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Posted on January 27, 2013 FURTHER WRITINGS OF
SUN LUTANG
– THE XINGYI MANUAL OF
SUN LUTANG
THE BAGUA MANUAL OF
SUN LUTANG
BOXING ARTS FUNDAMENTALS – ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK FOR TANTUI THE TAIJI MANUAL OF
SUN LUTANG
BAGUA SWORD
postures performed by He Guangxian
Recent Comments
text compiled by Hu Jian Archives
May 2015
April 2015
published by Chinese Library of Shanghai
March 2015
December 2014
1st edition – May, 1917 November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
drawings by Xu Beihong of Yixing August 2014
[In his early twenties at the time of the book’s publication, Xu was later to become one of the June 2014
March 2014
renowned painters of the 20th century. This book’s drawings are therefore a priceless January 2014
example of his early work. Though unimpressive when held up against his later work, they December 2013
may arguably have a certain something when compared to other artists’ attempts at drawing November 2013
September 2013
figures rapidly within the martial arts publications of the era.] August 2013
July 2013
[translation by Paul Brennan, Jan, 2013] June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
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Boxing Arts Fundamentals – Illustrated Handbook for Tantui

– calligraphy by Huang Yanpei

PREFACE [by Ling Rongqi]

The Englishman Charles George Gordon once said that the Chinese people are hard-
working and easily employed, and that if we train our military, we will have the strongest army
in the world. It is because we are hard-working that we are easily employed. But where does
our tendency to work hard come from? It is because of our boxing arts. For all the styles of
boxing arts, they are to be attended to without interruption. Practitioners with genuine interest
take no pleasure in going at them half-heartedly. Through personal hard work, everything will
be achieved.
Ever since Europeans started bringing firearms to the East long ago, our nation has been
defeated again and again, and so boxing societies have been abandoned. We did not
understand that while firearms are advantageous for long-range attack, they are
disadvantageous for close-quarter combat. When fighting in narrow alleys at the range of
knife or body, rifles and cannons lose their effectiveness, and boxing arts rival their use.
When the Japanese defeated the Russians east of the Liao river [in 1905], was it not
because of jujitsu that they were victorious? Jujitsu is a part of our nation’s boxing arts. They
actually stole our nation’s secrets and then changed the name. It has recently dawned on our
countrymen that boxing arts are our nation’s specialty, able to both defend one’s health and
protect the nation. The military uses them for training, and schools hold courses in them,
thereby preserving our cultural essence. But these arts have no specialized literature
adequate to supply for the self-training of students, for which the discerning regret.
The Jiangsu Educational Association set up a Physical Education Training Institute, in
which there is a boxing course taught by Zhang Mengji of Wuxing [in Zhejiang], who instructs

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in the northern art of Tantui. My classmates Hu Shaogang [Jian] and He Shoubai [Guangxian]
have made a handbook about it so that students may teach themselves. You can go by its
explanations and drawings to obtain it for yourself without the trouble of seeking it. Inspired to
share, Hu and He have generously made this book available. It will go far and will become a
bestseller shining in the world of physical education. [This was apparently not a vain
prediction – by 1923, the book was on its 7th printing.]
– written by Ling Rongqi of Nanjing at the Jiangsu Educational Association, Phy-Ed
Bureau lecturer’s dorm

PREFACE [by Zhu Hongshou]

I once studied world history. Since the arrival of the modern era, every culture in the world has
advocated using the military as a back-up for peace. We Chinese are called the “sick men of
Asia”, looked down on by the whole world. Why is this? Because we have made the perilous
error of not giving attention to martial studies, and have become unaware that our nation’s
study of martial skills was the earliest to develop.
During the Eastern Han Dynasty, commoners came up with systems in their own localities.
Then during the Liang Dynasty, the Indian zen master Damo transmitted teachings to China
and wrote the two classics of Changing the Sinews and Washing the Marrow. What he
passed on to his followers was called the Buddhist School, what in modern times is the
renowned Shaolin School. Hong Boxing originated from the first Song emperor. The Wudang
School began with Zhang Sanfeng. In the Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties, there were famous
schools, but alas, the custom of venerating the civil and trivializing the martial went to excess,
and so skill in martial arts became inferior to earlier times.
As for their development in ancient times, although there has over the generations been no
lack of people studying these arts, they have generally been of a lower social status. Hence
there are no records of these systems that can be relied on, nor is there any lineage that can
accurately be called authentic, and those who do have the real stuff spend so much time
fighting that they only do harm to society. For these reasons, our sacred national culture may
end up sinking into oblivion.
Martial arts stem from the goal of strengthening the body to extend one’s lifespan.
Therefore they are called “longevity arts”, and their main purpose is not really for fighting
people. Furthermore, martial arts are in all respects related to physiology, yet within the world
of our nation’s martial arts, there are those who do not even know what physiology is.
Whenever we see practitioners of martial arts who have not learned the real stuff, their bodies
have been extremely weakened by it. The reason for this is not a flaw in martial arts, but is the
fault of instructors who have no understanding of physiology and are without systematic
teaching materials.
During the last winter, everyone in the Jiangsu Educational Association has come to
understand that if we do not esteem our martial aspect, we will be inadequate to the task of
building our nation’s presence in the world. Thereupon the Physical Education Training
Institute was established, in which martial arts studies are a required course, and for which
martial arts specialists have been invited to teach. Students have come from all over the

