscosity of water at 20 OC = 0.975CP, Equivalent length in terms of pipe
diameter: Open globe valve = 300 D, 90o elbow = 30D, Friction Factor

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH604 Heterogeneous Reaction Engineering


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain various non-idealities in reactor behavior and distinguish between various RTD curves
2. Predict the conversion in a non-ideal reactor using tracer information
3. Develop rate laws for heterogeneous reactions
4. Estimate the effects of diffusion, mass and heat transfer in catalyst pellet on reaction rate
5. Predict reactor performance when the observed reaction rate is significantly influenced by internal
mass transfer in porous heterogeneous catalysis
6. Develop the rate-controlling model for heterogeneous non-catalytic reactions

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Basics of Non-Ideal Flow
Non-ideal flow, Residence time distribution (Importance and interpretation of RTD curve, E, F and C curves
and relationship between them in reactor), Statistical Interpretation, RTD measurement, Conversion in non-ideal
flow reactors, Diagonizing reactor ills, Dispersion model, Tanks-in-series model
Micro fluid–Macro fluid–Early mixing–Late mixing
12 + 4 Hours
Unit II
Heterogeneous Reactions and Solid Catalysis
Heterogeneous processes, Rate equations for heterogeneous reactions, adsorption isotherm and rates of
adsorption, desorption and surface reaction, concept of rate controlling steps and analysis of rate equation.
Classification and preparation of catalysts, Promoters and inhibitors, Catalyst characterization: Surface area and
pore size distribution, Poisoning of catalysts
Temkin isotherm-Redlich-Peterson isotherm
11 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Solid Catalyzed Reactions
Characteristics of catalyzed reaction, Mechanism, Pore diffusion resistance combined with surface kinetics,
Single cylindrical pore with first order reaction, Effectiveness factor, Porous catalyst particles, Heat effects
during reaction, Performance equation for reactors containing porous catalyst particles, Experimental methods
for finding rates, Deactivation of catalysts and mechanism - the rate and performance equations
Fixed Bed Reactors - Fluidized Bed Reactors
12 + 4 Hours
Unit IV
Fluid--Particle Reactions
Selection of kinetic model, Shrinking core model for spherical particles of unchanging size: Diffusion through
gas film controls, Diffusion through ash layer controls, Chemical reaction controls; Rate of reaction for
shrinking spherical particles: Chemical reaction controls, Diffusion through gas film controls, SCM for
cylindrical particles of unchanging size, determination of rate controlling step
Conversion-time expression for non-spherical particles
10 + 3 Hours
Total: 45 + 15 Hours

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Textbook (s)
1. O. Levenspiel, Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Ed. John Wiley & Sons, 2007.
2. J.M. Smith, Chemical Reaction Kinetics, 3rd Ed. McGraw Hill, Inc, 1981.

Reference (s)
1. J.J. Carberry, Chemical and Catalytic Reaction Engineering, McGraw Hill, Inc, 1976.
2. K. A. Gavhane, Chemical Reaction Engineering – II, 8th Ed., Nirali Prakashan, 2012.
3. H. S. Fogler, Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 4 th Ed., PHI, 2005.

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test45 (%)
Remember 30 20 --
Understand 40 30 --
Apply 20 40 50
Analyze 10 10 50
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define residence time distribution in reactors
2. List the 2 different types of mixing pattern commonly encountered in reactors
3. What type of ill do sharp early peak in MFR indicate?
4. List any 2 examples of reactions in which adsorption and surface reaction control the overall reaction
rate

Understand
1. Explain short-circuiting and bypassing phenomena in reactors
2. What is the advantage of step input over pulse input?
3. For which order reactions, late mixing and early mixing are favourable?
4. Explain the different steps involved in the process of burning of carbon particle in air

Apply
1. A pulse of tracer was injected into a reactor, and the effluent concentration as a function of time is in
the graph below. Construct a figure of C(t) & E(t) and calculate the fraction of material that spent
between 3 & 6 min in the reactor
t, min 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 14
C, g/m3 0 1 5 8 10 8 6 4 3 2.2 1.5 0.6 0
2. The gas phase isomerization AB is to be carried out in a flow reactor. Experiments were carried out
at a volumetric flow rate of 2 lit/min in a reactor that had the following RTD: E(t)=10 e -10t min-1, where
t is in minutes
(a) When the volumetric flow rate was 2 lit/min, the conversion was 9.1%. What is the reactor volume?
(b) When the volumetric flow rate was 0.2 lit/min the conversion was 50%. When the volumetric flow
rate was 0.02 lit/min, the conversion was 91%. Assuming the mixing patterns don't change as the flow
rate changes, what will the conversion be when the volumetric flow rate is 10 lit/min?
(c) This reaction is now to be carried out in a 1L plug flow reactor at a volume metric flow rate of 1
lit/min. What will be the conversion?
3. Develop the overall rate expression for the solid catalyzed reaction A (g) + B (s) → R (g). The reaction
is second order with respect to A. On the surface of B, the reactant A reacts to produce R which then
diffuses back into the main gas stream
4. An adsorption study was conducted by adding varying amounts of activated carbon to a series of seven
flasks containing 500 mL of feed water used in soft drink preparation having an initial TOC of 2.0
mg/L. The flasks were agitated for 14h, and the residual, steady-state TOC concentrations were

45
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

determined. Plot the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for the data presented below and determine
the values of the appropriate constants
Flask No. Carbon Dosage (mg) Final TOC (mg/L)
1 0 2
2 4.4 1.7
3 9.7 1.4
4 14 1.2
5 28 1
6 56 0.9
7 140 0.8

Analyze
1. How does the macrofluid and microfluid behaviour affect the reactor performance? A solid catalyzed
first-order reaction ε = 0, takes place with 50% conversion in a basket type mixed reactor. What will be
the conversion if the reactor size is trebled and all else-temperature, amount of catalyst, feed
composition, and flow rate remains unchanged?

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH607 Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Estimate rate constant by applying Arrhenius theorem
2. Estimate rate law parameters for a given reaction in a batch reactor by using two different methods
3. Determine the rate law parameters in a MFR&PFR for a given reaction
4. Estimate of residence time distribution in a MFR, PFR&PBR for a given reaction
5. Find the residence time distribution by applying Non-ideal dispersion model in CSTRs in series
6. Estimate mass transfer coefficients in mass transfer with and with-out chemicalReactions

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO4 PO 13
1 3 3
2 3 3
3 2 3
4 2 3
5 3 3
6 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Experiments
1. Experiments using Batch reactor
 Determination of the activation energy of a reaction
 Determination of rate constant of a reaction of known order
2. Experiments using Tubular reactor
 Determination of the order of reaction and rate constant
 Determination of RTD and dispersion number using a tracer
3. Experiments using CSTR
 Determination of rate constant and the effect of residence time on conversion
 Determination of RTD and dispersion number using a tracer
4. Experiments using CSTR in series
 Comparison of experimental and theoretical values of space times of reactors
5. Experiments using Packed bed reactor
 Determination of RTD and dispersion number for a packed-bed using a tracer
6. Mass transfer with chemical reaction (Solid-Liquid System)
 Determination of mass transfer coefficient
7. Mass transfer with & without chemical reaction (Liquid-Liquid System)
 Determination of mass transfer coefficient

List of Augmented Experiments46


1. Esterification reaction in Batch reactor
2. Esterification reaction in MFR
3. Esterification reaction in PFR
4. Adsorption of Acetic acid on waste material
5. Temperature effect on Esterification reaction
6. RTD studies in MFR using Sulfuric Acid as tracer
7. RTD studies in PFR using Sulfuric Acid as tracer
8. RTD studies in Packed Bed Reactor using Sulfuric Acid as tracer
9. RTD studies in MFR's in series using Sulfuric Acid as tracer
10. Esterification reaction in Recycle Bed reactor

Reading Material (s)


1. O.Levespiel, Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1999

46
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH701 Process Modeling and Simulation

3103
Course Outcomes
1. Summarise the stages involved in the development of a process model
2. Construct and simulate a mathematical model for a simple flow systems
3. Construct and simulate mathematical models for various types of Heat exchange equipments
4. Construct and simulate mathematical models for various Mass transfer operations
5. Construct mathematical models for various types of reactors under specific conditions
6. Implement the simulationfor the mathematical models developed for the CSTR and Batch reactors

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 1 3 1 3
2 3 3 3 3
3 3 3 3 3
4 3 3 3 3
5 3 3 3 3
6 3 3 3 1
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Mathematical Modeling
Mathematical models for chemical engineering systems, introduction to fundamental laws.
Mathematical Modeling in chemical processes-Gravity flow tank, Interacting and non-interacting systems.
Simulation examples of gravity flow tank, Interacting systems.
Mathematical modeling for flow through pipe-simulation of non-interacting system
11+3 Hours
Unit II
Mathematical Modeling in Heat transfer
Heat Transfer through metal rod, two heated tanks, single component vaporizer, double pipe heat exchanger,
shell and tube heat exchanger, Simulation examples of heat transfer through metal rod, double pipe heat
exchanger.
Simulation of two heated tank-single component vaporizerr
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Mathematical Modeling in Mass Transfer
Ideal binary distillation column, batch distillation with holdup, mass transfer with chemical reaction, steam
distillation, liquid- liquid extraction, Absorption, Adsorption, Simulation examples for Binary distillation.
Simulation of batch distillation with holdup-steam distillation-liquid–liquid extraction
12+4 Hours
Unit IV
Mathematical Modeling in Chemical Reaction Engineering
CSTR, PFR, Unsteady State PFR Batch reactor, constant hold-up CSTRs, CSTRs with variable hold ups, gas
phase pressurized CSTR, non-isothermal CSTR. Simulation examples of constant hold-up CSTRs, Batch
reactor.
Simulation of CSTR with variable holdup–PFR–Gas phase pressurized CSTR
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook(s)
1. W. L. Luyben, Process Modeling, Simulation and Control for Chemical Engineers, 2 nd Ed., McGraw
Hill, 1989

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

2. Upreti, Simant R. Process Modeling and Simulation for Chemical Engineers: Theory and Practice.
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
3. Verma, Ashok Kumar. Process Modelling and Simulation in Chemical, Biochemical and
Environmental Engineering. CRC Press, 2014

Reference(s)
1. R. G. E. Franks, Modeling and Simulation in Chemical Engineering, 1stEd., Wiley-Interscience, 1972
2. T.G. Dobre, J. G. Sanchez Marcano, Chemical Engineering: Modeling, Simulation and Similitude,
1stEd., Wiley-VCH., 2007
3. R. G. Rice, D. D. Do, Applied Mathematics and Modeling for Chemical Engineers, 1 stEd., John Wiley
& Sons, 1995
4. H. Scott Fogler, Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering,3 rdEd., Prentice Hall of India, 2004
5. T.F. Edgar and D.M. Himmelblau, Optimization of Chemical Processes, 2 ndEd., McGraw-Hill, 2001
6. J. P. Holman, Heat transfer, 10th Ed., McGraw Hill,2009

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test47(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 40 60 100
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define mathematical model.


2. State the assumptions used in two heated tanks.
3. Define relative volatility and selectivity
4. Give the adavntages of CSTR over batch reactor.

Understand

1. Distinguish lumped and distributed models.


2. Explain the steps involved in simulation of heat transfer through metal rod.
3. Explain the assumptions used in modeling of ideal binary distillation column.
4. Discuss the effect of temperature on the specific reaction rate.

Apply

1. Consider a perfectly mixed CSTR, in which component ‗A‘ reacts irreversibly and at a specific
reaction rate k releases heat of reaction ‗λ‘ cal/g.mol of A reacted. Develop a mathematical model for
the system using energy equation.
2. Develop a mathematical model for single-component vaporizer considering both liquid and vapour are
in dynamic state. State the parameters and other assumptions taken clearly.
3. Batch distillation is frequently used for small-volume products and even to separate a multicomponent
mixture. Represent a typical batch distillation column, state the conditions and assumptions used.
Develop the mathematical model and give the simulation steps for the system.
4. Consider a system in which temperature changes with time. An irreversible, exothermic reaction is
carried out in a single perfectly mixed CSTR: ; the reaction is nth order in reactant ‗A‘ and has a
heat of reaction λ cal/g.mol of A reacted. To remove the heat of reaction, a cooling jacket surrounds
the reactor. Develop a mathematical model for this non-isothermal CSTR considering perfectly mixed
cooling jacket.

47
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

109
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH608 Mass Transfer Operations Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Justify Rayleigh‘sequation for a given batch distillation system
2. Compute the steam economy for immiscible system
3. Implement the cross current extraction process
4. Construct a batch drying curve
5. Demonstrate the principle of leaching
6. Select a suitablecolumn for a given separation process
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO4 PO13


1 3 3
2 3 3
3 3 3
4 3 3
5 3 3
6 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

List of Experiments
1. team distillation
2. Differential distillation
3. Packed Bed distillation
4. Ternary Liquid Equilibria
5. Multi-Stage cross-current extraction
6. Batch Drying experiment
7. Leaching experiment
8. Liquid liquid extraction in packed column
9. Spray column
10. Plate absorption column

List of Augmented Experiments48


1. Estimate the mass Transfer Coefficients for a given system using Packed column or Spray column
2. Investigate the influence of air velocity on the drying rate of a wet solid in air of fixed temperature and
humidity
3. Investigate the influence of air temperature on the drying rate of a wet solid in air of fixed velocity
4. Determine the VLE data and plot T-x-y diagram of the given binary system
5. Estimate the diffusivity of the Naphthalene in Air
6. Estimate the mass transfer coefficient of vaporization of Naphthalene
7. Study the principles governing leaching and compare the results obtained by conducting the batch
leaching test for a mixture of sodium carbonate and sand
8. Estimate the mass transfer coefficients for the given system in the wetted wall column using Reynold‘s
and Chilton – Colburn Analogy
9. Verify the principle of immiscible liquid mixture boiling and find the vaporization and thermal
efficiencies using steam distillation
10. Determine rate of absorption using tray column
11. Determine the % recovery of given solute from a liquid/solid mixture using water as solvent by Single
stage and Three stage cross current extraction and to determine the stage efficiencies
12. Determine the HTU of the system using packed bed distillation column
Reading Material (s)
1. R.E. Treybal, Mass Transfer Operations, 3rdEd., McGraw Hill, 1980
2. W.L. McCabe, J.C. Smith & P. Harriott, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, 6 th Ed., McGraw-
Hill, 2001

48
Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH705 Process Simulation Lab


0032
Course Outcomes
1. Identify MATLAB/SCILAB as a simulating tool to solve chemical engineering problems
2. Execute steady state chemical engineering problems using MATLAB/SCILAB
3. Use the commercial simulation tools like ASPEN PLUS
4. Find the solutions using ASPEN/MATLAB for different ideal reactor systems
5. Demonstrate simulation for basic heat transfer equipment
6. Demonstrate simulation for basic mass transfer equipment

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO4 PO5 PO13


1 3 3 3
2 3 3 3
3 3 3 3
4 3 3 3
5 3 3 3
6 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

The following experiments are to be solved in MATLAB/SCILAB or ASPEN/any other open


source ware
1. Gravity Flow tank
2. Three CSTRs in series–open loop
3. Three CSTRs in series–closed loop
4. Non isothermal CSTR
5. Binary Distillation column
6. Heat Exchanger
7. Isothermal Batch reactor
8. Interacting & Non interacting system-two tank liquid level
9. Optimization of Minimum Reflux Ratio of distillation columns
10. Boundary value problems in heat and mass transfer
11. Stability analysis of process control systems using Simulink

List of Augmented Experiments49


I.Aspen plus
1. Prepare a process design and an appropriate selection of thermodynamic models, ASPEN uses
mathematical models to predict the performance of the process
2. To optimize the design, the accurate modeling of thermodynamic properties is particularly important in
the separation of non-ideal mixtures using ASPEN
3. ASPEN has large data bases of regressed parameters. Including multiple-column separation systems.
4. Solve the problems on unit operations and chemical reactors by using ASPEN
5. Solve the problems on distillation of chemically reactive compounds by using ASPEN
6. Solve the problems on heat exchangers, mass transfer and electrolyte solutions by using ASPEN

II.Mat Lab
7. Solve the Continuous Stirrer Tank Reactors in Series Project using Mat Lab
8. Solve the plug flow Reactors Project using Mat Lab
9. Solve the batch Reactors Project using Mat Lab
10. Solve the Heat Exchanger Project using Mat Lab
11. Solve the Continuous Stirrer Tank Reactors and plug flow Reactors in Series Project using Mat Lab
12. Solve the VLE Project using Mat Lab
13. Solve chemical engineering Optimization and PDC problems

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Students shall opt any one of the Augmented Experiments in addition to the regular experiments

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

III.Others
14. T-xy, P-xy diagrams of a Binary mixture
15. Flash drum
16. Ideal reactor–CSTR, PFR and Batch
17. Distillation column
18. Heat exchanger

Reading Material (s)


1. W. L. Luyben, Process Modeling, Simulation and Control for Chemical Engineers, 2ndEd,
McGraw Hill, 1989

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH801 Industrial Pollution Control Engineering


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Summarize different types of pollution viz. water and air
2. Assess the characteristics of wastewater viz. BOD and DO
3. Select a suitable wastewater treatment technique
4. Identify suitable sampling and control equipment for air pollutants
5. Understand the safety and ethical issues that may arise from industrial processes and various methods
available to study the accident and loss statistics
6. Understand the concepts of fires & explosions and associated terms
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO 2 PO 3 PO 7
1 3 2 -- 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 1 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 1 3
6 3 2 1 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Industrial Pollution Emissions and Indian Standards
Types of emissions from chemical industries and effects on environment, Type of pollution and their sources,
Effluent guide lines and standards, Solid waste management: Sources and classification, Methods of collection
(HCS and SCS), Disposal methods, Characterization of effluent streams, Oxygen demands and their
determination (BOD, COD, and TOC), Oxygen sag curve, BOD curve interpretation, Controlling of BOD curve,
Self-purification of running streams
Determination of Inorganic Substances-Nitrogen-Phosphorous-Trace Elements 11+3 Hours
Unit II
Wastewater Treatment Processes
Wastewater treatment Process-Methods of primary treatment; Screening, sedimentation, flotation,
neutralization, secondary treatment: Biological treatment of wastewater and bacterial growth curve, suspended
growth processes (activated sludge, aerated lagoon and stabilization pond), attached growth processes (trickling
filter and rotating biological contactor); tertiary treatment methods (carbon adsorption, membrane separation,
chlorination, and ozonation)
Anaerobic treatment, UV radiation for disinfection 11+4 Hours
Unit III
Air Pollution Sampling, Control Methods and Equipments
Criteria and toxic air pollutants, Air pollution sampling and measurement:Ambient air sampling: collection of
gaseous air pollutants, Collection of particulate air pollutants, Stack sampling: Sampling system, particulate and
gaseous sampling.Air pollution control methods and equipments:Source correction methods: raw material
changes, process changes and equipment modification, Particulate emission control: collection efficiency,
Control equipments like gravity settling chambers, Cyclone separators, Fabric filters, Electrostatic precipitator,
Scrubbers (spray towers andventuri scrubbers), Gaseous emission control (SO x, NOx and organic vapor):
absorption by liquids and adsorption by solids
Analysis of air pollutants(SOx, NOx, CO, Particulates) 12+4 Hours
Unit IV
Introduction to safety
Introduction: Safety Programs - Accident and Loss Statistics- Acceptable Risk-Public Perceptions- The nature
of the Accident Process-Inherent Safety. Industrial Hygiene: Government of India regulations and OSHA –
Industrial Hygiene - Identification – Evaluation - Control. The fire triangle, Distinction between fire and

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

explosions; Definitions, Flammability characteristics of liquids and vapors, ignition energy, Auto ignition,
Auto oxidation, Adiabatic compression, Explosions.
MSDS, cold and hot work permit, types of fire extinguishers 11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook(s)
1. C.S. Rao, Environmental Pollution and Control Engineering, 2 nd Ed., Wiley, India, 2006
2. S.P.Mahajan, Pollution Control in Processes Industries, TMH, 1985
Reference (s)
1. M.NarayanaRao and A.K.Datta, Waste water treatment, 3 rd Ed., Oxford and IBH, 2005
2. M.N.Rao,H. V.N.Rao, Air Polution, Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited, India,2010
3. H.S.Peavy, P.R. Rowe, G. Tchobanoglous, Environmental Engineering, McGraw Hill, 1985
4. Metcalf and Eddy, Wastewater engineering treatment and reuse, 4 thEd., Tata McGraw Hill, 2003

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 50(%)
Remember 25 20 --
Understand 40 35 40
Apply 35 45 60
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. List the major sources of heavy metals and give their effects.
2. What are the widely used coagulants for waste water treatment?
3. Define COD and TOC.
4. Define oxygen deficit.
5. List any four major operations of petroleum industry release particulate.

Understand

1. Illustrate few opportunities for the industrial sector to reduce pollution.


2. Raw material changes can decrease air pollution. Justify.
3. Identify the major unit operations used in petroleum industries along with pollutants released from it.
4. Classify hazardous waste with examples and characteristics.
5. When do you recommend absorption as a method of control of gaseous contaminants? What are the
characteristics required by an absorbent?

Apply

1. Calculate the exit concentration of the substrate in a recycled activated sludge process using steady
state mass balance for microorganisms.
2. An air stream contains particulate matter in the size range of 3 μm to 200 μm. Select any four suitable
particulate control equipments by specifying their advantages and disadvantages.
3. Presence of E. coli bacteria in the water leads to health hazards. Select various suitable disinfection
methods specifying their advantages and disadvantages.
4. The ultimate BOD for some waste is 300 mg/L. For the values of k 1‘ equal to 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.3,
calculate the 5 day BOD in each case.
5. Calculate the critical DO deficit using Oxygen sag curve.

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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH802 Transport Phenomena


3103

Course Outcomes
1. Recognize the mechanisms of different transport processes
2. Use the equation of continuity, motion and energy
3. Implement the shell momentum balance equations for steady state flow problems
4. Usethe time smoothed equation of continuity, motion and energy
5. Implement the shell energy balance equations for steady state heat transfer problems
6. Implement the shell mass balance equations for steady state mass transfer problems
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO13


1 3 2 3
2 3 2 3
3 3 3 3
4 2 2 3
5 3 2 3
6 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Mechanisms of Transport Processes
Newton‘s law of viscosity–Fourier‘s law of heat conduction–Fick‘s law of binary diffusion–generalization of
Newton‘s law of viscosity–pressure and temperature dependence of viscosity–thermal conductivity and
diffusivity, Molecular theory of the viscosity of gases at low density–molecular theory of the viscosity of
liquids.Theory of thermal conductivity of gases at low density.Theory of diffusion in gases at low density, The
equation of continuity–the equation of motion– the equations of energy–Special forms of energy equations– the
equations of continuity for binary mixtures
Analogies–Dimensionless parameters
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Momentum Transport
Shell momentum balances and boundary conditions–flow of a falling film–flow through a circular tube–flow
through annulus–flow of two adjacent immiscible fluids–and creeping flow around a sphere, Use of the
equations of change to setup steady flow problems, Time smoothed equations of change for an incompressible
fluids
Flow in non circular tubes–Unsteady equations
9+3 Hours
Unit III
Energy Transport
Shell energy balances and boundary conditions–heat conduction with an electrical heat source–heat conduction
with a nuclear heat source–heat conduction with a viscous heat source–heat conduction with a chemical heat
source–heat conduction through composite walls–heat conduction in a cooling fin–forced convection–free
convection. Use of the equations of change to setup steady-state heat transfer problems, Time smmothing the
energy equation
Energy integration–Unsteady heat conditions
12+4 Hours
Unit IV
Mass Transport
Shell mass balances and boundary conditions–diffusion through a stagnant gas film–diffusion with a
heterogeneous chemical reaction–diffusion with a homogeneous chemical reaction–diffusion into a falling liquid
film (gas absorption)–diffusion into a falling liquid film (solid dissolution)–diffusion and chemical reaction
inside a porous catalyst.Use of the equations of change to setup diffusion problems, Time smoothing of equation
of continuity of A

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Non-porus catalyst–Unsteady diffusion


12+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook(s)
1. R.B. Bird, W.E. Stewart and E.N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, 2 ndEd., John Wiley and Sons, 2007
2. Griskey, Richard G. Transport phenomena and unit operations: a combined approach. John Wiley &
Sons, 2005.

