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NATIONAL OPEN UNIVERSITY AND DISTANCE - UNAD

SCHOOL SCIENCE EDUCATION


COURSE: TEACHING ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES

UNIT 2 TASK 3 - VARIABLES FOR DESIGNING AN ESP


(ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY)

PARTICIPANTS:
NESTOR ALMANZA

GROUP: 551038_20

TUTOR:
CLARA ESPERANZA BILBAO CORTÉS

DATE:
OCTOBER 25- 2018
Argumentative essay

You have been hired by a young tourist guide who already has an English level of B2,
and who is highly motivated to get a better job opportunity at a coffee plantation. In three
months, this Coffee plantation is expected to hire new staff with a general knowledge of English,
who is also familiar with a specific vocabulary related with coffee plantations, production,
machinery and refinement processes to be able to explain to foreign business investors and/or
visitors all the steps required for the development and completion of the product, meanwhile he
is showing them the different areas of that coffee plantation.

English for specific purposes, or ESP, is the teaching of the English language for professionals in
different areas, focusing on the types of expressions, vocabulary, standard and formal structures
that will be used especially in a specific field, etc. in this case We'll talk about English for
tourism.

ESP students are adults who already have some familiarity with English and are learning the
language in order to communicate a set of professional skills and perform specific work-related
functions.

When we start a course of these, the first thing we have to take into account are the needs of the
students, identify these needs and the capacities imply to identify the functions for which the
students will use the English.

We can call 'necessities' the type of need determined by the demands of the target situation, that
is, what the learner has to know in order to function effectively in the target situation. For
example:

The staff who will be hired at the coffee plant should have general knowledge of English, and
who is also familiar with a specific vocabulary related to coffee plantations, production,
machinery and refinement processes to be able to explain to foreign business investors and/or
visitors all the necessary steps for the development and completion of the product, while
showing the different areas of that coffee plantation.

For the design of the ESP course we must make a Curriculum, materials, methodology and
evaluation procedures.
Listen, read, speak and write: these are the four basic language skills. In this course these tour
guide skills should be emphasized in listening and speaking, however, no skill should be taught
in isolation.

Activities for Teaching speaking and listening.

 We must bring to class all the useful vocabulary on the subject of coffee production.
 Match the students and give them a theme about coffee production and collection each
student becomes a speaker or listener when he or she has finished speaking.
 Practice, Practice, use the words as often as possible and in as many ways as possible.
Say, write, and point to the words in all appropriate contexts. When an appropriate time
comes up, not only should you repeat the word clearly, but have all of the students repeat
after you to practice using the word in the correct contexts.
 Dictation exercises. Dictation combines listening and writing practice. When dictating,
read the whole sentence at normal speed three times, allowing time for writing between
each repetition.
 Debating. You can divide students into teams and have them present opposing sides of an
issue.
 Giving directions; for example, looking at a map and explaining how a person would get
from point A to point B.

we must select and schedule activities for each lesson.

It is useful to build the lessons around a common format. For example, every Monday the class
can start with a listening activity and then have a series of reading activities.

On Wednesday you can work on grammar and writing. Having a common format in the classes
gives us a framework on which to build each unit and helps students get used to a teaching routine.

To determine if you have reached the goals and objectives and then make adjustments to those
programs.
REFERENCES

Jordan, R. (1997). English for Specific Academic Purposes. In English for Academic Purposes:
A Guide and Resource Book for Teachers (Cambridge Language Teaching Library). Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press. Retrieved on May 20 from:

https://bibliotecavirtual.unad.edu.co:2300/core/services/aop-cambridge-
core/content/view/6989B9B30343AD70BB0B8FAE2320EFB2/9780511733062c16_p228-
248_CBO.pdf/english_for_specific_academic_purposes.pdf

Hutchinson, T., & Waters, A. (1987). English for Specific Purposes. Chapters 4, 5, 6 and 7
(Cambridge Language Teaching Library). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
doi:10.1017/CBO9780511733031. Retrieved on May 20 from:

https://bibliotecavirtual.unad.edu.co:2300/core/books/english-for-specific-
purposes/449E5F788C04B222B0C9CD58FEB16868