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province to learn, and have quickly become capable. The common curriculum has been
compiled into a book, complete with illustrations, to share with the world.
A member of the Training Institute, Huang Jingwan [editor of the book], asked a preface of
me. Although I have studied these methods for more than twenty years, I have also been
studying medicine, and between the two tasks I have not been able to focus on this one.
Consequently my study and experience of these arts is superficial. Nor am I any good at
writing, so how can I presume to write a preface anyway? And so I must stop here, for I cannot
relate my knowledge any further.
– written by Zhu Hongshou of Baoshan at the director’s building of the Chinese & Western
Universal Hospital, 1916, 2nd month, 7th day

AUTHOR’S PREFACE [Hu Jian]

Boxing arts are our nation’s specialty, as everyone knows. Although there is such a variety of
styles, for those who seek to be able to learn something in a short period of time, it turns out
there are not many options. This is why students often dabble in one of them and then give up,
unable to attain a deep level.
We [“I, Jian, and the rest of us”] learned at the Jiangsu Educational Association’s Physical
Education Training Institute, where Zhang Mengji of Wuxing instructed us in the movements of
the northern art of Tantui. All of its twelve lines are simple and nimble, easy for beginners to
learn and become proficient in, thus able to succeed in one of the systems.
Regarding its educational result, the movements are balanced [i.e. are done on both
sides], and so it can cause the body to be developed uniformly. Regarding its health effect,
the exercise is appropriately proportioned, and so it can improve blood circulation.
Regarding its practical function, your hands are made agile and your steps are made stable,
so that when you encounter danger, it will be sufficient to defend yourself with.
Our abilities are limited and shallow. Though we have explained every line in sequence,
complete with drawings, and have published it to share with all those who are interested, we
would not presume to praise ourselves for what we have learned.

ESSENTIALS OF BOXING ARTS – by Xu Tingjun

In boxing arts, there are hundreds of fundamental skills. Once you train in them until you are
proficient, then [quoting from Qi Jiguang’s New Book of Effective Methods, chapter 14:] “Your
body is nimble, your hands fluent. With your feet agile yet stable, and with correct advancing
and retreating, [your legs will be able to fly.] Its ingenuity lies in dropping, turning, and slipping
through. Its fierceness lies in chopping and swinging. Its swiftness lies in flinging the opponent
down so he is looking up at the sky. Its softness lies in knowing when to lean out of the way…
When posture after posture follows upon each other, [you will subdue the opponent.] When
your adaptations are inexhaustible, [he will have no idea what you are doing.] Your actions

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are shadowy and invisible, he cannot figure it out, [and so he calls it magic.]”
The use of weapons – staff, saber, spear, sword, lance, shield, etc – are all based in this.
Now that firearms have been invented, the staff, saber, spear, and sword have all been
abandoned, and boxing arts too are seldom considered anymore. Although firearms have the
advantage at a distance, they do not at short range. When fighting close in, sharp weapons
ought to come forth. Adapting to circumstances will depend on the agility of hands and feet,
and on the vigor of the body. So how can boxing arts be abandoned?
Therefore educational institutions nowadays incorporate both boxing arts and weapons.
What I hope of students is that you: do not shirk hard work, do not overemphasize posing, do
not show off with flashy techniques, and do not paint yourself with a collection of empty
postures, for you should seek applicable methods. Alas, this nation is trudging through
troubles. Everyone should vigorously express diligence, rousing the weak of today. Why
abandon health and courage? We have to esteem boxing arts.
Below are the essentials, followed by the Shaolin Stick and Shaolin Tantui methods. The
stick exercises are for training wrist strength, while Tantui is for exercising the leg muscles,
both being very helpful things in boxing arts.

1. Generally when practicing boxing arts: your head should press up, your neck should be
flexible, and your shoulders should hang down.

2. Energy passes through to your elixir field and wraps all the way around your waist.
Your shoulders follow your elbows, and your elbows follow your hands. Both feet stand on the
ground, all ten toes putting forth effort. These are the principles of standing.

3. Common methods of using the palm are: hooking hand, vulture hand, eagle hand, monkey
hand, plucking hand, rubbing hand, knocking hand, switching hand, feigning hand, chopping
hand, rushing hand, and blocking hand.