Reference(s)
1. Ch. J. Geankopolis, Transport processes and unit operations, 3rdEd., PHI, 1993
2. Beek, W. J., K. M. M. Muttzall, and J. M. van Heuven. Transport Phenomena, 2 nd Ed., John Wiley &
Sons Ltd 1999.
3. J.R.Wilty, R.W.Wilson, and C.W.Wicks, Fundamentals of Momentum Heat and Mass Transfer, 2 ndEd.,
John Wiley, New York, 1973
4. W.J.Thomson, Introduction to Transport Phenomena, Pearson Education Asia, New Delhi, 2001
5. Tosun, Ismail. Modeling in transport phenomena: a conceptual approach. Elsevier, 2007.
6. Cercignani, Carlo, and Ester Gabetta, eds. Transport phenomena and kinetic theory: applications to
gases, semiconductors, photons, and biological systems. Springer Science & Business Media, 2007.

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 51(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State Newton‗s law of Viscosity.


2. Write Fourier‘s law of heat conduction.
3. Define Mass Diffusivity.
4. What are the units of Kinematic viscosity and Dynamic viscosity?.

Understand

1. How momentum can be in and out of the system in shell balance equation?
2. What are the boundary conditions for solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces?
3. Discuss the classification of Non-Newtonian fluids using two parameters and three parameters model.
4. How thermal conductivity of gases at low density varies with temperature and pressure?

Apply

1. Calculate the steady-state momentum flux in lbf/ft2 when the lower plate velocity is 1 ft/sec in the
positive x-direction, the plate separation is 0.001 ft and the fluid viscosity is 0.7 cp
2. Calculate the viscosity of the following gas mixture at 1 atm and 293 K from the given data on the pure
component at 1 atm and 293 K.

Species Mass fraction Mol. Wt. µ * 107(g/cm.sec)


CO2 0.133 44.01 1462
O2 0.039 32.0 2031
N2 0.828 28.016 1754
3. Using the Shell momentum balance equation, derive the velocity distribution equation for a laminar
flow of fluid through a circular tube.

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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

4. Using Von Karman Integral Method, derive the temperature profiles near a flat plate, along which a
Newtonian fluid is flowing. The wetted surface of the plate is maintained at temperature T o and the
temperature of the approaching fluid is T °K.
Analyze

5. How does one decide which macroscopic balances to use for a given problem? What auxiliary
information might need in order to solve problems with macroscopic balances?
6. Develop an expressions for the mole fraction profile x A(y) and the temperature profile T(y) for the
system, the mole fractions and temperatures at both film boundaries (y = 0 and у = δ). Here a hot
condensable vapor, A, is diffusing at steady state through a stagnant film of non-condensable gas, B, to
a cold surface at у = 0, where A condenses. Assume ideal gas behavior and uniform pressure.
Furthermore assume the physical properties to be constant, evaluated at some mean temperature and
composition. Neglect radiative heat transfer.
7. Determine the efflux time for a conical funnel initially filled with a liquid. The fluid is allowed to drain
out by gravity. Use appropriate notations and conditions.
8. Consider two identical fans, one at sea level and the other on top of the mountain, running at identical
speeds. How would you compare (a) the volumetric flow rates (b) the mass flow rates of these two
fans?
Evaluate

1. Estimate the effect of chemical reaction rate on the rate of gas absorption in an agitated tank.
Consider a system in which the dissolved gas A undergoes an irreversible first order reaction with
the liquid B; thatis, A disappears within the liquid phase at a rate proportional to the local
concentration of A.
2. A fluid stream emerges from a chemical plant with a constant mass flow rate w and discharges into
a river. It contains a waste material A at mass fraction ωА0, which is unstable and decomposes at a
rate proportional to its concentration according to the expression rA = -k'"pA that is, by a first-
order reaction. To reduce pollution it is decided to allow the effluent stream to pass through a
holding tank of volume V, before discharging into the river. The tank is equipped with an efficient
stirrer that keeps the fluid in the tank at very nearly uniform composition. At time t = 0 the fluid
begins to flow into the empty tank. No liquid flows out until the tank has been filled up to the
volume V. Develop an expression for the concentration of the fluid in the tank as a function of
time, both during the tank-filling process and after the tank has been completely filled.
3. Air at 1 atm and 30°C flows tangentially on both sides of a thin, smooth flat plate of width W = 12
ft, and of length L = 4 ft in the direction of the flow. The velocity outside the boundary layer is
constant at 25ft/s. (Use of boundary-layer equations)
(a) Compute the local Reynolds number Re A= xvx/ at the trailing edge.
(b) Assuming laminar flow, compute the approximate boundary-layer thickness, in inches, at the
trailingedge.
4. Using Equation of change, determine the temperature distribution in an incompressible liquid confined
between two coaxial cylinders, the outer one of which is rotating at a steady angular velocity Ω 0. The
temperatures of the inner and outer surfaces of the annular region are maintained at Tkand
T1respectively, with Тk≠Т1. Assume steady laminar flow, and neglect the temperature dependence of the
physical properties.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH001 Fertilizer Technology (Elective I)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Define the characteristics of a good fertilizer
2. Explain types of fertilizer and raw materials available
3. Discuss the production methods for various fertilizers
4. Draw the production flow sheet and explain the equipments used in production process
5. Explain about various soil testing methods
6. Explain about Controlled Released fertilizers

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO13


1 3 2 3
2 3 2 3
3 2 2 3
4 2 2 3
5 3 2 3
6 3 2 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction
Source of Nitrogen and Hydrogen, Steam Reformation of hydrocarbons, Coal Gasification process, Partial
oxidation of fuel oils, Gas purification, high and low temperature shift conversion, CO removal processes,
Methanation
Steam reformation–Gasification–Partial oxidation–Methanation
9+3 Hours
Unit II
Ammonia and Urea
Manufacture of Ammonia, Ammonia synthesis by various processes, by product ammonia recovery by direct
and indirect methods, Manufacture of nitric acid and production of urea, urea once through, total and partial
recycle processes, Prilling
Ammonia synthesis–Ammonia recovery–Urea–Nitric acid–Prilling
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Nitrogenous Fertilizer
Manufacture of other nitrogenous fertilizer such as ammonium sulfate, calcium ammonium nitrate, ammonium
chloride etc., Granulation techniques. Phospahatic fertilizers, single and triple super phosphate, manufacture and
production of ammonium phosphate and nitro phosphates, manufacture of phosphoric acid
Ammonium sulphate–Phosphatic fertilizers–SSP–TSP–Phosphoric acid
12+4 Hours
Unit IV
Potassium Fertilizers
Potassium fertilizers, mixed and compound fertilizers, liquid fertilizers, Indian fertilizer industry, production
economics and future plans, fertilizer application techniques for different soils, controlled release fertilizers
Rock Phosphate–Mixed & Liquid fertilizer–Soil testing–Controlled released fertilizers
12+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. Reinhold, Chemistry and Technology of Fertilizers: American Chemical Society, Issue 148, 1960
2. G.T.Austin, Shreve‘s Chemical Process Industries, International Student Edition, 5 th Ed., McGraw Hill
Inc., 1998
3. A. S. M, M. GopalaRao, Dryden‘s Outlines of Chemical Technology for the 21 st Century, 3rd Ed., WEP
East West Press, 2010

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Reference (s)
1. M. GopalRao&. M. Sittig, C.E. Dryden‘s Outlines of Chemical Technology, 3 rd Ed., East-West Press,
1997
2. F.T. Nielsson, Dekker, Manual of fertilizer processing, New York, 1987
3. Hess, Wayne T., A. Kurtz, and D. Stanton. "Kirk-Othmer encyclopedia of chemical technology.1995

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test52 (%)
Remember 30 30 --
Understand 60 50 --
Apply 10 10 60
Analyze -- 10 40
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. What is Grade of Fertilizer?
2. What is Prilling?
3. Discuss in detail about the Resources & Occurrences of Potash
4. Explain the sources of Nitrogen and Hydrogen

Understand
1. Describe the process for manufacturing Phosphoric acid
2. Distinguish between the high temperature and low temperature shift conversion
3. Explain the H2 production from Steam reforming of hydrocarbon
4. Explain the Partial oxidation of fuel oils?

Apply
1. How to remove CO from the stack gases?
2. Discus the various methods available for the production of Ammonium sulphate
3. Discuss the process flow diagram for manufacture of Triple super phosphate by Kuhlman process
4. Explain the manufacturing process of ammonia in an integrated steel plant?

Analyze
1. Discuss the growth of Fertilizer Industry in India
2. How Controlled Released fertilizers will impact on the environment?
3. Why liquid fertilizers will be more preferred than granulated fertilizers?
4. How fertilizer industry will impact the economy of India?

52
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

119
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH002 Pharmaceutical Technology (Elective I)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Familiarize basic principles involved in the manufacturing of pharmaceuticals
2. Select the unit operations for the manufacturing of pharmaceutics
3. Illustrate hygiene and good manufacturing practices while preparing the final product stream
4. Summarize the aspects involved in the preparation of microbiological and animal products
5. Select analytical techniques for product analysis and quality control
6. Manage environmental impacts in the field of pharmaceuticals

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 1 2 3 2
2 1 2 3 2
3 1 2 3 2
4 1 2 3 2
5 3 2 3 1
6 1 2 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introductory principles of pharmaceutical chemistry
Organic therapeutic use and economics, Chemical conversion processes, Alkylation, Carboxylation,
Condensation and Cyclisation, Dehydration, Esterification, Halogenation, Oxidation, Sulfonation
Therapeutic-Chemical conversions-fermentation
10 + 4 Hours
Unit II
Manufacturing principles and emulsions
Compressed tablets, wet granulation, dry granulation, direct compression , tablet presses formulation, coating,
pills, capsules, sustained dosage forms, parenter solutions, oral liquids, injections, cirtmerts, standard of
hygienes and good manufacturing practice
Tablet processes-Encapsulation-Liquid pharmaceuticals
13 + 4 Hours

Unit III
Microbiological and animal products
Antibiotics, biologicals, hormones, vitamins, preservatives, analytical methods for testing for various
pharmaceuticals, packing techniques, quality control
Important microbiological products-Packing-Product analysis
12 + 3 Hours

Unit IV
Environmental issues in pharmaceutical production
Safety, toxicity and environmental issues in pharmaceutical production.
Handling, usage-instructions-Environment protection
10 + 4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. E.A. Rawlines Bertleys, Text books of pharmaceuticals, 3rd Ed. Billlieere Tincall, London, 1977
Reference (s)
1. Remingtons, The science practice of Pharmacy, Edited by R. AlfansoGennaro, Mack publishing
company of Eastern, Pennsylvania, 1997

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test53(%)
Remember 30 25 --
Understand 35 35 --
Apply 35 40 100
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. How the friability test is performedfor tablets?
2. Name four different evaluationtests for capsules
3. Enlist the types of glass used for packaging
4. Write the factors influencing the choice of containers for parenterals

Understand
1. Explain formulation and manufacture of tabletsprepared by wet granulation
2. Distinguish betweena primary and secondary packaging container.Whichfactorsinfluenceselectionof
material forthesecontainers?
3. Outlinethe steps involvedin filmcoating of tabletswith diagram. Mention the formurationand process
variables influencing each step film. Enumeratefilm defects thatarelikcly to occur in coated tablets
4. Write different types of granulation with their merits and demerits

Apply
1. Calculate the displacement value of zinc oxide in theobroma oil suppositories containing 40% of zinc
oxide and is prepared in a 1g mould ( weight of 8 suppositories is 11.74 g)
2. Give reasons for the non-compliance to test for uniformity of weight
3. why does dissolution test suitable to be used for batch to batch quality control

53
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

121
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH003 Polymer Technology (Elective I)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Summarize the polymer classification and mechanism
2. Identify chemical formulas for common polymers and distinguish whether a polymer was likely
synthesized via a condensation (step growth) or addition (chain) polymerization reaction
3. Calculate the extent of reaction required to reach a particular degree of polymerization reaction and the
time required to reach that extent of reaction given appropriate rate constants
4. Determine the solubility of a polymer in a solvent given the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter
5. Identify and analyze data from experimental methods of measuring the radius of gyration, different
molecular weight averages, and second virial coefficient for polymer solutions
6. Determine the volume fraction of crystallinity for a polymer sample and measure the glass transition
temperature

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Polymer Technology
Introduction; definitions: polymer& macro molecule, monomer, functionality, average functionality, copolymer,
polymer blend., plastic and resin, Methods of polymerization: mass or Bulk polymerization process, solution
polymerization process, suspension polymerization process and emulsion polymerization method comparison of
merits and demerits of three methods, Mechanism and kinetics of Addition or chain polymerization) Free radical
addition polymerization, b) Ionic addition polymerizations c) Coordination polymerization d) Coordination or
step growth or condensation polymerization
Polymer classification–Bio Polymers
11+3 Hours

Unit II
Measurement of Molecular Weight and Size
End group analysis, Colligative property measurement, light scattering, ultra centrifugation, solution viscosity
and molecular size and gel permeation chromatography, poly-electrolytes
Polymer structure and physical properties: The crystalline melting point, the glass transition temperature,
properties involving large deformations, properties involving small deformations, Property requirements and
polymer utilization
Scanning electron microscopy
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Thermodynamics of Polymer Mixtures
Introduction, criteria for polymer solubility, the Flory Huggins theory, free volume theories, Free volume theory
of diffusion in rubbery polymers, gas diffusion in glassy polymers, polymer-polymer diffusion- Degradation of
polymers, Role of the following additives in the polymers- Fillers and reinforcing fillers ii) Plasticizers iii)
Lubricants iv) Antioxidants and UV stabilizers v) Blowing agents vi)Coupling agents vii)Flame retardents
Inhibitors 12+4 Hours

Unit IV
Manufacturing and Properties of Polymers
Brief description of manufacture, properties and uses of:i) Polyethylene (HDPE&LDPE), ii) Poly propylene iii)
Polyvinylchloride iv) Polystyrene v) Polytetrafloroethylene vi) Polymethylmehacrylate vii)

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Polyvinylacetate&PolyvinylalcoholPolymer Processing: Molding, Extrusion, other processing methods


(calandering, casting, coating, foaming, forming, laminating), multi-polymer systems and composites, additives
and compounding
Poly Urithene 11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. J. R. Fried, Polymer Science and Technology, 3 rd Ed., Prentice Hall India, 2014
2. B.Meyer, F.W.Jr., Textbook of Polymer Science, 3 rd Ed., John Wiley & sons, 1984

Reference (s)
1. J.H. Brison and C.C. Gosselin, Introduction to Plastics, Newnes-Butterworth, London, 1968
2. C.C.Winding and G.D.Hiatt, Polymeric Materials, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1961

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test54(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define polymer.
2. Write the examples of thermosetting polymers.
3. Define coating.
4. Define foaming.

Understand
1. Explain methods of polymerization.
2. Describe principle of emulsion polymerization.
3. Derive the Flory-Huggins theory.
4. Explain the manufacture of HDPE.

Apply
1. What are the applications of coordination polymerization?
2. What are the applications of poly-electrolytes?
3. Explain the thermodynamic principles of Antioxidants and UV stabilizers
4. Explain the manufacture of Polystyrene
Analyze
1. Why do monomers show different reacting tendencies in binary copolymerization? Which factors
influence their relative reactivates.
2. How is isobutylene polymerized? state the important properties of resulting polymer
3. Enlist the distinguish features of LDPE& HDPE
4. Comment on the molecular weight of a polymer when the concentration of one of the reactants is away
from the stoichiometric balance.

Evaluate
1. How does vulcanization change the properties of natural rubber?
2. Discuss various factors influencing the glass transition temperature of polymers.
3. Bring out the differences in the dissolution of crystalline & amorphous polymers
4. With the help of a neatly labeled diagram explain SEM. Mention important applications.
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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

123
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH004 Material Science and Engineering (Elective II)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Relate the structure-property of materials
2. Analyze structural defects and their effects on material properties
3. Interpret the phase diagram & phase transformation of steels and identify the appropriate material for
process equipment
4. Summarize the strengthening mechanisms
5. Interpret the failure analysis and select appropriate materials or relevant corrosion protection schemes
for corrosion resistance
6. Explain the basic aspects of engineering materials and their applications

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 1 1
2 1 1 3 2
3 3 1 1 1
4 1 1 3 2
5 1 3 1 1
6 3 1 1 1
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction
Definition of a material, classification of engineering materials, Level of structure, Property relation to Bond
characteristics
Crystal Geometry and Structure Determination: Geometry of crystals- Concept of unit cell space lattice, the
Bravais lattices, Crystal directions and planes-the Miller indices, Atomic packing factor and density Structure
determination-X-Ray diffraction- Bragg law, The powder method
Crystal Imperfections:Point defects, Line defects-edge and screw dislocations, Burgers Vector, Burgers Circuit,
Surface defects, Frank read source-dislocation multiplication, dislocation climb, jogs, force on dislocation line
Ionization potential-Electron Affinity-Electronegativity-Chemical Bonding-Vander Waal Bond- Bravais lattices-
Miller indices- Burgers Vector- dislocation line
12 + 4 Hours
Unit II
Heat Treatment
Fe-Fe3C System, Phase transformations in steels, various types of heat treatment such as Annealing,
Normalizing, Quenching, Tempering and Case hardening. Modifications in structure of Steel by Heat Treatment
– Time– Temperature – Transformation Curves for Eutectoid Steel
Alloys of Steel and their uses in Chemical Industry-Cast iron as a material of construction with reference to its
application in chemical engineering
12 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Elastic deformation
Plastic deformation-The tensile stress-strain curve, Plastic deformation by slip, the shear strength of perfect and
real crystals, Strengthening mechanisms – Work Hardening or Strain Hardening, Alloying – Cold and Hot
working – Recovery and Recrystallization, Grain Growth, Grain Size and Yield Strength, Age hardening of
Aluminum alloys – Al-Cu system
Creep-Mechanisms of Creep, creep resistant materials, Fracture-Brief theoretical consideration of Fracture and
Fatigue
Modulus- Anelastic-Spring-Dashpot models
10 + 3 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Unit IV
Metals
Engineering materials-elementary study of nonferrous metals and alloys, copper, aluminum, lead, chromium,
tin, brass, bronze and monel with reference to the application in chemical industries
Nonmetals–Glass, Enamels, graphite, wood, plastics, rubber, ceramic mixture-structure and properties,
polymeric material with reference to the application in chemical industries
Eebonite-reinforced plastic composite material
11 + 4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. V. Raghavan, Material Science and Engineering, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd

Reference (s)
1. Manas Chanda, Science of Engineering Materials, Vol. 1 & 2, McMillan Company of India Ltd. 1981
2. L.H. Van Vlack, Elements of Materials Science and Engineering, 6thEdition, Pearson Educational India,
2008

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 55(%)
Remember 30 25 --
Understand 35 35 --
Apply 35 40 100
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. State the application and limitations of phase rule
2. Define Electron Affinity, Electro Negativity and Ionization Potential
3. Name the materials which exhibitviscoelastic behavior
4. Sketch the planes i) (632) ii) (221) iii) (100) iv) (110)

Understand
1. Find the density of Aluminium from the following data:
At.Wt = 26.88g/mole, A = 4.049Ao,N = 6.02 x 1023atoms/mole
2. If two phases having different values of E are to sustain the same stress, theirrespective regions in the
metal must deform different amounts. Using sketches ofthe two different conditions of loading, explain
why the iso stress concept mightapply to long fine fibers ―perpendicular‖ to the direction of stress, but
not to suchfibers parallel to this direction
3. Explain the fatigue behavior of materials with the help of S-N curves
4. State the difference between high angle and low angle boundary and their relative effects on materials

Apply
1. Brittle materials are found to be stronger if the total volume under test is reduced drastically. Why?
2. The first three lines from the powder pattern of a cubic crystal having the following S values: 24.95,
40.9 and 48.05mm. The camera radius is 57.3mm. Molybdenum k α radiation of wave length 0.71Ao is
used. Determine the structure and lattice parameter of the material
3. Displacements produced by intersection of two dislocation lines are easily visualized in a hypothetical
simple cubic metal. Considering only < 100 > type Burger‘s vectors and slip on {100} type planes
show that all the three types of the displacements of the dislocation line occur in the two possible lines
of the intersection of edge dislocations

55
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

125
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH005 Petroleum Refining and Petrochemicals (Elective II)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Outline the formation of crude oil and its pretreatment
2. Make use of the means of processing data including thermal properties
3. Compare the properties, tests and treatment methods for important petroleum products
4. Develop skills in drawing neat flow diagrams of different petroleum refining processes
(cracking/reforming/alkylation/isomerization/hydrocracking etc.,) aimed at producing high
value/demand products Illustrate detailed value addition process techniques using relavant flow
diagrams. Develop skills in illustrating refinery value addition process techniques.
5. Outline and construct flow diagram for the manufacture of petrochemicals from methane
6. Describe the manufacturing operations for the production of petrochemicals from ethylene

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 2 - 1 2
2 1 - 1 2
3 1 1 - 2
4 1 - 1 3
5 1 - - 3
6 1 - - 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Petroleum Formation, Pretreatment and Refining
Origin, formation and composition of petroleum: Origin and formation of petroleum, theories explaining the
crude formation. Fractionation of petroleum: Dehydration and desalting of crudes, heating of crude-pipe still
heaters, distillation of petroleum
Crude oil–Components–Distillation of multi-components–Mercaptns–Thiophenes–Refining
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Properties and Test Methods for Petroleum Products
Evaluation of petroleum, thermal properties (viscosity index, flash, fire points,of petroleum fractions), important
products, properties and test methods
Treatment techniques: fraction-impurities, treatment of gasoline, treatment of kerosene, treatment of lubes
API Scale–Viscosity–Spark pulg engine–Compression ignition engine
10+4 Hours
Unit III
Modern Refinery Value Addition Processes
Thermal and catalytic processes: Cracking, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, Naphtha cracking, coking,
Hydrogenation processes, Alkylations processes, Isomerization process Petrochemical Industry – Feedstocks-
gases, liquids, solids; purification of gases, aromatics separation from Reformates-Udex process
Cracking-Cyclone separator-Liquid-Liquid Extraction
10+3 Hours
Unit IV
Petrochemicals from C1 and C2 Hydrocarbons
Chemicals from methane: Introduction, production of Methanol, Formaldehyde, Ethylene glycol, and
Methylamines, Chemicals from Ethane-Ethylene-Acetylene: Oxidation of ethane, production of Ethylene,
Manufacture of Vinyl Chloride monomer, Vinyl Acetate manufacture, Ethanol from Ethylene, Acetaldehyde
from Acetylene
Petrochemicals–Acetylene uses–Ethylene glycol uses
13+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. B.K. Baskara Rao, Modern Petroleum Refining Processes, 4 th Ed., Oxford & IBH Publishing, 2002