4. Common methods of using the fist are: thrusting punch, pressing punch, snapping punch,
continuous punches, and “cannon to the sky”.

5. Common methods of stepping are: advancing, retreating, short step, long step, stealing
step, advancing with one foot, advancing with both feet, continuous stepping, mandarin duck
step, shivering chicken step, double circling step, squared step, double squared step,
pointed step, and tiptoe step.

6. Amongst common principles of application, there is: emptiness and fullness, advance and
retreat, hard and soft, long and short, above and below, left and right, front and behind, far
and near, and wide and narrow.
There is the bow & arrow stance, in which your front leg is bent like a bow and your rear
leg is straight like an arrow, thereby protecting your lower abdomen and strengthening your
legs.
Loosen your elbows.
Your punch is like a meteor streaking. Your eyes are like lightning flashing. Your waist is
like a snake slithering. Your leg is like a drill poking through. Your hand shoots out like an
arrow, then withdraws fast as lightning.

7. Common methods of kicking are: pressing kick, chopping kick, snapping kick, front
sweep, kicking while punching with the opposite hand, swinging kick, back sweep, whirlwind
kick, back kick, sword kick, spinning kick, millstone leg, deflecting kick, rushing kick.

8. Although the skills in boxing arts cannot be comprehensively described in writing, they do
not go beyond these eight kinds of methods: methods of watching, methods of using the

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hands, methods of stepping, methods of turning, methods of pushing, methods of striking,
methods of grabbing, and methods of falling.
A mnemonic goes:
Be a cat when going through the center, a dog when going around from the side, and
step like a shivering chicken.
Have an eagle’s keen vision, a monkey’s active hands, and slip all the way through like
a fox’s tail.
When you understand these things, you have the essentials of boxing arts.

The Shaolin stick exercises come from the Shaolin Temple. They are magnificently useful.
Listed here are the names of the exercises:

1. Skanda Threatens with his Pestle

2. Arhat Holds up his Alms Bowl

3. Turn the River to Stir the Sea

4. Yellow Dragon Turns Around

5. Black Dragon Coils its Tail

6. Emperor Waves his Banner

7. Silver Dragon Extends a Claw

8. Atlas Props Up the Sky

9. White Snake Flicks its Tongue

10. Crouching Tiger Claims the Mountain

Two thick ropes are attached to a roof beam above and the ends of a stick below. [The stick
cannot be more than about three feet wide.] Hanging below the center of the stick is a stone.
Stick and stone are about three feet apart, the stone placed on the ground.
When practicing, take hold of each of the ropes, and by bending them [i.e. pulling one
toward you while pushing the other away], lift the stone and gently let it down again. If two
people stand at either end of the stick, they can turn the stick together. This stick can bear the
weight of a stone between thirty and two hundred pounds.

As for the 10-Line versions of Tantui [here meaning “snapping kicks”] passed down from
Damo, their variations are numerous. The [two] most common versions are listed below:

1. Thrust Punch

2. Kick with Opposite Hand Punching

3, Saddle the Horse

4. Bracing & Pulling Down

5. Planting Across

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6. Single Spreading

7. Touch & Lock

8. Drill Through & Surround

9. Coiling Elbow

10. Sword-like Snapping Kick

1. A Single Path Beside the Lawn

2. Sudden Toe-Kick with Opposite Hand Punching

3. Saddle the Horse for a Night Journey

4. Bracing & Pulling Down (or “Tyrant Blocks the Road”)

5. Planting Across so the Opponent Cannot Defend

6. Single Spreading

7. Touch & Lock

8. Drill Through & Surround

9. Coiling Elbow

10. Sword Kick

EXPLANATIONS OF TANTUI’S FUNCTIONS (according to our research)

It is said that Tantui comes from the Dragon Pool Temple [“Long Tan Si”] in Shandong, and
thus Tan [“Pool”] is used in the name. Its patterns are divided into twelve lines. Each road is
simple and easy, and are variations on a theme.
Whenever beginners do not yet comprehend its subtleties, they ignorantly belittle it. Until
the power of their bodies has been trained, the whole thing will be superficial. Although they
may be strong enough to lift a caldron, what good is that? Those who value strength hope that
ability with hands and feet will count as applicability.
Beginners rarely understand these things, and so they only seek of Tantui’s postures,
overlooking its wonders, showing a lack of discernment [“buying the box and returning the
pearl”]. But how can we mock them? To know it and not explain it is a fault that lies in
ourselves, and therefore they are not to be despised. So that our comrades will not look down
on them, its functions are explained in detail below.

[1] It develops power:

The body of a beginner is not very flexible, and thus the power emitted from the hands and

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feet is tiny. After training over a long period, energy gradually extends from flank to fingertips,
and at that time, you will apply as much power as you wish. When focused in the exercise,
with your hands and feet expressing to the same place over and over again, it causes your
muscles to daily develop and your power to daily increase.

[2] It stabilizes stances:

A person who has not yet trained will be top-heavy. The soles of your feet will lack substance
and be unable to stand flush against the ground. As soon as any effort is used, you will
become unsteady and your feet will constantly tremble. In the old days, boxing masters had to
first go through stance training, in which the feet do not move, and which is incredibly dull.
Tantui’s method uses the exercising of the hands and feet instead. Students who would
otherwise be bored will say this is a good method, a wonderful idea.
After the first few days of training, you will inevitably find your whole body to be
extraordinarily aching, especially your knees. This gradually happens simply because the
muscles are performing so many movements. Do not let this make you cower. You must forge
on ahead. After about a week, the ache will go away and your heels will become strong.
Potential students often begin to distrust northern instructors because of this experience,
resisting their instruction, not going along with it though they take it in, and when they talk with
older students about any injuries, they become afraid of it, diminishing their enthusiasm to
learn it. Alas.

[3] It has practical application:

Tantui not only can train the self, for you can seek out a person of equal strength and work
each line with a two-person exercise, what is called Contact Tantui (compiler’s description).
After practicing it for a long time, you will dodge and deflect with unusual agility. Whether you
work with a partner or get attacked by someone, you will be able to perform all of its
applications and also protect yourself efficiently, and the methods of eye, body, hand, step,
and so on (the [eight] methods described earlier as a part of northern boxing arts), will be
daily refined as a bonus.

[4] It toughens muscles and bones:

With Tantui it is said that if the Contact version be worked on, the hands and feet of both
people will be clashing with each other, and so they need to understand that the stronger the
clashing, the harder their bodies will get. After practicing it for not even half a year, their arms
and legs will be hard as iron. But whether or not such progress is made depends on how
much hard work both people can bear.
Comparing it to methods in the old days of striking against wooden dummies, sandbags,
and so on, it differs in severity and difficulty, and cannot be thought of in the same terms. This
is because when two partners are being equally forceful against each other, both will
experience the pain of it, whereas when striking dummies and the like, you alone will taste the
hardship.
Described above are only the essential ideas. Its adaptability is difficult to describe in
words, and until you have become skillful and precise, you will not have a sense of it.
It is said among northern practitioners that for those who practice only the first line of Tantui
for several years, it is almost always the case that it is over before the opponent has kicked,

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for with a single kick, a three hundred pound stone will be rolled away more than ten feet. How
could an opponent stand up to that?
Those who unceasingly work to toughen their muscles and bones may be few, but it is
evident that when it comes to developing power, toughening the muscles and bones, and
invigorating the whole body – nothing compares to Tantui.
[Although inspiring, the exhortations in 3 & 4 to practice the Tantui two-person set do seem
somewhat out of place in a book that contains only the solo exercise.]

GENERAL REMARKS

– The materials that went into making this book were selected from what instructors have
taught, what my fellow students have learned, and what I [Hu Jian] have learned myself.

– This book makes use of basic northern boxing, the movements of which, being simple and
essential, are not only convenient for self-study but are also suitable for group instruction.

– This book has both illustrations and explanations. When you work from the illustrations, you
will not find it difficult to understand them at a glance, and so because time has been brief, the
accompanying explanations are not very detailed. May the knowledgeable pardon us for this.

– Because this book was hurriedly sent to the printers before there was time to proofread it in
detail, and since the compiler’s knowledge is superficial, errors are bound to be numerous.
We hope that top martial arts experts will come forward and put us right, for which we would
feel most fortunate.

A BRIEF LOOK AT [THE NAME OF] TANTUI

Tantui is the fundamental training in northern boxing. In the north, athletic boys train in it upon
becoming teenagers. There are different explanations as to who created it:
Some say that a certain monk from the Dragon Pool Temple in Shandong created it for
teaching his followers. Later generations of martial arts practitioners then honored him by
using “Pool” in its name.
Others say that a man from Henan named Tan created it to emphasize training the legs.
Once his skill was deep and abundant, he defeated all challengers. His students who taught
his method therefore used “Tan” in the name.
[In this book, the author chose to go by the place name ( ) rather than the surname ( ).
Between these two choices however, the surname is probably more reasonable, since to
abbreviate Dragon Pool to Pool seems unlikely, nor does there appear to be any reason to
abbreviate it at all. The Shaolin version mentioned earlier uses a different “tan” altogether ( ),
meaning “springy”, “snapping”, or “to shoot”, describing a quality of the kicking rather than a
source of the system. Amongst our different ways to render Tantui – Mr. Tan’s Kicks, Dragon
Pool Temple Kicks, Snapping Kicks – the safest is to just refer to it as Tantui, which covers
all of these explanations.]