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

2. M. Gopal Rao & M. Sittig, C.E. Dryden‘s Outlines of Chemical Technology, 3 rd Ed., East-West Press,
1997

Reference (s)
1. B.K. Bhaskara Rao,A text book on Petrochemicals, 4 th Ed., Khanna publishers, 2002
2. O. P. Gupta, Fuels Furnaces and Refractories, Khanna Publishers, 1967
3. G.T. Austin, Shreve‘s Chemical Process Industries–International Student Ed., 5th Ed.,McGraw Hill
Inc., 1998

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 56(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 30 55
Analyze 20 30 25
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Draw schematic diagram for 2-stage crude distillation
2. Describe the purpose of catalytic cracking
3. Define reforming in realtion to petroleum refinery
4. Describe doctor‘s test for Sulfur

Understand
1. Explain the construction of electric desalter
2. Describe principle involved in the alkylation process
3. When hydrocracking considered in refinery operation
4. Explain the principle use of isomerisation process in modern refienry

Apply
1. List the Raw materials, reactions catalytic cracking
2. Show the naphtha (steam) cracking flow sheet for olefins production; discuss the sequential operations.
3. Describe the production of formaldehyde with a neat flow sheet, present the raw materials and ractions
involved?
4. Explain Ethanol production from ethylene employing the direct hydration reaction along with flow
sheet

Analyze
1. Differentiate the reactions for ethanol production from ethylene employing the direct & indirect way
of hydration reactions
2. Organize the manufacturing of vinyl chloride with a neat flow diagram and describe the process with
chemical reactions
3. What is the influence of temperature and pressure on methanol manufacture from synthesis gas as feed
stock
4. Differentiate the applications of vinyl chloride and vinyl aqcetate

56
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

127
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH006 Energy Engineering (Elective II)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain the various conventional and non-conventional energy resources available, production and use
2. Discuss the sustainability in application of non-conventional energy resources
3. Identify the energy production from biological source
4. Elucidate the concept of fuel cells and future applications
5. Confer about the sources of Nuclear energy, production technology and its applications
6. Substantiate the Energy Storage and Distribution methodology for sustainability

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Conventional Energy Sources
Introduction to conventional and non-conventional energy sources, their significance & availability,
consumption patterns in India, Energy survey and policies for India, Wood and Wood Charcoal, products of
wood carbonization, Coal and Coal derived fuels characteristics, production methods and uses, Oil and Gases:
Fuels derived from oil and gases, Characteristics, production methods and uses
Conventional energy–Energy polic–Wood–Coal–Fuel characteristics
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Non-Conventional Energy Sources
Solar Energy Conversion: Introduction to Heat balance, Physical Characteristics of Selective Surfaces, Use of
Selective Solar Energy Collectors, Anti-Reflection Coatings, Solar Reflector Materials, Selective and Non-
Selective Surfaces, Types of Selective coatings, Intrinsic Solar Selective Materials, Photo Voltaic Cells:
Introduction: Types of Solar Cells, Applications, Electrical Storage, Future developments, Wind-power:
Introduction, Basic principles of wind energy conversion, Types of wind machines, Wave power: Introduction,
advantages and disadvantages, energy and power from the waves, Wave energy conversion devices
Solar Energy–Solar cell–Wind power–Wave Energy
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Bio Fuels and Fuel Cells
Introduction, Bio mass conversion technologies, Wet processes, dry processes, Bio-gas generation, Factors
affecting bio-digestion, Classification of biogas plants, Production methods, characteristics, uses of biodiesel,
bio-butanol, bio-ethanol, Second generation biofuel feed stocks-Fuel Cells: Working principle, Types,
Advantages, Current and Future Applications
Biomass Energy–Biofuels–Fuel Cells–Applications of Fuel cells
12+4 Hours
Unit IV
Nuclear Energy
Nuclear fission fuels processing, nuclear reactions and nuclear reactors, Energy Storage and Distribution:
Mechanical Energy Storage, Hydroelectric Storage, Compressed Air Storage and Energy Storage via Flywheels,
Electric Storage, Chemical Storage, Thermal Energy Storage
Fast Breed Reactor–Pressurized HeavyWater Reactor
9+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Text book (s)


1. G. D. Rai, Non-Conventional energy sources, 18th Ed., Khanna Publisher, 2017
2. S. Sarkar, Fuels and Combustion, Universities Press, 3rd Ed., 2009

Reference (s)
1. B H Khan, Non-Conventional Energy Sources, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill, 2017
2. D. Reay, Industrial Energy Conservation, Pergamon Press, 1979
3. S. Srinivasan, Fuel Cells: From Fundamentals to Applications, Springer, 2006
4. O. P. Gupta, Fundamentals of Nuclear power reactors, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 1983

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test57(%)
Remember 30 20 --
Understand 40 50 --
Apply 20 10 60
Analyze 10 20 40
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Explain the conventiaonal & non-conventional energy resources?
2. What is anti reflection coatings?
3. Discuss in the basic principles of wind energy conversion
4. Explain the Thermal Energy Storage

Understand
1. What are the fulels can be derived from coal?
2. Discus the Selective and Non-Selective Surfaces in solar cell.
3. What are the Second generation biofuel feed stocks available?
4. Explain the Nuclear fission fuels processing?

Apply
1. How to produce energy through wood carbonization?
2. What is the applications of wave energy?
3. What is the advantage of biomass conversion technologies?.
4. Explain the utilization of chemical energy

Analyze
1. Explain the energy consumption patterns in India
2. How the the solar energy utilization will impact the future development?
3. What is Current and Future Applications of fuel cells?
4. Explain the Compressed Air Storage and Energy Storage via Flywheels

57
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

129
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CE007 Disaster Management (Open Elective)


4003
Course Outcomes
1. Demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of disaster management
2. Apply the knowledge to formulate different risk management frameworks and pre-preparedness tools
for natural and manmade disasters
3. Summarize the risk and vulnerability associated with disasters
4. Apply different technologies in the management of disasters
5. Outline the importance of education and preparedness in the management of disasters
6. Infer the role of different organizations in disaster management
COs–POs Mapping

COs PO2
1 2
2 3
3 3
4 3
5 1
6 1
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Disaster Management and Management of Natural Disasters
Introduction: Interdisciplinary nature of the subject, Disaster Risk Reduction–Global Policies and Practices,
Basic Strategies and Practices of Disaster Reduction, Linking Disaster Risk Reduction with Global Framework,
Integrated Disaster Risk Management and Post-Disaster Response-Management of Natural Disasters: Floods,
Droughts, Earthquakes, Global Warming, Cyclones, Landslides, Tsunamis and Post Tsunami hazards along the
Indian Coast
Significant Aspects of Disasters-Global Earthquake Safety Initiative-Prediction of Tsunamis-Typology of flood
risks-Framework for Preparedness and Mitigation
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Management of Manmade Disasters and Risk & Vulnerability
Management of Manmade Disasters: Temporal Transport Hazard Dynamics, Solid Waste Management: Post–
disaster, A Threat of Bio-terrorism in Mega Cities, Rail and Air craft‘s accidents, emerges infectious diseases,
AIDS and Climate Change Risk Reduction-Risk & Vulnerability: Building Codes and Land Use Planning,
Social Vulnerability, Environmental Vulnerability and Disaster Risk Reduction, Macroeconomic Management
and Sustainable Development, Financial Management of Disaster related Economic Losses
Temporal Analysis of Transport-Capacity Building and Institutional Strengthening-Climate Risk Management -
Decision Framework
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Role of Technology in Disaster Management
Role of Technology in Disaster Management: Implementation Technology for Disaster Reduction, Disaster
Management for Infrastructure, Geospatial Information in agriculture Drought Assessment and Monitoring,
Multimedia Technology in Disaster Risk Management Training-Education and Community: Education in
Disaster Risk Reduction , Essentials of School Disaster Education, Community Capacity and Disaster
Resilience, Community-based Disaster Recovery, Community-based Disaster Management and Social Capital,
Designing Resilience
Disaster Management Program-Building Community Capacity-Remote Sensing and GIS 11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Multi Sectional and Crosscutting Issues
Multi Sectional Issues: Impact of Disasters on Poverty and Deprivation, Climate Change Adaptation and Human
Health, Health Hazards and Environmental Risk-Crosscutting Issues: Forest Management and Disaster Risk

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reduction, Institutional Capacity in Disaster Management, Corporate Sector and Disaster Risk Reduction,
Essentials of Pre-disaster Recovery Planning
Poverty Vulnerability Indices-Protective Functions of Forest Resources-Corporate Organizations and Disaster
Potential-Community Focused Approach
11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. R. Shaw and R. R. Krishna Murthy, Disaster Management: Global Challenges and Local Solutions, 1 st
Ed., Universities Press (India) Private Limited, Hyderabad, 2009
2. J. Singh, Disaster Management: Future Challenges and Opportunities,2 nd Ed., I.K.International
Publishing House Private Limited, New Delhi, 2007

Reference (s)
1. D. P. Coppola, Introduction to International Disaster Management, 3 rd Ed., Elsevier Publications, 2011
2. U. Ranke, Natural Disaster Risk Management, Springer International Publishing, 2016

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 58 (%)
Remember 20 10 --
Understand 30 40 --
Apply 50 50 100
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define Hazard.
2. Define Disaster.
3. What are the different phases of disaster management cycle?
4. Define Tsunami.
5. Define landslide.
Understand
1. Explain when hazard become disaster
2. ―Prevention is better than cure is opted proverb in the context of disaster management‖ Explain.
3. Explain the causes of global warming.
4. Explain the difference between environmental and social vulnerabilities.
5. ―All the developmental projects will lead to disaster risk‖, Justify.
Apply
1. Role of Geospatial technology in disaster management
2. Role of multimedia technology in disaster management

58
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

131
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16EE004 Renewable Energy Sources (Open Elective)


3003
Course Outcomes
1. Summarize the principles of solar energy systems
2. Demonstrate the applications of solar energy system
3. Illustrate the working principles of wind and biomass energy systems
4. Interpret working principles of geothermal energy system
5. Summarize operation and classification of ocean , tidal, fuel cells, small hydro and magneto hydro
energy system
6. Extend renewable energy sources to distributed generation & micro grids
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO2 PO7


1 3 2
2 2 3
3 2 3
4 2 3
5 2 3
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction &Solar Energy
Introduction to renewable energy, advantages of generating power through renewable energy sources – technical
& economical, Solar Energy: Physics of sun, the solar constant, extra-terrestrial and terrestrial solar radiation,
instruments for measuring solar radiation and sun shine. Flat Plate and Concentrating Collectors, classification
of concentrating collectors, thermal analysis of flat plate collectors, Photo voltaic energy conversion,PV cell
model and characteristics, Maximum power point tracking for photovoltaic power systems. Types of Maximum
power point tracking methods (Perturb and Observe (hill climbing), Incremental Conductance, Fractional short
circuit current, Fractional open circuit voltage)
Solar applications-solar heating /cooling technique
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Wind & Bio-Mass Energy
Sources and potentials, horizontal and vertical axis windmills, performance characteristics, Betz criteria,
maximum power point tracking for wind, types of Maximum power point tracking methods
Principles of Bio-Conversion, Anaerobic/aerobic digestion,Types of Bio-Gas Digesters,gas yield, Combustion
characteristics of bio-gas,
Utilization for cooking, IC.Engine operation
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Energy Conversion systems
Geothermal & Ocean Energy: Types of Resources (hydrothermal, geo-pressured, hot dry rock), types of wells,
and methods of harnessing the energy (vapour dominated, liquid dominated).Ocean thermal energy conversion,
principles, Open loop&closed loop OTEC Cycles.Tidal energy- potential, conversion techniques-single basin,
two basin system. Wave energy: conversion techniques.
Fuel cells-Principle of working of various types of fuel cells and their working, Magneto-hydrodynamics
(MHD)-Principle of working of MHD Power plant, Hydrogen generation, battery energy storage system.
Wave, tidal power conversion systems & Small hydro power generation 11+3Hours
Unit IV
Distributed generation & Microgrid
Define grid, distributed generation(DG) & microgrid, importance of DG & microgrid, typical structure and
configuration of a microgrid, AC and DC microgrids, modes of operation and control of microgrid: grid
connected and islanded mode, anti-islanding schemes: passive, active and communication based techniques.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

HVDC microgrid system 10+4 Hours


Total: 45+15=60 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. B H Khan, Non-Conventional Energy Sources, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill, 2017
2. G.D. Rai, Non-conventional energy resources, 18th Ed., Khanna Publisher, 2017
3. Alexis Kwasinski , Wayne Weaver, Robert S. Balog, Micro grids and other local area power and
energy systems, 1st Ed., Cambridge University Press, 2016

Reference (s)
1. Tiwari and Ghosal, Renewable energy resources, 2nd Ed., Narosa Publishing house, 2001
2. Ranjan Rakesh, Kothari D. P.& Singal K. C., Renewable Energy Sources And Emerging Technologies,
2nd Ed., PHI, 2013
3. Nikos Hatziargyriou, Micro grids: Architectures and Control, 1st Ed., Wiley,2014
4. Electricity Act 2003
5. Renewable Energy Act 2015
6. Indian Constitution-Articles 51A, 47, 48A.
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Comprehensive Test59 (%)
Remember 40 40 ---
Understand 60 60 80
Apply 20
Analyze --- --- ---
Evaluate --- --- ---
Create --- --- ---
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define renewable energy
2. List out the advantages HAWT
3. List out the disadvantages non concentration collector
4. Define solar radiation
5. Define solar constant
6. Define micro-grid
Understand
1. Explain need of micro-grid
2. Interpret faraday‘s laws
3. Explainclosed loop OTEC Cycles system
4. Explain Principle of working of MHD Power plant
5. Compare HAWT and VAWT
6. Classify concentrating collectors
Apply
1. Compute the power coefficient of wind turbine
2. Demonstrate storage of energy from battery
3. Assess magnetic flux density due to circular ring
4. Compute solar cell working
5. Assess the nature of microgrid

59
Comprehensive test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills

133
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16ME009 Principles of Entrepreneurship (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes

1. Explain the role of entrepreneur in economic development


2. Demonstrate methods of generating ideas
3. Develop the business plan to start their own enterprise
4. Manage various production aspects such as manufacturing costs control, marketing management and
waste reduction
5. Make financial plan for enterprise
6. Find the institutional support entrepreneurship
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO5 PO8 PO11


1 3 - 3 2
2 3 - 1 -
3 3 - 1 3
4 3 3 2 2
5 3 3 3 3
6 3 - 1 3
3 – Strongly linked | 2 – Moderately linked | 1 – Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Definition of Entrepreneur, Entrepreneurial Traits, Entrepreneur Vs. Manager, Entrepreneur Vs Entrepreneur.
The Entrepreneurial decision process- Role of Entrepreneurship in Economic Developments, Ethics and Social
responsibility of entrepreneurs, Woman as entrepreneur.
Opportunities for entrepreneurs in India and abroad.
10+3 Hours
Unit II
Creating and starting the venture
Sources of new Ideas, Methods of generating ideas, creating problems solving- Product planning and
development process
The business plan
Writing Business plan, Evaluating Business plans, Using and implementing business plans, marketing plan,
financial plan and the organizational plan launching formalities
Nature and scope of business plan.
15+5 Hours
Unit III
Financing and managing the new venture
Source of Capital, record keeping, recruitment, motivating and leading teams, financial controls, Marketing
and sales controls. E- Commerce and Entrepreneurship
New venture expansion strategies and issues
Features evaluation of joint ventures, acquisitions, merges, franchising, Public issues, rights issues, bonus
issues
Internet advertising
9+3 Hours
Unit IV
Institutional support Entrepreneurship
Role of Dire crate of Industries, District Industries, Centers (DICS), Industrial development Corporation
(IDC), state Financial corporation (SFCs), Small Scale Industries Development Corporations (SSIDCs), Khadi
and village Industries Commission (KVIC), Technical Consultancy Organization (TCO), small Industries
Service Institute (SISI), National Small Industries Corporation (NSIC), Small Industries Development Bank of
India (SIDBI), salient provision under Indian Factories Act, Employees State Insurance Act, Workmen‘s
Compensation Act and payment of Bonus Act.
Labour legislation
11+4 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Total: 45+15Hours
Textbook (s)
1. Robert Hisrich & Michael Peters, Entrepreneurship, 5th Ed., TMH 2009
2. Dollinger, Entrepreneurship, 4th Ed., Pearson Education, 2004
Reference (s)
1. Vasant Desal, The Dynamics of Entrepreneurial Development and Management, 5th Ed., Himalaya
publishing House, 2017
2. William A. Sahlman, James Stancill, Arthur Rock, Harvard Business Review on Entrepreneurship, 10th
Ed., Harvard Business School Press, 1999
3. Robert J. Calvin, Entrepreneurial Management, Tata McGraw-Hill Education 2004
4. Gurmeet Naroola, The Entrepreneurial Connection: East Meets West in the Silicon Valley, Special
edition, TiE, 2001
5. Bill Bolton & John Thompson, Entrepreneurs Talent, Temperament, Technique, 2nd Ed., Routledge
2004
6. Agrawal, A.N. & Agarwal, M.K., Indian Economy: Problems of Development and Planning, 42nd Ed.,
New Age International, 2017
7. Gaurav Datt & Ashwani Mahajan, Dutt & Sundaram‘s Indian Economy, 72nd Ed., S. Chand, 2016
8. Srivastava, Industrial Relations Labour Laws, 6th Ed., Vikas Publishing House, 2005
9. Aruna Kaulgud, Entrepreneurship Management, Vikas publishing house, 2003.
10. Thomas W. Zimmerer & Norman M. Scalbrorough, Essential of Entrepreneurship and small business
management, 4th Ed., PHI, 2005
11. Mary Coulter, Entrepreneurship in Action, 2nd Ed., PHI, 2005
12. Kaplan, Patterns of Entrepreneurship, 4th Ed., Willey, 2005
13. ND Kapoor, Industrial Law, 14th Revised Ed., Sultan Chand & Sons, 2013
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 60(%)
Remember 30 40 -
Understand 70 60 -
Apply - - 35
Analyze - - 45
Evaluate - - 20
Create - - -
Total (%) 100 100 100
Remember
1. List the different methods of generating ideas and explain any four methods.
2. List the difference between entrepreneur vs manager.
3. What are the objectives of market research?
4. What are the market research activities? List them.
5. List the important functions of IDBI.
Understand
1. Illustrate the difference between entrepreneur vs manager.
2. Illustrate the characteristics or traits of an entrepreneur.
3. Illustrate the sources of new ideas for entrepreneur.
4. Explain the various steps involved in writing a business plan.
5. What are the various sources of capital required for business venture?
6. Describe the role of E-commerce in entrepreneurship with its applications.
7. Write about marketing plan and financial plans required for an entrepreneur.
8. Illustrate the factories act 1948.
9. Illustrate the reasons for the need of labor legislation becomes important
.

60Assignment Test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills

135
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16EC004 Fundamentals of Global Positioning System (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Summarize the history of GPS, NAVSTAR GPS
2. State the working principle of GPS, GNSSs
3. Outline GALILEO, GLONASS signal constellation details
4. Conclude about GPS segments, signal components, IRNSS specifications
5. Demonstrate GPS coordinate systems
6. Classify various datums and map projections
COs–POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO6


1 1 2 2
2 1 2 2
3 2 3 3
4 2 3 3
5 3 2 2
6 2 2 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Global Navigation Satellite Systems
The History of GPS, The Evolution of GPS, Development of NAVSTAR GPS, Block I, Block II, Block IIA,
Block IIR, Block IIR-M, Block IIF and Block III satellites, GPS working principle, Trilateration, Determination
of satellite position, Determining the receiver position: 2D or X-Y Plane, 3D or X-Y-Z Plane, Ionospheric
effects of GPS signals
GIS Integration
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Types of Global Navigation Satellite Systems
GALILEO: Advantages of GALILEO, signal components, PRN codes, Modulation schemes of Galileo signals:
BOC, Alt-BOC, Galileo and GPS Signal interoperability, Improved performance from the combination of
GALILEO and GNSSs, GLONASS: GLONASS constellation details, signal structure: PRN code,P-code,C/A
code,navigation data,signal modulation
GAGAN Navigation system
12+3 Hours
Unit III
GPS Satellite constellation and Signals
GPS system segments: Space segment, Control segment, User segment, GPS Signals: Pseudorandom noise
(PRN) code, C/A code, P code, Navigation data, GPS signal generation: generation of codes, Comparison of
GNSSs in terms of constellation and services, IRNSS: Segments, 1A to 1G specifications, applications
Simulation of GPS signals
10+4 Hours
Unit IV
Coordinate Systems
Geoid, Ellipsoid, Coordinate Systems: Geodetic and Geo centric, CTRS, CIRS, ECEF, Datums: world geodetic
1984, Indian geodetic datum, Conversion between Cartesian and geodetic coordinate frame, Map projections:
Advantages, metric properties, construction, types of map projections
Extract GPS Coordinates for a Google Maps Location
11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

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Textbook (s)
1. G.S. Rao, Global Navigation Satellite Systems, McGraw-Hill Publications, New Delhi, 2010
2. Ahmed El-Rabbany, Introduction to GPS: the Global Positioning System,Artech House, 2002
Reference (s)
1. Scott Gleason and DemozGebre- Egziabher, GNSS Applications and Methods, Artech House, 685
Canton Street, Norwood, MA 02062, 2009
2. James Ba-Yen Tsui, Fundamentals of GPS receivers-A software approach, John Wiley &Sons, 2001

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 61(%)
Remember 20 -- --
Understand 45 35 --
Apply -- 35 45
Analyze 35 30 55
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define trilateration.
2. List two applications of GPS.
3. List two important specifications of GLONASS
4. Retrive the need of PRS.
5. Define ranging codes and data.

Understand

1. Illustrate the working principle of GPS.


2. Identify the GPS and GLONASS interoperability issues.
3. Formulate the signal structure of GPS.
4. Abstract geodetic and geocentric coordinate systems.
5. Illustrate the modulation techniques of GALILEO system.

Apply

1. Compute the receiver position using 3D plane.


2. Find the pseudo range on satellite with travelling time of 70ms?
3. Find the free space loss factor on a GPS satellite L1 C/A code signal at a distance of 2x107.
X
Show that the longitude of a point in ECEF is   tan
1
4. .
Y
x(t )  A, t   / 2
5. Compute the Fourier transform of a pulse signal defined as
 0, t   / 2
Analyze

1. Compare the features of C/A code and P-code.


2. Outline the unknowns to be solved in acquisition of GPS signal.
3. Contrast BOC and AltBOC modulation techniques.
4. Compare GPS and IRNSS features
5. Contrast ephemeris and almanac codes

61
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

137
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CS006 Computational Intelligence (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Identify and describe Soft Computing Techniques and their roles in building Intelligent Machines
2. Apply Supervised Learning Networks in Machine Learning Problems
3. Illustrate the working of Associative memory networks
4. Apply Unsupervised Learning Networks in Machine Learning Problems
5. Apply Fuzzy Logic and Reasoning to handle Uncertainty and Solve Engineering Problem
6. Apply Genetic Algorithms to solve Optimized Problems

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO3 PO5 PO6


1 3 2 1
2 3 2 1
3 2 3 1
4 3 2 1
5 3 2 2
6 2 3 2

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Basic Elements of Soft Computing
Basic elements of Soft Computing: Difference between Hard Computing & Soft Computing - Introduction
to Neural Networks - Fuzzy Logic - Genetic Algorithms - Hybrid Systems. Artificial Neural Networks:
Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks - Evolution of Neural Networks - Basic Models of Neural
Networks - McCulloch-Pitts Neuron - Hebb Network.
Basics of Artificial Intelligence and Computational Intelligence.
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Supervised Learning Network
Supervised Learning Network: Artificial Neural Networks: Introduction - Perceptron Networks - Back
Propagation Network. Radial Basis Function Network.
Associative Memory Networks: Auto-associative Memory Network - Hetero auto-associative Memory
Network - Bidirectional Associative Memory (BAM) - Hopfield Networks.
Functional Link Neural Network.
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Unsupervised Learning Network
Introduction - Fixed Weight Competitive Nets -Kohonen Self-Organizing Feature Maps - Learning Vector
Quantization - Counter Propagation Networks - Adaptive Resonance Theory Networks (ART-1 & ART-2).
Support Vector Machines and their applications for Classification.

11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Fuzzy logic and Genetic Algorithm
Introduction to Fuzzy Sets: Difference between Classical Sets & Fuzzy Sets – Properties.
Classical Relations and Fuzzy Relations: Cartesian product of Relations - Classical Relations - Fuzzy Relations
Membership Functions: Features of Membership Functions -Fuzzification - and Defuzzification
Genetic Algorithm: Basic Concepts – Operators.
Concepts on Fuzzy Controller and its applications -a Simple Application of Genetic Algorithm for function
Optimization.
11+4 Hours
Total: 44+16 Hours

138
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. S. N. Sivanandam, S N Deepa, Principles of Soft Computing, 2 ndEditionWiley India, 2007
2. V. Kecman, Learning and soft computing, Pearson Education, India, 2006
3. Russell Eberhart and Yuhui Shi - Computational Intelligence: Concepts to Implementations (2007)
Reference(s)
1. G. J. Klir and Bo Yuan, Fuzzy sets and Fuzzy Logic, Prentice Hall, USA, 1995
2. N. J. Nelsson, Artificial Intelligence, A New Synthesis, Harcourt Asia Ltd., 1998
3. D. E. Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms: Search, Optimization and Machine Learning, Addison Wesley,
N.Y – 1989
4. S. Haykins, Neural networks: a comprehensive foundation Pearson Education, India, 2002
5. A. P. Engelbrecht, Computational Intelligence: An Introduction, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.
6. X. Yu and M. Gen, Introduction to Evolutionary Algorithms, Springer Verlag, 2010.
7. Fakhreddine Karray and Clarence de Silva - Soft Computing and Intelligent Systems Design, 2004.
8. Andries Engelbrecht - Computational Intelligence: an Introduction, 2007.
9. Amit Konar - Computational Intelligence: Principles, Techniques, and Applications, 2005.
10. Vojislav Kecman - Learning and Soft Computing: Support Vector Machines, Neural Networks, and
Fuzzy Logic Models, 2001.
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 62 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 15 --
Apply 20 20 40
Analyze 20 30 40
Evaluate -- 20 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define Chromosome
2. List two methods in which the information flows in a nervous system
3. List five unsupervised learning algorithms
4. List the difference between classical logic and fuzzy logic
5. List the computational units of ART

Understand
1. Explain the components of Soft Computing
2. Explain the role of activation function in exhibiting the output from a neuron
3. Construct the 5 node pattern {0,1,1,0,1} by Hopfield network and explain the procedure for recalling
and storing
4. Explain Adaptive Resonance Theory and its type
5. Explain CPN and illustrate the steps involved in training algorithm of full CPN
Apply
1. Construct a ANN circuit which makes the flow of data using multilayered and multilevel networks
2. Apply clusters of various datasets maintained by learning approach considering live example
3. Draw the neat architecture of hamming network and trace the inhibitatory and excitatory neurons by
considering an inconsistent vector
4. Find the Max-min and Max Product composition of the fuzzy relation matrices
R={0.6,0.3,0.2,0.9}(2x2) S={1,0.5,0.3,0.8,0.4,0.7}(2x3)
5. Find the cardinality for the matrices R={1,4,6,7}(2x2) S={5,2,3,7}(2x2)

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Analyze
1. Differentiate between learning and training algorithms considering multilayer perceptron network and
trace the different types of networks obtained
2. Differentiate between Counter Propagation Network and Adaptive Resonance Theory

Evaluate
1. Evaluate using Back Propagation algorithm for the below map considering weights , inputs and outputs

2. Evaluate the instance, that the 2 dimensional input vector X is presented to the three-neuron
ohonennetwork, x=[ 0.52 0.12]. The initial weight vectors, Wj are given by
W1=[0.27 , 0.81]
W2=[0.42 , 0.70]
W3=[0.43 , 0.21]
in a form of 2 X 1 matrix. Find the winning neuron using the Euclidean distance and apply kernel self-
organization map.State the differences between register machines and stack machine?

140
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CS007 IoT for Engineering Applications (Open Elective)


(Common to CH, CE, EE, EC, ME & PE)
3103
Course Outcomes
1. Understand the basic concepts of IoT
2. Summarize the structural knowledge of IoT
3. Explain M2M in the context of Internet of Things.
4. Describe the IoT Reference Architecture
5. Design the Internet of things systems for the given problem
6. Apply IoT for various engineering applications
COs–POs Mapping
COs PO1 PO5
1 3 3
2 3 3
3 3 3
4 3 3
5 3 3
6 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

UNIT I
Introduction and Fundamental IoT Mechanisms
What is the Internet of Things? : History of IoT, About IoT, Overview and Motivations, Examples of
Applications, Internet of Things Definitions and Frameworks : IoT Definitions, IoT Architecture, Identification
of IoT Objects and Services, Structural Aspects of the IoT, Environment Characteristics, Traffic Characteristics,
Scalability, Interoperability, Security and Privacy.
IOT paradigm-smart objects-Bits an atoms-goal orientation-RTLS+ GPS-agents+ Multi agent system
12+3 Hours
UNIT II
M2M to IoT
A Market Perspective– Introduction, Some Definitions, M2M Value Chains, IoT Value Chains, An emerging
industrial structure for IoT, The international driven global value chain and global information
monopolies. M2M to IoT-An Architectural Overview– Building an architecture, Main design principles and
needed capabilities, An IoT architecture outline, standards considerations.
Introduction to Atmega 8 /16 microcontroller- Architecture of the AVR Microcontroller-Pin description of the
microcontroller-I/O of the microcontroller-IR Sensors
11+4 Hours
Unit III
IoT Reference Architecture
Introduction, Functional View, Information View, Deployment and Operational View, Other Relevant
architectural views. Real-World Design Constraints- Introduction, Technical Design constraints-hardware is
popular again, Interaction and remote control. Industrial realizing the enterprise integrated Web of Things, IMC-
AESOP: from the Web of Things to the Cloud of Things, Commercial Building Automation- Introduction, Case
study: phase one-commercial building automation today, Case study.
Specification-Domain Model Specification-Information Model Specification-Service Specifications-IoT Level
Specification-Functional View 11+4
Hours

Unit VI
IoT for Business Applications
Internet of Things Application : IoT for Smart Grid ,City Automation, Automotive Applications, Home
Automation, Smart Cards , Process Monitoring / Automation, Sensor Technology, Raspberry- pi Interface,

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Smart Healthcare, Smart Transportation, M2M Communication, Smart Metering, Systems and Services
Integration, Hands-on training, Smart Waste Management System.
Sharing Sensor Data on Social Networks-Twitter-Facebook Connection App-Updation of Sensor Data on
Website / Blog
11+4 Hours
Total: 44+16 Hours

Textbook (s)
1. Jan Holler, Vlasios Tsiatsis, Catherine Mulligan, Stefan Avesand, Stamatis Karnouskos, David
Boyle, From Machine-to-Machine to the Internet of Things: Introduction to a New Age of
Intelligence, 1st Edition, Academic Press, 2014.
2. Daniel Minoli, Building the Internet of Things with IPv6 and MIPv6: The Evolving World of M2M
Communications, ISBN: 978-1-118-47347-4, Willy Publications, 2014
3. Bernd Scholz-Reiter, Florian Michahelles, Architecting the Internet of Things, ISBN 978-3- 642-
19156-5 e-ISBN 978-3-642-19157-2, Springer, 2016

Reference Book (s)


1. Parikshit N. Mahalle & Poonam N. Railkar, Identity Management for Internet of Things, River
Publishers, ISBN: 978-87-93102-90-3 (Hard Copy), 978-87-93102-91-0 (ebook), 2015

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 63 (%)
Remember 40 40 --
Understand 50 40 20
Apply 10 10 40
Analyze -- 10 30
Evaluate -- -- 10
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Write the major significance of Internet of Things.
2. State the crucial requirement f IoT in terms of application and its supporting natures.
3. List the dominant technologies behind IoT development.
4. Identify two major differences between Internet of Everything and Industrial IoT.
5. Write about the data-center based cloud tools that use to run the machine learning algorithm internally.
6. Recognizes an alternative approach that results in better adaptivity in case of network fluctuations and
increased latency.
7. Identify the on-demand processing and storage capabilities that is used to analyze the data generated by
IoT objects in batch or stream format.
Understand

1. Identify the evolutionary terms of Internet of Things (IoT) that use to interact and live with the physical
objects.
2. Illustrate the reference architecture of IoT that unifies the smart objects and human beings to provide
the ubiquitous communication
3. Illustrate the service-oriented architecture of IoT that ensures the interoperability among the
heterogeneous devices
4. Illustrate the API-Oriented Architecture of IoT that use SOAP and Remote Method Invocation (RMI)
as a means for describing, discovering, and calling services
5. Discuss the resource capacity, selecting and provisioning the resources that greatly impact Quality of
Service (QoS) of the IoT applications
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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

6. Classify the taxonomy of resource management activities of IoT.


7. Report the standard requirement of real time analytics to fulfill the demand of real-time stream
processing engine.
Apply
1. Interpret a study analysis on open-source prototyping platform for the industrial IoT.
2. Implement a suitable OPENIoT Architecture for IoT/Cloud Convergence that provides an abstract
presentation of the functional elements of architecture.
3. Sketch W3C SSN-XG ontology and how to semantically enable real time sensor feeds
4. Execute the two-tier data dissemination model for large-scale wireless sensor network
5. Demonstrate SPARQL query caching in order to improve the performance of semantic web
applications
6. Illustrations a technique to cluster semantically similar QA pairs for retrieving an answer for a newly
given query without asking the QA engine on the cloud side
Analyze
1. Comparative analysis on real-time analytics in Cloud-IoT and fog computing.
2. Compare the communication efficiencies for the following protocols such as AMPQ, CoAP, DDS,
MQTT, UPnP and XMPP in terms of Transport Layer Protocols.
3. Differentiate the major significances of nesC, keil C and Dynamic C.
4. Relate a set of minimal features to be fulfilled by the programming frameworks for IoT.
5. Comparative analysis on IoT programming approaches
Evaluate
1. Select an example that utilizes the device-collaboration framework for the proactive suggestion
application
2. Appraise a semantic QA cache that implement the device/cloud collaboration framework to compute
the probability of the on-device semantic QA cache to answer a given query correctly.
3. Select a suitable example that use automatically tagging recognized images to display the additional
information such as social sentiment in order to achieve similar performance improvement for speech-
recognition application with DL through device/cloud collaboration framework
4. Critique on fog-computing assisted distributed analytics system that uses a set of fall-detection
algorithms, including algorithms based on acceleration measurements and time-series analysis
methods, as well as filtering techniques to facilitate the fall-detection process

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH007 Industrial Safety and Hazard Management (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Demonstrate the safety and ethical issues that may arise from industrial processes
2. Explain industrial hygiene practices and its procedures
3. Illustrate the toxic pathways and elimination of toxicity on bio organisms
4. Understand hazards arising from runaway reactions, explosions and fires, and how to deal with them.
5. Choose a suitable method for prevention of fires and explosions
6. Evaluate the process and able to do Hazards Identification and risks Risk Assessment
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO6 PO8


1 2 2 1 3 3
2 1 2 1 3 3
3 3 2 3 1 1
4 3 1
5 3 3 3 2
6 3 3 3 3 2
7.

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Safety & Industrial Hygiene
Safety programs, Engineering ethics, Accident and Loss Statistics, Acceptable Risk, Public Perceptions, The
nature of the Accident Process, Inherent Safety, Government of India and OSHA regulations, Industrial
Hygiene, Identification, Evaluation & Control
Lethal dosage–Material Safety Data Sheets
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Toxicology, Fires and Explosions
how toxicants enter biological organisms, how toxicants are eliminated from biological organisms, effects of
toxicants on biological organisms The fire triangle, Distinction between fire and explosions, Definitions,
Flammability characteristics of liquids and vapors, MOC and inerting, ignition energy, Auto ignition, Auto
oxidation, Adiabatic compression, Explosions
Firefighting equipment–Personal protecting equipment–Building fire safety codes
11+3 Hours
Unit III
Designs to Prevent Fires and Explosions
Inerting, static electricity, controlling static electricity, explosion proof equipment and instruments, ventilation,
sprinkler systems, miscellaneous designs for preventing fires and explosions
Work permit–Earthling–Color codes for identification of process
10+4 Hours
Unit IV
Hazards Identification and Risk Assessment
Process hazards checklists, hazards surveys, hazards and operability studies, safety reviews, other methods.
Review of probability theory, event trees, fault trees, QRA and LOPA
Health and safety foundation–5S Practice–Emergency procedures
12+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. D. A. Crowl, J. F. Louvar, Chemical Process Safety: Fundamentals with Applications, 3 rd Ed., Prentice
Hall, 2011
2. Reese, Charles D. Industrial Safety and Health for People-oriented Services. CRC Press, 2008

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Reference (s)
1. H. H. Fawcett and W. S. Wood, Safety and Accident Prevention in Chemical Operations, John Wiley
and sons, 2nd Ed., New York, 1982
2. Hammer, Willie, and Dennis Price. Occupational safety management and engineering. Pearson College
Division, 2001
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 64(%)
Remember 20 20 --
Understand 30 20 --
Apply 30 20 35
Analyze 20 30 35
Evaluate -- 20 30
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define terms hazard and accidents
2. List three-step of accidents process?
3. Define terms LD and ED
4. List any four reversible effects that caused by toxic exposure
5. Define terms risk, loss prevention
Understand
1. Identify the initiation, propagation, and termination steps for motor accident
2. Explain about how toxicants enter biological organisms
3. Explain the key responsibilities‘ of professional engineers
4. Explain the inherent safety techniques that are used in the chemical industry
5. Explain how toxicants are eliminated from biological organisms
6. List the ingredients of safety program for outstanding safety program

Apply
1. An employee works in a plant with a FAR of 4. If this employee works a 4-hr shift, 200 days per year,
what are the expected deaths per person per year?
2. Air contains 5 ppm of diethylamide (TLV-TWA of 5 ppm), 20 ppm of cyclohexanol (TLV-TWA of 50
ppm), and 10 ppm of propylene oxide (TLV-TWA of 2 ppm). What is the mixture TLV-TWA and has
this level been exceeded?
3. The following accident report has been filed. Failure of a threaded 1½″ drain connection on a rich oil
line at the base of an absorber tower in a large (1.35 MCF/D) gas producing plant allowed the release
of rich oil and gas at 850 psi and –40°F. The resulting vapor cloud probably ignited from the ignition
system of engine driven re compressors. The 75′ high × 10′ diameter absorber tower eventually
collapsed across the pipe rack and on two exchanger trains. Breaking pipelines added more fuel to the
fire. Severe flame impingement on an 11,000-horsepower gas turbine–driven compressor, waste heat
recovery, and super-heater train resulted in its near total destruction. Identify the initiation,
propagation, and termination steps for this accident
4. A process has a reported FAR of 2. If an employee works a standard 8-hr shift 300 days per year,
compute the deaths per person per year
Analyze
1. Can gate valves be placed between a vessel relief and its vessel
2. Liquid levels in storage tanks are frequently determined by measuring the pressure at the bottom of the
tank. In one such tank the material stored in the tank was changed and an overflow resulted. Why?
Evaluate
1. How to convert your kitchen in to XP area
2. Does LOPA really replace 90% of the QRA?

64
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

145
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16IT005 Fundamentals of Cloud Computing (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Interpret the main concepts, key technologies, strengths, and limitations of cloud computing and the
possible applications for state-of-the-art cloud computing
2. Illustrate various problems and evaluate related cloud computing solutions.
3. Apply the architecture and infrastructure of cloud computing, including SaaS, PaaS, IaaS, public cloud,
private cloud and hybrid cloud to different problems.
4. Analyze cloud provider for a defined environment and to a specific platform in a cost effective way.
5. Analyze case studies to derive the best practice model to apply when developing and deploying cloud
based applications
6. Build a virtual machine with a machine image

COs–POs Mapping

COs PO2 PO5 PO6


1 3 2 1
2 3 2 1
3 3 2 1
4 2 2 2
5 3 2 1
6 2 2 1
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Understanding Cloud Computing
Cloud computing: Introduction, Cloud application architectures, Value of cloud computing, Cloud Infrastructure
models, Cloud Services, History of Cloud Computing, Advantages of Cloud Computing, Disadvantages of
Cloud Computing, Companies in the Cloud Today, Amazon Web Services, Windows Azure, Google services,
IBM Cloud
Before the move into the cloud- Know Your Software Licenses, The Shift to a Cloud Cost Model, Service
Levels for Cloud Applications Ready for the cloud: Web Application Design, Machine Image Design, Privacy
Design, Design, Database Management.
Tata Cloud- Salesforce.com
13+3 Hours
Unit II
Virtual Machines and Virtualization of Clusters and Data Centers
Implementation Levels of Virtualization, Virtualization Structures/Tools and Mechanisms, Virtualization of
CPU, Memory, and I/O Devices, Virtual Clusters and Resource Management, Virtualization for Data-Center
Automation Case Studies: Cloud centers in detail, Comparing approaches, Xen, Eucalyptus, Cloud Stack, and
Open Stack
VMware- KVM.
10+5 Hours
Unit III
Scaling of Cloud Infrastructure & Security
Capacity, Planning, Cloud Scale.Cloud Security-Data Security, Network Security, Host Security, Compromise
Response
Disaster Recovery-Disaster Recovery Planning, Disasters in cloud, Cloud Disaster Management.
Requirements for modern data centers- high availability and Service Orientated Infrastructures (SOI)- Modern
data centre use case studies.
10+3 Hours
Unit IV
Cloud Computing Software Security Fundamentals
Cloud information Security Objectives, Cloud Security Services, Relevant Cloud Security Design Principles,
Secure Cloud Software Requirements, Approaches to Cloud Software Requirements Engineering, Cloud

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Security Policy Implementation. Cloud Computing Risk Issues: The CIA Triad, Privacy and Compliance Risks,
Threats to Infrastructure Data and Access Control, Cloud Access Control Issues, Cloud Service Provider Risks.
Security concepts-Confidentiality-privacy-integrity-authentication-non-repudiation-availabilit- access control-
defence in depth- least privilege
12+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. George Reese, Cloud Application Architectures, 1st Edition O‘Reilly Media, 2009
2. Ronald L.Krutz and Russell Dean Vines, Cloud Security, 1 st Edition, Wiley Publishing, 2010

Reference (s)
1. Michael Miller, Cloud Computing-Web Based Applications that change the way you work and
collaborate online, 1st Edition, Pearson Education, Publishing, 2011
2. Kai Hwang, Geoffrey C Fox and Jack J. Dongarra, Distributed & Cloud Computing from Parallel
Processing to the Internet of Things, 1st Edition, MK Publishing, 2010
3. David S Linthicum, Cloud Computing and SOA Convergence in Your Enterprise: A Step-by-Step
Guide, 1st Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2009

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test65 (%)
Remember 40 45 --
Understand 40 45 --
Apply 20 10 80
Analyze -- -- 20
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define Cloud Computing
2. List types of virtualization
3. Define proactive scaling
4. What is CIA Triad?

Understand
1. Explain different cloud Infrastructure models
2. Explain different levels of virtualization
3. Explain about cloud Network security in detail?
4. Explain about Recovery Point Objective.

Apply
1. Explain any IaaS service provided by Amazon
2. What is cloud Stack?
3. How disaster recovery planning can be done
4. How Web Application Design is used in designing cloud applications

Analyze
1. Compare cloud center and service infrastructure.
2. Analyze different cloud services provided by Amazon
3. With neat diagram explain the functioning of Xen Architecture.
4. List and explain various cloud service providers risks.

65
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills Pertaining to this course

147
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16PE007 Smart Grid Technology (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Compare the basic difference between existing grid and smart grid
2. Explain perfect power system network (Including distributed and fully integrated systems)
3. Explain the importance of renewable energy systems and distributed energy resources in smart grids
4. Summarize the wide area monitoring system and advanced measuring technologies
5. Recall the technologies like Zigbee, HAN and NAN in smart grids
6. Explain SCADA technology in modern power systems and to analyze the micro grid systems
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO3 PO5


1 2 2
2 3 3
3 3 3
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked| 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to the Smart Grids
Introduction to smart grid- Electricity network-Local energy networks- General considerations for a smart grid,
characteristics of smart grids, elements in smart grids.
Electric transportation- Low carbon central generation-Attributes of the smart grid- Alternate views of a smart
grid.
Smart grid to evolve a perfect power system: Introduction- Overview of the perfect power system
configurations- Device level power system- Building integrated power systems- Distributed power systems-
Fully integrated power system-Nodes of innovation.
Present status of smart grids in India
14+4 Hours
Unit II
Smart Electric Grid & Measurement Technologies
Smart electric grid: generation- Distributed energy resources: Renewable energy, energy storage, solar energy,
wind energy, biomass, hydro power, geothermal and fuel cell, effect of electric vehicles(EV‘s) , transmission,
distribution, and end-user; Basic concepts of power, load models, load flow analysis
Measurement Technologies: Wide area monitoring system (WAMS), advanced metering infrastructure (AMI),
phasor measurement units.
Functioning of PMU
12+3 Hours
Unit III
Communication & Networking Technology
Architectures, standards and adaptation of power line communication (PLC), zigbee, GSM, GPS, GIS, machine
to-machine communication models for the smart grid; Home area networks (HAN) and neighborhood area
networks (NAN)
Machine to human communication system
11+3 Hours
Unit IV
Energy Management in Smart grids
Aspects of energy management in the smart grid; SCADA; micro grids; demonstration projects; case studies.
Policy and economic drives of the smart grid; environmental implications; sustainability issues of smart grid
systems.
Environmental issues related to smart grid systems
10+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

148
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Text Book(s)
1. Clark W Gellings, ―The Smart Grid, Enabling Energy Efficiency and Demand Side Response‖- CRC
Press, 2012
2. Janaka Ekanayake, Kithsiri Liyanage,Jianzhong.Wu, Akihiko Yokoyama, Nick Jenkins, ―Smart Grid:
Technology and Applications‖- Wiley, 2012
Reference(s)
1. A. Keyhani, Smart Power Grid Renewable Energy Systems, Wiley 2011
2. James Momoh, Smart Grid :Fundamentals of Design and Analysis, Wiley, IEEE Press, 2012
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test66 (%)
Remember 10 10 ---
Understand 50 50 --
Apply 40 40 55
Analyze -- -- 45
Evaluate --- --- ---
Create --- --- ---
Total (%) 100 100 100
Remember
1. Define smart grid system
2. Write about self healing capability
3. List out four basic characteristics of smart grid system
4. Write about resiliency to disturbances
5. Write down the basic elements of smart grid system
6. Write about smart meters
7. Write down the generation options which are possible in smart grid system
8. Write about the functions of smart grids
9. Write down the attributes of smart grid system
10. Write about smart home energy management system
Understand
1. Illustrate the advanced power system network
2. Draw the block diagram of smart grid system
3. Explain the self healing property of smart grid system
4. Explain about self healing capability technology in smart grid systems
5. Explain the self healing property of smart grid system
6. Explain about the smart homes
7. Explain the energy storage system in smart grids
8. Explain about outage management system
Apply
1. Construction of modern power system network with the help of basic characteristics
2. Choose the best renewable energy source based on the environmental conditions
3. Execute the smart home with the smart grid elements
4. Develop a smart hybrid electric vehicle with efficient battery system
5. Compute micro grid system with dc loads
6. Find the net power injected in the bus i for a two bus system
Analyze
1. Differentiate between traditional and modern grid
2. Identify the reasons for failure of existing grid
3. Justify the need of AMI in smart grids
4. Compare the operation of micro grid and smart grid systems
5. Identify WAMS in smart grids
66
Assignment Test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills

149
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16MA001 Computational Mathematics (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Apply the knowledge of finding roots of nonlinear equations and different errors in series
approximations
2. Understand the consistency and inconsistency of linear system of equations
3. Evaluate the solution of Initial and Boundary value problems
4. Perform numerical differentiation and integration
5. Analyze the solution of PDEs under given conditions
6. Apply Knowledge of numerical techniques to Engineering problems
COs–POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2


1 3 2
2 3 2
3 2 3
4 2 2
5 3 3
6 3 3

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Errors in numerical calculations and Solutions of algebraic and transcendental equations

Absolute, relative and percentage errors, a general error formula, errors in a series approximation
Locating Roots of Equations with one variable : Secant method, Muller‘s method
Solution of nonlinear equations - Introduction, Iteration method, Newton-Raphson method
Develop MATLAB code for Bisection method, Newton-Raphson method and for the above methods
12 + 3 Hours
Unit II
Solution of Linear Systems and Interpolation

Direct methods -LU Decomposition, Iterative methods –Jacobi method, Gauss-Seidel method
Interpolating polynomials using finite differences- Bessel interpolation, Piecewise and spline interpolation -
Piecewise Linear interpolation, Quadratic spline interpolation
Develop MATLAB code for the above methods
11 + 4 Hours
Unit III
Numerical Integration and BVP (ODE)

Newton-Cotes methods (Weddle‘s rule)


Solution of BVP - Finite difference method, shooting method, the cubic spline method
Develop MATLAB code for Trapezoidal, Simpson’s 1/3 & 3/8 rules and for the above methods
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Numerical solutions of PDEs

Introduction, Finite difference approximations to derivatives, Solutions of Laplace & Poisson equations using
Jacobi‘s, Gauss-Seidel & SOR methods. Solution of parabolic equation using -Bender-Schmidt & Crank-
Nicolson methods. Solution of hyperbolic equation
Develop MATLAB code for the above methods
11 + 4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

150
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook(s)
1. M. K. Jain, S.R.K. Iyengar, R.K. Jain, Numerical methods for Scientific and Engineering Computation,
4th edition, New Age International publishers, New Delhi(
2. S. S. Sastry, Introductory methods of numerical analysis, 4 th Edition, PHI
3. B. S. Grewal, Higher Engineering Mathematics, 42nd edition, Khanna publishers, New
Delhi
Reference(s)
1. S. C. Chapra & R. P. Canale, Numerical Methods for Engineers, 6th Edition, McGraw Hill(2012)
2. Cleve Moler, Numerical Computing with MATLAB, SIAM.