NAMES OF THE TWELVE TANTUI LINES

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Line 1: THRUST PUNCH

Line 2: KICK & STRIKE

Line 3: CHOP & TIE

Line 4: PROP & PEEL

Line 5: SIDE STRIKE

Line 6: SINGLE SPREADING

Line 7: DOUBLE SPREADING

Line 8: SIT LIKE A MOUND

Line 9: TOUCH & LOCK

Line 10: ARROW KICK

Line 11: ABOVE, BETWEEN, BELOW

Line 12: ADVANCE WITH SIDEWAYS DRUMMING

METHODS OF MAKING A FIST AND USING A PALM

A. How to make a fist:

Tightly bend in all four fingers so that the larger joint sections make a single flat plane. The
thumb bends in at the upper joint, the tip placed between the middle finger and ring finger.
The back of your hand makes a flat plane with your forearm.

B. What to avoid when making a fist:

The grip is empty and there is no strength in it.

C. How to use a palm:

The thumb tightly bends in. The four fingers are straight, gathered together with strength. Do
not let them spread apart. When using a palm, push forward with the inner [outer] edge (the
meatiest area below the little finger and above the wrist), the fingers pointing upward.

D. What to avoid when using a palm:

The four fingers are not tightly together. The palm is facing forward.

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THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF STANCES

A. Horse-riding stance:

Your feet are spread apart with the toes wider than the heels. The distance between your feet
is somewhat wider than shoulder width. Bend at the knees and squat down. Your thighs
should be flat. Your kneecaps must be in a vertical line with your toes. Your upper body is
upright and your chest should be sticking out. [For an example, see 1.2 of Line 1.]

B. Bow stance – facing to the left:

The toes of both feet are pointed to a forty-five degree angle. Your left thigh is almost flat and
your right leg is straight. Your right heel must not leave the ground. Your upper body must be
erect and cannot be leaning. [See 1.1 of Line 1.] (The bow stance on the right side is the
same as this, just on the opposite side.)

C. Pouncing stance:

The standard is that when squatting down on your right leg, your left leg is prostrated straight,
and when squatting down on your left leg, your right leg is prostrated straight. But the foot of
the straight leg should still be flat on the ground and must not lift up the slightest bit. As for
your upper body, it should slightly incline in the direction of the squatting leg. [See 1.2 of Line
6.]

D. T stance – right:

With your left leg bent so the thigh is flat, your right toes are touching the ground. Your right
toes should be in a straight line with your left heel. (The T stance on the left side is the same
as this, just on the opposite side.) [See 1.6a of Line 8.]

E. Retreating insertion stance:

Your front leg is slightly bent, rear leg straight. Your upper body should bend to the side, be it
left or right, but must not bend forward or back. [See 1.1 of Line 4.]

Points for attention:

The stances described above should change direction in accordance with what your hands
are doing. The postures should most of all avoid being stiff. Keep your attention by watching
the actions of your fists.

ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK FOR TANTUI

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EXPLANATIONS FOR EACH LINE

LINE 1: THRUST PUNCH (three times, five counts each)

Preparation:

Your body stands straight, chest sticking out forward, buttocks arched to the rear, your feet
are standing toes together [i.e. not only heels together]. Your right arm grasps into a fist (the
standard being that the thumb presses down on the ring finger) and is raised level to the right
with the tiger’s mouth facing upward (performing a side punch), while your left arm bends to
be in front of your chest, palm facing to the right and placed beside your right shoulder bone.
This is the preparation for the movements.

Movements:

1.1: Your left foot steps out to the left and the knee bends, making a bow stance, while your
left hand grasps into a fist and extends level to the left (performing a thrust punch). Your head
goes along with the movement and turns to the left. Your eyes must be looking toward your left
fist.

1.2: Your left arm bends in horizontally to be to the side of your chest (performing a “refusing
hand” technique). At the same time, your right knee bends and flattens out so that both legs
are bent into a horse-riding stance.

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1.3: Your left arm goes from beside your left lower leg to draw a half circle to the rear until at
shoulder level (performing a raising fist). At the same time, your right arm goes from the right,
drawing a half circle, your upper body turning to the left, and your right arm is raised level in
front (performing a carrying punch). Your right leg is now straight, and you are again in a bow
stance facing to the left.

1.4: Your right arm draws a circle on the left side (performing a drumming punch) and the
upper arm comes tight to the side of your chest, the forearm raised forward with the center of
the fist facing upward.

1.5: Your left [right] foot kicks out (performing an “inch kick”), your left leg bending at the knee
and not leaving its location.

2.1: Your right foot steps down as your right arm extends level to the right. At the same time,
your torso turns to the left, then repeat 1.1 [on the other side].

2.2-2.5 are the same as in 1.2-1.5, except on the other side.

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3.1-3.5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5.

Stand at attention – three movements:

i. Your right foot steps down firmly and you repeat 2.1.

ii. Return to the preparation posture. (With your left arm to the outside, right fist to the inside, it
is as though you will perform a threading punch, which is also called “cannon to the sky”.)

iii. Your arms hang down, your toes may spread apart, and you return to standing at attention.