Sample Question (s)


Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 67(%)
Remember 30 30 -
Understand 45 40 -
Apply 20 25 40
Analyze 5 5 30
Evaluate - - -
Create - - 30
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. List out different Errors in Numerical calculations


2. List the three numerical methods to solve Algebraic and Transcendental equations
3. Define initial and boundary value problem for Ordinary differential equations
4. List the numerical methods in solving Laplace‘s, partial differential equations i.e. Parabolic and
hyperbolic

Understand

1. Summarize the Absolute, relative and percentage Errors


2. Illustrate the procedure for Newton-Raphson method for finding root of an algebraic equation
3. Explain the mechanism involved in LU decomposition method in solving linear systems
4. Explain spline interpolation formula

Apply

1. Given𝑓 , construct the Taylor series approximations of orders 0 to 7 at and state their
absolute errors.
2. Apply Newton-Raphson method to find a root of the equation .
3. Given the set of data points (1,-8), (2,-1) and (3, 18) satisfying the function 𝑓 , find the linear
splines satisfying the given data. Determine the approximate values of y(2.5) and ̇
4. Apply Gauss-Seidel‘s method to solve Laplace equation for the region given in the figure

67
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

151
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Analyze

1. Compare the roots obtained from Secant method, Muller‘s methods and explain which method is
preferable
2. Analyze the physical significance of spline‘s interpolation formula
3. Differentiate shooting and cubic splines methods for numerical integration.
4. Analyze the platform for the application of Laplace Equation

152
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CY001 Nano Science and Technology (Open Elective)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Apply various chemical and physical methods for the synthesis of nanomaterials
2. Understand the properties of nano-materials and their applications in relation to bulk materials
3. Describe the nano size effect on optical, electrical, magnetic and thermal properties
4. Characterize nano materials by powder XRD and microscopy techniques.
5. Understand structure, properties and applications of Fullerenes and Carbon nanotubes.
6. Review the applications of nanomaterials, specially semiconducting metal oxides for sensing and
catalysis

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO12

1 3 2
2 3 2
3 3 2
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Nanomaterials
Introduction to nanomaterials and nanotechnology, Nano-sizes and their unique properties: comparison with the
bulk materials, Different shapes sizes and morphology of nanomaterials; Defects in nanocrystalline materials,
Effect of grain size on physical properties – magnetic, electrical, optical and thermal properties.
11 + 3 Hours
Unit II
Fabrication of Nanomaterials
Top Down Approaches: Grinding, Planetory milling and comparison of particles; Bottom Up Approach: Wet
Chemical Synthesis - Microemulsion Approach, Colloidal Nanoparticles Production, Sol Gel Methods,
Sonochemical Approach, Microwave and Atomization; Gas phase Production Methods - Chemical Vapour
Depositions; Carbon Nano structures: carbon molecules, carbon clusters, carbon nano tubes- synthesis,
formation.
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Characterization of Nanomaterials
Fractionation principles of particle size measurements, Particle size and its distribution, powder X-ray
Diffraction, Zeta potential, Electronic band structure Electron statistics Application: Optical transitions in solids,
photonic crystals, Microscopies: Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic
Forced Microscopy, Scanning and Tunneling Microscopy.
11 + 4 Hours
Unit IV
Applications of Nanomaterials
Self-assembly and molecular manufacturing, Surfactant based system Colloidal system applications, Functional
materials Applications: Single walled and multi walled CNTs, quantum dots, GaN wires, TiO 2 and ZnO nano
crystalline materials, Nanosensors based on optical properties.
11 + 4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours

153
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook(s)
1. B. S. Murthy, P. Shankar, Baldev Raj, B.B. Rath, Ames Murday, Text book of Nanoscience and
Nanotechnology, published by Springer & Universities Press (India) Pvt. Ltd.
2. Sulabha K. Kulkarni, Nanotechnology: Principles & Practices, Springer
3. Nils O. Petersen, Foundations for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CRC Press, 2017.

Reference(s)
1. Stuart M. Lindsay, Introduction to Nanoscience, Oxford University Press, 2009.
2. Robert Kelsall, Ian Hamley, Mark Geoghegan, Nanoscale Science and Technology, John Wiley &
Sons, 2005.
3. Gabor L. Hornyak , H.F. Tibbals , Joydeep Dutta, John J. Moore Introduction to Nanoscience and
Nanotechnology CRC Press
4. Davies, J.H. The Physics of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: An Introduction, Cambridge
University Press, 1998

Internal Assessment Pattern


Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 68(%)
Remember 30 30 -
Understand 40 40 -
Apply 30 30 80
Analyze - - 20
Evaluate -- - -
Create -- - -
Total (%) 100 100 100

Sample Question (s)


Remember
1. Define a nanomaterial. List any four naturally occurring/synthetically prepared nanomaterils used in
daily life.
2. Differentiate between nano materials & bulk materials in terms of physical properties.
3. List two methods of preparing nanomaterials in bottom up approach & top down approach.

Understand
1. Explain the sol-gel method of preparing nano materials. What kind of materials can be prepared by this
method in nano form.
2. How will the electrical, magnetic & optical properties vary for nano amterials compared to bulk.
Explain with an example for each.
3. What are the various carbon nano materials available? Describe one methos of producing Carbon nano
tubes.

Apply
1. How is SEM used for characterization of nano materials? Describe the principle and working of
instrument.
4. Based on the optical properties of Nano TiO2 and ZnO, describe the design & construction of nano
sensors.
5. Describe the functions and applications of Carbon nano tubes and gaN nano wires.

Analyze

1. How is the size of nanomaterials characterized? Assess the advantage of using SEM & TEM instead of
powder XRD for size of particle, grain size characterization.
2. For a semiconductor, as the materials is sized down to nano, the electronic band structure is found to
vary from bulk material. Explain the changes in electronic band structure for a direct band gap
material.
3. Calculate the changes in surface to volume ratio (S/V ratio) for a particle of 1 micrometer cube divided
into 10 nanometer cubes by top down approaches. Comment on its impact in catalysis

68
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

154
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH008 Biochemical Engineering (Elective IV)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Illustrate the different cells and their use in biochemical processes
2. Explain the role of enzymes in kinetic analysis of biochemical reaction
3. Demonstrate the role of enzyme immobilization
4. Apply the basic concepts of thermodynamics, mass and energy balances, reaction kinetics and reactor
design for biochemical processes
5. Analyze bioreactors, upstream and downstream processes in production of bio-products
6. Demonstrate the fermentation process and its products for the latest industrial revolution
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO 2 PO 3 PO 13
1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 3 2 3 3
4 3 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to microbiology and biochemistry: Classification and characteristics of microorganism,
Essential chemicals of life - Lipids, sugars and polysaccharides, RNA and DNA, amino acids and proteins.
Introduction to metabolic pathways – EMP Pathway and TCA Cycle, biosynthesis, end products of
metabolism, stoichiometry of cell growth and product formation.
Calvin Cycle–Electron Transport and photophosphorylition 11 + 4 Hours

Unit II
Kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reaction: Enzyme substrate complex and enzyme action, simple enzyme kinetics
with one and two substrates, modulation and regulation of enzyme activity, effects of other parameters on
enzyme activity.
Immobilized enzyme technology: Applications of Enzyme immobilization in industrial processes, Immobilized
enzyme kinetics: effect of external mass transfer resistance, analysis of intra-particle diffusion and reaction.
Medical and Analytical Applications of Immobilized enzymes 12 + 4 Hours

Unit III
Kinetics of cellular growth and analysis of bioreactors – Growth phases, yield coefficient, Monod growth
kinetics, ideal bioreactors – batch – fed-batch - mixed flow - CSTR reactors with recycle and cell growth, plug
flow reactors and their analyses.
Transport phenomena in bioprocess systems: Transport across cell membranes (Active, passive and
facilitated diffusion), Gas-liquid mass transfer in cellular systems, determination of oxygen transfer rates,
overall kLa‘ estimates.
Growth of Filamentous Organisms–Thermal Death kinetics of Cells &Spores 11 + 3 Hours

Unit IV
Fermentation technology: Medium formulation, design and operation of a typical aseptic, aerobic fermentation
process, sterilization of reactors, medium and gases.
Downstream processing: Strategies to recover and purify products; cell disruption-mechanical and non-
mechanical methods; membrane separation (dialysis, ultra filtration and reverse osmosis), chromatographic
techniques, important industrial bio-products – ethanol, penicillin, citric acid, and acetic acid.
Alternative Bio-Reactor Configurations–Single Cell Proteins 11 + 4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

155
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook(s)
1. J.E.Bailey, D.F.Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2 nded., McGraw Hill,1986.
2. Michael L. Shuler, F. Kargi, Bioprocess Engineering, 2 nded., Prentice Hall, 2002.

Reference(s)
1. P.M. Doran, Bioprocess engineering principles, 2nded., Academic Press, 2012.
2. H.W. Blanch, D.S. Clark, Biochemical Engineering, 2 nd ed., Marcel Dekker, 1997.

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test69(%)
Remember 30 20 --
Understand 40 30 50
Apply 30 50 50
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define microbiology and list important cell types.


2. List the factors influencing enzyme activity.
3. Give the different types of ideal reactors used.
4. Define downstream processing.
Understand

1. Differentiate Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells and give an example for each.
2. Explain how Michaelis-Menten parameters are estimated.
3. Describe the various growth phases of batch cultivation and elucidate the different perspectives of cell
population.
4. Explain the production of penicillin with a neat flow diagram.
Apply

1. A competitive inhibition reaction has the following values. [S] = 3.6 × 10 −4 M, Km = 2.7 × 10−3 M and
Ki = 3.1 × 10−5 M. Calculate how much of inhibitor is needed for a 65% inhibition.
2. An enzyme with a Km of 1×10−3 M was assayed using initial substrate concentration of 3×10 −3 M. After
2 min, 5 percent of the substrate was converted. How much substrate will be converted after 10, 30 and
60 min?
3. E.coli is cultivated in continuous culture under aerobic conditions with a glucose limitation. When the
system is operated at D = 0.2 hr−1, determine the effluent glucose and biomass concentrations by using
the Monod equation (S0 = 5 g/L), μmax = 0.25 hr−1, and Ks = 100 mg/L.
4. Suppose you have a microorganism that obeys the Monod equation, where μ max = 0.7 hr-1 and Ks = 5
g/L. The cell yield (YX/S) is 0.65. You want to cultivate this microorganism in one CSTR. The flow rate
and the substrate concentration of the inlet stream should be 500 L/h and 85 g/L, respectively. The
substrate concentration of the outlet stream must be 5g/L. What should be the size of the fermenter?
What is the cell concentration of the outlet stream?

69
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

156
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH009 Clean Process Technology (Elective IV)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Summarize the concept of environmental sustainability, and the difference between pollution
prevention vs. pollution control
2. Explain the concept of industrial ecology and its benefit
3. Describe cleaner production activities and its benefit
4. Describe the function of process internal solutions to minimize air pollution emissions (flue gas
pollutants and VOC) and emissions through waste water discharges
5. Explain the function of different process external methods to minimize pollutions to air or water.
6. Identify robust cleaner production procedures for the older and modern industries

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 1 3 1 3
2 3 3 3 3
3 3 3 3 3
4 3 3 3 3
5 3 3 3 3
6 3 3 3 1
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Issues Concerning Energy and Environment
Industrial and commercial sector development and related energy and environmental issues, Global
environmental issues including global energy issues, global warming, and ozone depletion, air and water quality
issues, Overview of environmental sustainability, Introduction to life-cycle assessment
Demand–Alternate energy–Pollution–Quality standards–BIS
11 + 3 Hours
Unit II
Strategies for Cleaner Technologies
Pollution prevention vs. pollution control, Principles of pollution prevention and cleaner production, approaches
and means of pollution prevention, Introduction to methods and tools for cleaner production, reuse, recycle,
recovery, source reduction, raw material substitution, toxic use reduction and process modifications, Pollution
prevention in material selection for unit operations, Pollution prevention for chemical reactors, Pollution
prevention for separation devices, Pollution prevention in storage tanks, pollution prevention assessment
integrated with HAZOP analysis
Design modifications–Health &Safety
12+4 Hours
Unit III
Mitigation of Air and Water Pollution
Air pollution control and gas cleaning technology, Process internal solutions (process changes, raw material
changes) and external solutions (gas treatment) in order to minimize air pollution (both gaseous compounds and
particles)Waste water treatment, Process internal solutions (process changes, raw material changes) and external
solutions (different methods to treat waste water) in order to minimize water pollution
Compact design–Robust technology–Process intensification–Standards
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Industrial Ecology and Bio-Engineering
Basic concept of industrial ecology and eco-industrial parks, Case studies on industrial applications of cleaner
technologies in various industries including chemical, metallurgical, pulp and paper, textile, dairy, cement and
other.
Industrial networks–Bio-based technologies–Energy minimization
11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

157
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. Pl. L. Bishop, Pollution Prevention: Fundamentals and Practice, McGraw Hill, 1 stEd., 2000
2. D.T. Allen, D.R. Shonnard, Green Engineering: Environmentally Conscious Design of Chemical
Processes, Prentice-Hall Inc., 3rdEd., 2002
3. N.L Nemerow, Zero Pollution for Industry: Waste Minimization through Industrial Complexes, John
Wiley & Sons, 1995
Reference (s)
1. T.E.Graedel, B.R.Allenby, Industrial Ecology and Sustainable Engineering, PHI Publishers, 1 st Ed.,
2009
2. John Durkee, Management of Industrial Cleaning Technology and Processes, 1st Ed., Elsevier
Science 2006
3. Ron Pernick & Clint Wilder, The Clean Tech Revolution: The Next Big Growth and Investment
Opportunity HarperBusiness; 2007
4. Kamelia Boodhoo & Adam Harvey, Process Intensification Technologies for Green Chemistry:
Engineering Solutions for Sustainable Chemical Processing 1st Edition Wiley; 2013

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test70(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 40 60 100
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define global warming


2. List the gases contribute to greenhouse effect
3. Define lifecycle assessment
4. Define industrial ecology

Understand

1. Explain the role of industrial ecology in cleaner process industries


2. How eco-industrial parks contribute to cleaner production
3. Explain the internal and external process solutions that involved in clean production

Apply

1. How material selection reduce the waste in process industries


2. Explain different methods applied in pollution prevention at chemical reactors
3. Explain the role of process change in cleaner production
4. Explain how electric transportation reduce pollution
5. With neat sketch of flow diagram explain the various sources and water conservation alternatives in
pulp and paper industry

70
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

158
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH010 Novel Separation Techniques (Elective IV)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain different types of adsorptive separations and derive the equations for the same
2. Design the chromatographic columns
3. Classify and illustrate the pressure and concentration driven membrane processes
4. Illustrate the concepts of surfactant based separations
5. Examine physico-chemical aspects and applications of Super critical fluid extraction
6. Explain the applicability of electric, magnetic and centrifugal separation processes for practical
situations

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO3 PO7 PO13


1 1 1 3 3
2 1 3 2 3
3 1 1 3 2
4 1 1 2 2
5 1 1 2 3
6 1 1 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Adsorption & Chromatography
Adsorptive separations: Review of fundamentals, Mathematical modeling of column factors, Pressure swing &
thermal swing adsorption, Counter current separations
Chromatography: Chromatography fundamentals, Different types, Gradient & affinity chromatography, Design
Calculations for chromatographic columns
Ion Exchange in Adsorption &Chromotography
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Membrane Separation Processes
Membrane separation processes: Thermodynamic considerations, Mass transfer considerations, Design of RO &
UF, Ion selective membranes, Micro filtration, Electro dialysis, Pervaporation, Gaseous separations.
Nano Filtration–Membrane Modules
12+3 Hours
Unit III
Surfactant Based & Super Critical Separations
Surfactant based separations: Fundamentals. Surfactants at inter phases and in bulk, Liquid membrane
permeation, Foam separations, Micellar separations
Super critical fluid extraction: Thermodynamics and physicochemical principles, Process description,
Application, Case study
Design of Cloud Point Extractor–Extraction from natural products by SFE
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
External Field Induced Separations
External field induced separations: Electric & magnetic field separations, Centrifugal separations and
calculations, Other Separations: Separation by thermal diffusion, electrophoresis and crystallization
Preparation Smiconductors
10+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. R.W.Rousseu, Handbook of Separation Process Technology,4th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1987

159
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

2. J.D.Seader, Separation Process Principles,3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2010
3. Humphrey, Jimmy L. Separation process technology. McGraw-Hill, 1997

Reference (s)
1. K.Othmer, Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, 5th Ed., Wiley, 2007
2. P.C.Wankat, Rate Controlled Separations, Springer (SIE), New Delhi, 2005
3. P. C.Wankat, Large Scale Adsorption Chromatography, CRC Press, Volume 1 & 2, 1986
4. S. Sourirajan, T.Matsura, Reverse Osmosis and Ultra Filtration Process Principles, NRC Publication,
Ottawa, 1985
5. M.A.McHugh and V.J.Krukonis,2nded., Supercritical Fluid Extraction, Butterworth, 1985
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern

Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test71(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 50
Apply 40 60 50
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define the most useful separation techniques such as GC and HPLC


2. Define and describe the most important parameters in the chromatograms resulted from the separation
technique
3. Enlist three drawbacks of membrane processes
4. Define the terms of permeate, retentate and rejection.
5. Define the term of critical Micellar concentration
6. Define the term Cloud point extraction for surfactant based separation processes
7. Name three industrial applications of Reverse osmosis

Understand

1. Explain electrodialysis process with industrial applications


2. Explain the solution diffusion model for Reverse Osmosis transport
3. Explain the basic principle and working procedure of High performance liquid chromatography
4. Explain the basic fundamentals of Surfactant based separations
Apply

1. A cellulose triacetate membrane is being used for reverse osmosis of a saline water solution containing
predominantly NaCl at 27 oC. The concentration of NaCl in the feed solution is 2500 ppm and its
density is 999 kg/m3.Water permeability constant is 4.79 x 10-4 kg/m2.sec.atm and solute permeability
constant is 4.38 x 10-7 m/sec.Calculate the water flux, solute flux and solute rejection. Data: Osmotic
pressure difference is 1.89 atm, applied pressure difference is 28.5 atm, concentration of solvent in
permeate stream 997 kg/m3, use following relation for calculation of B ( B = Aw/AsxCw2).Develop a
mathematical model for single-component vaporizer considering both liquid and vapour are in dynamic
state. State the parameters and other assumptions taken clearly.

71
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

160
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16ME017 Computational Fluid Dynamics (Elective IV)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Define the basic principles of mathematics and numerical concepts of fluid dynamics.
2. Develop governing equations for a given fluid flow system
3. Adapt finite difference techniques for fluid flow models
4. Apply finite difference method for heat transfer problems
5. Solve computational fluid flow problems using finite volume techniques
6. Analyze complex fluid-flow systems using available modern CFD software‘s

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO3 PO4 PO5 PO13


1 - - - 3
2 2 2 - 3
3 2 3 3 3
4 2 3 3 3
5 2 3 3 2
6 2 3 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Governing Equations for Basic Fluid Flow
Introduction to CFD, Basic Philosophy of CFD, Governing equations of fluid dynamics (Mass Equation),
Governing equations of fluid dynamics (Newton‘s Equation), Governing equations of fluid dynamics (Energy
Equation), Incompressible Inviscid flows sources, Vortex flow model.
Gas & liquid dynamics–Analogies–Basic mathematics–modeling–Simulation
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Implementation of Finite Difference Techniques in Fluid Flow
Transformations and Grids, McCormack's method, finite differences, discretization, consistency, stability,
fundamentals of fluid flow modeling, elementary finite difference quotients, implementation aspects of finite
difference equations.
Study zone–Three Dimensional study–Fluid characteristics–Boundary conditions
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Application of Finite Difference Technique in Heat Transfer
Finite difference applications in heat conduction and convection-Heat conduction: steady heat conduction in a
rectangular geometry, transient heat conduction, finite difference application in convective heat transfer.
Modes of heat transfer–Governing equation–Assumptions–Effectiveness
11+3 Hours
Unit IV
Finite Volume Methods & Overview on Commercial Packages
Introduction of finite volume methods in computational fluid dynamics, Approximation of surface integrals,
volume integrals, interpolation and differentiation practices, FCM – Like finite volume methods, Cell Centered
formulation, LAX- Wendroff time stepping, Aspects of CFD computations with commercial packages Like ZN
Tutor and Fluent.
Softwares–License–Freeware–Packages–Post Processing
11+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. J. F. Wendt, J. D. Anderson, Computational Fluid Dynamics: An Introduction,3rd Ed., Springer, 2009
2. K.Muralidhar, T.Sundarajan, Computational Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer,2 ndEd., Narosa Publishing
House, 2011

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reference (s)
1. S.V. Patankar, Numerical Heat Transfer and Fluid flow, Taylor & Francis, 1st Ed., 1980
2. J. D. Anderson, Computational Fluid Dynamics–The Basics with Applications, McGraw–Hill, New
York, 1995
3. Niyogi, Computational Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer, Pearson Publications, 2 nd Ed., 2009

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test72(%)
Remember 25 15 10
Understand 35 25 20
Apply 20 25 25
Analyze 20 25 25
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100
Remember
1. Give a brief summary on the governing equations in both conservation and non-conservation form for
fluid dynamics (Continuity, Momentum and Energy Equations)
2. Write a short note on well posed problem
3. Mention various CFD related software tools based on preprocessing and post processing
4. List the widely used CFD commercial packages for 3D drawings
5. Recall the Finite Volume methodology in CFD

Understand
1. Explain the physical meaning of ⃗ by deriving suitable formula for the same

2. Derive an expression for the second-order central second difference for the derivative at grid
point (i, j).
3. What do you mean by truncation error and how would you attempt to reduce the same?
4. Illustrate cell centered formulation.
5. Why the Lax Wendroff time stepping method is most popular time integration method?

Apply
1. Obtain an expression in computational plane by applying below mentioned
transformation for a steady two dimensional flow by considering the continuity
equation as the governing equation which can accomplish grid
stretching
2. Among various ways of generating dissipation, obtain the simultaneous time & space discretization
using Lax-Wendroff Scheme
3. Discuss in detail the finite element interpolation in piecewise defined shape functions.

Analyze
1. How do you analyze the aptness of the solution obtained from a CFD solver. Also show a general step
by step procedure of solving a computational fluid dynamics problem using a commercial package with
a suitable example.
2. Analyze the appropriateness of CFD tool for both the aspects of design and research components
3. Formulate the concept of finite volume method while approximating surface integrals.
Evaluate
1. Assess why the Lax Wendroff time stepping method is one of the most popular time integration
method? Support your answer with an example
2. Judge the usefulness of FVM over other methods used in CFD
3. Evaluate the solution of the PDE, obtained through CFD tool, using any of the numerical methods

72
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

162
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH011 Corrosion Engineering (Elective V)

3103
Course Outcomes
1. Summarize the electrochemical, environmental and metallurgical behavior of corroding systems
2. Justify electrochemical and metallurgical aspects in combating eight forms of corrosion
3. Choose the suitable testing procedures for corroding systems
4. Select suitable materials and methods to combat corrosion
5. Explain the polarization and the passivation behavior of corroding systems
6. Predict the corrosion behavior

COs – POs Mapping


COs PO1 PO2 PO3
1 3 1 1
2 2 3 1
3 1 3 2
4 3 2 3
5 3 2 3
6 3 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction
Definitions of Corrosion - classification of corrosion, Passivity, EMF and Galvanic series, Galvanic and
electrolyticcells–Potential measurements, expression of corrosion rate, Basic theory of Eh – pH diagrams,
applications and limitations of Eh – pH diagrams, Cost of Corrosion, Metallurgical properties influencing
corrosion.
Passivity, Fe- H2O – O2 system, environmental effects 11 + 4 Hours

Unit II
Forms of Corrosion
Uniform attack, galvanic, crevice, pitting, Inter granular, selective leaching, erosion and stress corrosion –
Mechanisms and their prevention.
Hydrogen embrittlement 12 + 3 Hours

Unit III
Corrosion testing procedures & Protection against corrosion
Corrosion testing procedures-Introduction, Purpose of Testing, Steps involved in Corrosion testing, NACE test,
Huey and Streicher test for stainless steels, Slow stain rate test.
Protection against corrosion-Design-Wall thickness and Design rules, coatings and inhibitors – Cathodic
protection and Anodic protection.
Paint test, Seawater test, In vivo corrosion test (Field test)
11 + 4 Hours
Unit IV
Electrode kinetics &predicting corrosion behavior
Electrode kinetics-Exchange current density, Activation Polarization, Concentration Polarization, Combined
Polarization, Mixed potential theory, mixed electrodes, Passivity with modern aspects.
Predicting corrosion behavior-Effect of oxidizers, Velocity effects, galvanic coupling, Alloy evaluation.
Corrosion prevention-Anodic Protection and Noble-Metal Alloying

11 + 4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours

163
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. M. G. Fontana, Corrosion Engineering, 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1986
2. D. A. Jones, Principles and Prevention of Corrosion, 2 nd Ed., Prentice- Hall, N. J,1996
3. Ahmad, Zaki. Principles of corrosion engineering and corrosion control. Elsevier, 2006.

Reference (s)
1. Cicek, Volkan. Corrosion engineering. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.
2. H. H. Uhlig and R. W. Revie, Corrosion and Corrosion Control, Wiley,1985
3. P.Roberge,Handbook of Corrosion Engineering, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2000

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 73(%)
Remember 35 25 --
Understand 45 40 50
Apply 20 35 50
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define and classify corrosion.


2. Write the expression for electrode potential.
3. How can we prevent or reduce uniform attack.
4. A luggin capillary is commonly used in potential measurements and polarization studies. Comment on
its advantages.

Understand

1. Calculate the reversible potential for zinc in contact with ZnCl2 at 10-3.
2. Illustrate the mechanism involved in crevice corrosion.
3. Mention the design rules that must be followed for best corrosion resistance.
4. A steel tank is corroding at a constant current density of 0.1 mA/cm2. What is the corrosion rate in
mpy and in mm/y (Note that 40 mpy= 1 mm/y).

Apply

1. 24 g of zinc is solubilized in 1M acid solution. Using Faraday‘s law, calculate coulombs (Q) produced
in the anodic oxidation process.
2. What happens if an active-passive alloy such as stainless steel is maintained in the passive region
through an applied potential (or current) from a potentiostat?
3. A part to be coated is immersed in a solution of the metal to be plated and direct current is passed
between the part and another electrode. Name the process and explain with examples.
4. Which attack may occur in narrow band next to weld if exposed to corrosive environments?

Analyze

1. Outline the testing procedures to study crevice corrosion.


2. How do you test a specimen with regard to pitting?
3. In case of difference in concentration at the top and bottom of a scrubber, would there be any effect on
the corrosion of scrubber material. If so, to what extent?
4. In case of a cold worked component with certain parts still more severely cold worked, will
dezincification be selective.

73
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

164
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH012 Fluidization Engineering (Elective V)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain the concept of fluidization behavior
2. Summarize the fluidization concept in process industriesvizDrying and combustion
3. Compute pressure drop, bubble size, voidage, heat and mass transfer rates for the fluidized beds
4. Formulate suitable model equations for fluidized beds
5. Choosegas-solid fluidized bed reactors for given process
6. Use the heat and mass transfer concepts in fluidized bed

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3


1 3 2 1
2 3 2 3
3 3 3 3
4 3 2 2
5 3 2 3
6 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Concept and Applications of Fluidization
The phenomenon of fluidization, liquid like behaviour of a fluidized bed, Comparison with other contacting
methods, Advantages and disadvantages of fluidized beds, Industrial applications of fluidized beds, Coal
gasification, gasoline from other petroleum fractions, Gasoline from natural and synthesis gases, Heat exchange,
Coating of metal objects with plastics, Drying of solids, FCCU, Fluidized combustion of coal, incineration of
solid waste, Activation of carbon
Gasification of waste–Bio-fluidization 9+3 Hours
Unit II
Fluidization and Mapping of Regimes
Minimum fluidization velocity, Pressure drop vs. velocity diagram, effect of temperature and pressure on
fluidization, Geldart classification of particles, terminal velocity of particles, turbulent fluidization, pneumatic
transport of solids, fast fluidization, solid circulation systems, Mapping of regimes of fluidization, Bubbles in
dense bed, Single rising bubbles, Davidson model for gas flow at bubbles, Evaluation of models for gas flow at
bubbles
Voidage diagram 12 + 4 Hours

Unit III
Bubbling and Turbulent Fluidized Beds
Estimation of bed porosities, Physical models: simple two phase model, K-L model, Turbulent fluidized bed,
Fast fluidization pressure drop in turbulent and fast fluidization, Solids Movement, Mixing, Segregation and
staging, Vertical movement of solids, Horizontal movement of solids, Staging of fluidized beds
Applications of Bubbling fluidization 12 + 4 Hours

Unit IV
Heat and Mass Transfer in Fluidized Beds
Spouted bed, pressure drop-flow diagram, minimum spouting correlation and effect of various parameters on
spouting,Variables affecting heat transfer rate, heat transfer at the wall of containing vessel, heat transfer to
immersed tubes, models proposed by i) Wicke-Fetting, ii) Mickley and Fair Banks and iii) Levenspiel and
Walton, heat transfer in fixed and fluidized beds, definition and evaluation of mass transfer coefficient
Importance of heat and mass transfer in fluidized beds
12 + 4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

165
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. K. Kunii,O.Levenspiel, Fluidization Engineering,5 thEd., Butterworth-Heinemann Publisher, 1991
2. Gibilaro, L. G., Fluidization - Dynamics, Butterworth - Heinemann 2001.

Reference (s)
1. Rhodes, M., Introduction to Particle Technology, 2nd Ed., Wiley, 2008
2. D. Geldart, Gas Fluidization Technology, John Wiley Sons, 1986
3. L. S. Fan, Gas-Liquid-Solid Fluidization Engineering, Butterworths, 1989
4. M. Kwauk, Fluidization Idealized and Bubbleless with Applications, Science Press, 1992
5. Yang, Wen-ching, ed. Handbook of fluidization and fluid-particle systems. CRC press, 2003
6. Yates, J. G. Fundamentals of Fluidized-Bed Chemical Processes,Butterworth-Heinemann, 2013
7. Davidson, J. F., R. Clift and D. Harrison, Fluidization, 2nd Ed., Academic Press 1985
8. Jackson, R., The Dynamics of Fluidized Particles, Cambridge University Press, 2000

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 74(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 40 25 50
Analyze -- 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define fluidized Bed.
2. Write applications of fluidizrd bed.
3. Define FCCU.
4. What is Actvated carbon?
Understand

1. How temperature and pressure effect the fluidization?


2. Diffrentiate between turbulent fluidization and fast fluidization.
3. Discuss the Davidson model for gas flow at bubbles.
4. Explain the staging of fluized beds.
Apply

1. How the fluidized bed concept applicable in drying of solids? Explain in details.
2. Explain the industrial application of fluidized bed for producing gasoline from other petroleum
fraction.
3. With help of mathematical expressions explain gas interchange between bubble and emulsion phase.
4. In a fluidized bed, mixing is combined effort of plug flow and mixed flow mode- Explain.
Analyze
1. Constrast on the Mapping of regimes of fluidization
2. Compare between the simple two phase model, K-L model.
3. Differentiate between Vertical movement of solids and Horizontal movement of solids.
4. Justify the different variables affecting heat transfer rate in fluidized bed.
Evaluate
1. Determine the evaluation method for calculating the mass transfer coefficient of fluidized bed.
2. Judge the best method for evaluating the heat transfer in immersed tubes.
3. Choose the suitable one among the evaluation of models for gas flow at bubbles. Justify your answer.
4. Estimate the Bed porosityfor fluidized bed in K-L model.
74
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

166
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH013 Fuel Technology (Elective V)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain the various solid fuels available, its processing and storage
2. Illustrate the carbonization of coal and its by product recovery methods
3. Identify the liquid fuels and its purifications
4. Explain the various gaseous fuels, manufacturing and its properties
5. Summarize the Nuclear fuels and its applications
6. Enlist the componets, types and aplications of fuel cells

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2


1 1 2
2 2 3
3 3 3
4 3 3
5 3 3
6 1 2
7.

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Solid Fuels
Coal-Origin, Chemical composition, calorific value, Classifications, Characteristics & distribution of Indian
coals, Storage and spontaneous combustion of coal, Coal washing and blending, Pertrographic constituents of
coal, Carbonization of coal, manufacture and properties of metallurgical coke, recovery of by-products
Coke Oven Plant–Coal washeries in India
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Liquid Fuels
Origin and composition of crude oil, crude oil distillation and its products with special reference to gasoline,
Kerosene and diesel oil, cracking and reforming, Coaltar distillation Products, Shale oil, Properties of liquid
fuels
Byproducts from coaltar distillation–Other liquid fuels
9+3 Hours
Unit III
Gaseous Fuels & Alternative fuels
Natural gas, Coal gas, Coke oven and blast furnace gas, Manufacture of Water gas and producer gas,
Carburetted water gas, Hydrogen as fuel Bio fuels, Biomass conversion technologies, Introduction to Nuclear
fuels and nuclear reactors, moderators and structural materials
Advantages and disadvanatages of using gaseous fuel
12+4 Hours
Unit IV
Fuel Cell Technology-
Basic Structure of fuel cell, Critical Functions of Cell Components, Fuel Cell Stacking, Fuel Cell Types,
Demonstrations, and Status of fuel cells- Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, Alkaline Fuel Cell, Phosphoric Acid
Fuel Cell, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, Applications- Stationary Power Generation
Portable Applications, Automotive Applications
Nernst potential–Open circuit voltage
12+4 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours

167
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)

1. S.Sarkar, Fuels and Combustion, 3rd Ed.,CRC Press, 2010


2. S.P. Sharma, and M. Chander, Fuels and Combustion, Tata McGraw Hill, 1984
3. Hoogers, Gregor, ed. Fuel cell technology handbook. CRC press, 2002.

Reference (s)
1. J.S.S. Brame and J. G. King, Fuel: Solid, Liquid and Gaseous, 5 thEd., Edward Arnold Publisher, 1955
2. O. P. Gupta, Elements of Fuels, Furnaces and Refractories, 6 thEd.,Khanna Publishers, 2002
3. R. C. Gupta,Fuels, Furnaces and Refractories, Prentice-Hall of India Pvt.Ltd 2016
4. Fricke, Jochen, and Walter L. Borst. Essentials of Energy Technology: Sources, Transport, Storage,
Conservation. John Wiley & Sons, 2013
5. Handbook, Fuel Cell. "EG&G technical services." Inc., Albuquerque, NM, DOE/NETL-2004/1206
2004
6. Linden D. Handbook of batteries and fuel cells. New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1984

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 75(%)
Remember 25 25 20
Understand 35 25 20
Apply 40 50 60
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100
Remember
1. What is coal carbonization?
2. List out the various applications of the petroleum products.
3. Define gross & net calorific value.
4. Write the Dulong‘s formula?
5. How are fuels classified?
6. What is meant by proximate analysis?
7. What is meant by ultimate analysis
Understand
1. Explain the fractional distillation method of refining petroleum products with suitableSketches
2. Explain the significance of viscosity of liquid fuels with the support of numericalValues.
3. Explain the kinetics of solid and liquid fuels combustion
4. Distinguish between proximate and ultimate analysis?
5. How is coke superior to coal?
Apply
1. What areanti knock additives? Give examples
2. How are gaseous fuels superior to other fuels?
3. Explain how metallurgical coke is obtained by otto-Hoffmann by-product method.
4. Draw a schematic diagram of Orsat‘s apparatus and describe the analysis of flue gas.
5. Calculate the minimum volume of air required for the complete combustion of one litre of a gaseous
fuel containing the following composition by volume CO-23%, H2-12%, CH4-35, CO2-5%, N2-55%
and O2-2%.
6. A sample of coal was found to contain the following elements, C-81%, H-4%, O-2%, N-1% and the
remaining ash. Estimate the quantity of minimum air required for the complete combustion of 3kg of
coal sample.
7. Calculate the minimum quantity of air needed for the combustion of 1kg of coal which is 90% pure.
8. Calculate the gross calorific value of a coal sample having the following composition C=80%,H
=7%,O=3%,S=3.5%,N=2.5% and ash=4.4%.
9. Calculate the net Calorific value for a coal sample .Given that GCV=9650kcal/kg and H=8%.
75
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

168
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH014 Introduction to Nano-Technology (Elective V)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Define the mechanism for stabilization of nano particles
2. Summarize various methods to synthesize nanoparticles
3. Exemplify one dimensional nanostructure
4. Summarize the fabrication of organic or inorganic-organic materials
5. Summarize various methods to synthesizehybrid thin films
6. Formulatecarbon nanotubes

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2


1 3 --
2 3 2
3 2 1
4 3 2
5 3 2
6 3 2
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Nano-Technology and Nano-Structures
Introduction, Importance of Nano-technology, Emergence of Nano-Technology, Bottom-up and Top-down
approaches,challenges in Nano Technology–Zero Dimensional Nano-structures, Nano particles through
homogenous nucleation;Growth of nuclei, synthesis of metallic Nano particles, Nano particles through
heterogeneous, nucleation; Fundamentals of heterogeneous nucleation and synthesis of nano particles using
micro emulsions and Aerosol
Synthesis of semiconductor Nano particles–Epitaxial Core-Shell Nano particles
11+4 Hours
Unit II
One Dimensional Nano-Structures
Nano wires and nano rods, Spontaneous growth: Evaporation and condensation growth, vapor-liquid-solid
growth, stress induced recrystallization. Template based synthesis: Electrochemical deposition, Electro-phoretic
deposition, Electrospinning
Dissolution & Condensation growth–Template filling–Converting through chemical reactions
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Two Dimensional Nano-Structures
Fundamentals of film growth. Physical vapourDeposition(PVD): Evaporation molecular beam epitaxy (MBE),
Sputtering, Comparison of Evaporation and sputtering, Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD), CVD methods,
diamond films by CVD
Vaccum Science
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Thin Films and Carbon Fullerence&NanoTubes
Thin films, Atomic layer deposition (ALD), Electrochemical deposition (ECD), Sol-Gelfilms–SpecialNano
Materials–Carbon fullerness,formation, properties and applications, Carbon nano tubes: formation and
applications
Super lattice–Self Assembly–Langmuir–Blodgett Films
12+3 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours

169
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. G. Cao, Y. Wang, Nano structures and Nano materials: Synthesis, properties and applications, 2 ndEd.,
World Scientific, 2011
2. Murty, B. S., et al. Textbook of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Springer Science & Business Media,
2013.

Reference (s)
1. A.K.Bandyopadhyay, Nano Materials, 1stEd., New Age Publishers, 2007
2. T.Pradeep, Nano:The Essentials: Understanding Nanotechnology&Nanoscience, TMH, 2007
3. Schimmel, Thomas. Nanotechnology: An Introduction, 2ndEd., Wiley Online Library,2012
4. Fulekar, M. H. Nanotechnology: importance and applications. IK International Pvt Ltd, 2010
5. Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K. Introduction ToNanoscience And Nenotechnology. PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.,
2009.
6. Shah, M. A., and Tokeer Ahmad. Principles of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Alpha Science
International, 2010.
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 76(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 35 50
Apply 40 50 50
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State the challenges in nano technology.


2. State the advantages of electrochemical deposition.
3. Recognize the importance of chemical vapor deposition
4. List some of the most interesting nanoparticles found in nature (not manufactured in the lab)

Understand

1. What opportunities are hidden in the nanodimension?


2. Illustrate Nanotechnology? How are safety tests carried out in nano tech?
3. Summarize the techniques followed in characterisingthe nanoparticles?
4. Summarize the applications of carbon nano tubes.

Apply

1. Assess the potential impacts of nanotechnology on health, materials, technology, environment.


2. Demonstrate the procedure to synthesizenano particles using micro emulsions and Aerosol.
3. Assess the process of stress induced recrystallization.
4. Predict the strength of two dimensional Nano-Structures using evaporation and sputteringtechniues.

Analyze

1. Identify the risks involved in nano-foods that labels won‘t tell?


2. What is the difference between nanotech, biotech and synthetic biology?
3. Differentiate between Bottom-up and Top-down approaches.
4. Differentiate atomic layer deposition with electrochemical deposition.

76
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

170
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH015 Chemical Engineering Mathematics (Elective VI)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Summarize the basic concepts in mathematical formulation of a model
2. Solve the ordinary differential and second order non lineareqations
3. Formulate a chemical engineering problem as a mathematical model, and select an appropriate solution
method
4. Use the knowledge of finite difference method to solve chemical engineering problems
5. Select a suitable iterative solution for algebraic equations
6. Select suitable statistical methods encountered in Heat and Mass Transfer

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO13


1 3 3 3
2 3 2 3
3 3 2 3
4 3 2 3
5 3 3 3
6 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Mathematical formulation of the Physical Problems
Mathematical formulation of the Physical Problems: (i)Application of the law ofconservation of mass-Salt
accumulation in a stirred tank- starting an equilibriumstill-solvent extraction in two stages-Diffusion with
chemical reaction (ii)Application of the law of conservation of energy-Radialheat transfer througha cylindrical
conductor-Heating a closed Kettle, Analytical (explicit) solution of Ordinary differential equation encountered
in chemical engineering problems (i) First order differential equations-Method of separation ofvariables-
Equations solved by Integration factors-certainexamples involving Mass and Energy balances andReaction
Kinetics.(ii) Second order differential equations-Non-linear equations-linearequations- SimultaneousDiffusion
and Chemical reaction in a Tubular reactorContinuoushydroloysis of Tallow in a spray column
Flow of heat from a fin- Application for reaction engineering problem
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Formulation of Partial Differential Equations &Iterative Solution of Algebraic Equations
(Formulation of partial differential equations-Unsteady state heat conduction in one dimension-Masstransfer
with axial symmetry-Continuity equations, Boundary conditions-function specified-Derivative specified and
Mixedconditions, Iterative solution of algebraic equations- Jacobi's method, Gauss-Siedal Method, Successive
order-relaxation (S.O.R) method.
Transient heat flow in a semi-infinite solid
11+3 Hours
Unit III
Finite Differences
Difference operator and different tables, linear finite difference equations, Non-linear finite difference
equations-analytical solution.Solution of the followingtype of problems by finite difference. Method (a)
Calculation of the number of plates required for an absorption column (b) Calculation of the number of
theoretical plates required for distillation column (c) Number of steps required for a counter-current extraction
and leaching operations
Lagranges interpolation formula application in chemical engineering
11+4 Hours

171
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Unit IV
Application of Statistical Methods
Propagation of errors of experimental data- propagation through addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division, parameter estimation of algebraic equations encountered in Heat and MassTransfer, Kinetics and
Thermodynamics by the method of averages, Linear least squares and Weight linear least squares methods
Propagation through a general functional relationship
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
V.J. Jenson, G.V.Jeffereys, Mathematical methods in chemical engineering, Academic Press,2 nd Ed.,
1.
1977
2. Pushpavanam, S. Mathematical methods in chemical engineering. PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 1998
Reference (s)
1. H.S.Mickley, T.K.Sherwood, C.E.Reed, Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering, 2nd Ed., Tata
McGraw-Hili, Publications, 1975
2. N.W. Loney, Applied Mathematical Methods for Chemical Engineers, 2 ndEd.,CRC press, 2007
3. Rice, Richard G., and Duong D. Do. Applied mathematics and modeling for chemical engineers. John
Wiley & Sons, 2012
4. Loney, Norman W. Applied mathematical methods for chemical engineers. CRC Press, 2016.
5. A. Varma& M. Morbidelli, Mathematical Method in Chemical Engineering by, Oxford
University Press. 2013

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 77(%)
Remember 40 30 --
Understand 35 40 20
Apply 25 30 80
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define dependent variables to measure the properties being investigated.