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Points for attention in this line:

Bow stance and horse-riding stance should be distinct from each other and must not get
blurred together. The raising fist must go from below the forward knee. When the kick comes
out, the knee should be straight, but the knee of the standing leg should be slightly bent. While
the fists are moving, it should not cause the legs to wobble. If you can do it in this way, you will
obtain the art.

LINE 2: KICK & STRIKE (three times, three counts each)

Preparation: same as in Line 1.

Movements:

1.1: Your right arm draws a circle going from above your head until placed below your right
flank. At the same time, your left fist extends to the left over your right arm (performing a flat
leading punch), the center of the fist facing downward, as your left foot steps out to the left.
Both legs are bent to make a horse-riding stance. Your head is turned to the left, eyes looking
toward your left fist.

1.2: Your right fist extends to the left (performing a waist-driven punch) while your left fist
withdraws to be beside your chest, the center of the fist facing upward, and your torso twists
to the left, your right knee straightening, making a bow stance facing to the left.

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1.3: Your left fist extends forward while your right arm bends in to be beside your chest. At the
same time, your right foot kicks out forward (performing a “cross kick” [a kick coordinating
with an action of the opposite hand]).

2.1: Your right foot steps down, your torso turning to the left, and both legs bend and flatten out
to make a horse-riding stance. At the same time, your right arm extends to the right, the
center of the fist facing downward (performing a flat leading punch), and your left arm bends
in to be beside your chest, the center of the fist facing upward.

2.2&2.3 are the same as in 1.2&1.3, except on the other side.

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3.1-3.3 are the same as in 1.1-1.3.

[Stand at attention: same as before.]

Points for attention in this line:

When both legs bend, they should be neither too high nor too low. When in a bow stance, the
kneecap [of your front leg] should be in a vertical line with the toes, and for the leg that is not
bent, the straighter it is the better.

LINE 3: CHOP & TIE (three times, five counts each)

Preparation: same as before.

Movements:

1.1: Your left foot steps out to the left and the knee bends (making a bow stance). At the same
time, your left hand grasps into a fist and extends to the left (performing a thrust punch), your
head turns to the left, and your eyes look to your left fist.

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1.2: Your left knee straightens, your right knee bends, and your upper body turns to the right.
At the same time, your right hand goes from below, arcs a half circle to extend to the upper
right, the forearm slightly bent in, the center of the fist facing to the right, while your left hand
goes from above in front, and arcs a half circle downward to raise to the rear (When your fists
cross, your left fist is on the outside, right fist on the inside. This is called “cannon to the sky”
or “threading punch”.).

1.3: Your left arm goes up from below, arcs a circle in front of your body, and is raised level to
the left (performing a carrying punch [raising fist]). At the same time, your upper body turns to
the left, your right arm goes from above, arcs a half circle, and is raised level in front, the
center of the fist facing to the left (performing a chopping punch).

1.4: Your right fist arcs a circle on the left, the upper arm leaned in close beside your chest,
the forearm raised level, the center of the fist facing upward.

1.5: Your right toes forcefully kick out slightly forward (performing an inch kick), and your left

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knee is slightly bent.

2.1: Your right foot steps down and the knee bends, your right arm extending to the right. At
the same time, your torso turns to the left. It is the repeat of 1.1 [except on the other side].

2.2-2.5 are the same as in 1.2-1.5, except on the other side.

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3.1-3.5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5.

Stand at attention: as before.

Points for attention in this line:

For the threading punch, your fist is at shoulder height. The chopping punch and raising fist
should both be very forceful for it to be the right method.

LINE 4: PROP & PEEL (three times, five counts each)

Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1: Your left hand grasps into a fist and extends to the left (as a flat fist) while your right arm
bends in to be in front of your chest, palm facing to the left, placed beside your left shoulder
bone. Your head is turned to the left, eyes looking toward your left fist, and your right foot has
advanced a small step to the left rear (making a retreating insertion stance).

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1.2: Your left foot retreats as your upper body turns to the right, making a diagonal bow
stance. At the same time, your left hand comes out as a palm to the right corner while your
right hand goes across and withdraws behind you as a hook.

1.3: Your right hand threads past your left palm, your left hand now below your left armpit.

1.4a: Your right hand draws a circle below your right knee.

1.4b: Your right hand continues the circle from behind your head until in front of your head.

1.4c: Your right hand (as a hook) then raises up behind while your left hand (as a palm)
extends beside [above] your leg. At the same time, your upper body turns from the left to the
rear [from the right to the left], making a left bow stance facing to the left.

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1.5: Your right foot kicks out slightly to the left (performing a propping kick).

2.1-2.5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5, except on the other side.

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3.1-3.5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5.

Stand at attention: as before.