2. Differentiate between linear and non-linear differential equations.
3. State Fourior‘s law of conduction.

Understand

1. A system consists of N stirred tanks each of volume v ft 3 arranged in cascade. If each tank initially
contains pure water and a salt stream of concentration xolb/ft3 is fed to the first tank at the rate of R
ft3/h, calculate what the output concentration from the last tank should be as a function of time if the
stirring is 100% efficient.
2. Two vertical cylindrical tanks of 6 ft diameter and 4 ft diameter are joined at the base by a horizontal
pipe 2ft 6 inch long and 0.5 inch in diameter. The 6 ft diameter tan also has an outlet at the base
consisting of a horizontal tube 2 ft long and 0.5 inch in diameter. If the larger tank is filled with oil to
a depth of 12 ft whilst the smaller tank is empty, and both tubes are open simultaneously, prove that
the maximum depth of oil occurring in the smaller tank will be 4.81 ft. Assume that the flow in both
tubes is laminar and neglect kinetic losses.
3. A cylindrical furnace is lined with two uniform layers of insulating brick of different physical
properties. What boundary conditions should be imposed at the junction between the layers?

77
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172
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Apply

1. A stirred tank reactor of effective volume V ft3 containing a solution of a reactant A, of concentration
CAo is heated to such a temperature that the pseudo first order reaction takes place. When the
chemical reaction is initiated a solution of A of concentration CA1 is fed continuously to the reactor at
the rate of qft3/min. If the specific reaction rate is k min-1 and the vessel is assumed to contain a perfect
stirrer, develop an expression giving the concentration of A in the effluent as a function of time.
2. 8540 lb/h of an animal fat are to be hydrolyzed and extracted in a spry column using 3760 lb/h of
water. If the column is to operate under counter current flow conditions, the percentage hydrolyzable
glycerin in the fat is 8.53% by weight, and the glycerin in the fatty acid, leaving the tower is 0.24% by
weight, calculate the number of theoretical stages in the column. A mass balance will give a glycerine
concentration in the sweet water of 18.8%, and the total weight of the fat phase held up in the column
is 12200lb.The distribution ratio of glycerine between water and fat is 10.32, and the reaction rate
constant is 10.2h-1

173
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH016 Design and Analysis of Experiments (Elective VI)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Predict how many numbers of experiments are to be carried out, given the number of important factors
2. Compute the factor levels that are used to optimize a given objective function
3. Demonstrate response surface methodology to optimize the process
4. Explain strategies in planning and conducting experiments
5. Choose an appropriate experiment to evaluate a new product design or process improvement
6. Useresponse surface methodology to optimizethe process parameters
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO5


1 3 1 1 3
2 3 2 1 3
3 3 1 2 3
4 3 3 1 3
5 1 2 3 3
6 1 3 1 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Strategy of Experimentation
Strategy of Experimentation, Some Typical Applications of Experimental Design, Basic Principles, Guidelines
for Designing Experiments, A Brief History of Statistical Design
Paired comparison design–Interference about the variances of normal dtribution
12+3 Hours
Unit II
The Analysis of Variance
The Analysis of Variance, Analysis of the Fixed Effects Model, Statistical Analysis of the Randamized
Complete Block Design (RCBD)
Analysis of variance–Statistical analysis
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Introduction to Factorial Designs
Introduction to Factorial Designs, Basic Definitions and Principles, The Advantage of Factorials, The Two-
Factor Factorial Design, The General Factorial Design
The 2k factorial design–the 22 design–the 23 design
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Response Surface Methodology
Introduction to Response Surface Methodology, the Method of Steepest Ascent, Experimental Designs for
Fitting Response Surfaces- Designs for Fitting the First-Order Model, Designs for Fitting the Second-Order
Model, Evolutionary Operation
Case study problems
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. D.C. Montgomery,Design and analysis of experiments, 8 thEd., John Wiley and sons, NewYork, 2013

Reference (s)
2. G. E. P. Box, J. S. Hunter, W.G. Hunter, Statistics for Experimenters:Design, Innovation and
discovery, 2ndEd., Wiley, 2005

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3. W. J. Diamond, Practical Experiment Designs for Engineers and Scientists, John Wiley & Sons, 2001
4. Giri, Narayan C. Design and analysis of experiments. New Age International, 1986.
5. Dean, Angela, et al., eds. Handbook of design and analysis of experiments. Vol. 7. CRC Press, 2015.
6. William G. Cochran, Gertrude M. Cox Experimental Designs, 2 nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1977

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 78(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 40 60 100
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State applications of experimental Design.


2. Write about the analysis of variance
3. Write briefly about the importance of factorial Designs.
4. State the concept behind Response Surface Methodology.
Understand

1. Explain thebasic principles to be considered in experimental Design.


2. Describe the‗Fixed Effects Model ‘ features used in analysis of variance .
3. Explain the Two-Factor Factorial Design process advantages.
4. Compare design for fitting the First-Order Model with Second-Order Model.

Apply

1. Demonstrate application of experimental design with an example


2. Johan has heard that cows produce more milk when they get to listen to classical music. He sets up an
experiment to test this, where he from his 12 cows randomly selects 6 which get to listen to classical
music, and 6 that do not. The resulting milk production over a week is then measured for each cow:
Cows listening to classical music: 113 118 126 121 111 119
Cows with no music : 110 116 110 121 117 110
a) Johan would like to make a hypothesis test. Assuming that the observations in each group come
from a normal distribution, choose a test, and compute a p-value for your test. Do you have to
make additional assumptions in order to use your test? How would you conclude?
b) Based on the computations above, find a 90% confidence interval for the difference between the
expected milk production with and without music.
3. Construct a 25 design in blocks of 8 plots confounding ABC, ADE and BCDE. Give the analysis of
such a design with r replications.
4. Construct a 25 design in blocks of 8 plots confounding ABC, ADE and BCDE. Give the analysis of
such a design with r replications.

Analyze

1. Organize the general procedure for Designing Experiments, stating clearly the assumptions.
2. Resolve the general factorial design steps in sequential order and present its importance.
3. Differentiate between 2k factorial design–the 22/23design.
4. Describe the analysis of a completely Randomized Design with k observations percell.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH017 Integrated Solid Waste Management (Elective VI)


3103

Course Outcomes
1. Recognize the importance of integrated waste management and its legislations
2. Summarize physico-chemical & biologicaland hazardous waste characteristics and suggest suitable
treatment methods
3. Implementengineered principles for handling and disposal ofsolid and hazardous wastes
4. Execute the principles of unit operations/process for the separation and processing of solid wastes for
energy recovery and for producing biological products
5. Use scientific, engineering and economic principles in design of modern landfills
6. Generalise the current challenges mitigation associated with waste management in industrial settings
7.
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO7


1 3 2 3
2 3 2 3
3 3 2 3
4 1 3 3
5 2 2 3
6 1 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Prospective and Sources, composition & Properties of Solid wastes and Legislation
Evolution of Solid waste management, legislative trends and impacts, Sources, Types and composition of
Municipal &solid and hazardous wastes–Physical, Chemical & Biological properties of Municipal &solid and
hazardous wastes
Biomedical wastes
11+4 Hours
Unit II
Solid Waste Generation & Collection Rates
Solid Waste generation and Collection rates–Collection of Solid wastes–transfer & transport
Waste handling & Separation, Storage, and processing at the source
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Separation, Transformation and Recycling of Waste materials
Material Separation & processing Technology–Thermal Conversion Technologies–Biological & Chemical
Conversion Technologies–Solidification and stabilization of hazardous wastes, Solidwaste management in
different industries like – Papermils- Sugar mills
Recycling of Materials found in Municipal Solid Waste
12+3 Hours
Unit IV
Closure, Restoration and Rehabilitation of Landfills
Disposal in landfills–site selection–design and operation of sanitary landfills–secure landfills and landfill
bioreactors–Leachate and landfill gas management–Landfill closure and environmental monitoring–Landfill
remediation–Elements of integrated waste management
Case Studies
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. George TchobanoglousKreith, Frank. Handbook of solid waste management. 1999.

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2. McDougall, Forbes R., et al. Integrated solid waste management: a life cycle inventory. John Wiley &
Sons, 2008
3. Nag, Ahindra. Environmental education and solid waste management. New Age International, 2005.

Reference (s)
1. M. La Grega, P. Buckingham, J. Evans, Hazardous Waste Management, 2 nd Ed., McGraw Hill, 2001
2. McDougall, Forbes R., et al. Integrated solid waste management: a life cycle inventory. John Wiley &
Sons, 2008.
3. Cheremisinoff, Nicholas P. Handbook of solid waste management and waste minimization
technologies. Butterworth-Heinemann, 2003.
4. Unnisa, SyedaAzeem, and S. BhupatthiRav, eds. Sustainable solid waste management. CRC press,
2012.
5. Rao, M. N., et al. Solid and Hazardous Waste Management: Science and Engineering. Butterworth-
Heinemann, 2016.
6. Goel, Sudha, ed. Advances in Solid and Hazardous Waste Management. Springer, 2017.

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test79 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 25 50
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. List potential sources of hazardous wastes generated in GMRIT environment. Indicate what properties
make such substances hazardous
2. List the advantages and disadvantages associated with the separation of solid wastes in the high-rise
appartments.
3. What are the typical energy recovery systems?
4. Differentiate mass fired and RDF-fired combustion system
5. Write short note on selection of landfill site
6. What are the factors that affect the rate of waste generation
7. List the most common or primary method used for management of municipal waste in India. List two
key reasons for that being the primary method
8. List 2 disadvantages of managing MSW by combustion
9. What is anaerobic digestion of MSW? List 3 key bi-products of this process

Understand

1. Identify and discuss the issues that you feel will be important in the field of solid waste management
in the late 1990
2. Describe the general trends that you would observe in the future in the generation of MSW in your
community
3. Discuss material balance Analysis use to determine waste generation rates
4. Explain how the nature of the waste effect the aerobic decomposition of the solid waste
5. Discuss the path ways leading to the production of methane & carbon dioxide from the anaerobic
digestion
6. Discuss important design considerations for aerobic composting
7. Are thermal conversion techniques important element in integrated waste management system?
Explain?
8. Explain various methods of land filling
9. Discuss the sequential phases in the generation of landfill gases?
10. Discuss leachate management options

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Apply

1. Determine the haul speed constants for the following data


Round trip distance(x)mi/trip 2 5 8 12 16 20 25
Average haul speed(y)mi/h 17 28 32 36 40 42 45
Find the round –trip haul time for a site located 11 miles away.
2. Determine the heat available in the exhaust gases from the combustion of 125ton/d of the solid waste
with the following charecteristics;(10M)
Component % of total Lb/day
Combustiables 54.6 135,500
Non Combustiables 24.0 60000
Water 21.4 53500

Element C H O N S H 2O Inerts
% of total 27.4 3.6 23.0 0.5 0.1 21.4 24.0
3. Refer to the schematic of a landfill presented below. Assume that the porosity (volume of voids divided
by total volume) of the MSW is 0.64, initial volumetric water content (volume of water divided by total
volume) is 0.6, and the field capacity of the MSW is 0.4. Estimate the total quantity of leachate in m3
produced from the waste as a result of drainage under the action of gravity.

Volume of MSW =
2,000 m3
MSW

4. The as-fired heating value of the solid waste is 5065BTU/lb, the grate residue contains 5% unburnt
carbon, temperature: entering air 80°F,grate residue, 800°F; Specific heat of residue=0.25BTU/lb°F;
radiation losses=0.005BTU/lb°F; latent heat of water 1040BTU/lb; all the O 2 is bound as water;
theoretical air requirements for C=11.52lb/lb,H 2=34.56lb/lb,sulfur=4.31lb/lb; the net H2 available for
the combustion is equal to % H2-1/8th of O2. This accounts for the bound water in the dry combustible
material; the heating value of carbon is 14000BTU/lb; moisture in the combustion is 1%
5. Total Head at Point A > or < or = Total Head at Point B (circle one of these: >, <, or = )(note that the
water level in the U tube on both sides of the U is at the same vertical distance from the datum)

6. Water flowing upward to a vertical pipe enters a reducer with a velocity of 1m/sec. Diameter at the
entrance is 0.2m and diameter at the exit is 0.1m if the pressure at the entrance to the section is 105kpa.
What is the pressure at the exit? Given that the entrance and exit are 5m apart.
Create

1. Obtain data for your community or nearby community on the percentage distribution of the
components found in the residential and commercial portion of the MSW. How do the values obtained
compare with the typical values? Explain any major differences
2. How do you manage Hazordous wastes commonly found in your near bymunicipality?
3. How did you ensure environmental quality monitoring at the landfills?
4. Write about design considerations and layout of landfillsin the nearby city

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5. Assume a landfill is to be designed for the disposal of MSW generated by a town of 500, 0000
population. Assume the waste generation rate per person per day is 0.1 kg/person/day. What will be the
aerial dimensions and height of the landfill in meters? Assume about 80% of the waste will be in the
upper part of the landfill that is above ground and 20% is below the ground surface. Assume the shape
of the landfill is a pyramidal frustum where the top of the frustum is square and has the dimensions of
20 m x 20 m. Assume the slope of the sides of the landfill is 1v to 4h (25%)
6. You will be using the first order decay equation to predict landfill gas generation for a MSW landfill.
Assume that the landfill is only active for a limited period of 30 years and does not receive MSW after
30 years. During the active period, the landfill received about 10,000 lbs of MSW per year.
LFG = 2LoR(e-kc – e-kt)
7. where, LFG = total gas generated in ft3 in the current year; Lo = methane generation potential of MSW
(ft3/lb); R = average annual waste acceptance rate (lb); k = rate of methane production (per year); t =
years since the landfill opened; c = time since the landfill closure; Lo = 2.72 ft3/lb; and k = 0.05/yr. c
will be zero when the landfill is active (that means c = 0 for t = 0 to 30 years)
Estimate gas generated from the landfill in ft3 at the end of the first year and at the end of 10th year.
Estimate the total landfill gas the landfill will generate from the 30 years of filling from t = 0 to ∞

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16CH018 Process Intensification (Elective VI)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain the basic concepts involved in process intensification
2. Predict the model equations for spinning disc reactors
3. Construct the models for rotator and oscillatory systems
4. Choose most energy efficient and compact Heat Exchangers
5. Identify the rates of heat transfer, mass transfer and mixing applications in micro-reactors
6. Assess the value and limitations of process intensification, cleaner technologies and waste
minimization options

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3


1 3 2 3
2 2 3 3
3 2 3 3
4 2 3 3
5 2 3 3
6 1 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to PI and Basic Design of Micro Reactors
Definition of Process Intensification (PI), Benefits of PI, Techniques for PI application: active and passive
techniques, Operating principle and development of model for Micro-reactors
Robust–Design–Innovative–Energy minimization
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Heat Exchange and Rotating Reactors
Operating principle and development of models for Heat Exchange (HEX) Reactors, Rotating Packed-Bed
Reactor
Novel reactors–Hybrid equipments–Compact Design–Moving Equipment
13+5 Hours
Unit III
Compact Heat Exchangers
Definition of Compact Heat Exchangers, Construction and main properties, Applications, Basic design
procedures, Examples of Micro-channel Heat Exchangers
Miniature parts–Alternate Design–Assembling–Multi-functional
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Applications of Process Intensification
Multifunctional Reactors : Reactive Distillation, Hybrid Separations : Adsorptive Distillation, Alternative
Energy Sources: Solar Energy, Other Methods : Supercritical Fluids Dynamic (Periodic) Reactor Operation
Innovative design–Process integration–Compact design–Overall size minimization
9+3 Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. M. Dekker, A.Stankiewicz and Moulijn, Re-Engineering the Chemical Process Plants, Process
Intensification, CRC Press, 2003

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Reference (s)
1. D.Reay, C.Ramshaw, A. Harvey, Process Intensification, 2 ndEd.,Butterworth Heinemann, 2008
2. Boodhoo, Kamelia, and Adam Harvey, eds. Process intensification technologies for green chemistry:
engineering solutions for sustainable chemical processing. John Wiley & Sons, 2013
3. Juan Gabriel Segovia-Hernández, Adrián Bonilla-Petriciolet, Process Intensification in Chemical
Engineering: Design Optimization and Control, Springer, 2016
4. AndrzejStankiewicz, The Fundamentals of Process Intensification, Wiley, 2015

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test80(%)
Remember 20 20 --
Understand 35 30 20
Apply 25 25 60
Analyze 20 25 20
Evaluate -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State the reasons for over consumption of chemical products


2. List technically and economically feasible processes based on the renewable feedstocks.
3. Reproduce the fundamental benefits of PI.
4. State the difference between process integration and process intensification.

Understand

1. Explain the reason behind incurring Lower costs due to PI.


2. Objective of process synthesis is the selection of the best (optimal) process flowsheet from among
numerous alternatives for converting specified raw materials into specific desired products, subject to
predefined performance criteria. Illustrate with a suitable example.
3. PI plays a major role in achieving the desired improvements in processing options through the design
of processes that constitute more sustainable alternatives, that is, hybrid/intensified unit operations
(equipment). Identify any one equipment that is currently available.

Apply

1. Find innovative methods and technologies that would drastically increase the efficiency of chemical
and biochemical processes.
2. Predict the difference between Process Intensification, Process Systems Engineering and Process
Optimization.
3. Demonstrate a Microreactor for manufacturing of a specialty product.
4. Assess the essentiality of multidisciplinarity of R&D approach to Process Intensification. Show that the
collaboration between chemical engineering and other disciplines such as chemistry & catalysis,
material science, applied physics or electronics is very important.

Analyze

1. Fundamental principles and approaches of Process Intensification are applicable to any chemical
process or operation. Intensification needs simultaneous addressing the four domains, Identify them.
2. Identify the procedure for shortening the time to the market in pharmaceutical technologies?
3. Differentiate the working of a High-Gravity Rotating Packed Bed used for the production of
hypochlorous acid (Dow Chemical) with the conventional packed bed reactors.
4. Attribute the advantages of Reactive Stripping in High-Gravity (HiGee) Rotating Packed Beds.

80
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

181
Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH019 Process Optimization (Elective VI)


3103
Course Outcomes
1 Use the knowledge of optimization to formulate the problems
2 Asses the optimization criterion for solving problems
3 Implement different numerical methods for unconstrained optimization problems
4 Execute simplex method for linear optimization problems
5 Summarize advanced optimization techniques like Genetic algorithms
6 Formulate optimization problem for industrial case studies

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3


1 3 3 3
2 3 3 3
3 3 3 3
4 3 3 3
5 3 3 1
6 3 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Concepts of Optimization
Nature and organization of optimization problems: Examples of applications of optimization, the essential
features of optimization problems, formulation of objective functions, general procedure for solving
optimization problems, obstacles to optimization. Classification of models, how to build a model
Basic concepts of optimization: Continuity of functions, unimodal versus Multimodel functions, Convex and
Concave functions, Convex region, Necessary and sufficient conditions for an extremum of an unconstrained
function, interpretation of the objective function in terms of its quadratic approximation
Concave and convex problems formulation for industrial applications
11+4Hours
Unit II
Unconstrained Optimization
Optimization of unconstrained functions: one-dimensional search: Numerical methods for optimizing a function
of one variable, scanning and bracketing procedures, Newton‘s, Quasi-Newton‘s and Secant methods of
unidimensional search, polynomial approximation methods, region elimination methods
Unconstrained multivariable optimization: random search, grid search, uni-variate search, simplex method,
conjugate search directions, gradient method - Steepest Descent, conjugate gradient method, second order
gradient, Newton method, and Quasi-Newton method
Application of Numerical methods in solving industrial problems
12+4Hours
UnitIII
Linear Programming–Genetic Algorithms
Linear programming and applications: Basic concepts in linear programming, Degenerate LP‘s – graphical
solution, natural occurrence of linear constraints, standard LP form, the simplex method of solving linear
programming problems, obtaining a first feasible solution
Genetic Algorithms: (Qualitative treatment) Working principles, differences between GAs and traditional
methods, similarities between GAs and traditional methods
Genetic algorithm applications in solving chemical Engg problems 11+4Hours
Unit IV
Optimization of Unit operations (Problem Formulation)
Recovery of waste heat, shell & tube heat exchangers, evaporator design, liquid-liquid extraction process,
optimal design of staged distillation column, optimal pipe diameter, optimal residence time for maximum yield
in an ideal isothermal batch reactor, chemostat

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Problem formulation for chemical reaction with sepaeration process problems


11+3Hours
Total: 45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. T. F. Edgar,D. Himmelblau, L. S. Lasdon, Optimization of chemical processes, 2 ndEd., McGraw Hill,
2001
2. K. Deb, Optimization for Engineering Design: Algorithms and Examples, PHI, 2009
Reference (s)
1. S. S. Rao, Engineering Optimization: Theory and Practice, 3rdEd., John Wiley & Sons, 2009
2. Dutta, Suman. Optimization in Chemical Engineering. Cambridge University Press, 2016.
3. Rangaiah, GadePandu. Multi-objective optimization: techniques and applications in chemical
engineering. Vol. 1. World Scientific, 2009.
4. Nocedal, Jorge, and Stephen J. Wright. Numerical optimization 2 nd Ed., 2006.
5. Joshi, Mohan C., and Kannan M. Moudgalya. Optimization: theory and practice. Alpha Science Int'l
Ltd., 2004.

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 81(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 20
Apply 40 60 80
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. State any six applications of optimization in process industries.


2. List four methods used to solve unconstrained optimization problem.
3. Define solution and feasible solution.
4. List the variables used in optimal evaporator design.

Understand

1. Explain the procedure to solve optimization problem.


2. Explain the Newton‘s method graphically. List its advantages and disadvantages.
3. Explain the working principles of Genetic Algorithm.
4. Write down the criteria for optimizing the flow rates in a liquid-liquid extraction column.

Apply

1. Aposter is to contain 300 cm2 of printed matter with margins of 6 cm at the top and bottom and 4 cm at
each side. Find the overall dimensions that minimize the total area of the poster.
2. Find the minimum of the following objective function by Newton's method starting at x T= [10 10],
f ( x )  8 x1  4 x1 x2  5 x2 .
2 2

3. Maximize the profit function using simplex method Z = 7x + 5y


Subject to the constraints .
4. For a waste heat recovery system the following data are given: Cost per unit area of exchanger, CA=
Rs.20/ft2, Value of power, incorporating necessary conversion factors to have a consistent set of units,
CH= 1. 76 × l0-5, Average overall heat transfer coefficient, U = 95Btu / (h)(ºF)(ft2), Number of hours
per year or operation, y = 8760 h/year, Annualization factor for capital investment, r = 0.365,
Efficiency of overall system, η= 0.7, Condensing temperature, T2= 600ºR Average hot fluid
temperature, Ts= 790ºR. Calculate the optimum value of the working fluid temperature, TH.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH020 Scale-Up Methods in Chemical Engineering (Elective VI)


3103
Course Outcomes
1 Interpret any given chemical process and develop flow chart
2 Formulate scale up equations to design appropriate equipment
3 Select the scale up design based on flow concepts
4 Implement the scale up methods for a specific processviz homogeneous and solid-fluid reactor system
5 Implementthe scaleup concepts to design a specific unit operation viz mixing
6 Implement the scaleup concepts to design a specific unit operation vizcontinuous column

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3


1 1 3 2
2 2 2 3
3 3 3 3
4 3 3 3
5 3 3 3
6 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction & Dimensional Analysis
Concept of prototypes, models–scale ratios–element. Principles of similarity: Geometric similarity–Distorted
similarity. Static–dynamic–kinematics–thermal and chemical similarity with examples. (Review of Rayleigh‘s–
Buckingham Π methods)–Differential equation for static systems–flow systems–thermal systems–masstransfer
processes–chemical processes-homogeneous and heterogeneous
Dimensionless analyses–Applications–Separations–Reactions–Working models
12+4 Hours
Unit II
Regime Concept
Static regime, Dynamic regime, Mixed regime concepts, Criteriatodecide the regimes, Equations for scale
criteria of static–dynamic processes–Extrapolation, Boundary effects
Flow pattern–Interpolation–Parameter effects–External limits
10+3 Hours
Unit III
Scale up of Unit Processes
Chemical reactor systems - Homogeneous reaction systems.Reactor for fluid phase processes catalyzed by
solids.Fluid-fluid reactors.
Process integration–Intensification–Robust design–Energy Calculations
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Scale up of Unit Operations
Mixing process–agitated vessel–Stage wise mass transfer processes, Continuous mass transfer processes, Scale
up of momentum and heat transfer systems, Environmental challenges of scale up
Scale down design–Environmental effects–Design modifications–Process development
12+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1 A.Bisio, R.LKabel, Scale up of Chemical Processes: Conversion from Laboratory Scale Tests to
Successful Commercial Size Design, John Wiley & Sons,1985

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2 M. Zlokarnik, Dimensional Analysis and Scale–up in Chemical Engineering, 2ndEd., John Wiley &
Sons, 2006

Reference (s)
1 D. G. Jordan, Chemical Process Development, Inter science Publishers, 1988
2 Divall, Colin, and Sean F. Johnston. Scaling Up: The Institution of Chemical Engineers and the Rise of
a New Profession. Vol. 20. Springer, 2013
3 Euzen, Jean-Paul, Pierre Trambouze, and Jean-Pierre Wauquier. Scale-up methodology for chemical
processes. Editions Technip, 1993.
4 Johnstone, Rebert, and Meredith Wooldridge Thring. Pilot plants, models, and scale-up methods in
chemical engineering.McGraw-Hill 1957.

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 82(%)
Remember 40 20
Understand 20 40 20
Apply 40 40 80
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember

1. Define dimensional homogeneity.


2. Define geometric similarity
3. Define scale up ratio
4. Write standard representation of temperature dependency of density

Understand

1. What do you understand by scale invariance of Pi space?


2. Represent temperature dependency of viscosity in dimentionless function

Apply

1. Explain the scope of applicability of dimensional analysis


2. Explain how material functions are represented in dimensionlessly?
3. How temperature dependency of density is expressed in dimensionless standard representation
4. Explain the thumb rules of chemical reactor scale up
5. Explain the scale up procedure for mixture for solid mixing

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Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH021 Bioprocess Engineering (Contemporary Course)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Outline the difference between bioprocesses and chemical processes
2. Explain microbial growth kinetics and modeling
3. Explain design of batch and continuous sterilization processes
4. Build mathematical models of cell growth in batch, fed-batch, and continuous flow processes
5. Illustrate the reactor and product scale-up methods
6. Identify different types of bioreactors, appropriate conditions for their use

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO13


1 3 2 2 3
2 3 2 3 3
3 2 2 3 3
4 2 2 3 3
5 3 2 3 3
6 3 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Introduction to Bioprocess Engineering
Role of a Bioprocess Engineer, Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering, Microbial growth kinetics,
Modeling growth of bacterial, yeast and fungal cultures, Environmental (e.g. temp, pH, O 2) impacts on
microbial growth, Steps in Bioprocess development, Major products of biological processing
Role of Chemical Engineers in Bioprocess Engineering
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Sterilization Processes
Media sterilization, Kinetics of thermal death of cells & spores, Design of batch thermal sterilization, Design of
continuous thermal sterilization, Sterilization of air and filter design, Radiation and chemical sterilization,
Problems on calculation of sterilization time
Sterilization practices in industry
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Analysis of Bioreactors
Continuous growth cultures: CSTR, Fed-batch and Plug Flow reactors, Chemostat with recycle, Bioenergetics,
Stoichiometry of microbial growth
Application of Batch and Continuous reactors in Bioprocess Engineering
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Scale-Up Methods & Novel Bioreactor Configurations
Various approaches to scale-up including regime analysis, Scale-up methods by currently used rules-of-thumb
viz. constant P/V, kLa, Analysis of alternate bioreactor configurations including cell-recycle, air-lift and
immobilized-cell bioreactors
Novel Bioreactor configurations
11 + 4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Textbook (s)
1. M. L. Schuler and F.Kargi, Bioprocess Engineering: Basic concepts, 2 ndEd., Prentice Hall, NJ, 2002

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Reference (s)
1. J. Bailey and D. F.Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2 ndEd.,McGraw-Hill Book Company,
NY, 1986
2. P. M. Doran, Bioprocess Engineering Principles, Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1985

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 83 (%)
Remember 30 20 --
Understand 40 30 --
Apply 30 50 100
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. List the parameters influence the growth of the microbes.
2. Define sterility and classify the types of sterilization.
3. Give the advantages and disadvantages of CSTR over batch reactor for measuring cell growth kinetics.
4. How do you estimate kLa and power requirement in agitated vessels?

Understand
1. How do you consider that a study of microbiology will lead to an understanding of biochemical
processes?
2. Differentiate batch and continuous sterilization.
3. Derive the general substrate balance equation for the single enzyme catalyzed reaction S P taking
place in a CSTR.
4. Discuss about the different methods of scale up of bioreactors.

Apply
1. E.coli is cultivated in continuous culture under aerobic conditions with a glucose limitation. When the
system is operated at D = 0.2 hr−1, determine the effluent glucose and biomass concentrations by using
the Monod equation (S0 = 5 g/L), μmax = 0.25 hr−1, and Ks = 100 mg/L.
2. An autoclave malfunctions, and the temperature reaches only 119.5 °C. the sterilization time at the
maximum temperature was 20 min. the jar contains 10 l of complex medium that has 10 5 spore/l. At
121 °C kd = 1.0 min-1 and Eod = 90 kcal/g-mol. What is the probability that medium was sterile?
3. Suppose you have a microorganism that obeys the Monod equation, where μ max = 0.7 hr−1 and KS = 5
g/L. The cell yield (YX/S) is 0.65. You want to cultivate this microorganism in one CSTR. The flow rate
and the substrate concentration of the inlet stream should be 500 L/h and 85 g/L, respectively. The
substrate concentration of the outlet stream must be 5 g/L. What should be the size of the fermenter?
What is the cell concentration of the outlet steam?
4. Consider the scale-up of a fermentation from a 10 l to 10,000 l vessel. The small fermenter has a
height-to-diameter ratio of 3. The impeller diameter is 30% of the tank diameter. Agitator speed is 500
rpm and three Rushton impellers are used. Determine dimensions of the large fermenter and gitator
speed for:
a. Constant P/V
b. Constant impeller tip speed
c. Constant Reynolds number

83
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH022 Green Engineering (Contemporary Course)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Explain global environmental issues of recent times
2. Estimate risk associated with any process
3. Utilize property estimates to estimate environmental persistence of contaminants
4. Design materials, products, processes, and systems that are inherently safer, generate less waste, and use
energy efficiently
5. Recommend pollution prevention strategies in unit operations and processes
6. Explain the different life cycle phases for a product, process, or system and provide examples of
anticipated environmental impacts and risks from each phase

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO2 PO3 PO6 PO7 PO11


1 3 2 2 3 3
2 - 3 2 3 3
3 2 - - 3 3
4 3 2 - 3 3
5 2 1 2 3 3
6 2 2 2 3 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Global Environmental Issues & Risk Assessment
Role of Chemical Process and Chemical Products, Overview of Global Environmental Issues, Air and Water
Quality Issues, Risk Assessment in the Engineering Profession, Risk-Based Environmental Law, Overview of
Risk Assessment Concepts, Hazard Assessment, Dose-Response, Exposure Assessment, Risk Characterization,
Responsibilities for Chemical Process Safety and Environmental Protection
Important Environmental Protocols-Risk in Chemical Industry
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Property Estimation & Designing Safer Chemicals
Chemical & Physical Property Estimation, Estimating Environmental Persistence and Ecosystem Risks, Use of
Property Estimates to Estimate Environmental Fate and Exposure, Designing Safer Chemicals, Green Chemistry
Methodologies, Optimization Based Frameworks for the Design of Green Chemical Synthesis Pathways
Persistent pollutants
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Pollution Prevention
Pollution Prevention in Material Selection for Unit Operations, Pollution Prevention for Chemical Reactors,
Pollution Prevention for Separation Devices, Pollution Prevention Applications in Separative Reactors,
Pollution Prevention in Storage Tanks and Fugitive Sources, Process Energy Integration, Process Mass
Integration, Case Study of a Process Flow sheet
Process Integration practices in typical chemical industries
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Life Cycle Assessments & Industrial Ecology
Introduction to Product Life Cycle Concepts, Life Cycle Assessments, Uses of Life Cycle Studies, Industrial
Ecology, Material Flows in Chemical Manufacturing, Eco-Industrial Parks, Assessing Opportunities for Waste
Exchanges and Byproduct Synergies
Industrial symbiosis around the world
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook (s)
1. D.T.Allen, D.R.Shonnard, Green Engineering, 2 nd Ed., Pearson Publishers, 2001

Reference (s)
1. P.Ll.Bishop, Pollution Prevention: Fundamentals and Practice, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 2000

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test84 (%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 35 25 --
Apply 20 25 50
Analyze 20 25 30
Evaluate -- 10 20
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Give an overview of global environmental issues
2. How do you design a safe chemical
3. How to assess the risk involved in any engineering profession

Understand
1. Explain the importance of life cycle assessment
2. Deduce a procedure to integrate the total energy of a process
3. Explain the quality issues related to air and water

Apply
1. Estimate environmental persistence and ecosystem risks of a given area which is exposed to pollution
2. Apply pollution prevention technique in a reactor
3. Design green chemical synthesis pathways

Analyze
1. Assess the possibilities in waste exchanges and following byproduct synergies
2. Explore the possibilities of eco-industrial parks and industrial symbiosis
3. Analyze the economics involved in employing green engineering to solve pollution problem

Evaluate
1. Forecast the level of impact on air quality around the insutrial cluster
2. Evaluate the profits incurred in a symbiosis network of industries of any location

84
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH023 Chemical Process Safety (Contemporary Course)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Prevent accidents and damages while working in plant
2. Develop a safe protocol and minimize potential damages to process equipments, people and the
environment
3. Perform hazard identification, risk assessment
4. Integrate safety concepts into chemical process design
5. Analyze fire and explosion hazards
6. Perform safety audit for chemical plants
COs – POs Mapping

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO6 PO8 PO13


1 2 2 1 3 3 1
2 1 2 1 3 3 3
3 3 2 3 1 1 3
4 3 1 3
5 3 3 3 2 2
6 3 3 3 3 2 3
1.

3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Plant Safety and Safety Regulation
Plant Safety and Safety regulation: Importance & objectives of safety, safety in chemical industry, criteria for
setting & layout of chemical plant, factories Act and Safety Regulations.Plant Hazards: Fire hazards, Chemical
hazards, Toxic hazards, Explosion, hazards, Electrical hazards, Mechanical hazards, Radiation hazards, Noise
hazards, Control, precautions & prevention, Safety measures in plant
Inherently Safer DesignEthics–Toxicology studies
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Risk Management Principles and Risk Analysis Techniques
Risk assessment and management- Risk picture- definition and characteristics- risk acceptance criteria-
quantified risk assessment- hazard assessment- fatality risk assessment. Risk Analysis Techniques: Hazard &
Operability (HAZOP) studies, Hazard Analysis (HAZAN), Fault Tree Analysis, Consequence Analysis
DOW Fire and Explosion Index–Quantitative Risk Assessments
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Safety Audit and Modeling in Safety
Objective of safety audit, Procedure for safety auditing, Audit report, Safety report.Storage& Transportation of
chemicals: characteristics of chemical with special reference to safe storage & handling of chemicals, layout of
storage, various modes of transportation of chemicals.Accidents modeling- release modeling- fire and explosion
modeling- toxic release and dispersion modeling, accident investigation and reporting- concepts of HAZOP and
PHA. Safety measures in design and process operations- inerting, explosion, fire prevention, sprinkler systems
Safety precautions in transportation of different types of chemicals–Design and operations of sprinkler system
11 + 4 Hours
Unit IV
Economic Aspects of Safety and Design of Safety Systems
Operational safety-commissioning, safe start-up and safe shut-down of equipment such as, distillation column,
furnace, reactor, Design of Safety Systems:Interlock / tripping System, Safety devices, Control of Major
Chemical Hazards, Revealed and unrevealed faults, Ventilation calculations, control of worker exposure
Economic Aspects of Safety for pumps and compressors–Designs to Prevent Fires and Explosions
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

Textbook(s)
1. D. A. Crowl, Joseph F. Louvar, Chemical Process Safety: Fundamentals with Applications, 3 rd Ed.,
Prentice Hall, 2011
2. H.H. Faucet, W.S. Wood, Safety& Accident prevention in Chemical operation, 2 nd Ed., John Wiley &
Sons, New York, 1965
Reference (s)
1. William & Handley ,Industrial Safety Handbook , McGraw Hill, 1969
2. Lees‘ Loss Prevention in the Process Industries: Hazard Identification, Assessment and
Control,McGraw Hill, 2012
Sample Question (s)
Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test85(%)
Remember 20 20 --
Understand 30 20 --
Apply 30 20 35
Analyze 20 30 35
Evaluate -- 20 30
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Define terms hazard and accidents
2. List three-step of accidents process?
3. Define terms LD and ED

Understand
1. Identify the initiation, propagation, and termination steps for motor accident
2. Explain how toxicants are eliminated from biological organisms
3. List the ingredients of safety program for outstanding safety program
Apply
1. An employee works in a plant with a FAR of 4. If this employee works a 4-hr shift, 200 days per year,
what are the expected deaths per person per year?
Analyze
1. Can gate valves be placed between a vessel relief and its vessel
2. Liquid levels in storage tanks are frequently determined by measuring the pressure at the bottom of the
tank. In one such tank the material stored in the tank was changed and an overflow resulted. Why?

Evaluate
1. How to convert your kitchen in to XP area
2. Does LOPA really replace 90% of the QRA?

85
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CH024 Energy Audit in Process Utilities (Contemporary Course)


3103
Course Outcomes
1. Assess the concepts of energy audit and process utilities
2. Interpret the scope of energy auditing for Industries
3. Evaluate the energy conserving opportunities and environmental management
4. Illustrate and present the energy audit reports
5. Summarize the scenarios using various case studies for industries, buildings and transport sectors, and
potential energy savings
6. Explain life cycle analysis of given process and report the observations in audited format

COs – POs Mapping

COs PO2 PO3 PO11


1 3 2 3
2 - 3 3
3 2 - 3
4 3 2 3
5 2 1 3
6 2 2 3
3–Strongly linked | 2–Moderately linked | 1–Weakly linked

Unit I
Energy Audit & Energy Management
Energy Audit: Need and types of energy audit, Energy audit approach, understanding energy costs, bench
marking, energy performance, matching energy use to requirement
Energy Management: Concept, performance evaluation, identifying opportunities for energy savings, Energy
utilization and energy saving opportunities in chemical process utilities like Steam system, Boiler, Furnace,
Waste Heat Recovery systems, Refrigeration System, Fans, Compressors and blowers, Pumps and Pumping
System, Cooling Tower
Eenergy audit instruments
12+3 Hours
Unit II
Concepts of Energy Savings
Concept, performance evaluation, identifying opportunities for energy savings, Energy utilization audit and
energy saving opportunities in chemical process utilities like Steam system, Boiler, Furnace, Waste Heat
Recovery systems, Fans, Compressors and blowers, Pumps and Pumping System, Cooling Tower.
Refrigeration System
11+4 Hours
Unit III
Energy Policy Planning and Implementation
Energy Policy Planning and Implementation: Force Field Analysis, Energy Policy-Purpose, Perspective,
Contents and Formulation.
Format and Ratification, Organizing: Location of Energy Manager, Top Management Support, Managerial
functions, Role and responsibilities of Energy Manager, Accountability. Information Systems: Designing,
Barriers, Strategies, Marketing and Communicating Training and Planning.
Requirements for Energy Action Planning
11+4 Hours
Unit IV
Procedures and Techniques
Data gathering : Level of responsibilities, energy sources, control of energy and uses of energy get Facts, figures
and impression about energy /fuel and system operations, Past and Present operating data, Special tests,
Questionnaire for data gathering.
Analytical Techniques: Incremental cost concept, mass and energy balancing techniques, inventory of Energy
inputs and rejections, Heat transfer calculations, Evaluation of Electric load characteristics, process and energy

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

system simulation. Evaluation of saving opportunities: Determining the savings in Rs, Noneconomic factors,
Conservation opportunities, estimating cost of implementation.
Energy Audit Reporting: The plant energy study report- Importance, contents, effective organization, report
writing and presentation.
Life Cycle Concepts
11+4 Hours
Total:45+15 Hours
Text book (s)
1. Jack Broughton, Process Utility Systems – Introduction to design, operation and maintenance
Butterworth-Heinemann publishers, 2nd Ed., 2006.

Reference (s)
1. Steve Doty, Wayne C. Turner, Energy Management Handbook, Fairmont Press, Inc, and Taylor &
Francis Ltd., 2000
2. Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) Guide Books for National Certificate Examination

Sample Question (s)


Internal Assessment Pattern
Cognitive Level Int. Test 1 (%) Int. Test 2 (%) Assignment Test 86(%)
Remember 25 15 --
Understand 45 40 50
Apply 30 45 50
Analyze -- -- --
Evaluate -- -- --
Create -- -- --
Total (%) 100 100 100

Remember
1. Write the need and types of energy audit
2. Recall the concepts of energy utilization audit

Understand
1. Summarize energy saving opportunities in chemical process utilities
2. Explain the roles and responsibilities of Energy Manager

Apply
1. Assess the questionnaire and reports of data gathered during auditing
2. Predict the level of responsibilities during energy audit

86
Assignment test should contain only questions related to Higher Order Thinking (HOT) Skills pertaining to this course

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16ESX01 Employability Skills I


0200
Soft Skills: Communication Skills & Confidence: How Communication Skills affect Confidence? How to
communicate effectively.(with Examples) ; Listening: Listening? , Listening Vs Hearing, Possible reasons for
why people do not Listen at times, Active Listening Vs Passive Listening, How Listening can affect our
relationships? How Listening helps in Campus Placements also? (with Examples);Goal Setting: Vision Vs
Mission Vs Goals, Why Goal Setting? SMART Technique to Goal Setting, Putting First things First, SWOT
Analysis and Time Management; Attitude & Confidence: Attitude Vs Skills Vs Knowledge, Attitude Vs
Behaviour, How to develop Positive Attitude? Confidence? Fear? Steps to Overcoming the Fear of Public
Speaking? Public Speaking: JAM, J2M, Presentations by Students on General Topics.

16ESX02 Employability Skills II


0201
Soft Skills: Communication Skills (An Overview): Communication? Elements of Communication,
Communication Skills and Role of Feedback, Cross-Checking, Detail Orientation and Follow-up in our
Interactions (with Examples); Building Vocabulary: Reading Articles, Exploring New Words, Meanings and the
usage with examples; Self Esteem: Definition? Types of Self Esteem, Causes of Low Self Esteem, Merits of
Positive Self Esteem and Steps to build a positive Self Esteem; Group Discussions (Practice): GD? GD Vs
Debate, Overview of a GD , Skills assessed in a GD, Dos & Don‘ts, & Conducting practice sessions (Simple
Topics); Brain Storming Sessions (on Current affairs) ; Case Study (on Problem Solving) ; Motivational Talk:
Team Work: Team Vs Group? Stages in Team Building, Mistakes to avoid and Lessons to Learn (Through
Stories); (Can be a Case Specific also)

16ESX03 Employability Skills III


0200
Soft Skills: Introduction to Campus Placements: Stages of Campus Placement, Skills assessed in Campus
Placements & How to get ready? ; Building Vocabulary: Through reading Articles, Exploring New Words,
Meanings and the usage with examples; Motivational Talks on Positive Thinking: Beliefs, Thoughts, Actions,
Habits & Results (Success) ; Resume Preparation: Resume? Templates? Mistakes to be avoided in a Resume,
Steps to be followed in preparing it.(with examples); Group Discussions (Recap): GD? Stages of a GD, Skills
assessed in a GD, Blunders to be avoided, How to excel in a GD? (through Practice Sessions); Psychometric
Tests: Definition, Types of Psychometric Tests: Numerical Computation, Data Interpretation, Verbal
Comprehension, Verbal Critical Reasoning and Personality Questionnaires ; Exercises related to
Communication: JAMs, Case Studies, Video Synthesis, Story Writing, TAT etc.

16ESX04 Employability Skills IV


0201
Soft Skills: Introduction to Campus Placements: Stages of Campus Placement, Skills assessed in Campus
Placements; The Changing scenario and its Challenges & How to get ready? ; Building Vocabulary: Through
reading Articles, Exploring New Words, Meanings and the usage with examples; Business Terminology:
Vision, Mission, Objectives, Goals, Targets and Financial Terms such as Debt, Equity, Share, Working Capital,
Turnover, Net Worth etc ; Resume (Recap): Resume? Templates? Mistakes to be avoided in a Resume and
Steps to be followed in preparing it; Group Discussions (Recap) & Practice: GD? Stages of a GD, Skills
assessed in a GD, Blunders to be avoided, How to excel in a GD? Practice sessions and sharing Feedback.
(Screening sample Videos); Interview Skills: Interview? Types of Interview, Dos & Don‘ts, Skills assessed in an
Interview, Mistakes to be avoided, How to equip oneself to excel? How to handle the Typical Interview
Questions? (with Examples); Mock Interviews: Practice sessions with Feedback; Exercises related to
Communication: JAMs, Case Studies, Video Synthesis, Email Writing, Story Writing, TAT etc.

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Department of Chemical Engineering, GMRIT | Syllabi | Regulation 2016

16CHI01 Material and Energy Balance In Process Industry (Elective I MOOCs)


(RDCIS, SAIL, Ranchi)
1001
Intended Learning Outcome (s)
1. Summarize mass balance in blast furnace
2. Summarize energy balance in blast furnace

Material Balance–weight of the slag formed, Weight of dry blast furnace gas formed, Weight of air supplied,
weight of water vapor in the blast furnace gases, Overall-mass balance, Oxygen balance.
Energy Balance–Enthalpy of slag, Enthalpy of Pig iron, Heat absorbed in decomposition of iron oxide, Heat
absorbed in decomposition of Mn2O4, Heat absorbed in decomposition of SiO2, Heat absorbed in calcined
carbonate, Heating value of blast furnace gas, Heat value & carbon appearing in pig iron, Heat absorbed in
forming Fe3C, Heat absorbed by cooling water, Heat losses.
Mineralogical compositions of raw materials for the production of Pig Iron
15 Hours
Reading Material (s)
1. O. A. Hougen, K. M. Watson and R. A. Ragatz, Chemical Process Principles, Part-I, Material and
Energy Balance, 2nd ed., Wiley and Sons, New York, 2009
2. R. M. Felder and R. W. Rousseau, Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, 3 rd ed., Wiley, 2004

16CHI02 Chemical Engineering Unit Operations (One Credit Course )


(Utkal Aluminum Refinery, Tikiri)
1001
Intended Learning Outcome (s)
1. Analyze the basic unit operations involved for producing alumina from bauxite ore, definitions of key
process terminology, importance of bauxite quality in refinery design, and basic refinery facilities
2. Understand the fundamentals of alumina calcination, process design criteria, and operational and
maintenance requirements for large calciners in the alumina industry

Bauxite mining, The Bayer Process & recent developments, Production and processing of aluminum, Milling,
Desilication, Digestion, Clarification/Settling, Precipitation, Classification, alumina quality testing procedure,
optimization of grinding of alumina in the rotary-vibration mill. Fundamentals of alumina calcination, Process
design criteria, and operational and maintenance requirements for large calciners: both circulating fluid bed and
gas suspension technologies.
15 Hours
Reading Material (s)
1. Altenpohl, Dietrich, Aluminum Viewed from Within: An introduction into the Metallurgy of
Aluminum Fabrication (English translation), Aluminium-Verlag, 1982
2. Russell, S. Allen, Aluminum, McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, McGraw-Hill,
1997

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