Points for attention in this line:

Whether palm or hook, all four fingers put effort into joining tightly, but in the case of the palm,
the thumb bends inward toward the center of the palm.

LINE 5: SIDE STRIKE (three times, four counts each)

Preparation: as before.

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Movements:

1.1: Same as in 2.1.

1.2: Your left fist bends in and raises up to be in front of your forehead (about two inches away
from it) while your right fist extends (performing a thrust punch to the chest) and your upper
body twists to the left to make bow stance facing to the left.

1.3: Your right arm draws a circle downward on the left side (performing a drumming punch),
the upper arm coming in close beside your chest, the forearm raised to be diagonally
upward, the center of the fist facing upward.

1.4: Your right foot kicks out (performing an inch kick), left leg slightly bent.

2.1-2.4 are the same as in 1.1-1.4, except on the other side.

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3.1-3.4 are the same as in 1.1-1.4.

Stand at attention: as before.

Points for attention in this line:

Your stance should be stable. Your eyes look to the extended fist. Your chest should stick out

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and your belly should withdraw.

LINE 6: SINGLE SPREADING (three times, four counts each)

Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1: Your left foot steps out to the left and the knee bends (making a bow stance). At the same
time, your left hand grasps into a fist and extends to the left (performing a thrust punch), your
head turning to the left. Your eyes are looking to your left fist.

1.2: Your right arm raises diagonally to the rear as your left arm bends its fist to be beside
your chest. At the same time, your right knee bends downward, your upper body inclines to
the right, and your left leg straightens, the toes turning to the right (making a pouncing stance).

1.3: Your left fist arcs a half circle above your left leg, turning and bending in to be raised in
front of your forehead. At the same time, your upper body turns to the left to make a bow
stance facing to the left, and your right fist chops down from above (performing a chopping
punch), placed so that the upper arm is close in front of your chest and the forearm is lifted up
(performing a drumming punch).

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1.4: Your right foot kicks out forward (performing an inch kick), your left leg slightly bent.

2.2-2.4 are the same as in 1.2-1.4, except on the other side.

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3.2-3.4 are the same as in 1.2-1.4.

Stand at attention: as before.

Points for attention in this line:

When in the pouncing stance, your torso should incline to the side, the straight leg must not
bend, and the heel should press the ground without slackening.

LINE 7: DOUBLE SPREADING (three times, four counts each)

Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1: Same as in 1.1 of Line 2.

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1.2: Your left fist coils a half [full] circle from in front of your left knee, upward and forward, and
is placed at your waist. At the same time, your torso twists to the left (making a bow stance)
as your right fist coils a half circle upward from your right side, and is placed below your left
fist (performing a waist-driven punch).

1.3: Your right fist does a crosswise strike forward, the center of the fist facing to the left
(performing a crosswise backfist).

1.4: Same as in 1.3 of Line 2.

2.1: Your right foot steps down, your torso turning to the left, and both legs bend to make a
horse-riding stance. At the same time, your right arm extends to the right, the center of the fist
facing downward (a flat fist), repeating 1.1 [except on the other side].

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2.2-2.4 are the same as in 1.2-1.4, except on the other side.

3.1-3.4 are the same as in 1.1-1.4.

Stand at attention: as before.

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Points for attention in this line:

The crosswise backfist should go diagonally upward to the right [in 1.3 and diagonally upward
to the left in 2.3]. In the case of the waist-driven punch, both fists must come tight in to the
waist.

LINE 8: SIT LIKE A MOUND (twenty-eight movements [including Stand at Attention])

Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1-1-5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5 of Line 1.

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1.6a: Your right foot steps down forward as your torso turns to the left, your right knee bends,
and your left heel lifts so the toes are touching down. Your right fist is slightly bent in to be
above your head, the center of the fist facing forward, while your left fist is placed beside your
left heel. Both legs are squatting down (making a T stance).

1.6b: Your right hand comes down from above, threading past your left fist, then bending in to
be beside your chest. At the same time, your left foot does a level kick to the left (a bracing
kick) while your left fist does a level strike to the left.

1.7 is the same as in 1.6, except the movement is done on the right side.

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2.1-2.5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5 [except on the other side]. [There is a mistake in the
drawing for 2.5, which should instead look like the drawing for 2.5 in Line 10.]

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2.6a: Your left foot lifts [steps down forward] as your right foot [torso] turns to the right. When
your left foot comes down, the knee bends, and your right heel lifts. Your left fist is slightly bent
in to be above your head, the center of the fist facing forward, while your right fist is placed
beside your right heel. Both legs are squatting down (making a T stance).

2.6b: Your left hand comes down from above, threading past your right fist, then bending in to
be beside your chest. At the same time, your right foot does a level kick to the right (a bracing
kick) while your right fist does a level strike to the right.

2.7: Same as in 1.6.

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2.8: Same as in 1.7.

3.1-3.7 are the same as in 1.1-1.7.

4.1-4.5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5.

Stand at attention: as before.

Points for attention in this line:

When your left foot does the level kick to the left, your left fist should be in line with your left
foot. (And when your right kick does the level kick to the right, your right fist should be in line
with your right foot.) When making the T stance, your chest should be erect and must not
slouch forward.

LINE 9: TOUCH & LOCK (three times, five counts each)

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Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1: Same as in 1.1 of Line 1.

1.2: Your left elbow draws back, the center of the fist facing inward, your right palm slapping
onto your left fist. At the same time, your torso turns to the left.

1.3: Your left palm braces level to the left side as your right palm braces level forward.

1.4: Your right arm arcs a circle on the left (performing a drumming punch), the upper arm
sticking close beside your chest, the forearm raised diagonally upward, the center of the fist
facing upward. At the same time, your left hand stays where it is but grasps into a fist, the

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center of the fist facing outward.

1.5: Your right foot kicks out forward (performing an inch kick), and your left knee is slightly
bent.

2.1: Your right foot steps down, your right arm extending to the right. At the same time, your
torso turns to the left. It is the repeat of 1.1 [except on the other side].

2.2-2.5 are same as in 1.2-1.5, except on the other side.

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3.1-3.5 are then the same as in 1.1-1.5.

Stand at attention: as before.

Points for attention in this line:

When your palms go out in unison, your torso must face halfway to the left, as in 1.2 and 1.3.
Once you become familiar with the movements, you can do it in this way as one movement
[i.e. 1.2 and 1.3 will merge into 1.2&3].

LINE 10: ARROW KICK (three times, eight counts each)

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Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1-1-5 are the same as in 1.1-1.5 of Line 1.

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1.6: Your body turns to the left with your left hand going to the outside and your right hand
going to the inside (performing a threading punch), your left forearm rotating and bending in
to rise above your head, palm upward, as your right hand goes from your right side to be
raised level. Your eyes are looking to your right fist (a flat fist). Your stance has changed to a
horse-riding stance.

1.7: Your left palm pushes to the right (as an inward slanting palm) while your body turns to the
right (making a bow stance), your left [right] elbow drawing back.

1.8: Your right hand extends forward (with a level punch) as your left fist withdraws beside
your chest, the center of the fist facing upward. At the same time, your feet perform level kicks
in succession (performing a double flying kick), left foot first, with your left fist tapping your
right toes.

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2.1-2.8 are the same as in 1.1-1.8, except on the other side.

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3.1-2.1 are the same as in 1.1-1.8.

Stand at attention: as before.

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Points for attention in this line:

During the flying kick, your upper body should be erect. When your feet come down, your
body should be stable and must not wobble.

LINE 11: ABOVE, BETWEEN, BELOW (three times, five counts each)

Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1: Same as in 1.1 of Line 1.

1.2: Your left arm shifts from the outside of your left knee to be below your right armpit. At the
same time, your left leg shifts behind your right leg (making a bow stance).

1.3: Your left arm goes horizontally to the left rear, hooking across, palm to the rear, fingers
making a hook shape (performing a “hook and kick” action) as your left foot kicks out forward
(as a sweeping kick), your right knee straightening. Your eyes are looking straight ahead.

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1.4: Your left leg, in unison with your torso, turns to the left rear (making a horse-riding stance),
your right fist hanging across until below the hip, the center of the fist facing inward, while your
left fist is raised across to the left side, the center of the fist facing outward.

1.5: Your left fist goes from the left side upward to the right side with a diagonal strike. At the
same time, your torso twists to the right (making a bow stance).

2.1: Your left fist goes outward while your right fist goes inward (performing a threading
punch). It is the repeat of the posture in 1.1 [except on the other side].

2.2-2.5 are the same as in 1.2-1.5, except on the other side.

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3.2-3.5 are the same as in 1.2-1.5.

Stand at attention: as before.

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Points for attention in this line:

During the third part of the movement [the “hook and kick”], hand and foot should both exert
force at the same time, and you must not give emphasis to one or the other.

LINE 12: ADVANCE WITH SIDEWAYS DRUMMING (three times, two counts each)

Preparation: as before.

Movements:

1.1: Same as in 1.1 of Line 1.

1.2a: Your right foot does a low kick to the left.

[1.2b:] Then your torso turns to the left (as you make a pouncing stance) and your right fist is
placed near your right leg, the center of the fist facing downward.

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2.1: Your right fist goes to the right to be raised level. It is the repeat of the posture in 1.1. Your
eyes look to your right fist. (You are in a bow stance.)

2.2 is the same as 1.2, except on the other side.

3.1 is the same as [the posture in] 1.1 [as in the drawing below], then 3.2 follows the
same 1.2.

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Stand at attention: as before.

Points for attention in this line:

When changing from pouncing stance to bow stance, your torso and hand should coordinate
with each other.

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